0618-24 NY Times Crossword 18 Jun 24, Tuesday

Constructed by: Aaron M. Rosenberg
Edited by: Joel Fagliano

Today’s Theme (according to Bill): Doubly Puzzling, Kinda …

Themed answers use a prefix or suffix, meaning “KINDA”, that repeats part of the attached word:

  • 16A Kinda comedic and saucy? : BURLESQUE-ESQUE
  • 28A Kinda religious institution? : SEMI-SEMINARY
  • 39A Kinda squishy and sting-y? : JELLYFISH-ISH
  • 50A Kinda hunchbacked figure? : QUASI-QUASIMODO

Bill’s time: 7m 18s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Path of a cornhole shot : ARC

Cornhole is a game in which contestants throw bean bags towards a tilted-up platform with a hole in it. Bags that land in the hole score 3 points, and bags that land on the board score 1 point.

16 Kinda comedic and saucy? : BURLESQUE-ESQUE

The word “burlesque” came into English from French, although the word is rooted in the Italian “burla”, the word for a joke, or mockery. A burlesque is a work of literature, drama or music that is intended to amuse and cause laughter. Burlesques in the US took on a variety show format and were popular in the US from the 1860s. Over time, the variety acts started to include female striptease, and the term “burlesque” has come to be mainly associated with such entertainment. The derivative verb “to burlesque” means “to imitate mockingly”.

19 Number one Hun : ATTILA

The Huns were a nomadic people who originated in Eastern Europe in the 4th century. Under the command of Attila the Hun they developed a unified empire that stretched from modern-day Germany across to the steppes of Central Asia. The whole of the Hunnic Empire collapsed within a year of Attila’s death in 453 AD.

21 Extremely damaged, in military lingo : FUBAR

Fouled Up Beyond All Recognition (FUBAR)

24 Kingdom east of Fiji : TONGA

The Kingdom of Tonga is made up of 176 islands in the South Pacific, 52 of which are inhabited and scattered over an area of 270,000 square miles. Tonga was given the name Friendly Islands in 1773 when Captain James Cook first landed there, a reference to the warm reception given to the visitors. The nation’s capital is the city of Nukuʻalofa on the island of Tongatapu.

28 Kinda religious institution? : SEMI-SEMINARY

Originally, a seminary was where plants were raised from seeds, as “semen” is the Latin for “seed”. The first schools labeled as seminaries were established in the late 1500s. Those first schools were more likely to be academies for young ladies back then, rather than for trainee priests.

30 Hiker’s snack : GORP

“Gorp” is a name sometimes used for trail mix, particularly by hikers. It’s not really known for sure how this name came about, but some say it stands for “good old raisins and peanuts” or perhaps “gobs of raw protein”.

32 “Miny” follower : … MOE

Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

35 Tibetan bovines : YAKS

The English word “yak” is an Anglicized version of the Tibetan name for the male of the species. Yak milk is much prized in Tibetan culture. It is made into cheese and butter, and the butter is used to make a tea that is consumed in great volume by Tibetans. The butter is also used as a fuel in lamps, and during festivals the butter is even sculpted into religious icons.

Something described as bovine is related to a cow, ox or buffalo, or indeed any ruminant in the genus Bos. “Bos” is the Latin for “cow”, and “bovinus” a Late Latin derivative term.

36 Emissions-monitoring org. : EPA

The Clean Air Act of 1963 is administered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

39 Kinda squishy and sting-y? : JELLYFISH-ISH

Jellyfish are found all over the ocean, right across the whole planet. They have been around for 500-700 million years, and so are the oldest multi-organ animal extant.

42 The first “A” in A.A.P.I. Heritage Month : ASIAN

Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI)

46 Winding ski race : SLALOM

“Slalom” is an anglicized version of the Norwegian word “slalam” that translates as “skiing race”. There is a longer version of the traditional slalom that is called giant slalom

50 Kinda hunchbacked figure? : QUASI-QUASIMODO

The title character in Victor Hugo’s novel “The Hunchback of Notre-Dame” is Quasimodo, the hunch-backed bell-ringer . Quasimodo falls for the beautiful Roma girl Esmeralda, and eventually rescues her just before she is due to be hanged. He carries Esmeralda into Notre-Dame crying out “Sanctuary!” There is some recent evidence that a hunchbacked stone carver, working at Notre-Dame at the same time Hugo was alive, may have been the inspiration for Quasimodo the bell-ringer.

56 Rich ___ Pennybags, a.k.a. Mr. Monopoly : UNCLE

Mr. Monopoly is also known as Rich Uncle Pennybags, and is the mascot of the game Monopoly. For years, we could spot Mr. Monopoly reaching out of the “O” in the word Monopoly on the game board.

Down

5 Pungent sushi condiment : WASABI

Sometimes called Japanese horseradish, wasabi is a root used as a condiment in Japanese cooking. The taste of wasabi is more like mustard than a hot pepper in that the vapors that create the “hotness” stimulate the nasal passages rather than the tongue. Personally, I love the stuff …

6 Lawyer’s title: Abbr. : ESQ

The title “esquire” is of British origin and is used differently today depending on whether one is in the US or the UK. Here in America the term is usually reserved for those practicing the law (both male and female). In the UK, “esquire” is a term of gentle respect reserved for a male who has no other title that one can use. So, a mere commoner like me might receive a letter from the bank, say, addressed to W. E. Butler Esq.

8 Estadio cheers : OLES

In Spain, one might hear a shout of “Olé!” in “un estadio” (a stadium).

9 Kind of accent heard in “Pahk yah cah in Hahvahd Yahd” : BOSTON

Harvard Yard is a large grassy area at the very center of Harvard University.

10 ___ au vin : COQ

The French word “coq” actually means rooster, but a more tender bird is usually chosen for the classic French dish “coq au vin”. The most common wine used for the “vin” is burgundy, but sometimes another red wine is chosen, and you can also find on a menu “coq au Champagne” and “coq au Riesling”.

11 PC core : CPU

The central processing unit (CPU) is the main component on the motherboard of a computer. The CPU is the part of the computer that carries out most of the functions required by a program. Nowadays you can get CPUs in everything from cars to telephones.

22 Queens neighborhood that’s home to the Steinway & Sons piano company : ASTORIA

Astoria is a neighborhood in the borough of Queens, New York. The area sits on the East River, and was originally called Hallet’s Cove after the first landowner William Hallet, who settled there in 1659. The area was renamed Astoria in a deal to get John Jacob Astor, then the wealthiest man in the country, to invest $2,000 in the neighborhood. Astor only put up $500 in the end, but the name stuck.

Steinway & Sons is a supplier of handmade pianos based in New York City and in Hamburg, Germany. The company was founded in Manhattan in 1853 by German immigrant Henry E. Steinway. One element of Steinway’s business model is to offer a “piano bank” service. Performing artists can “borrow” a particular piano from the bank for a particular concert or tour. About 400 pianos are in the bank, and are located all over the world. The value of the bank’s collection of pianos is estimated at over $25 million.

25 Football’s “Broadway Joe” : NAMATH

Legendary quarterback Joe Namath played most of his professional football games with the New York Jets. He was dubbed “Broadway Joe” in 1965 by offensive tackle Sherman Plunkett, a reference to Namath’s appearance on the cover of “Sports Illustrated”. Namath had played college football with the University of Alabama but left school without finishing his degree, to play professionally. Many years later he enrolled in Alabama’s External Degree program, and graduated with a BA in December 2007, at 64 years of age. Well done, Joe!

26 Understands, informally : GROKS

To grok is to understand. “Grok” is a slang term that’s really only used in “techie” circles. It is the creation of science fiction author Robert Heinlein, who coined it in his 1961 novel “Stranger in a Strange Land”.

28 Mogadishu resident : SOMALI

Mogadishu is a major port city on the east coast of Africa, and is the capital of Somalia. The city is known locally as “Xamar”.

33 ___ vu : DEJA

“Déjà vu” is French for “already seen”.

37 Singer Lauper : CYNDI

If you’ve ever heard Cyndi Lauper speaking, you’d know that she was from Queens, New York. She is the daughter of divorced parents, and strongly influenced by a supportive mother. Lauper was always a free spirit, and even as a young teen in the mid-sixties she dyed her hair different colors and wore outlandish fashions. She was a young woman who wanted to “find herself”, and to that end she once spent two weeks alone in the woods up in Canada, well, just with her dog.

45 Color similar to cyan : AQUA

“Cyan” is short for “cyan blue”. The term comes from the Greek word “kyanos” meaning “dark blue, the color of lapis lazuli”.

49 One vowing to get in a habit? : MONK

A monk is a member of a religious community who lives in a monastery. The term “monk” ultimately derives from the Greek “monos” meaning “alone”. The original monks were men who practiced their religious duties in solitude, away from the world.

50 Play callers, for short : QBS

Quarterback (QB)

51 Dubai’s land: Abbr. : UAE

Dubai is one of the seven emirates that make up the federation known as the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The two largest members of the UAE (geographically) are Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the only two of the seven members that have veto power over UAE policy.

52 Summer ___ (Samuel Adams offering) : ALE

Samuel Adams beers (sometimes ordered as “Sam Adams”) are named in honor of the American patriot who played a role in the American Revolution and the Boston Tea Party. Samuel Adams came from a family associated with the brewing industry, mainly involved in the production of malt.

53 Chapel Hill sch. : UNC

The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill started enrolling students way back in 1795, making it the first public university in the country to open its door to students.

54 “Dagnabbit!,” in Düsseldorf : ACH!

Düsseldorf lies in the west of Germany, fairly close to the border with France. The city is located on the River Rhine.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Path of a cornhole shot : ARC
4 Take influence from : OWE TO
9 Secretly includes, in a way : BCCS
13 Campy accessory : BOA
14 ___ spray (pharmacy purchase) : NASAL
15 “My bad!” : OOPS!
16 Kinda comedic and saucy? : BURLESQUE-ESQUE
19 Number one Hun : ATTILA
20 Didn’t play, say : SAT
21 Extremely damaged, in military lingo : FUBAR
24 Kingdom east of Fiji : TONGA
28 Kinda religious institution? : SEMI-SEMINARY
30 Hiker’s snack : GORP
31 Not slack : TAUT
32 “Miny” follower : … MOE
33 Stops up : DAMS
34 Emotionally distant : COLD
35 Tibetan bovines : YAKS
36 Emissions-monitoring org. : EPA
37 Ending with Apple or Obama : -CARE
38 Understands : GETS
39 Kinda squishy and sting-y? : JELLYFISH-ISH
42 The first “A” in A.A.P.I. Heritage Month : ASIAN
43 Arcade game pioneer : ATARI
44 “Get a room!” elicitor, in brief : PDA
46 Winding ski race : SLALOM
50 Kinda hunchbacked figure? : QUASI-QUASIMODO
55 Hay unit : BALE
56 Rich ___ Pennybags, a.k.a. Mr. Monopoly : UNCLE
57 Bog : FEN
58 Tournament ranking : SEED
59 Partner of pains : ACHES
60 Finger wagger’s syllable : TSK!

Down

1 First pop band to perform on “Saturday Night Live” : ABBA
2 Lopsided contest : ROUT
3 Checkout icon : CART
4 Common sugar serving : ONE LUMP
5 Pungent sushi condiment : WASABI
6 Lawyer’s title: Abbr. : ESQ
7 Sigma follower : TAU
8 Estadio cheers : OLES
9 Kind of accent heard in “Pahk yah cah in Hahvahd Yahd” : BOSTON
10 ___ au vin : COQ
11 PC core : CPU
12 Opposite of NNW : SSE
17 They’re in it for the long haul : LIFERS
18 Wipe out spectacularly : EAT IT
22 Queens neighborhood that’s home to the Steinway & Sons piano company : ASTORIA
23 Most authentic : REALEST
25 Football’s “Broadway Joe” : NAMATH
26 Understands, informally : GROKS
27 Passing votes : AYES
28 Mogadishu resident : SOMALI
29 “Slung” stuff : MUD
30 Stares slack-jawed : GAPES
33 ___ vu : DEJA
34 Half-___ (coffee order) : CAF
35 Rebuttal to “No, you’re not!” : YES, I AM!
37 Singer Lauper : CYNDI
38 Playful term for one’s female friends : GIRLIES
40 Expired : LAPSED
41 Inconvenience : HASSLE
45 Color similar to cyan : AQUA
47 Spacious converted apartment : LOFT
48 Praiseful works : ODES
49 One vowing to get in a habit? : MONK
50 Play callers, for short : QBS
51 Dubai’s land: Abbr. : UAE
52 Summer ___ (Samuel Adams offering) : ALE
53 Chapel Hill sch. : UNC
54 “Dagnabbit!,” in Düsseldorf : ACH!

8 thoughts on “0618-24 NY Times Crossword 18 Jun 24, Tuesday”

  1. 06:58. 21A definitely had me FUBAR for a while, but a smooth solve otherwise. Didn’t help that I’d initially filled LINERS in 17D (giving an equally incomprehensible NUBAR in 21A). Got through finally after scratching around for a bit. Interesting theme, nonetheless. Cheers, all!

  2. 7:11, no errors. Agree with previous posters, it was cute-ish (but only because I finished it). Had to do my due diligence to understand that ABBA was in fact the first pop group to appear on SNL. Previous episodes had musical acts, but none were pop groups. Minor nit: the show was not called “Saturday Night Live” when ABBA appeared in 1975. It was called “NBC’s Saturday Night”.

  3. 7:05. Cool theme.

    “Statue of a man cut off above the naval”. TORSO-OR SO ? But no one asked for my help with this puzzle. Their mistake.

    At first I didn’t get 30A because I read it as “Hitler’s snack”…

    Best –

  4. 12 min, 2 errors
    REAL(I)ST / CAR(I)

    I liked OBAMA CARE but I couldn’t grasp REALEST. I guess it’s a real word.

  5. No errors…not sure the first word of 21A is fouled but this is a family friendly website.
    Stay safe😀
    Go Orioles⚾️

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