0609-24 NY Times Crossword 9 Jun 24, Sunday

Constructed by: Zachary Schiff
Edited by: Joel Fagliano

Today’s Theme: Quiet Time

Each circled letter in the grid is a SILENT in the word of which it is part. Together, the letters spell out “SILENT AUCTION”:

  • 117A Popular charity event … or a hint to this puzzle’s circled letters : SILENT AUCTION
  • 22A Sweet loaf with a swirl : CINNAMON BREAD (silent A)
  • 31A Triple-platinum song from Taylor Swift’s debut album : TEARDROPS ON MY GUITAR (silent U)
  • 49A Potato battery or model volcano, e.g. : SCIENCE PROJECT (silent C)
  • 58A Extra source of income, slangily : SIDE HUSTLE (silent T)
  • 76A Side dish at a summer cookout : FRUIT SALAD (silent I)
  • 84A Classic game show intro : THIS IS JEOPARDY! (silent O)
  • 103A Pay a backhanded compliment, perhaps : DAMN WITH FAINT PRAISE (silent N)
  • Bill’s time: 17m 59s

    Bill’s errors: 0

    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    5 San Diego winter hrs. : PST

    The name of the California city of San Diego dates back to 1602, when Spanish explorer Sebastián Vizcaíno named the area after the Catholic Saint Didacus. Saint Didacus was more commonly referred to as San Diego de Alcalá.

    12 “Bennie and the Jets,” vis-à-vis “Candle in the Wind” : B-SIDE

    “Bennie and the Jets” was a big hit for Elton John in 1974 and was first released the year before on his famous “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” album. “Benny” or “Bennie”, that is the question! The spelling “Bennie” was used on the label of the 1973 album’s vinyl disk, but “Benny” was used on the album’s track listing and on the sleeve of the single released the following year.

    “Candle in the Wind” is a 1973 song written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin in honor of Marilyn Monroe, hence the lyric “Goodbye, Norma Jean”. Elton John rewrote some of the words in honor of Diana, Princess of Wales and performed it at the princess’s memorial service. The line most descriptive of Diana in the 1997 version is “Goodbye, English rose”.

    17 Bar order that’s dairy-free, despite its name : CREAM ALE

    A cream ale is an American beer that is similar to a pale lager, even though it truly is a top-fermented ale.

    26 Like some dive bars and granola bars : SEEDY

    We’ve been using the word “dive” in American English for a run-down bar since the latter half of the 19th century. The term comes from the fact that disreputable taverns were usually located in basements, so one had to figuratively dive into them. I’m a big fan …

    The names “Granola” and “Granula” were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole-grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

    28 Q5 maker : AUDI

    The Q5 is a compact crossover made by Audi starting in 2008. The Q in “Q5” stands for “Quattro”, which is Audi’s four-wheel drive system.

    30 Pro ___ : RATA

    “Pro rata” is a Latin phrase meaning “in proportion”.

    37 Western Hemisphere grp. since 1948 : OAS

    The Organization of American States (OAS) was founded in 1948, and has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. Not all of the independent states in the Americas are members. Cuba was barred from participation in the organization after a vote in 1962. Honduras had her membership suspended after the country’s 2009 coup.

    The Western Hemisphere is that half of the Earth’s surface lying to the west of the prime meridian (which runs through Greenwich). The opposing half of the planet is the Eastern Hemisphere.

    38 Global bank headquartered in London : HSBC

    HSBC is a UK-based financial services company that was the largest bank in Europe in 2018. It can trace its history back to 1865, when it was founded in British Hong Kong as the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank. The initialism “HSBC” stood for the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation.

    39 Hockey Hall-of-Famer Cam : NEELY

    Cam Neely is a retired professional hockey player from Comox, British Columbia. Having played for the Vancouver Canucks and the Boston Bruins, Neely was named president of the Bruins team in 2010.

    45 Bear who loves a “pic-a-nic” : YOGI

    Yogi Bear made his debut for Hanna-Barbera in 1958, on “The Huckleberry Hound Show” before he was given his own series. Do you remember that collar that Yogi wore around his neck? That was a little trick from the animators. By using the collar, for many frames all they had to do was redraw everything from the collar up, saving them lots and lots of time. Yogi and Boo-Boo lived in Jellystone Park, and made Ranger Smith’s life a misery.

    47 Colt, for one : PISTOL

    Samuel Colt was fascinated as a young man by the science behind gunpowder and its use in weapons. He decided early on in his life that he would respond to the challenge of the day, how to achieve the impossible, a weapon that fires more than two times before reloading (like a double-barreled shotgun). He came up with the concept of the revolver while at sea, modeling his design on the spoked wheel that steered the ships on which he served. His revolver made him a very rich man in his own lifetime. By the time he died in 1862, his estate was valued at around $15 million. Can you imagine? $15 million back in 1862?

    56 Lines connected to pumps? : AORTAS

    The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

    58 Extra source of income, slangily : SIDE HUSTLE

    A side hustle is a side job, additional employment taken by a person to supplement his or her primary income.

    66 Christmas poem opener : ‘TWAS

    The poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” was published anonymously in 1823, and is better known today by its first line “‘Twas the night before Christmas”. Most scholars believe that the poem was written by Clement Clarke Moore, a theologian from New York City. Others say that it was written by Henry Livingston, Jr., a poet from Upstate New York.

    70 Bauhaus artist Paul : KLEE

    Artist Paul Klee was born in Switzerland, but studied art in Munich in Germany. We can see many of Klee’s works in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. If you get to Bern in Switzerland, even more of them can be seen at the Zentrum Paul Klee that was opened in 2005. Klee’s most celebrated work is his pointillist painting from 1932 called “Ad Parnassum”, which is owned by the Kunstmuseum, also located in Bern.

    The literal translation to the term “Bauhaus” is “House of Building”. It was a school (i.e. education establishment) that operated from 1919 to 1933. It became famous for its approach to design across many disciplines, everything from art to typography.

    73 Part of a Viking funeral : PYRE

    The Vikings were a Germanic people from northern Europe who were noted as great seafarers. Key to the success of the Vikings was the design of their famous “longships”. Made from wood, the longship was long and narrow with a shallow hull, It was also light, so that the crew would actually carry it small distances over land and around obstacles. Longships were designed to be propelled by both sail and oars.

    81 ___ Gershovitz, birth name of Ira Gershwin : ISRAEL

    Ira Gershwin was the lyricist who worked with his brother George to create such American classics as the songs “I Got Rhythm” and “Someone to Watch Over Me”, as well as the opera “Porgy and Bess”. After George Gershwin died, Ira continued to create great music, and worked with the likes of Jerome Kern and Kurt Weill.

    84 Classic game show intro : THIS IS JEOPARDY!

    The TV show “Jeopardy!” first went on the air in 1964, and is another successful Merv Griffin creation. But, it took the introduction of Alex Trebek as host in order to bring the show into the big times. Trebek was host from 1984 until his sad passing in 2020.

    91 Ancient region once conquered by Julius Caesar : GAUL

    The Gauls were a Celtic race, with Gaul covering what is now known as France and Belgium. We use the term “Gallic” today, when we refer to something pertaining to France or the French.

    The most famous Roman known as “Caesar” was Gaius Julius Caesar, the dictator usually referred to as Julius Caesar. It was Julius Caesar’s actions and assassination that ushered in the end of the Roman Republic and the birth of the Roman Empire. The name Gaius Julius Caesar was also used by the dictator’s father, and indeed by his grandfather.

    92 Gobsmacks : AWES

    “Gobsmack” is slang from Britain and Ireland. “Gob” is also slang for “mouth”. So someone who is gobsmacked has received a smack in the “mouth”, is stunned.

    93 Old dating inits. : BCE

    The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

    94 Ending with concert : -INA

    A concertina operates much like an accordion, with the main difference being that the concertina has buttons/keys on both ends, and the accordion only on one end.

    99 Priory of ___, guardians of a monumental secret in “The Da Vinci Code” : SION

    In the preface of Dan Brown’s novel “The Da Vinci Code”, the Priory of Sion is presented as a secret society that does in fact exist. However, there is a lot of evidence that the priory was an invention, and created in forged documents in the sixties. Regardless, Dan Brown’s book is a really enjoyable read, in my humble opinion …

    101 Fashion designer Anna : SUI

    Anna Sui is a fashion designer from Detroit, Michigan.

    110 Updo hairstyle : POUF

    Marie Antoinette, Queen of France, is credited with popularizing the elaborate hairstyle known as the pouf. The hair was styled using a pomade made from wholesome ingredients such as beef marrow and bear grease. Because of the complexity of the hairstyle, ladies wore it for a week or two, during which time the animal fat would become rancid. It was reported that vermin would be attracted to the hair while sleeping, which apparently led to the phrase “her hair is a rat’s nest”.

    112 Cookie brand named for its signature ingredient : NILLA

    As one might expect, “Nilla” is a shortened form of “vanilla”. However, you won’t find any vanilla in Nilla brand cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, which is synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred …?

    117 Popular charity event … or a hint to this puzzle’s circled letters : SILENT AUCTION

    In a silent auction, bids are written in list form on a piece of paper. At the end of the auction, the highest bidder wins the item. The auction is described as silent because there is no auctioneer leading the bidding.

    120 Error message on a Blu-Ray player, maybe : NO DISC

    A CD player reads the information on the disc using a laser beam. The beam is produced by what’s called a laser diode, a device similar to a light-emitting diode (LED) except that a laser beam is emitted. That laser beam is usually red in CD and DVD players. Blu-ray players are so called as they use blue lasers.

    123 Actress Witherspoon : REESE

    “Reese” is not actually actress Witherspoon’s given name. She started out life as Laura Jeanne Witherspoon. “Reese” is her mother’s maiden name.

    125 Looney Tunes devil, for short : TAZ

    The “Looney Tunes” character known as the Tasmanian Devil, or “Taz”, first appeared in a cartoon short with Bugs Bunny called “Devil May Care” in 1954.

    Down

    2 Soul singer India.___ : ARIE

    India Arie (sometimes “india.arie”) is an American soul and R&B singer who was born India Arie Simpson in Denver, Colorado.

    3 Field with a pool? : GENETICS

    The set of all genes in a particular population is known as the “gene pool”, a term coined in Russian by geneticist Aleksandr Sergeevich Serebrovskii in the 1920s. In general, the larger the gene pool, the more diverse and robust the population.

    4 Like a proper shuffleboard table : SANDED

    The game of shuffleboard has been around for a long time. King Henry VIII was fond of playing, and in fact he prohibited commoners from playing the game. Shuffleboard is also known as shovelboard, a reference perhaps to the shovel-like paddles used to propel the pucks.

    5 Grier of “Foxy Brown” : PAM

    Pam Grier is an actress whose most acclaimed performance was in the 1997 Quentin Tarantino film “Jackie Brown”, in which she played the title role.

    7 Barbershop fixtures? : TENORS

    Barbershop music is played in the a cappella style, meaning that it is unaccompanied vocal music. It originated in African-American communities in the South, as gospel quartets often gathered in neighborhood barber shops to sing together.

    9 Top city in England, by the sound of it? : LEEDS

    “Leeds” sounds like “leads”.

    I went to school for a while not far from Leeds in West Yorkshire in the north of England. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, Leeds was a major center for the production and trading of wool, and then with the onset of mechanization it became a natural hub for manufacture of textiles. These days Leeds is noted as a shopping destination and so has been dubbed “the Knightsbridge of the North”.

    10 T’Challa ___ Black Panther : AKA

    “Black Panther” is a 2018 superhero film starring Chadwick Boseman in the title role. Black Panther is a Marvel Comics character created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. When not a superhero, Black Panther is the king of the fictional African nation of Wakanda, and goes by the name “T’Challa”.

    11 Accords, e.g. : SEDANS

    The American sedan car is the equivalent of the British and Irish saloon car. By definition, a sedan car has two rows of seating and a separate trunk (boot in Britain and Ireland), although in some models the engine can be at the rear of the car.

    Honda started manufacturing the Accord model in Marysville, Ohio in 1982, making the Accord the first Japanese car to be produced in the US. The Accord was the best-selling Japanese car in America from 1982 to 1997, and 1989 was the first import to become the best-selling car in the US.

    13 Bit of rosemary : SPRIG

    The herb known as rosemary is reputed to improve memory. As such, rosemary has been used as a symbol of remembrance, especially in Europe and Australia. For example, mourners might throw sprigs of rosemary into graves, symbolically remembering the dead. The character Ophelia in William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” utters the line “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance”. The name of the herb comes from the Latin “ros marinus” which means “dew of the sea”. The idea is that rosemary can in fact grow in some arid locations with only the moisture that is carried by a sea breeze.

    18 Early pyramid builders : MAYA

    The Mayan civilization held sway in Central America and Mexico from about 350 AD, until the arrival of the Spanish in the 1500s.

    25 Hardly : NARY

    The adjective “nary” means “not one”, as in “nary a soul” or even “nary a one”.

    36 One of four for a grand slam : RBI

    In baseball, a grand slam is a home run hit with runners on all three bases, leading to a score of four runs.

    41 Bear who loves honey : POOH

    Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author who is best known for his delightful “Winnie-the-Pooh” series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin’s real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

    46 Test for college srs. : GRE

    Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

    48 Fitting N.B.A. team to go on a hot streak? : THE SUNS

    The Phoenix Suns NBA team are in the Pacific Division, and are the only team in that division not based in California.

    50 TV franchise since 2000 : CSI

    The “CSI” TV show franchise uses hits from the Who as theme music:

    • “Who Are You” … “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”
    • “Baba O’Riley” … “CSI: New York”
    • “Won’t Get Fooled Again” … “CSI: Miami”
    • “I Can See for Miles” … “CSI: Cyber”

    51 Wild dogs : JACKALS

    Jackals are small omnivorous predators and scavengers that are related to the wolf and dog. Jackals have been deliberately crossbred with certain species of dog. One example is the Russian Sulimov dog, a breed developed by crossing Lapponian herder dogs with Turkmen golden jackals. Sulimov dogs are used in Russia for airport security as sniffer dogs.

    52 “Gotta catch ___!” (Pokémon phrase) : ‘EM ALL

    “Pokémon” is the second-biggest video game franchise in the world, second only to the “Mario” franchise. “Pokémon” is a contraction of “Pocket Monsters”.

    53 Chick of jazz : COREA

    Chick Corea is an American jazz pianist. Corea is noted for his work in the area of jazz fusion, as well as for his promotion of Scientology.

    58 Short-tailed weasel : STOAT

    The stoat has dark brown fur in the summer, and white fur in the winter. Sometimes the term “ermine” is used for the animal during the winter when the fur is white. Ermine skins have long been prized by royalty and are often used for white trim on ceremonial robes.

    60 Start of an Eastern religious title : DALAI …

    The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may even be female.

    64 “Wheel of Fortune” buy : AN I

    Contestants have been spinning the “Wheel of Fortune” since the game show first aired in 1975.

    69 Caribbean nation whose capital is Castries : ST LUCIA

    The Caribbean island nation of Saint Lucia has a population of less than 200,000. Remarkably, Saint Lucia has produced two Nobel Laureates: economist Arthur Lewis and poet Derek Walcott.

    74 Carnival city : RIO

    The Rio de Janeiro Carnival is the largest carnival celebration in the world. The city hosts about two million celebrants on its streets for the six days of the festival.

    75 Neighbor of Francia : ESPANA

    In Spanish, “Francia” (France) is a neighbor of “España” (Spain) in Europe.

    Spain is the second largest country in the European Union (after France). “Spain” is an anglicized form of the Spanish name “España”, which comes from the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula “Hispania”.

    77 Cabs, e.g. : REDS

    The cabernet sauvignon (often just “cab”) grape has been around since the 17th century, and is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the cabernet franc and sauvignon blanc grapes.

    78 Opposite side divided by the hypotenuse : SINE

    The hypotenuse is the longest side of a right-angled triangle, i.e. the side opposite the right angle.

    80 Agcy. for retirees : SSA

    The Social Security Administration (SSA) was set up as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. The first person to receive a monthly retirement benefit was Ida May Fuller of Vermont who received her first check for the sum of $22.54 after having contributed for three years through payroll taxes. The New Deal turned out to be a good deal for Ms. Fuller, as she lived to be 100 years of age and received a total benefit of almost $23,000, whereas her three years of contributions added up to just $24.75.

    82 “Tartare” : RAW

    Steak tartare was first served in French restaurants in the early 1900s. Back then, the dish went by the name “steak à l’Americaine”, would you believe? It was basically raw, seasoned beef mixed with egg yolk. A later version of l’Americaine, without the egg yolk and with tartar sauce served on the side, was dubbed “steak tartare”. Over time the two versions became one, and the steak tartare moniker won out. By the way, if you order steak tartare in Switzerland, I believe you are served horse meat. There are now similar “tartare” dishes made with raw salmon, or raw tuna.

    86 Yale of Yale University : ELIHU

    Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

    89 Fee, in dollars, to run the inaugural N.Y.C. marathon in 1970 : ONE

    The annual New York City Marathon has more competitors than any other marathon run in the world, with over 50,000 racers completing the course in 2013. The race has been held every year since 1970, except for 2012 when it was canceled due to Hurricane Sandy, and 2020 when it was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    93 Mozzarella with a creamy core : BURRATA

    Mozzarella is an Italian cheese that is prepared using a spinning and cutting technique. It is the cutting that gives the cheese its name, as “mozzare” means “to cut” in Italian.

    96 Whom Biden debated in 2008 : PALIN

    When John McCain selected Sarah Palin as candidate for Vice President in the 2008 presidential election, she became the first Alaskan to go on the national ticket for a major party. She also became the first woman nominated for Vice President by the Republican Party.

    97 Bach’s “Mass in ___” : B MINOR

    Perhaps the most famous mass in classical music is J. S. Bach’s “Mass in B minor”, which was completed just before he died. It was one of the last of Bach’s compositions, although much of the music was composed earlier in his life.

    105 Arnold Schwarzenegger, to Chris Pratt : IN-LAW

    Body-builder, actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger was born in Graz in Austria, the son of the local police chief. Schwarzenegger’s family name translates into the more prosaic “black plowman”. In his bodybuilding days, he was often referred to as the Austrian Oak. When he was Governor of California he was called “the Governator”, a play on his role in the “The Terminator” series of movies.

    Chris Pratt is an actor who really got his big break playing the rather dopey Andy Dwyer on the sitcom “Parks and Recreation”. Pratt then played a pretty macho role as a SEAL team operator in “Zero Dark Thirty”, before taking leading heroic roles in “Guardians of the Galaxy” and “Jurassic World”. Pratt was married from 2009 until 2018 to Anna Faris, the comedic actress who plays Christy Plunkett on the sitcom “Mom”. In 2019, he married Katherine Schwarzenegger, daughter of fellow actor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

    108 Early pyramid builders : INCA

    Inca pyramids were typically located at the center of a community. They were symbolic of power and often had an altar that was used for rituals.

    113 MGM co-founder Marcus : LOEW

    Marcus Loew was a New Yorker born into a poor Jewish family. He started out in a penny arcade business and used its profits to buy into a nickelodeon. He built a whole chain of movie theaters, and then moved into the production of films so that he could guarantee supply of features that he could show in his theaters. Eventually he pulled together the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) film production company, and sadly passed away just three years after he inked the deal.

    118 Judge Lance of the O.J. Simpson trial : ITO

    Judge Lance Ito came in for a lot of criticism for his handling of the 1995 O.J. Simpson murder trial. The lead prosecutor in that trial was Marcia Clark, you might recall. I read the book that Clark wrote about the trial called “Without a Doubt”, and she pointed out one trait of Judge Ito that I think is quite telling. Ito would almost always refer to the prosecutor as “Marcia”, while addressing the men on both sides of the case with the honorific “Mister”.

    119 Potato chip brand : UTZ

    Utz is the largest privately-held producer of snack foods in the US. The company was founded in 1921 and is based in Hanover, Pennsylvania.

    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1 Sacks : BAGS
    5 San Diego winter hrs. : PST
    8 Lead-in to bad news : ALAS …
    12 “Bennie and the Jets,” vis-à-vis “Candle in the Wind” : B-SIDE
    17 Bar order that’s dairy-free, despite its name : CREAM ALE
    19 Hockey fake-out : DEKE
    20 On deck : UP NEXT
    22 Sweet loaf with a swirl : CINNAMON BREAD
    24 “Get real!” : DREAM ON!
    26 Like some dive bars and granola bars : SEEDY
    27 Tried to get on one’s side : WOOED
    28 Q5 maker : AUDI
    30 Pro ___ : RATA
    31 Triple-platinum song from Taylor Swift’s debut album : TEARDROPS ON MY GUITAR
    35 Electrical network : GRID
    37 Western Hemisphere grp. since 1948 : OAS
    38 Global bank headquartered in London : HSBC
    39 Hockey Hall-of-Famer Cam : NEELY
    40 Block letters? : ABC
    41 Work diligently at : PLY
    42 Ice cream brand with brown-and-white striped lids : EDY’S
    45 Bear who loves a “pic-a-nic” : YOGI
    47 Colt, for one : PISTOL
    49 Potato battery or model volcano, e.g. : SCIENCE PROJECT
    55 See 23-Down : -HOO
    56 Lines connected to pumps? : AORTAS
    57 Win over : ENAMOR
    58 Extra source of income, slangily : SIDE HUSTLE
    62 ___ chips : PITA
    65 Close call : SCARE
    66 Christmas poem opener : ‘TWAS
    67 Big container : TUB
    68 Pros with IVs : RNS
    70 Bauhaus artist Paul : KLEE
    71 Prepare to massage, perhaps : OIL UP
    73 Part of a Viking funeral : PYRE
    76 Side dish at a summer cookout : FRUIT SALAD
    79 Yoga positions : ASANAS
    81 ___ Gershovitz, birth name of Ira Gershwin : ISRAEL
    83 Wee, informally : LIL’
    84 Classic game show intro : THIS IS JEOPARDY!
    87 Remove a plug from : UNSTOP
    91 Ancient region once conquered by Julius Caesar : GAUL
    92 Gobsmacks : AWES
    93 Old dating inits. : BCE
    94 Ending with concert : -INA
    95 Accelerated H.S. science class : AP BIO
    99 Priory of ___, guardians of a monumental secret in “The Da Vinci Code” : SION
    101 Fashion designer Anna : SUI
    102 “I feel that!” : AMEN!
    103 Pay a backhanded compliment, perhaps : DAMN WITH FAINT PRAISE
    109 Members of a famous boxing family : ALIS
    110 Updo hairstyle : POUF
    111 Flat’s problem : NO AIR
    112 Cookie brand named for its signature ingredient : NILLA
    115 Upgrade for a growing family : MINIVAN
    117 Popular charity event … or a hint to this puzzle’s circled letters : SILENT AUCTION
    120 Error message on a Blu-Ray player, maybe : NO DISC
    121 List-ending abbr. : ET AL
    122 Got to : ATTAINED
    123 Actress Witherspoon : REESE
    124 Gives a ride to the body shop : TOWS
    125 Looney Tunes devil, for short : TAZ
    126 Puts in stitches : SEWS

    Down

    1 List that only the sender sees : BCCS
    2 Soul singer India.___ : ARIE
    3 Field with a pool? : GENETICS
    4 Like a proper shuffleboard table : SANDED
    5 Grier of “Foxy Brown” : PAM
    6 Sleepy time at work : SLOW DAY
    7 Barbershop fixtures? : TENORS
    8 One selling space, informally : AD REP
    9 Top city in England, by the sound of it? : LEEDS
    10 T’Challa ___ Black Panther : AKA
    11 Accords, e.g. : SEDANS
    12 Genre for “Turner & Hooch” and “21 Jump Street” : BUDDY COP
    13 Bit of rosemary : SPRIG
    14 Chemical suffix : -INE
    15 Baby doll : DEARIE
    16 Former friend : EX-MATE
    18 Early pyramid builders : MAYA
    21 All-encompassing : TOTAL
    23 With 55-Across, “Oh, cry me a river!” : BOO-
    25 Hardly : NARY
    29 “Yeah … I’m gonna go now” : UM … BYE
    32 Introduce : ROLL OUT
    33 “Hot damn!” : OH SNAP!
    34 Couplings : UNIONS
    35 Intervening period : GAP
    36 One of four for a grand slam : RBI
    41 Bear who loves honey : POOH
    42 Green sci. : ECOL
    43 Dreadful : DIRE
    44 “Better ___ …” : YET
    46 Test for college srs. : GRE
    48 Fitting N.B.A. team to go on a hot streak? : THE SUNS
    49 Waited : SAT BY
    50 TV franchise since 2000 : CSI
    51 Wild dogs : JACKALS
    52 “Gotta catch ___!” (Pokémon phrase) : ‘EM ALL
    53 Chick of jazz : COREA
    54 Trapped up in the branches : TREED
    58 Short-tailed weasel : STOAT
    59 “That would be nice” : I WISH
    60 Start of an Eastern religious title : DALAI …
    61 “Yo!” : SUP!
    63 Without a doubt : TRULY
    64 “Wheel of Fortune” buy : AN I
    69 Caribbean nation whose capital is Castries : ST LUCIA
    72 Chinese gambling game with dominoes : PAI GOW
    74 Carnival city : RIO
    75 Neighbor of Francia : ESPANA
    76 Cab charge : FARE
    77 Cabs, e.g. : REDS
    78 Opposite side divided by the hypotenuse : SINE
    80 Agcy. for retirees : SSA
    82 “Tartare” : RAW
    85 Never, ever again : JUST ONCE
    86 Yale of Yale University : ELIHU
    88 History book graphic : TIMELINE
    89 Fee, in dollars, to run the inaugural N.Y.C. marathon in 1970 : ONE
    90 Give a bad review : PAN
    93 Mozzarella with a creamy core : BURRATA
    95 Leading man? : ADAM
    96 Whom Biden debated in 2008 : PALIN
    97 Bach’s “Mass in ___” : B MINOR
    98 Like the first post position in horse racing : INSIDE
    100 Counterbalance : OFFSET
    101 Show utter contempt for : SPIT AT
    102 Presently : AS IT IS
    104 “Skip me” : I PASS
    105 Arnold Schwarzenegger, to Chris Pratt : IN-LAW
    106 Christmas carols : NOELS
    107 Bronzed : TAN
    108 Early pyramid builders : INCA
    113 MGM co-founder Marcus : LOEW
    114 “No ifs, ___ or buts” : ANDS
    116 Go toe-to-toe : VIE
    118 Judge Lance of the O.J. Simpson trial : ITO
    119 Potato chip brand : UTZ

    3 thoughts on “0609-24 NY Times Crossword 9 Jun 24, Sunday”

    1. 27:06. One of those where I noticed the theme only after solving the whole thing (still a nice one, btw).

      As for today’s edition of ‘why-no-jingle-after-filling-the-grid’, I point my finger towards a man named after a country. Was so convinced he was ISMAEL and not ISRAEL that I hadn’t even looked at the connecting “Tartare” clue. So much for a steak lover!

      I take this chance to remind myself of the need to look at every single clue in a grid, big or small. Cheers, all!

    2. 26:21 after fixing an error: early on, I entered “IN MY GUITAR” instead of “ON MY GUITAR”, so I ended up with “I_SNAP” for 33-Down and “_SBC” for 38-Across. It was late and I was dead tired and I wanted to go to sleep, so I then used Google to get the “H”, at which point I belatedly reconsidered where a teardrop might end up and changed an “I” to an “O”, giving me “OH, SNAP” (which I really should have seen anyway).

      So … I’ll repeat @AnonMike’s advice, with an addendum: one needs to look at every single clue and every single answer, big or small … 🙂.

    3. 32:46. Same as Dave and Mike. I went thru every answer looking for the “jingle.” Finally found POOF instead of POUF. Grrr.

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