0621-22 NY Times Crossword 21 Jun 22, Tuesday

Constructed by: Alex Eaton-Salners
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Split Second

Circled letters in the grid spell out noted SECONDS in various series, and those SECONDS are each SPLIT in two by a black square. The SECONDS are:

VEN-US
The planet Venus is the second planet from the Sun in our solar system. It is very bright in the night sky, brighter than any other planet or any star. When visible after sunset, Venus may be referred to as the Evening Star. When visible before sunrise, it is known as the Morning Star.

AD-AMS
John Adams was the second President of the United States. I must admit that I learned much of what I know about President Adams in the excellent, excellent HBO series “John Adams”, which is based on David McCullough’s 2001 biography of the same name. Having said that, I have also visited the Adams home in Quincy, Massachusetts several times. He was clearly a great man with a great intellect …

TUES-DAY
Tuesday is the second day of the week, to those of us who start the week on Monday. The name “Tuesday” comes from an Old English word that translates as “Tiw’s Day”. In turn, “Tiw” was the Old English name for the Norse god “Týr”. Týr was the Norse god of single combat, victory and heroic glory.

BE-TA
Beta is the second letter in the Greek alphabet. The term “beta” comes from the Phoenician letter “beth”.

  • 58A Instant … hinted at four times in this puzzle’s circled letters : SPLIT SECOND

Bill’s time: 7m 17s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Arid Mongolian expanse : GOBI

The Gobi, the large desert in Asia, lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. The Gobi desert is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity. The Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so-called “Green Wall of China”. The name “Gobi” is Mongolian for “waterless place, semidesert”.

The East Asian nation of Mongolia lies between Russia to the north and China to the south. With an area of over 600,000 square miles and a population of about 3 million people, Mongolia is the most sparsely populated sovereign nation on the planet. Almost half of the Mongolian populace lives in the capital city of Ulan Bator.

5 Forensics facility at Quantico, Va. : FBI LAB

The FBI Academy is located on a Marine Corps base in Quantico, Virginia. The academy opened for the first trainees in 1972. Included in the training complex is a 10-acre mock city known as Hogan’s Alley.

11 Driver’s guide, for short : GPS

Global positioning system (GPS)

14 Mireille ___, co-star of AMC’s “The Killing” : ENOS

Mireille Enos is an actress from Kansas City. Enos is perhaps best known for her TV work, playing Sarah Linden on “The Killing” and for playing twins Kathy and JoDean Marquart on “Big Love”. Enos is married to actor Alan Ruck, who I mainly remember playing Cameron Frye in the great movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”.

“The Killing” is an excellent crime series that aired for four seasons starting in 2011. It stars Mireille Linden as a Seattle homicide detective. The US-produced show is based on a Danish TV series titled “The Crime” in English.

15 Yale, to alums : OLD ELI

Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1701, making it the third-oldest university in the US. Originally called the Collegiate School, it was renamed to Yale University in honor of retired merchant Elihu Yale, who made generous contributions to the institution. Yale University’s nickname is “Old Eli”, in a nod to the benefactor.

16 Muscle worked by a kettlebell swing, informally : LAT

The muscles known as the “lats” are the latissimi dorsi, and are the broadest muscles in the back. “Latissimus” is Latin for “broadest”, and “dorsum” is Latin for “back”.

20 N.F.L. Hall-of-Famer Dawson : LEN

Len Dawson is a retired AFL-NFL quarterback who played for the Kansas City Chiefs (originally the Dallas Texans). Dawson played for the Chiefs in the first ever Super Bowl, losing badly to the Green Bay Packers. However, he was on the winning team in Super Bowl IV, when the Chiefs defeated the Minnesota Vikings. Quarterback Dawson was named the MVP that day.

22 Cheese in a Greek salad : FETA

Feta is a Greek cheese made from sheep’s milk, or a mixture of sheep and goat’s milk. The cheese is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months before it is eaten.’

25 City that’s home to the Anne Frank House : AMSTERDAM

Amsterdam is the cultural capital and the commercial capital of the Netherlands, but not the administrative capital. That honor goes to the Hague. Amsterdam’s name translates as “Dam on the river Amstel”.

The Anne Frank House is a museum in central Amsterdam. It was in this canal house that Anne Frank and her family hid from the Nazis for over two years. The house was opened as a museum in 1960, and is now one of the most visited museums in the Netherlands.

27 Teri of “Mr. Mom” : GARR

Actress Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr’s big break came with the role of Inga in “Young Frankenstein”, and her supporting role in “Tootsie” earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“Mr. Mom” is a 1983 comedy written by John Hughes that stars Michael Keaton and the great Teri Garr. The movie is all about an engineer in the auto industry in Detroit who loses his job and then takes over the running of the household while his wife heads back to work. It’s funny stuff …

29 Toilette water : EAU

“Eau de toilette” (toilet water) is a diluted perfume. A French person when dressing is said to be attending to his or her “toilette”.

31 Bull with a horn, informally : RHINO

There are five types of rhinoceros that survive today, with the smaller Javan Rhino being the most rare. The rhinoceros is probably the rarest large mammal on the planet, thanks to poaching. Hunters mainly prize the horn of the rhino as it is used in powdered form in traditional Chinese medicine.

37 The Thinker and others : STATUES

Rodin’s famous sculpture known as “The Thinker” has been reproduced many times. Rodin’s original version of “The Thinker” is actually a detail in a much larger work known as “The Gates of Hell”. The original plaster version of “The Gates of Hell” can be seen at the magnificent Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

39 ___ 500 (NASCAR’s “Super Bowl”) : DAYTONA

The coastal city of Daytona Beach in Florida is known for hard-packed sand on the beach. This makes a good surface for driving motorized vehicles, and resulted in Daytona Beach becoming a center for motorsports. The Daytona 500 is the event with the largest purse on the NASCAR calendar.

41 German bacteriologist who lent his name to a kind of dish : PETRI

Julius Richard Petri was a German bacteriologist and was the man after whom the Petri dish is named. The petri dish can have an agar gel on the bottom which acts as a nutrient source for the specimen being grown and studied, in which case the dish plus agar is referred to as an “agar plate”.

42 “Ripped” : SWOLE

“Swole” is an informal term meaning “very muscular”. Yeah, I hear that word all the time …

44 Destination on a fast-food lover’s bucket list? : KFC

The famous “Colonel” of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) fame was Harland Sanders, an entrepreneur from Henryville, Indiana. Although not really a “Colonel”, Sanders did indeed serve in the military. He enlisted in the Army as a private in 1906 at the age of 16, lying about his age. He spent the whole of his time in the Army as a soldier in Cuba. It was much later, in the 1930s, that Sanders went into the restaurant business making his specialty deep-fried chicken. By 1935 his reputation as a “character” had grown, so much so that Governor Ruby Laffoon of Kentucky gave Sanders the honorary title of “Kentucky Colonel”. Later in the fifties, Sanders developed his trademark look with the white suit, string tie, mustache and goatee. When Sanders was 65 however, his business failed and in stepped Dave Thomas, the founder of Wendy’s. Thomas simplified the Sanders menu, cutting it back from over a hundred items to just fried chicken and salads. That was enough to launch KFC into the fast food business. Sanders sold the US franchise in 1964 for just $2 million and moved to Canada to grow KFC north of the border. He died in 1980 and is buried in Louisville, Kentucky. The Colonel’s secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices is indeed a trade secret. Apparently there is only one copy of the recipe, a handwritten piece of paper, written in pencil and signed by Colonel Sanders. Since 2009, the piece of paper has been locked in a computerized vault surrounded with motion detectors and security cameras.

45 “Knives Out” actress de Armas : ANA

Ana de Armas is an actress from Cuba. Having attended the National Theater School of Cuba, she moved to Spain at the age of 18. Thre, she made a name for herself in a Spanish TV series called “El Internado”. De Armas moved to Los Angeles in 2014, after which her performance opposite Ryan Gosling in 2017’s “Blade Runner 2049” earned her critical acclaim.

“Knives Out” is an intriguing murder mystery film released in 2019. There’s a great cast including Daniel Craig, Jamie Lee Curtis, Toni Collette and Christopher Plummer. I really enjoyed this one, partly because it’s a clever, contemporary take on a classic whodunit movie …

47 Constitutional initiative passed in ’72 but never ratified : ERA

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was written by the American suffragist leader, Alice Paul. Although Paul was successful in her campaign to get passage of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution (guaranteeing voting rights regardless of sex), her 1923 Equal Rights Amendment didn’t make it to the Senate floor until 1972. The amendment was passed by the Senate, and then headed to the state legislatures for the required ratification. 38 states had to approve the legislation for the amendment to be adopted, but only 35 states voted in favor before the deadline. The amendment is still pending, although about half of the fifty states have adopted the ERA into their state constitutions.

48 Self-description for many an expert hobbyist : GEEK

Originally, a geek was a sideshow performer, perhaps one at a circus. Sometimes the term “geek” is used today for someone regarded as foolish or clumsy, and also for someone who is technically driven and expert, but often socially inept.

49 Desk item that’s shaken : SNOW GLOBE

It is believed that the first snow globes were introduced in France in the early 1800s. They were a development of glass paperweights that were already common, and were initially used to do the same job. Do you know who owns the biggest collection of snow globes in the world, over 8,000 of them? That would be the actor Corbin Bernsen of “LA Law” and “Psych” fame.

54 Countess’s counterpart : EARL

In the ranking of nobles, an earl comes above a viscount and below a marquis. The rank of earl is used in the British peerage system and is equivalent to the rank of count in other countries. Other British ranks have female forms (e.g. marquis and marchioness, viscount and viscountess), but there isn’t a female word for the rank of earl. A female given the same rank as an earl is known as a countess.

55 Actress Bonet : LISA

Lisa Bonet is an actress best known for playing one of the daughters on the “The Cosby Show”. Bonet was married for a few years to the singer Lenny Kravitz, with whom she eloped in 1987. She changed her name to Lilakoi Moon in 1992, but still uses “Lisa Bonet” as her stage name.

56 “___ House” (1970 Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young hit) : OUR

The Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (CSNY) song “Our House” was released in 1970. It is described as “an ode to countercultural domestic bliss”, and was written by Graham Nash while he was living with Canadian singer Joni Mitchell. Many years later, Nash performed “Our House” at a tribute concert that celebrated Mitchell’s 75th birthday.

57 Fright ___ (gag item) : WIG

A fright wig is a wig in which the hair stands up straight from the head, as if the wearer is terrified.

62 Señora Perón : EVA

Eva Perón was the second wife of President Juan Perón who was in office from 1946 to 1955. The Argentine First Lady was known affectionately by the people as “Evita”, the Spanish language diminutive of “Eva”. “Evita” is also the title of a tremendously successful musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice that is based on the life of Eva Perón.

63 Grimm sister : GRETEL

“Hansel and Gretel” is a Germanic fairy tale found in the collection of the Brothers Grimm. It tells of two siblings, Hansel and Gretel, the children of a woodcutter. The youngsters are abandoned in a forest at the behest of an evil stepmother. Clever Hansel hears of the plan and leaves a trail of pebbles so that he and his sister can find their way home, which they do. But the children are abandoned again and this time leave a trail of breadcrumbs. Unfortunately, the crumbs are eaten by birds and so the children do indeed become lost. But eventually they do all live happily ever after …

64 One of 24 : HOUR

There are 24 hours in a day, 12 hours of “daytime” and 12 hours of “nighttime”.

Counting systems based on the number 12 have been around since the days of the Babylonians and Sumerians. The choice of the number twelve may be due to the fact that there are twelve cycles of the moon in a year. It is also possible that 12 was chosen as there is a convenient way to use one’s hand to count in groups of twelve. The thumb can be placed on each of the three phalanges of the forefinger to count to three, and then placed on each of the phalanges of the remaining fingers to count up to six, nine and ultimately twelve. It’s true, just try it …

65 Kylo ___ of “Star Wars” : REN

Kylo Ren is the son of Han Solo and Princess Leia Organa in the “Star Wars” universe. The character’s birth name was Ben Solo. He was trained as a Jedi knight by his uncle, Luke Skywalker. However, Ben came to embrace the Dark Side, and changed his name to Kylo Ren. Ren is played by actor Adam Driver.

66 Bullfighter : TORERO

The term “torero” is used to describe all bullfighters. The term “matador” is reserved for the bullfighter whose job is to make the final kill. Aptly enough, “matador” is Spanish for “killer”.

67 CPR specialists : EMTS

An emergency medical technician (EMT) might administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Down

1 ___-X : GEN

The term “Generation X” originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication “Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture”. By one definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

2 The Yoko of “Oh Yoko!” : ONO

“Oh Yoko!” is a song written and performed by John Lennon in 1971 that appears on his iconic album “Imagine”. The title refers to Lennon’s wife, Yoko Ono.

3 Headgear for Laurel or Hardy : BOWLER HAT

I think that a bowler hat is usually called a derby here in the US. The bowler was first produced in 1849 in London by hatmakers Thomas and William Bowler, hence the name. The alternative name of “derby” comes from the tradition of wearing bowler hats at the Derby horse race (a major race held annually in England).

Stan Laurel was an English comic actor (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson), who made a great career for himself in Hollywood. Laurel ended up at the Hal Roach studio directing films, intent on pursuing a career in writing and directing. However, he was a sometime actor and was asked to step in when another comic actor, Oliver Hardy, was injured and couldn’t perform. Laurel and Hardy started to share a stage together during that time and when it was clear they worked so well together, their partnership was born. Oh, and the oft-quoted story that Clint Eastwood is the son of Stan Laurel … that’s just an urban myth.

Oliver Hardy was born Norvell Hardy in 1892 in Harlem, Georgia. Hardy used the stage name “Oliver” as a tribute to his father Oliver Hardy. His early performances were credited as “Oliver Norvell Hardy”, and off camera his nickname was “Babe Hardy”. Hardy appeared in several films that also featured the young British actor Stan Laurel, but it wasn’t until 1927 that they teamed up to make perhaps the most famous double act in the history of movies. The Laurel and Hardy act came to an end in 1955. That year, Laurel suffered a stroke, and then later the same year Hardy had a heart attack and stroke from which he never really recovered.

8 Some jeans : LEVIS

Levi Strauss was the founder of the first company in the world to manufacture blue jeans. Levi Strauss & Co. opened in 1853 in San Francisco. Strauss and his business partner were awarded a patent in 1873 for the use of copper rivets to strengthen points of strain on working pants.

9 Small building wing : ALETTE

In classical architecture, an ailette (also “alette”) is part of a pier that supports either side of an arch. The term “alilette” is also used for the jamb at either side of a doorway, and for a small wing of a building.

12 Spaghetti, e.g. : PASTA

The term “spaghetti” is a plural diminutive form of the Italian word “spago”, which means “thin string, twine”.

22 Peach or persimmon : FRUIT

There are two broad categories of peaches: freestones and clingstones. Clingstones (also “cling peaches”) have flesh that clings tightly to the pit. Freestones are easier to consume as the flesh separates easily from the pit.

The persimmon is the edible fruit of several species of tree, and in botanical terms is actually a berry.

26 Rapper on 1988’s “Straight Outta Compton” : EAZY-E

“Eazy-E” was the stage name of rapper Eric Lynn Wright. Eazy-E had a pretty liberal lifestyle, fathering seven children with six different women. In 1995, he died due to complications from AIDS when he was only 32 years old.

“Straight Outta Compton” was the first album by NWA. NWA was a hip hop group from Compton, California. The original five group members included rappers who have made a name for themselves as solo acts, including: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. The story of NWA is told in a 2015 film, also called “Straight Outta Compton”.

32 Shoe insert : ODOR EATER

Odor Eater insoles were introduced in the early seventies, and are manufactured by Combe. Combe sponsors a national contest held every year in Montpelier, Vermont, called “The Odor Eaters Rotten Sneaker Contest”. Very pleasant …

36 Exhibiting poor taste : TACKY

Something tacky is in bad taste. The term “tacky” derives from the noun “tackey” that was used in the early 1800s to describe a neglected horse.

43 Place to get a cookie, maybe : WEBSITE

When you visit a website, often it will leave a little piece of text information called a “cookie” on your computer. As a cookie is a text file, and not executable, it is relatively harmless. However, as browsers routinely read these text files, cookies can be used by spyware. Basically, the browser can read the cookie and tell a lot about your browsing habits. This can be a good thing, so when you go back to your favorite websites you will be recognized and this can help you. For example, you may have shopped at a site and you’ll find that your shopping cart still has the items you were looking at, often because the items were stored in a cookie. However, they can be “bad” as some spyware uses the cookies to detect your browsing habits and can direct the browser to do things you may not want it to do. I do accept cookies, as they do enhance the browsing experience, but only from sites that I trust …

49 Ninja turtle hangout : SEWER

The “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” started out as a parody of comic book superheroes, first appearing in a self-published comic book in 1984. A couple of years later the characters were picked up by someone who built a whole line of toys around the characters, and then television and movies followed. Do you remember the names of all four of the Turtles? Their names were all taken from Renaissance artists:

  • Leonardo
  • Raphael
  • Michelangelo
  • Donatello

51 Hymn player : ORGAN

The organ that we often see in churches, synagogues and concert halls is a pipe organ. Sound is produced by pressurized air driven through particular pipes selected by keys on a keyboard.

52 Edmonton athlete : OILER

The National Hockey League’s Edmonton Oilers are so called because they are located in Alberta, Canada … oil country.

Edmonton is the capital city of the Canadian province of Alberta. The city was founded as Fort Edmonton in 1795, with the name taken from the area in London called Edmonton. Edmonton, London was the home of pioneer John Peter Pruden who suggested the name. London’s Edmonton was also home for deputy governor Sir James Winter Lake of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

53 Piggy, in a nursery rhyme : TOE

This little piggy went to market,
This little piggy stayed home,
This little piggy had roast beef,
This little piggy had none,
And this little piggy went wee wee wee all the way home.

58 Pepper or Friday: Abbr. : SGT

“Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” was the alter-ego of the Beatles, and the title of a famous studio album released in 1967, as well as the name of the album’s title track.

The TV detective show “Dragnet” opened up each episode with lines spoken by the character Sergeant Joe Friday:

This is the city, Los Angeles, California, I work here. I’m a cop.

In later series, the phrase “I’m a cop” was replaced with “I carry a badge”.

59 ___-mo : SLO

Slow motion (slo-mo) replay of film.

61 A.M.A. members: Abbr. : DRS

American Medical Association (AMA)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Arid Mongolian expanse : GOBI
5 Forensics facility at Quantico, Va. : FBI LAB
11 Driver’s guide, for short : GPS
14 Mireille ___, co-star of AMC’s “The Killing” : ENOS
15 Yale, to alums : OLD ELI
16 Muscle worked by a kettlebell swing, informally : LAT
17 “This is payback!” : NOW WE’RE EVEN!
19 Manipulate : USE
20 N.F.L. Hall-of-Famer Dawson : LEN
21 “Hold your horses!” : WAIT!
22 Cheese in a Greek salad : FETA
23 Winning : AHEAD
25 City that’s home to the Anne Frank House : AMSTERDAM
27 Teri of “Mr. Mom” : GARR
28 ___ punk (fusion genre with Jamaican rhythms) : SKA
29 Toilette water : EAU
30 Bit of firepit debris : ASH
31 Bull with a horn, informally : RHINO
33 “Silence!” : ZIP IT!
37 The Thinker and others : STATUES
39 ___ 500 (NASCAR’s “Super Bowl”) : DAYTONA
41 German bacteriologist who lent his name to a kind of dish : PETRI
42 “Ripped” : SWOLE
44 Destination on a fast-food lover’s bucket list? : KFC
45 “Knives Out” actress de Armas : ANA
47 Constitutional initiative passed in ’72 but never ratified : ERA
48 Self-description for many an expert hobbyist : GEEK
49 Desk item that’s shaken : SNOW GLOBE
53 Linger : TARRY
54 Countess’s counterpart : EARL
55 Actress Bonet : LISA
56 “___ House” (1970 Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young hit) : OUR
57 Fright ___ (gag item) : WIG
58 Instant … hinted at four times in this puzzle’s circled letters : SPLIT SECOND
62 Señora Perón : EVA
63 Grimm sister : GRETEL
64 One of 24 : HOUR
65 Kylo ___ of “Star Wars” : REN
66 Bullfighter : TORERO
67 CPR specialists : EMTS

Down

1 ___-X : GEN
2 The Yoko of “Oh Yoko!” : ONO
3 Headgear for Laurel or Hardy : BOWLER HAT
4 “Cross my heart!” : I SWEAR
5 Jump ___ joy : FOR
6 Displayed affection from across the room, say : BLEW A KISS
7 He’s got notions : IDEA MAN
8 Some jeans : LEVIS
9 Small building wing : ALETTE
10 Container for recycling : BIN
11 Stuck together, in a way : GLUED
12 Spaghetti, e.g. : PASTA
13 Emission from a whistling kettle : STEAM
18 Bitter ___ : END
22 Peach or persimmon : FRUIT
23 Audibly astonished : AGASP
24 Undue hurry : HASTE
26 Rapper on 1988’s “Straight Outta Compton” : EAZY-E
28 “___ Drives Me Crazy” (Fine Young Cannibals hit) : SHE
31 Having misgivings about : RUING
32 Shoe insert : ODOR-EATER
34 Part of a house that might have a full house : POKER ROOM
35 Surmise : INFER
36 Exhibiting poor taste : TACKY
38 Big drag on a fishing expedition? : TRAWL
40 In the style of : A LA
43 Place to get a cookie, maybe : WEBSITE
46 Yearly honor awarded for each N.F.L. position : ALL-PRO
48 Lacking grace and refinement : GAUCHE
49 Ninja turtle hangout : SEWER
50 Unwise to the ways of the world : NAIVE
51 Hymn player : ORGAN
52 Edmonton athlete : OILER
53 Piggy, in a nursery rhyme : TOE
58 Pepper or Friday: Abbr. : SGT
59 ___-mo : SLO
60 Bolt’s counterpart : NUT
61 A.M.A. members: Abbr. : DRS

4 thoughts on “0621-22 NY Times Crossword 21 Jun 22, Tuesday”

  1. 9:43. Clever theme. I skipped down to the reveal early to understand it.

    It would have been much more difficult to do the theme with “thirds”. You’d have to incorporate “Wednesday” and “Jefferson” into it. “Earth” and “Gamma” wouldn’t have been too difficult, however.

    I was a fan of LEN Dawson as a kid. By pure chance I saw he turned 87 yesterday. Happy Birthday.

    Best –

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