0210-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Feb 13, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: I Heard You the First Time … each of today’s themed answers is a well-known phrase that contains at least one repeated adjective:

22A. Somewhat redundant 1965 country song? : GREEN, GREEN GRASS OF HOME
30A. Somewhat redundant Milton Bradley game? : HUNGRY HUNGRY HIPPOS
49A. Somewhat redundant size? : EXTRA EXTRA LARGE
64A. Somewhat redundant 1960s spy series? : THE WILD WILD WEST
83A. Somewhat redundant literary genre? : SHORT SHORT STORY
100A. Somewhat redundant theater production? : OFF-OFF-BROADWAY SHOW
112A. Extremely redundant 1963 caper film? : IT’S A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD

COMPLETION TIME: 27m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Gray piece : POEM
Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:

– Celestial fire
– Far from the Madding Crowd
– Kindred spirit

10. Cricket club : BAT
Cricket is the national game of England. The term “cricket” apparently comes from the Old French word “criquet” meaning “goalpost, stick”.

17. “Funeral Blues” writer : AUDEN
The noted poet W. H. Auden was born and raised in England, but eventually became a US citizen. As well as hundreds of poems, Auden also wrote librettos for operas, including Igor Stravinsky’s “The Rake’s Progress”.

18. “Pity is for the living, ___ is for the dead”: Twain : ENVY
Samuel Langhorne Clemens was the real name of the author Mark Twain. Twain wasn’t the only pen name used by Clemens. Early in his career he signed some sketches as “Josh”, and signed some humorous letters that he wrote under the name “Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass”. The name of Mark Twain came from the days when Clemens was working on riverboats on the Mississippi. A riverboat man would call out “by the mark twain” when measuring the depth of water. This meant that on the sounding line, according to the “mark” on the line, the depth was two (“twain”) fathoms, and so it was safe for the riverboat to proceed.

19. Kaplan of “Welcome Back, Kotter” : GABE
“Welcome Back, Kotter” is a sitcom from the the late seventies. The title character is a teacher at Buchanan High, one Gabe Kotter who himself had attended the school as a student. Kotter is played by Gabe Kaplan. One of the prominent students in his class is played by a young John Travolta, a role that launched Travolta’s  film career. In recent years you might have seen Gabe Kaplan as co-host of the popular show “High Stakes Poker” on GSN.

22. Somewhat redundant 1965 country song? : GREEN, GREEN GRASS OF HOME
“Green, Green Grass of Home” is a country song first recorded by Johnny Darrell, and then made popular in 1965 by singer Porter Wagoner. Tom Jones had the most success with the song when he released it as a single in 1966. My mother owned that record, and played it over and over …

26. Journalist Couric : KATIE
Katie Couric left NBC’s “The Today Show” in 2006 and took over as news anchor for “CBS Evening News”. In so doing she became the first solo female anchor of a broadcast network evening news program. Couric also has the honor of being the only person to guest-host on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno”. In fact she “swapped jobs” on that particular day, and Leno filled in for Couric on “The Today Show”.

27. ___ Lang, Superboy’s love : LANA
Smallville, Kansas is the town on Earth in which Superman grew up (as Clark Kent). One of Clark’s best friends in Smallville, and the romantic interest of his youth, was Lana Lang.

28. 1951 Cooperstown inductee : OTT
At 5′ 9″, Mel Ott weighed just 170 lb (I don’t think he took steroids!) and yet he was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. Sadly, Ott died in a car accident in New Orleans in 1958 when he was only 49 years old.

30. Somewhat redundant Milton Bradley game? : HUNGRY HUNGRY HIPPOS
Hungry Hungry Hippos is a children’s game in which players use plastic hippos to gobble up marbles.

35. Show featuring the L.V.P.D. : CSI
“CSI: NY” is the best of the CSI franchise of television shows, in my humble opinion, since the original “CSI” set in Las Vegas went off the boil a few years ago. Stars of the New York show are Gary Sinise and Sela Ward.

38. Oktoberfest collectibles : STEINS
Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I’ve been there twice, and it really is a great party …

39. Cotillion attendee : DEB
“Cotillion” is an American term that we’ve been using since about 1900 for a formal ball. In France a cotillion was a type of dance, with the term deriving from an Old French word for a petticoat. I guess the cotillion dance was one in which the lady would flash her petticoats as she did a twirl!

41. Kneeler’s offering : RING
A prospective husband is often on bended-knee when offering an engagement ring to the love of his life.

43. Ambient musician Brian : ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno’s most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft’s “start-up jingle”, the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up. Eno might have annoyed the Microsoft folks when he stated on a BBC radio show:

I wrote it on a Mac. I’ve never used a PC in my life; I don’t like them.

44. Org. that fines polluters : EPA
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was set up during the Nixon administration and began operation at the end of 1970.

57. “Nick News” host Linda : ELLERBEE
Linda Ellerbee is a television journalist from Bryan, Texas who worked with NBC News. Ellerbee was also the host of “Nick News” on Nickelodeon.

60. Song featured in “Animal House” : SHOUT
“Shout” is a huge hit released in 1959 by the Isley Brothers. A huge hit it was indeed, but not at first. In fact, it was destined to become the first record to “go gold” based on its longevity rather than its initial sales. “Shout” has been covered many times. My personal favorite cover versions are by Otis Day and the Knights in the film “Animal House” in 1978, and by Scottish singer Lulu in 1964.

63. Mr. Bill appeared on it: Abbr. : SNL
Mr. Bill is a clay figure who appeared in shorts broadcast on “Saturday Night Live”. Mr. Bill first featuredin a Super-8 reel shot by Walter Williams and submitted to the show. Williams went on to become a full-time writer for the show.

64. Somewhat redundant 1960s spy series? : THE WILD WILD WEST
I am huge fan of old movies and television shows. Having grown up in Ireland, I get to enjoy some of the classic shows of 1960s American television today for the very first time. My buddy’s wife gave him a DVD set of the original The Wild Wild West that ran on CBS from 1965 to 1969. He tells me it was meant to be like “James Bond on a horse” and that I will love it. I really do have to check it out!

73. Cartoon beagle : ODIE
Odie is the best friend of “Garfield” and is a slobbery beagle, a character in Jim Davis’s comic strip.

80. Elton John nickname : REG
Elton John’s real name is Reginald Dwight. John was knighted in 1998, not for his music but for his charitable work. He founded his own Elton John AIDS Foundation back in 1992.

82. O’Neill’s “___ Christie” : ANNA
Eugene O’Neill won a Pulitzer for his play “Anna Christie”.

The playwright Eugene O’Neill was born in a New York City hotel room in what is now called Times Square, in 1888. That building no longer exists and there is a Starbucks on the site today, but you can go take a look at the commemorative plaque at the Northeast corner of 43rd and Broadway. O’Neill died in 1953, in room 401 of the Sheraton Hotel on Bay State Road in Boston. His last words were, “I knew it. I knew it. Born in a hotel room, and God damn it, died in a hotel room.”

83. Somewhat redundant literary genre? : SHORT SHORT STORY
A short short story is just that, a short story that is less than one-thousand words. The shorter genre is also known as “flash fiction”.

93. Machiavellian concerns : ENDS
It is Niccolo Machiavelli’s political treatise titled “The Prince”, and the philosophical opinions expressed therein, that give rise to the term “Machiavellian” meaning cunning and devious, especially at the level of state politics.

94. John of Salisbury : LOO
The use of “john” as a slang term for a toilet is peculiar to North America. It probably comes from the older slang term of “jack” or “jakes” that had been around since the 16th century. In Ireland, in cruder moments, we still refer to a toilet as “the jacks”.

95. Pink lady ingredient : GIN
A Pink Lady is a cocktail consisting of gin, grenadine and egg white. The most basic recipe is:

– a glass of gin
– a tablespoon of grenadine
– an egg white

99. Buff : NUT
A “buff” or a “nut” is one who is extremely enthusiastic and knowledgeable about a subject.

100. Somewhat redundant theater production? : OFF-OFF-BROADWAY SHOW
An Off-Off-Broadway production is a small one, even smaller than an Off-Broadway show. Seating capacity for such productions is usually less than one hundred audience members.

106. Glinda’s creator : BAUM
In the 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”, Glinda is the Good Witch of the North, played by actress Billie Burke. As an aside, Burke was the wife of Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr. who produced the “Ziegfeld Follies” on Broadway. As another aside, Glinda wasn’t the Good Witch of the North in the original L. Frank Baum book, but was the Good Witch of the South.

108. Repo justification : LIEN
A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone’s property until a debt is paid.

112. Extremely redundant 1963 caper film? : IT’S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD
“It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World” is a 1963 comedy film with quite the cast. The list of great comedic actors appearing seems to be endless and includes: Sid Caesar, Mickey Rooney, Buddy Hackett, Jonathan Winters, Milton Berle, Ethel Merman, Spencer Tracy, Terry-Thomas, Phil Silvers, Jim Backus, Jimmy Durante and Peter Falk. In addition, there were cameo appearances by Jack Benny, Buster Keaton, Don Knotts, Carl Reiner, the Shirelles and the Three Stooges. I can’t remember any other movie with such a cast …

119. Patron saint of sailors : ELMO
St. Elmo is the patron saint of sailors. He lends his name to the electrostatic weather phenomenon (often seen at sea) known as St. Elmo’s fire. The “fire” is actually a plasma discharge caused by air ionizing at the end of a pointed object (like the mast of a ship), something often observed during electrical storms.

121. 128-character set : ASCII
ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) lists codes for 32 “control” characters, as well as the 95 printable characters (like a, A, b, B, 1, 2, etc). These binary ASCII codes are the way that our computers can understand what we mean when we type say a letter or a number.

123. Cooper Union’s location, briefly : NYC
Cooper Union is a private school in the East Village neighborhood in Manhattan, New York. Notably, every student who enters Cooper Union is given a full-tuition scholarship. As a result, Cooper Union was named by “Newsweek Magazine” as the #1 Most Desirable Small School in the country.

125. Chews (out) : REAMS
I must admit that I find the slang term “to ream”, with its meaning “to scold harshly”, quite distasteful. The usage of the word as a reprimand dates back to about 1950.

Down
5. Ancient Roman author Quintus ___ : ENNIUS
Quintus Ennius was a writer in Ancient Rome. Many consider Ennius to be the father of Roman poetry.

8. A Waugh : EVELYN
Evelyn Waugh was an English author, most famous for his fabulous 1945 novel “Brideshead Revisited”. Evelyn Waugh met and fell in love with Evelyn Gardner in 1927. Known to friends as “He-Evelyn” and “She-Evelyn”, the couple were married in 1929 (but divorced one year later).

9. Human speech mimickers : MYNAHS
Some species of myna (also “mynah”) bird are known for their ability to imitate sounds.

13. Peter Pan rival : JIF
The Peter Pan brand of peanut butter is of course named after the character in the J. M. Barrie play. What we know today as Peter Pan peanut butter was introduced in 1920 as E. K. Pond peanut butter, and renamed in 1928.

Jif is the leading brand of peanut butter in the US, and has been since 1981. Introduced in 1958, it is now produced by Smuckers.

15. Percussive dance troupe : STOMP
The marvellous percussion show called “Stomp” is a worldwide success. “Stomp” originated in Brighton in the south of England.

19. Will Geer’s role on “The Waltons” : GRANDPA
Will Geer died in 1978, just after filming the sixth season of “The Waltons” in which he played Grandpa Zeb Walton. Geer was a noted social activist and was blacklisted in the fifties for refusing to appear before the all-powerful House Committee on Un-American Activities.

31. MTV’s earliest viewers, mostly : GEN-X
The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication “Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture”. By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

36. Amendment guaranteeing a speedy trial : SIXTH
The Sixth Amendment to the US Constitution is the part of the Bill of Rights that deals with an individual’s rights when facing criminal prosecution.

44. South Dakota Air Force base : ELLSWORTH
Ellsworth Air Force Base is located about twenty miles northeast of Rapid City, South Dakota. Just outside the gates of the base is the South Dakota Air & Space Museum (well worth a visit) from which you can take a tour of the base itself. Inside the base, folks on the tour get to go down a missile silo. I’ve done the tour, and I highly recommend it …

50. Wimbledon champ Gibson : ALTHEA
Althea Gibson was known as “the Jackie Robinson of tennis” as she broke the “color barrier” and became the first African-American woman to win a Grand Slam title, in France in 1956. She was quite the athlete and was a great golfer as well as tennis player. She was the first African-American woman to play in the Ladies PGA tour, although she never had a win. Outside of sport, she sang a little and recorded an album, and even appeared in a movie (“The Horse Soldiers”) with John Wayne and William Holden. Sadly, towards the end of her life she ended up destitute and on welfare. When her plight was made known in a tennis magazine, well-wishers from all over the world sent her gifts of money, a total of nearly one million dollars. Quite a story …

53. Crystal Cave is one : GEODE
A geode is a rock in which there is a cavity lined or filled with crystal formations.

The Crystal Cave in Put-in-Bay, Ohio is the world’s largest geode, a cave in which the walls are lined with crystals. The crystals are made of celestine, a form of strontium sulfate. Some of the crystals are up to three feet in width.

59. E Day debuts : EDSELS
It was Henry Ford’s son Edsel who gave his name to the Edsel brand of automobile, a name that has become synonymous with “failure”.

When the Ford Motor Company introduced the Edsel motor car on 4 September 1957, Ford proclaimed the day to be “E Day”.

62. Captain who says “Well, gentlemen, between ourselves and home are 27,000 sea miles” : BLIGH
Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall wrote “Mutiny on the ‘Bounty'”, based on a true story. They followed up their successful novel with two more works, creating what is now called the “Bounty Trilogy”. The three books are:

1. “Mutiny on the ‘Bounty'”, the tale of the mutiny against Captain Bligh.
2. “Men Against the Sea”, the story of Captain Bligh and the eighteen men set adrift in an open boat by the mutineers.
3. “Pitcairn’s Island”, a narrative about the lives of the mutineers on South Sea islands after the mutiny.

67. Roman calendar day : IDES
There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually “fixed” by law. “Kalendae” were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. “Nonae” were originally the days of the half moon. And “idus” (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

75. Big East sch. : UCONN
The University of Connecticut (UConn) was founded in 1881 as the Storrs Agricultural School, taking its name from the Storrs brothers who donated the land and provided initial funding.

76. Proust’s “À la Recherche du Temps ___” : PERDU
The title of Marcel Proust’s seven-volume novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” translates as “In Search of Lost Time” or “Remembrance of Things Past”.

77. Sweet meet? : TRYST
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

79. Nabisco treats sold only seasonally : MALLOMARS
The first chocolate-coated marshmallow confection was created in Denmark about 200 years ago, and today Denmark produces more of the treats than any other country. The US version is known as a Mallomar and is produced by Nabisco, generally from October through April. Mallomars melt easily, so aren’t made available in the warmer months.

84. Athens’s home : OHIO
Athens, Ohio is home to Ohio University.

85. 1950s TV star Duncan : RENALDO
Duncan Renaldo was the stage name of Romanian-born actor Renault Renaldo Duncan. Renaldo is best remembered for playing “The Cisco Kid” on the small and big screens.

90. World capital situated in what was once ancient Thrace : SOFIA
Sofia is the capital of Bulgaria. Natives pronounce the name “Sofia” with the emphasis on the “o”, while the rest of us tend to stress the “i”. Bulgarians do agree with us though when it comes to the girl’s name “Sofia”, then they stress the “i” like we do!

97. “Music for the Royal Fireworks” composer : HANDEL
“Music for the Royal Fireworks” is a suite composed by George Frideric Handel in 1749. The suite was created for a royal fireworks display on the River Thames in London that was staged to celebrate the end of the War of the Austrian Succession. The music was a big hit, but the firework display … not so much. The fireworks caused a fire in the building in which the musicians were playing.

100. End note? : OBIT
“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

101. Nickname of jazz’s Earl Hines : FATHA
Earl “Fatha” Hines is considered one of the greats in the history of jazz. Hines played his piano twice at the White House, and once even played solo for the Pope.

103. Cheney’s follower : BIDEN
Vice President Joe Biden was a US Senator representing the state of Delaware from 1973 until he joined the Obama administration. While he was a senator, Vice President Biden commuted to Washington from Wilmington, Delaware almost every working day. He was such an active customer and supporter of Amtrak that the Wilmington Station was renamed as the Joseph R. Biden Railroad Station in 2011. Biden has made over 7,000 trips from that station, and the Amtrak crews were known to even hold the last train for a few minutes so that he could catch it. Biden earned himself the nickname “Amtrak Joe”.

105. “___ Body?” (first Lord Peter Wimsey novel) : WHOSE
Lord Peter Wimsey is delightful character created by Dorothy L. Sayers in a series of detective novels. Wimsey is a gentleman sleuth living in Britain in the twenties and thirties, and a man who loves the good life. The Lord Peter Wimsey stories are favorites for adaptation by the BBC into radio and television series. An excellent TV version was aired by the BBC in the seventies, which starred Ian Carmichael as the lead (available on DVD, and often shown in PBS).

110. Marine threat : ORCA
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

114. “Breaking Bad” network : AMC
I hadn’t seen the AMC drama “Breaking Bad” until recently when my wife borrowed the first and second seasons from our local library. It is a very well written show about a high school teacher stricken by lung cancer who turns to a life of crime to make money. It seems that AMC have a second big hit on their hands after the success of “Mad Men”.

115. Great Leap Forward overseer : MAO
Mao Zedong was born on December 16, 1893 in the Hunan Province of China. As Mao was the son of a peasant farmer, his prospects for education were limited. Indeed he left school at age 13 to work on the family farm but did eventually get to secondary school in Changsha, the provincial capital. In the years following, Mao continued his education in Beijing and actually turned down an opportunity to study in France.

“The Great Leap Forward” was the name given to the government-led campaign to transition China from an agrarian society to a modern communist society in the late fifties and early sixties.

116. BlackBerry buy : APP
The PDA known as a BlackBerry was given its name because the keyboard on the original device resembled the surface on the fruit of a blackberry.

117. Slam : DIS
“Dis” is a slang term meaning “insult” that originated in the eighties, and is a shortened form of “disrespect: or “dismiss”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Wallop : SMITE
6. Gray piece : POEM
10. Cricket club : BAT
13. Fair-minded : JUST
17. “Funeral Blues” writer : AUDEN
18. “Pity is for the living, ___ is for the dead”: Twain : ENVY
19. Kaplan of “Welcome Back, Kotter” : GABE
20. Info from a debriefing : INTEL
22. Somewhat redundant 1965 country song? : GREEN, GREEN GRASS OF HOME
26. Journalist Couric : KATIE
27. ___ Lang, Superboy’s love : LANA
28. 1951 Cooperstown inductee : OTT
29. Increases, with “up” : AMPS
30. Somewhat redundant Milton Bradley game? : HUNGRY HUNGRY HIPPOS
35. Show featuring the L.V.P.D. : CSI
38. Oktoberfest collectibles : STEINS
39. Cotillion attendee : DEB
40. Power in sci-fi : ESP
41. Kneeler’s offering : RING
43. Ambient musician Brian : ENO
44. Org. that fines polluters : EPA
45. Chicken bred for its meat : BROILER
49. Somewhat redundant size? : EXTRA EXTRA LARGE
54. Roof projection : EAVE
55. Constitutional : STROLL
56. Bedtime preyer? : OWL
57. “Nick News” host Linda : ELLERBEE
60. Song featured in “Animal House” : SHOUT
61. Bakery array : PIES
62. Reacted to a bad call : BOOED
63. Mr. Bill appeared on it: Abbr. : SNL
64. Somewhat redundant 1960s spy series? : THE WILD WILD WEST
69. Sound of heartbreak : SOB
72. Picks up : EARNS
73. Cartoon beagle : ODIE
74. Hit the roof : ERUPT
78. Like some passages in a symphony : THEMATIC
80. Elton John nickname : REG
81. Deli appliance : SLICER
82. O’Neill’s “___ Christie” : ANNA
83. Somewhat redundant literary genre? : SHORT SHORT STORY
88. Scrammed : GOT LOST
91. Brief laugh : HEH
92. Flamboyant stole : BOA
93. Machiavellian concerns : ENDS
94. John of Salisbury : LOO
95. Pink lady ingredient : GIN
96. “The things I put up with!” : SHEESH!
99. Buff : NUT
100. Somewhat redundant theater production? : OFF-OFF-BROADWAY SHOW
106. Glinda’s creator : BAUM
107. Clock face number : III
108. Repo justification : LIEN
109. Core philosophy : ETHOS
112. Extremely redundant 1963 caper film? : IT’S A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD
118. “Ta-da!” : THERE!
119. Patron saint of sailors : ELMO
120. Cut and collect : REAP
121. 128-character set : ASCII
122. Job title abbr. : ASST
123. Cooper Union’s location, briefly : NYC
124. Haute cuisine it’s not : SLOP
125. Chews (out) : REAMS

Down
1. Not look perky, say : SAG
2. Visibility reducer : MURK
3. Skull session result : IDEA
4. Comb row : TEETH
5. Ancient Roman author Quintus ___ : ENNIUS
6. In accordance with : PER
7. Goalie’s jersey number, often : ONE
8. A Waugh : EVELYN
9. Human speech mimickers : MYNAHS
10. Shearing shed sound : BAA
11. Swallow, as costs : ABSORB
12. Clearly low on patience : TESTY
13. Peter Pan rival : JIF
14. Not as content : UNHAPPIER
15. Percussive dance troupe : STOMP
16. Musician’s rate : TEMPO
19. Will Geer’s role on “The Waltons” : GRANDPA
21. Minus : LESS
23. Refined : GENTEEL
24. Animal whose head doesn’t make a sound? : GNU
25. Common check box on surveys : OTHER
31. MTV’s earliest viewers, mostly : GEN-X
32. With 33-Down, plastic shields and such : RIOT
33. See 32-Down : GEAR
34. Equal: Prefix : ISO-
35. Tangy salad leaves : CRESS
36. Amendment guaranteeing a speedy trial : SIXTH
37. Part of the front matter : INTRO
42. Mosaicist’s supply : GROUT
44. South Dakota Air Force base : ELLSWORTH
45. Not on deck, maybe : BELOW
46. R&D sites : LABS
47. Unchanging : EVEN
48. Walk while dizzy : REEL
50. Wimbledon champ Gibson : ALTHEA
51. Shakes up : ROILS
52. Very impressed : AWED
53. Crystal Cave is one : GEODE
58. Common middle name : LEE
59. E Day debuts : EDSELS
61. Emergency : PINCH
62. Captain who says “Well, gentlemen, between ourselves and home are 27,000 sea miles” : BLIGH
65. Fill up on : EAT
66. Perfume sampling spot : WRIST
67. Roman calendar day : IDES
68. Overused : TRITE
69. One way to go to a party : STAG
70. “What a calamity!” : OH NO!
71. Inclination : BENT
75. Big East sch. : UCONN
76. Proust’s “À la Recherche du Temps ___” : PERDU
77. Sweet meet? : TRYST
79. Nabisco treats sold only seasonally : MALLOMARS
81. Hidden : STASHED
84. Athens’s home : OHIO
85. 1950s TV star Duncan : RENALDO
86. Do as expected : OBEY
87. Old World deer : ROES
89. Body blow reaction : OOF!
90. World capital situated in what was once ancient Thrace : SOFIA
95. How bad news is often received : GRIMLY
96. Attests : SWEARS
97. “Music for the Royal Fireworks” composer : HANDEL
98. Open conflict : HOT WAR
100. End note? : OBIT
101. Nickname of jazz’s Earl Hines : FATHA
102. Joins : FUSES
103. Cheney’s follower : BIDEN
104. Slow on the uptake : DIM
105. “___ Body?” (first Lord Peter Wimsey novel) : WHOSE
110. Marine threat : ORCA
111. Skinny : SLIM
113. Satisfied : MET
114. “Breaking Bad” network : AMC
115. Great Leap Forward overseer : MAO
116. BlackBerry buy : APP
117. Slam : DIS

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7 thoughts on “0210-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Feb 13, Sunday”

  1. "Breaking Bad" – I enjoyed the first season. Intrigued, I went ahead and continued with the second season… however, it became too much for me. The scenes, the breakdown of his personality, the ignoring of the son, etc. Lately, I have been more discerning of what images I allow. These days, things stay with me a lot more and really bother me at the heart. Same reason I had to stop watching CSI. The episode with the baby left in the carseat… just killed me. Nip/Tuck was also a show that just gave too much shock to my brain and one day I had had enough.
    I think our society is becoming too… complacent and tolerable to ideas and images that will lead to a deterioration of our very soul.
    Just my opinion. I a lot of people I highly admire and respect like Breaking Bad. I think I started out with a hardened heart and as my healing came, the walls have been broken down. I think everyone is opposite of me. Par for the course for me…

  2. Hi, Sahsha.

    Thanks for the thoughtful comment.

    I certainly can understand that some shows can become too much, just because of the imagery that is presented, the situations dealt with. In fact, I sometimes feel that the producers are exploiting audiences by making some of the choices they do.

    Personally, I find violence and gore the most difficult and offensive element in programs, and avoid shows that lead with bloody images. I do tend give some leeway though, if there's great writing in a show. Murder and mayhem in the context of an Agatha Christie mystery is so very entertaining.

    "Breaking Bad" is a show that I still find entertaining, but will that last …?

  3. Interestingly, though (or not!), last night's Jeopardy final answer, which only one contestant got in The Tournament of Champions, was "Stalin's 5-year plan." There were several variations of it, but they essentially had to do with economic goals designed to strengthen the country's economy.

    My guess was The Great Leap Forward, a clue in this puzzle, China's version of similar policies. Wrong, but I was on the right track.

    As a regular watcher of the show, I've noticed that many contestants mention an interest in crossword puzzles : ) Just an observation.

    I often wonder where I get some of my general knowledge from. Eureka!

    Thanks for everything, Bill…

  4. Hi there, Greg.

    It's always good to hear from you.

    Your comment about "Jeopardy" and crossword lovers reminds me of Joon Pahk. I am sure you have solved some crosswords created by Joon over the years as he has had several published in the NYTimes. Joon was a "Jeopardy" champion for seven days in 2011 and won himself over $200,000!

    One can only dream …

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