0620-24 NY Times Crossword 20 Jun 24, Thursday

Constructed by: Ella Dershowitz
Edited by: Joel Fagliano

Today’s Reveal Answer: Trade Names

Themed answers come in pairs on the same line of the grid. Each includes a 3-letter NAME in circled letters. We need to TRADE those NAMES in order to make sense of the paired clues/answers:

  • 55A Commercial identifiers … or what four pairs of answers must do in order to match their clues : TRADE NAMES
  • 17A Breath : INHALATION (trade TIM for HAL)
  • 19A Marathoner’s focus : TIME (trade HAL for TIM)
  • 24A Kids’ menu go-with : CRAYON (trade ANN for RAY)
  • 26A Reaching across : SPANNING (trade RAY for ANN)
  • 35A Get out of Dodge : LEAVE (trade ALI for LEA)
  • 36A Fancy few : A-LIST (trade LEA for ALI)
  • 44A Walked for a cause : PICKETED (trade DON for TED)
  • 46A Prisoner’s reprieve : PARDON (trade TED for DON)

Bill’s time: 15m 55s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Evidence collector, for short : CSI

Crime scene investigator (CSI)

14 Homecoming, of a sort? : RUN

Maybe running for home in baseball or softball.

19 Marathoner’s focus : TIME

The marathon commemorates the legendary messenger-run by Pheidippides from the site of the Battle of Marathon back to Athens, and is run over 26 miles and 385 yards. The first modern Olympic marathon races were run over a distance that approximated the length of the modern-day Marathon-Athens highway, although the actual length of the race varied from games to games. For the 1908 Olympics in London, a course starting at Windsor Castle and ending in front of the Royal Box at White City Stadium was defined. That course was 26 miles and 385 yards, the standard length now used at all Olympic Games. Organizers of subsequent games continued to vary the length of the race, until a decision was made in 1921 to adopt the distance used in London in 1908.

20 Trial figure : STENO

Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek “steno” (narrow) and “graphe” (writing). A stenographer might be a court reporter, or a person provided captions accompanying a live television broadcast.

21 Itinerant : NOMAD

A nomad is someone who roams about. The term “nomad” comes from the Latin “nomas” meaning “wandering shepherd”. In turn, “nomas” comes from the Greek “nomas” meaning “roaming (especially when looking for pasture)”.

23 Hiking gear chain : REI

REI is a sporting goods store, with the initialism standing for Recreational Equipment Inc. REI was founded in Seattle by Lloyd and Mary Anderson in 1938 as a cooperative that supplies quality climbing gear to outdoor enthusiasts. The first full-time employee hired by the Andersons was Jim Whittaker, who was the first American to climb Mount Everest.

24 Kids’ menu go-with : CRAYON

We use the word “crayon” for a stick of colored wax used for drawing. The term was imported in the 16th century from French, in which language it means “pencil”.

31 Hanger-on : LEECH

We are most familiar with medicinal leeches, which feed on the blood of mainly vertebrate animals. However, most leeches are predatory and swallow other invertebrates for food.

34 Over it : BLASE

“Blasé”, meaning “nonchalant, bored from overindulgence” comes from French, in which language it can mean “satiated”.

35 Get out of Dodge : LEAVE

The phrase “get out of Dodge”, meaning “scram, flee”, is a reference to Dodge City, Kansas. The phrase became a cliché on TV westerns (mainly “Gunsmoke”, I think) and was then popularized by teenagers in the sixties and seventies.

38 Name associated with blue ribbons : PABST

Frederick Pabst was a brewer from the Milwaukee, Wisconsin area who had immigrated to the US from Prussia with his parents. Pabst bought himself into his father-in-law’s small brewery and over the years grew the enterprise into a public company. The most famous beer from Pabst is Pabst Blue Ribbon.

41 Accessibility law inits. : ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)

44 Walked for a cause : PICKETED

Back in the late 17th century, a picket was a pointed stake used militarily to defend against attacking forces, and charging cavalry in particular. Ultimately, the term “picket” comes from the French verb “piquer” meaning “to pierce”. The term “pickets” then became the name for troops posted in the front lines, watching for the enemy. A picket line is a unit of soldiers lined up as a team of lookouts. The first use of “picket line” in the sense of labor disputes appeared just after the end of WWII. Our use of “picket fence” evolved from the original lines of pointed stakes used to defend positions held by early colonists.

46 Prisoner’s reprieve : PARDON

A pardon is in effect a demonstration of pity and forgiveness for the crime. Amnesty is absolution while formally forgetting (“amnesty” is related to the term “amnesia”) that the crime took place. Further, a pardon can only be awarded to someone who has been convicted, whereas amnesty can be awarded to individuals who have not yet faced trial.

50 Sidekick of 1950s TV : TONTO

Tonto was played by the actor Jay Silverheels In the television version of “The Lone Ranger”. In the terrible 1981 movie “The Legend of the Lone Ranger”, Tonto was portrayed by Michael Horse. Tonto was then played by Johnny Depp In the 2013 movie “The Lone Ranger”. Famously, the Lone Ranger’s horse was called Silver and Tonto’s mount was named Scout. But, in the early TV shows, Tonto rode a horse called White Feller.

52 Dress down : SCOLD

To give someone a dressing-down is to give a reprimand, a scolding. One suggestion is that the term “dressing-down” has nautical roots. Sails that had become old and dry were “dressed down” to make them more useful. They were taken down and dressed with oil and wax so that they performed better in the wind. Similarly, a sailor might be given a figurative dressing-down in order to improve his effectiveness.

59 TV relative who wears a bowler hat and sunglasses : ITT

In the television sitcom “The Addams Family”, the family has a frequent visitor named Cousin Itt. He is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

60 Dope : PHAT

In hip-hop circles, the term “phat” means “excellent, first-rate”.

61 Roger’s cousin? : YES, SIR

The term “roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radiotelephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included “Roger” to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

Down

1 Brand for bakers : CRISCO

The Crisco brand of shortening was the first to be made entirely from vegetable oil. Although that sounds like a good thing, it’s actually made by hydrogenating vegetable oil so that it has physical properties similar to the animal shortening it was designed to replace. This hydrogenation turns good fats into bad fats, so medical professionals suggest limited intake.

3 Mens rea, for example : INTENT

“Mens rea” is Latin for “guilty mind” and is a central concept in criminal law. The concept is expanded to “actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea” meaning “the act does not make a person guilty unless the mind be also guilty”. In other words, someone should not be deemed guilty of an act, unless he or she had a “guilty mind”, intended to do wrong.

4 Bowling-pin-shaped creature of Al Capp cartoons : SHMOO

The Shmoo is a cartoon creature who first appeared in the Al Capp comic strip “Li’l Abner” in 1948. Apparently, shmoos are delicious to eat, and love to be eaten. They’ll even jump into the frying pan themselves!

5 What the March Hare dips his watch in : TEA

The March Hare is a character in Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. It was the March Hare who hosted the tea party near the start of the story, in which we are introduced to another famous character, the Mad Hatter.

7 Process of cell division : MEIOSIS

Mitosis is the process by which the complement of chromosomes in a cell nucleus replicates and then divides into two identical sets of new chromosomes. Mitosis is followed by division of the cell itself, resulting in two identical cells. Meiosis is a special type of cell division that results in reproductive cells that have half the full complement of chromosomes. The reproductive cells join together, with one cell coming from each parent, to form a new cell with a full complement of chromosomes. That new cell develops into offspring that have characteristics of both parents.

9 Technology used in seafloor mapping : SONAR

The British developed the first underwater detection system that used sound waves. Research was driven by defense demands during WWI, leading to production of working units in 1922. This new sound detection system was described as using “supersonics”, but for the purpose of secrecy the term was dropped in favor of an acronym. The work was done under the auspices of the Royal Navy’s Anti-Submarine Division, so ASD was combined with the “IC” from “superson-ic-s” to create the name ASDIC. The navy even went as far as renaming the quartz material at the heart of the technology “ASDivite”. By the time WWII came along, the Americans were producing their own systems and coined the term SONAR (Sound Navigation and Ranging), playing off the related application, RADAR. And so, the name ASDIC was deep-sixed …

10 Vape’s lack : ASH

An electronic cigarette (also called an “e-cigarette”) is a battery-powered device that resembles a real cigarette. The e-cigarette vaporizes a solution that contains nicotine, forming a vapor that resembles smoke. The vapor is inhaled in a process called “vaping”, delivering nicotine into the body. The assumption is that an e-cigarette is healthier than a regular cigarette as the inhaled vapor is less harmful than inhaled smoke. But, that may not be so …

11 Most lachrymose : TEARIEST

“Lachrymose” means “teary”, from the Latin “lacrima”, the word for “tear”.

12 Kind of electrons on the outermost shell of an atom : VALENCE

An atom’s valence is the number of electrons that it loses, adds or shares when bonding with other atoms.

13 Dancer’s haul : SLEIGH

We get the names for Santa’s reindeer from the famous 1823 poem called “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, although we’ve modified a couple of the names over the years. The full list is:

  • Dasher
  • Dancer
  • Prancer
  • Vixen
  • Comet
  • Cupid
  • Donder (originally “Dunder”, and now often “Donner”)
  • Blitzen (originally “Blixem”)

Rudolph was added to the list by retailer Montgomery Ward, would you believe? The store commissioned Robert L. May to create a booklet that could be handed out to children around Christmas in 1939, and May introduced us to a new friend for Santa, namely Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

18 Lorelai’s place of business on “Gilmore Girls” : INN

“Gilmore Girls” is a comedy show that originally aired from 2000 to 2007 on the WB. The title characters are mother and daughter Lorelai and Rory Gilmore, played by Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel. All the action takes place in the fictional Connecticut town of Stars Hollow. The theme song was written by Carole King, and is a version of her 1971 recording “Where You Lead”. King sing’s the show’s theme with her own daughter, Louise Goffin.

22 U.S. city where the frozen margarita was invented : DALLAS

No one seems to know for sure who first created the margarita cocktail. The most plausible and oft-quoted is that it was invented in 1941 in Ensenada, Mexico. The barman mixed the drink for an important visitor, the daughter of the German ambassador. The daughter’s name was Margarita Henkel, and she lent her name to the new drink. The basic recipe for a margarita is a mixture of tequila, orange-flavored liqueur (like Cointreau) and lime juice.

25 Gullible : NAIVE

A gull is someone easily cheated, a dupe. The term “gull” gave rise to the word “gullible”, which is in common use today. Did you know that the word “gullible” has been removed from all online dictionaries?

27 “Wild” ingredient in some beers : YEAST

Yeasts are unicellular microorganisms in the kingdom Fungi. The species of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for centuries in the making of wine and beer, and in breadmaking. Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates into carbon dioxide and alcohol in the process of fermentation. When making beer and wine, the carbon dioxide and alcohol may be captured by the liquid. When making bread, the carbon dioxide and alcohol is driven off by heat.

30 Symbol of industry : BEE

A simile is a figure of speech in which a comparison is made between two things that are unalike. For example, a person might be described as “cute as a kitten” or as “busy as a bee”.

34 Monk’s style : BEBOP

Thelonious Monk was a jazz pianist and composer, actually the second-most recorded jazz composer after the great Duke Ellington. That’s a pretty impressive statistic given that Ellington wrote more than 1,000 songs, whereas Monk only wrote about 70. Monk was a pioneer in the development of the jazz style called “bebop”, which gained popularity in the 1940s.

35 Boa you wouldn’t want around your neck : ANACONDA

Anacondas are native to the tropical regions of South America. The green anaconda is one of the world’s largest snakes, growing to 17 feet long and weighing up to 550 pounds! Anacondas are not venomous, and prefer to kill their prey by coiling around it and then squeeeeeezing …

40 President during the Era of Good Feelings : MONROE

James Monroe was the fifth US President, and the last of the Founding Fathers to hold the highest office. Famously, he presided over the Era of Good Feelings, when there was very little partisan strife in Washington. President Monroe racked up a lot of debt while in politics and so when he retired he had to sell off a lot of his property and struggled financially for the remainder of his life. Monroe was one of three US presidents to pass away on American Independence Day (along with Thomas Jefferson and John Adams). Monroe died on July 4th 1831.

41 Like some clocks : ATOMIC

An atomic clock is the most accurate tool known for keeping track of time. Most clocks work using some sort of an oscillation that takes place at a regular interval, like a pendulum. In the case of an atomic clock, the oscillation that is measured is between the nucleus of an atom (usually a cesium atom) and its surrounding electrons.

47 He played Mary Richards’s boss at WJM-TV : ASNER

The character Lou Grant originated on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. Grant was Mary Richards’ boss at WJM-TV in Minneapolis, and was played by Ed Asner. As Lou Grant, Asner was the only actor ever to win a comedy and drama Emmy for playing the same character.

56 Certain Ivy Leaguer : ELI

The term “Ivy League” originally defined an athletic conference, but now it is used to describe a group of schools of higher education that are associated with both a long tradition and academic excellence. The eight Ivy League Schools are: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Evidence collector, for short : CSI
4 Airport acquisitions : STAMPS
10 Transports not allowed on highways, in brief : ATVS
14 Homecoming, of a sort? : RUN
15 Lead-in to normative : HETERO-
16 Canning jar component : SEAL
17 Breath : INHALATION
19 Marathoner’s focus : TIME
20 Trial figure : STENO
21 Itinerant : NOMAD
23 Hiking gear chain : REI
24 Kids’ menu go-with : CRAYON
26 Reaching across : SPANNING
28 Neighbor of New York: Abbr. : ONT
29 Kind of : A BIT
31 Hanger-on : LEECH
32 Slop spots : STIES
34 Over it : BLASE
35 Get out of Dodge : LEAVE
36 Fancy few : A-LIST
37 In reserve : ON ICE
38 Name associated with blue ribbons : PABST
39 Loud kiss : SMACK
40 Staff note : MEMO
41 Accessibility law inits. : ADA
44 Walked for a cause : PICKETED
46 Prisoner’s reprieve : PARDON
49 Issue in a group project, perhaps : EGO
50 Sidekick of 1950s TV : TONTO
52 Dress down : SCOLD
53 “Deal!” : DONE!
55 Commercial identifiers … or what four pairs of answers must do in order to match their clues : TRADE NAMES
57 Letters on an “Organic” label : USDA
58 Take baby steps : TODDLE
59 TV relative who wears a bowler hat and sunglasses : ITT
60 Dope : PHAT
61 Roger’s cousin? : YES, SIR
62 Position held by a woman at roughly 10% of Fortune 500 companies : CEO

Down

1 Brand for bakers : CRISCO
2 Get bronze : SUNTAN
3 Mens rea, for example : INTENT
4 Bowling-pin-shaped creature of Al Capp cartoons : SHMOO
5 What the March Hare dips his watch in : TEA
6 Subject line abbr. : ATTN
7 Process of cell division : MEIOSIS
8 Inspiration for an essay writer : PROMPT
9 Technology used in seafloor mapping : SONAR
10 Vape’s lack : ASH
11 Most lachrymose : TEARIEST
12 Kind of electrons on the outermost shell of an atom : VALENCE
13 Dancer’s haul : SLEIGH
18 Lorelai’s place of business on “Gilmore Girls” : INN
22 U.S. city where the frozen margarita was invented : DALLAS
25 Gullible : NAIVE
27 “Wild” ingredient in some beers : YEAST
30 Symbol of industry : BEE
32 Smooth : SLICK
33 Something to pick up at will call : TICKET
34 Monk’s style : BEBOP
35 Boa you wouldn’t want around your neck : ANACONDA
36 On the ___ : LAM
37 “Wowzers!” : OMIGOSH!
38 Fivesomes : PENTADS
39 Went from a trot to a canter, say : SPED UP
40 President during the Era of Good Feelings : MONROE
41 Like some clocks : ATOMIC
42 Have away with words? : DELETE
43 Enhances : ADDS TO
45 Eccentric : DOTTY
47 He played Mary Richards’s boss at WJM-TV : ASNER
48 Former parent company of NBC : RCA
51 Calculations often expressed with a “+” or “–” : ODDS
54 Partake of : EAT
56 Certain Ivy Leaguer : ELI

9 thoughts on “0620-24 NY Times Crossword 20 Jun 24, Thursday”

  1. 16:48. Wow, one of those that I was just glad to finish! A few too many false starts to list in detail here. I often struggled to find any sort of foothold and just trudged along. Got the theme from the 35A/36A pair and finally made it through.

    Chops to the constructor for finding these clever word-pairs. Regardless of whether the theme’s a bit contrived or not (was surprised to find some strongly negative comments in my work group), the effort she’s put in to identify these combinations are definitely praiseworthy. Cheers, all!

  2. 28:31, no errors. I should have gone in search of the revealer lot earlier than I did. A remarkable construction!

  3. DNF after 36:27. NW corner (west of SHMOO) blank. Surprised the rest of the grid was clean, except for FEAST (as in Fancy Feast) in place of LEAST. If a puzzle and I don’t get along, I will never blame the puzzle. Kudos to those who finished.

  4. 29:40. Finally sought out the reveal, eventually solved it, and then the rest of the puzzle was relatively easy. Just took too long to get there.

    I had to come here to get “Dancer’s haul” as SLEIGH. Duh.

    Tough one today.

    Best –

  5. 45:21, so much “enjoyment for my subscription dollar. Finally got the concept with “picked on” and “parted”, but even with them I didn’t figure out “trade names” for a hot few minutes. Still enjoyed the challenge, as pathetic as my time is.

  6. No errors… But I definitely wasted a lot of ink with some cross outs and do overs. I thought this was tremendously, clever, tremendously difficult, and tremendously satisfying.

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