0428-24 NY Times Crossword 28 Apr 24, Sunday

Constructed by: Mike Ellison
Edited by: Joel Fagliano

Today’s Theme: The Sounds of Music

Themed answers each end with a note on the sol-fa SCALE, and that note FALLS DOWN into the row below:

  • 42D Cut back … or an alternative title for this puzzle? : SCALE DOWN
  • 52D Autumn colors … or an alternative title for this puzzle? : FALL TONES
  • 19A What a conductor might wear to a concert : TUXEDO (giving “DO”)
  • 111A Classic tune inspiring a joke about eels : THAT’S AMORE (giving “RE”)
  • 107A Question asked in a “Les Misérables” song : WHO AM I? (giving “MI”)
  • 82A Rapper who shares part of his name with the world’s tallest building : WIZ KHALIFA (giving “FA”)
  • 57A 1988 #1 country hit for Randy Travis : I TOLD YOU SO (giving “SO”)
  • 28A Rodgers and Hammerstein’s only musical written for TV : CINDERELLA (giving “LA”)
  • 24A One of a trio of famous tenors : PAVAROTTI (giving “TI”)
  • 123A Musical slide : GLISSANDO (giving “DO”)

Bill’s time: 19m 59s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Cartoondom’s “Princess of Power” : SHE-RA

“She-Ra: Princess of Power” is an animated television show, and a spinoff of the very successful “He-Man and the Masters of the Universe”. Both shows are aimed at young people, with “He-Man” targeted at boys and “She-Ra” at girls.

13 Short request at a salon? : BOB CUT

A bob cut is a short hairstyle in which the hair is cut straight around the head, at about the line of the jaw. Back in the 1570s, “bob” was the name given to a horse’s tail that was cut short, and about a century later it was being used to describe short hair on humans. The style became very popular with women in the early 1900s (as worn by actress Clara Bow, for example), with the fashion dying out in the thirties. The style reemerged in the sixties around the time the Beatles introduced their “mop tops”, with Vidal Sassoon leading the way in styling women’s hair in a bob cut again. Personally, I like it …

19 What a conductor might wear to a concert : TUXEDO (giving “DO”)

Apparently, the style of men’s evening dress called a “tuxedo” was first worn to a country club event in 1886 in New York. The use of a dark dinner jacket without tails became fashionable at the club with the members, and the tradition spread from there. The country club was located in Tuxedo Park, New York, giving the style of dress its name.

24 One of a trio of famous tenors : PAVAROTTI (giving “TI”)

Luciano Pavarotti was one of the most celebrated tenors of all time. He was able to appeal to audiences beyond the traditional fans of opera, helped by his performances with the Three Tenors: Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras. Pavarotti made his final performance on stage at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, where he sang his famous rendition of the moving aria “Nessun dorma” and brought the house down. Pavarotti passed away from pancreatic cancer the following year, at the age of 71.

25 “Breaking Bad” and “The Wire,” for example : DRAMAS

The AMC drama “Breaking Bad” is a well-written show about a high school teacher stricken by lung cancer who turns to a life of crime to make money. It turns out that the teacher has a talent for making high-quality crystal meth. The show was created by Vince Gilligan who had spent many years as a producer and writer of “The X-Files”. There is a “Breaking Bad” spin-off show running on AMC called “Better Call Saul” that focuses on the life of lawyer Saul Goodman. If I’m honest, I enjoyed “Better Call Saul” even more than the original show …

I didn’t watch the HBO series called “The Wire” when it first aired. We ended up buying all five series on DVD and we watched the whole thing several years ago. It is a great drama series, and I thoroughly recommend it.

26 Comparative that’s an inadvisable starting choice in Wordle : RARER

Wordle is a web-based word game that a Welsh software engineer developed to play with his partner during the COVID pandemic. The name “Wordle” is a play on the engineer’s own name: Josh Wardle. Wardle published the game on its own website in 2021, primarily for the use of Wardle’s family. One month later, the game had 90 players, and a month later 300,000 players. A week later, the number of daily players had grown to two million! The New York Times purchased Wordle in 2022 “for an undisclosed price in the low-seven figures”.

27 Tableau : SCENE

A tableau vivant (sometimes just “tableau”) is a silent scene that includes stationary actors. The French term “tableau vivant” translates as “living picture”.

28 Rodgers and Hammerstein’s only musical written for TV : CINDERELLA (giving “LA”)

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II were extremely successful writers of Broadway musicals in the forties and fifties. Rodgers composed the music and Hammerstein wrote the lyrics for hit shows such as “Oklahoma!”, “Carousel”, “South Pacific”, “The King and I” and “The Sound of Music”.

30 Zenith’s opposite : NADIR

The nadir is the direction pointing immediately below a particular location (through to the other side of the Earth for example). The opposite direction, that pointing immediately above, is called the zenith. We use the terms “nadir” and “zenith” figuratively to mean the low and high points in a person’s fortunes.

34 Mangy mutt : CUR

Mange is a skin disorder in animals caused by parasitic mites that embed themselves in the skin, perhaps living in hair follicles. The same disorder in humans is called scabies. We use the adjective “mangy” to describe an animal suffering from mange, but also anything that is seedy or shabby.

35 Disney voice role for Idina Menzel : ELSA

Actress and singer Idina Menzel came to public attention when she was a member of the original Broadway cast of “Rent”. She is known on the small screen for playing Shelby Corcoran on the musical TV show “Glee”. On the big screen, her most noted performance was as the voice actor behind Queen Elsa in the Disney hit “Frozen”. It is Menzel who sings the Oscar-winning song “Let It Go” in “Frozen”.

36 Some kicks : NIKES

Nike was founded in 1964 in Eugene, Oregon by entrepreneur Phil Knight and track-and-field coach Bill Bowerman as Blue Ribbon Sports (BRS). BRS started out by distributing athletic shoes made in Japan. The company started making its own shoes in 1971 and changed its name to Nike, after the Greek goddess of victory.

38 Exec in tech : CIO

Chief information officer (CIO)

40 Pollen carrier : BEE

There are over 16,000 species of bees, with the best-known probably being the western honey bee, the most common of the honey bees worldwide. Bees feed on nectar and pollen, and in so doing play a crucial role in the pollination of many plants. That’s one of the main reasons there is great concern about diminishing populations of wild bees.

46 What Beethoven’s next symphony would have been : TENTH

Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 9” is his wonderful “Choral” symphony. When it was composed in 1824 it was the first time that a major composer had used voices in a symphony. By the time of the Ninth’s premier, Beethoven was essentially deaf. He insisted on sharing the stage with the musical director (who was conducting), and was visibly counting out time but was off by quite a few measures. When the last notes were played there was enthusiastic applause, although Beethoven was still conducting. The lead contralto had to walk over to Beethoven, stop him, and turn him to the audience to receive his adulation.

55 Percussive shaker : MARACA

Maracas are percussion instruments that are native to Latin America. They are constructed from dried shells, like those of a coconut, to which handles are attached. The shells are filled with dried seeds or beans, and played by shaking.

56 ___ Colonies, communal society that went on to form an appliance company : AMANA

“The Amana Colonies” is the collective name given to seven villages in east-central Iowa, namely Amana, East Amana, High Amana, Middle Amana, South Amana, West Amana and Homestead. All seven villages were founded by German immigrants who called themselves the Community of True Inspiration.

57 1988 #1 country hit for Randy Travis : I TOLD YOU SO (giving “SO”)

Randy Travis is a country singer, and since the mid-nineties, a sometime actor. Starting in 1999, Travis’s recordings focused on gospel music. He suffered a massive stroke in 2013, from which he made a recovery. However, he hasn’t really recorded or performed much since that event.

60 Bumpkin : YOKEL

“Bumpkin” is really a not-so-nice term for someone from a rural area. The term has an even less nice derivation. It comes from from the Middle Dutch “bommekijn” meaning “little barrel”. “Bumpkin” was used as a derogatory term for Dutch people, who were regarded as short and plump.

61 Locale for one leg of the Triple Crown of Motorsport : LE MANS

Le Mans is a city in northwestern France. It is famous for the 24 Hours of Le Mans sports car race that has been held annually since 1923. The 24-hour race uses the city’s race track, but closed city streets are also used for part of the circuit.

63 Grammy-winning Beyoncé hit of 2009 : HALO

Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny’s Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2002, after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical “Dreamgirls”. Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as “Queen Bey”, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”. Her fan base goes by the name “Beyhive”.

64 Staccato marking : DOT

Staccato (stac.) is a musical direction signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato, indicating long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

66 ___ Smith, drummer for Alice Cooper : NEAL

Outrageous rock singer Alice Cooper’s real name is Vincent Furnier. “Alice Cooper” was originally the name of the band that Furnier fronted, but he adopted the name as his own when he started his solo career in 1975. Outside the recording studio, Cooper is an exceptional golfer. He has stated that golf was a great help to him as he overcame addiction to drugs and alcohol.

67 With 76-Across, genre for Fall Out Boy : EMO …
[76A See 67-Across : … POP]

Fall Out Boy is a rock band from Chicago that formed in 2001. They take their name from a character on “The Simpsons”, a superhero called “Fallout Boy”.

68 Classical singers? : SIRENS

In Greek mythology, the Sirens were seductive bird-women who lured men to their deaths with their song. When Odysseus sailed close to the island home of the Sirens he wanted to hear their voices, but in safety. He had his men plug their ears with beeswax and then ordered them to tie him to the mast and not to free him until they were safe. On hearing their song Odysseus begged to be let loose, but the sailors just tightened his bonds and the whole crew sailed away unharmed. We sometimes use the term “siren” today to describe a seductively charming woman.

73 New wave’s Adam ___ : ANT

Adam Ant is an English musician who had a few number-one hits on both sides of the Atlantic in the eighties. His most famous recordings were probably “Stand and Deliver” and “Prince Charming” from 1981, and “Goody Two-Shoes” from 1982. Englishman Ant even managed to get himself voted as sexiest man in America by viewers of MTV.

74 First word when thanking Mr. Roboto : DOMO

“Mr. Roboto” is a song on the 1983 album “Kilroy Was Here” by the Chicago band Styx. The first lines of the song are:

Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto,
Mata ah-oo hima de
Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto,
Himitsu wo shiri tai

which translates as:

Thank you very much, Mr. Robot
Until the day (we) meet again
Thank you very much, Mr. Robot
I want to know your secret

77 Lennon who co-wrote the Oscar-winning short “War Is Over!” : SEAN

Sean Lennon is the only child of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, and godson of Elton John. Sean is a musician and composer, and has a band called the Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger.

82 Rapper who shares part of his name with the world’s tallest building : WIZ KHALIFA (giving “FA”)

“Wiz Khalifa” is the stage name of rapper Cameron Jibril Thomaz.

Burj Khalifa is a spectacular skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE). It is the tallest man-made structure in the world, and has been so since the completion of its exterior in 2009. The space in the building came onto the market at a really bad time, during the global financial crisis. The building was part of a US$20 billion development of downtown Dubai that was backed by the city government which had to go looking for a bailout from the neighboring city of Abu Dhabi. The tower was given the name Burj Khalifa at the last minute, apparently as a nod to UAE President Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan who helped to broker the bailout.

87 Robert Matthew Van ___, real name of rap’s Vanilla Ice : WINKLE

Vanilla Ice is the stage name of rapper Robert Van Winkle. Van Winkle used to breakdance with a band of friends when he was a young teenager and, as he was the only white guy in the group, he was given the nickname “Vanilla”.

95 Steely Dan hit that charted for 19 straight weeks : PEG

Steely Dan’s heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993, and is still performing today despite the passing of founding member Walter Becker in 2017. Steely Dan’s best-selling album is “Aja” (pronounced like “Asia”), which was released in 1977.

98 Kind of billiards with no pockets : CAROM

A carom is a ricochet, the bouncing of some projectile off a surface. “Carom” has come to describe the banking of a billiard ball, the bouncing of the ball off the side of the table.

105 Like bossa nova or salsa : LATIN

Bossa nova is a style of music from Brazil that evolved from samba. The most famous piece of bossa nova is the song “The Girl from Ipanema”. The term “bossa nova” translates from Portuguese as “new trend”, or more colloquially as “new wave”.

The genre of music called salsa is a modern interpretation of various Cuban traditional music styles.

107 Question asked in a “Les Misérables” song : WHO AM I? (giving “MI”)

The 1980 musical “Les Misérables” is an adaptation of the 1862 novel of the same name by Victor Hugo. The show opened in London in 1985, and is the longest running musical in the history of London’s West End. My wife and I saw “Les Miz” in the Queen’s Theatre in London many years ago, but were only able to get tickets in the very back row. The theater seating is very steep, so the back row of the balcony is extremely high over the stage. One of the big events in the storyline is the building of a street barricade over which the rebels fight. At the height we were seated we could see the stagehands behind the barricade, sitting drinking Coke, even smoking cigarettes. On cue, the stagehands would get up and catch a dropped rifle, or an actor who had been shot. It was pretty comical. I didn’t really enjoy the show that much, to be honest. Some great songs, but the musical version of the storyline just didn’t seem to hang together for me.

111 Classic tune inspiring a joke about eels : THAT’S AMORE (giving “RE”)

“That’s Amore” is a pop standard written by Harry Warren and Jack Brooks in 1952. It became the signature song for Dean Martin after he sang it (with some help from Jerry Lewis) in the 1953 comedy film “The Caddy”. “When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that’s amore …”

Morays are a large group of about 200 species of eels found across the world’s oceans. They are carnivorous and look pretty scary but they’re quite shy when confronted and present no threat to humans. One interesting thing about morays is that they will sometimes work in cooperation with the grouper fish found in reefs, the two helping each other hunt for food.

118 Mark who played Luke Skywalker : HAMILL

Actor Mark Hamill is best known (by far) for playing Luke Skywalker in “Star Wars” movies. That said, fans of “Batman: The Animated Series” will know him as the voice actor behind the Joker.

121 “Easy on Me” singer : ADELE

“Easy on Me” is a 2021 song co-written and recorded by Adele. In the song, Adele is directly addressing her 9-year-old son, asking him to be “easy on” her following her divorce from his father.

123 Musical slide : GLISSANDO (giving “DO”)

In music, a glissando (plural “glissandi”), is a “glide” from one pitch to another, a rapid “slide” through a series of consecutive notes. On a piano, this can be accomplished by swiping a finger across the keys. On a harp, the effect is achieved with a similar action across the strings.

124 Female fox : VIXEN

Male foxes are usually called dogs, and sometimes tods or reynards. Females are vixens, and young foxes are cubs, pups or kits.

128 Necessity for beer or bread : YEAST

Yeasts are unicellular microorganisms in the kingdom Fungi. The species of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for centuries in the making of wine and beer, and in breadmaking. Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates into carbon dioxide and alcohol in the process of fermentation. When making beer and wine, the carbon dioxide and alcohol may be captured by the liquid. When making bread, the carbon dioxide and alcohol is driven off by heat.

Down

2 Chinese province known for its spicy cuisine : HUNAN

Hunan is a province in south-central China. It is located south of Lake Dongting, which gives the province its name, as “Hunan” translates as “south of the lake”.

6 Beatles hairdos : MOPS

The classic Beatles haircut is called a mop top. Apparently John Lennon and Paul McCartney saw someone wearing the style in Hamburg, and they liked it. The pair hitchhiked from Hamburg to Paris, and when they arrived at their destination, they had their hair cut that way for the first time.

9 Flexible position : ASANA

“Asana” is a Sanskrit word that translates literally as “sitting down”. The asanas are the poses that a practitioner of yoga assumes. The most famous is the lotus position, the cross-legged pose called “padmasana”.

11 Campus mil. program : ROTC

Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC)

16 Bumpy ride? : CAMEL

Perhaps the most distinctive feature of a camel is the large deposit of fatty tissue on its back. The dromedary is the most common camel, and has one hump of fatty tissue on its back. The Bactrian camel has two humps, and makes up just 6% of the world’s camel population. Those fatty humps are useful if no food or water is available, as fat can be broken down into water and energy.

17 Eurasian mountain range : URALS

The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia and Kazakhstan is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

18 Pioneer in electricity : TESLA

Nikola Tesla was born in the Austrian Empire in a village located in modern-day Croatia, and later moved to the US. Tesla’s work on mechanical and electrical engineering was crucial to the development of alternating current technology, the same technology that is used by equipment at the backbone of modern power generation and distribution systems.

21 Gradually increase in volume : CRESCENDO

Crescendo (cresc.) is an Italian word meaning “gradually becoming louder”, and is often seen on a musical score. The term with the opposite meaning is “diminuendo” (dim.).

37 Actress Russell of “The Americans” : KERI

Actress Keri Russell’s big break in television came with the title role in the drama show “Felicity” that ran from 1998 through 2002. The lead character in the show is Felicity Porter, a young lady introduced to the audience with a head of long curly blonde hair. Famously, Russell cut her hair extremely short at the start of the second season, an action that was associated with a significant drop in the show’s viewership. Russell had to grow out her hair over the season. I haven’t seen “Felicity”, but I really do enjoy Russell playing one of the leads in the entertaining Cold War drama called “The Americans” that is aired by FX.

“The Americans” is a very engaging drama series set during the Cold War that features two KGB spies living as a married couple just outside Washington, D.C. The show was created by Joe Weisberg, who is a novelist and former CIA officer. The lead roles in “The Americans” are played by real-life couple Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys.

41 Marketplace originally called AuctionWeb : EBAY

eBay was founded in 1995 as AuctionWeb. One of the first items purchased was a broken laser pointer, for $14.83. The buyer was a collector of broken laser pointers …

45 Singing Simone : NINA

“Nina Simone” was the stage name of Eunice Waymon. Simone was very much associated with jazz music, although she really wanted to be a classical musician early in her career. She was inspired by a love for the music of Bach.

47 Whose performances were as astonishing as all get-out? : HOUDINI

“Harry Houdini” was the stage name of Hungarian-born escapologist and magician Erik Weisz (later changed to “Harry Weiss”). Many people are under the impression that Houdini died while performing an escape that went wrong, an impression created by the storyline in a couple of movies about his life. The truth is that he died of peritonitis from a burst appendix. It is also true that a few days prior to his death Houdini took a series of punches to his stomach as part of his act, but doctors believe that his appendix would have burst regardless.

52 Autumn colors … or an alternative title for this puzzle? : FALL TONES

Here in the US, we tend to refer to the season following summer as “fall”. This name is short for “fall of the leaf”, referring to the loss of leaves by deciduous trees. The term “autumn” is a more common name used in Britain and Ireland instead of “fall”. However, back before the mid-1600s the term “fall” was in common use on the other side of the pond.

58 Gladys Knight’s backup group : THE PIPS

Gladys Knight & the Pips performed together from 1953 to 1989. The Pips were founded around Gladys Knight, originally featuring her brother, sister and two cousins. The group took its name from yet another cousin, a cousin named “Pip”.

69 Part of a Battleship guess : ROW

Battleship is a surprisingly fun guessing game that I used to play as a child. Back then, we would play it just using pencil and paper. These days kids are more likely to play an electronic version of the game.

70 Some special ops personnel : SEALS

The US Special Forces unit that is popularly referred to as SEAL Team Six, is more correctly known as the US Naval Warfare Development Group (NSWDG). “SEAL Team Six” was actually the name of the unit’s predecessor, which was disbanded in 1987. The original group was created soon after the Iran hostage crisis of 1979. Two SEAL teams were deployed, and the name SEAL Team Six was used as a ruse in order to confuse the Russian intelligence services about the actual number of teams in existence.

75 Doing mess hall duties, for short : ON KP

The initialism “KP” is US military slang that stands for either “kitchen police” or “kitchen patrol”.

79 One of a trio of famous Catherines : PARR

Henry VIII was the English King with the most wives. Well, something rubbed off on his last wife Catherine Parr. She was to become the English Queen with the most husbands! By the time she married Henry, she had been widowed twice. After Henry died, Parr married once again, racking up four husbands in all.

83 Closes, as a suitcase : ZIPS

What we know today as a “zipper” was invented by mechanical engineer Whitcomb Judson in 1890, when it was called a “clasp locker”. The device was introduced at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, but was not successful. Several people made improvements to the basic design over the coming decades. By the 1920s, the B. F. Goodrich Company was using the device on a line of rubber boots. It was Goodrich who introduced us to the name “zipper”.

91 Barge type : SCOW

A scow is a flat-bottomed boat with squared-off ends that’s often used for transportation, usually pushed or pulled by a barge. Often, a scow can be seen carrying junk or garbage.

94 Trees that can grow multiple acres wide : BANYANS

The banyan is a fig that germinates in cracks and crevices of a host tree and then sends roots down towards the ground. The roots that head down the host give rise to a familiar name for the banyan, namely the strangler fig. The banyan is the national tree of India.

96 Grocery checkout staple : GUM

The initialism “UPC” stands for Universal Price Code or Universal Product Code. The first ever UPC-marked item to get scanned in a store was on June 26, 1974 at 08:01 a.m. at Marsh’s supermarket in Troy, Ohio. It was a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit chewing gum.

98 Some Olds of old : CIERAS

Oldsmobile made the Cutlass Ciera from 1982 to 1996. The Ciera was the most successful model that bore the Oldsmobile badge.

99 Eldest of the Three Musketeers : ATHOS

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is the trio’s young protégé D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

100 Gregorian song : CHANT

Plainsong is a type of music used in several Western Christian traditions. Plainsong has a single, unaccompanied melody that is chanted. The most famous variety of plainsong is Gregorian chant, which is named for Pope Gregory I.

102 1986 autobiography of the “Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll” : I, TINA

“I, Tina” is a 1986 autobiography by Tina Turner. The book was so successful it was adapted into a movie called “What’s Love Got to Do with It?” The film version was released in 1993 and stars Angela Bassett as Tina Turner. The first chapter of the biography is called “Nut Bush”, a reference to the small farming community of Nutbush, Tennessee where Turner was born (as Anna Mae Bullock).

104 Comic pianist known as “The Clown Prince of Denmark” : BORGE

Victor Borge was such a talented Danish entertainer. He was nicknamed “The Great Dane” as well as “The Clown Prince of Denmark”. Borge was a trained concert pianist, but soon discovered that the addition of a stand up comedy routine to his musical presentations brought him a lot of work. He toured Europe in the 1930s, and found himself in trouble for telling anti-Nazi jokes, so when Germany occupied Denmark during WWII Borge escaped to America.

109 Speaker’s voice? : ALEXA

Alexa is a personal assistant application that is most associated with Amazon Echo smart speakers. Apparently, one reason the name “Alexa” was chosen is because it might remind one of the Library of Alexandria, the “keeper of all knowledge”.

110 Jazz trumpeter Davis : MILES

Jazz musician Miles Davis was born into a relatively affluent family, so he had plenty of music lessons as a child. After high school, Davis studied at the Juilliard School of Music in New York but he dropped out before finishing his studies. He stated later that the Juilliard classes focused too much on European and “white” music, but he acknowledged that the school gave him a foundation in music theory that helped him in later life.

115 Footwear retailer founded in Montreal : ALDO

ALDO is a chain of shoe stores that was founded in Montreal in 1972 by Moroccan-born Canadian Aldo Bensadoun. Bensadoun is the son of a retailer of shoes in Morocco and France, and the grandchild of a cobbler. A man with shoe leather in his blood …

120 “The end” : FIN

“Fin” is the French word for “end”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Cartoondom’s “Princess of Power” : SHE-RA
6 Flat formation : MESA
10 Jockish sort : BRO
13 Short request at a salon? : BOB CUT
19 What a conductor might wear to a concert : TUXEDO (giving “DO”)
20 Ice cream parlor request : ONE SCOOP
22 Gazing angrily : AGLARE
23 Split : IN TWO
24 One of a trio of famous tenors : PAVAROTTI (giving “TI”)
25 “Breaking Bad” and “The Wire,” for example : DRAMAS
26 Comparative that’s an inadvisable starting choice in Wordle : RARER
27 Tableau : SCENE
28 Rodgers and Hammerstein’s only musical written for TV : CINDERELLA (giving “LA”)
30 Zenith’s opposite : NADIR
32 Talk smack about : TRASH
34 Mangy mutt : CUR
35 Disney voice role for Idina Menzel : ELSA
36 Some kicks : NIKES
38 Exec in tech : CIO
40 Pollen carrier : BEE
42 Like many roofs : SHINGLED
46 What Beethoven’s next symphony would have been : TENTH
48 Some : A BIT OF
53 Needle holder : CONIFER
54 Reference online : LINK TO
55 Percussive shaker : MARACA
56 ___ Colonies, communal society that went on to form an appliance company : AMANA
57 1988 #1 country hit for Randy Travis : I TOLD YOU SO (giving “SO”)
60 Bumpkin : YOKEL
61 Locale for one leg of the Triple Crown of Motorsport : LE MANS
63 Grammy-winning Beyoncé hit of 2009 : HALO
64 Staccato marking : DOT
66 ___ Smith, drummer for Alice Cooper : NEAL
67 With 76-Across, genre for Fall Out Boy : EMO …
68 Classical singers? : SIRENS
70 Slopes attire resembling overalls : SKI BIB
73 New wave’s Adam ___ : ANT
74 First word when thanking Mr. Roboto : DOMO
76 See 67-Across : … POP
77 Lennon who co-wrote the Oscar-winning short “War Is Over!” : SEAN
78 Admits : COPS TO
80 Settings for timers : OVENS
82 Rapper who shares part of his name with the world’s tallest building : WIZ KHALIFA (giving “FA”)
86 Golf gimme : TAP-IN
87 Robert Matthew Van ___, real name of rap’s Vanilla Ice : WINKLE
89 Sweetened cornmeal in Mexican cuisine : PINOLE
90 Mounted on : ASTRIDE
92 Amount after deductions : NET PAY
93 Expels : SPEWS
94 Hats worn by Napoleon : BICORNES
95 Steely Dan hit that charted for 19 straight weeks : PEG
97 Brief instant : SEC
98 Kind of billiards with no pockets : CAROM
99 Musical’s beginning : ACT I
103 Buster : BUB
105 Like bossa nova or salsa : LATIN
107 Question asked in a “Les Misérables” song : WHO AM I? (giving “MI”)
111 Classic tune inspiring a joke about eels : THAT’S AMORE (giving “RE”)
114 “Toodles” : SEE YA
116 Marsalis family patriarch : ELLIS
118 Mark who played Luke Skywalker : HAMILL
119 Doctor’s note, perhaps : REFERRAL
121 “Easy on Me” singer : ADELE
122 Narrow soccer victory : ONE NIL
123 Musical slide : GLISSANDO (giving “DO”)
124 Female fox : VIXEN
125 Guitar cords? : STRAPS
126 Ages upon ages : EON
127 ExxonMobil brand, abroad : ESSO
128 Necessity for beer or bread : YEAST

Down

1 Rouse : STIR
2 Chinese province known for its spicy cuisine : HUNAN
3 What guacamole often costs : EXTRA
4 Get hitched again : REWED
5 Groupies, e.g. : ADORING FANS
6 Beatles hairdos : MOPS
7 Written in code? : ENACTED
8 Cuts off : SEVERS
9 Flexible position : ASANA
10 “That’s such a bummer!” : BOO!
11 Campus mil. program : ROTC
12 ___ chiasm, section at the lower front part of the brain : OPTIC
13 Disorienting thing to wake up from : BAD DREAM
14 Fabled monster : OGRE
15 Trumpet : BLARE
16 Bumpy ride? : CAMEL
17 Eurasian mountain range : URALS
18 Pioneer in electricity : TESLA
21 Gradually increase in volume : CRESCENDO
29 Small lump : NUB
31 Irritate : RILE
33 Suspicious, informally : HINKY
37 Actress Russell of “The Americans” : KERI
39 Quattro x due : OTTO
41 Marketplace originally called AuctionWeb : EBAY
42 Cut back … or an alternative title for this puzzle? : SCALE DOWN
43 Bit of living room footage : HOME MOVIE
44 “I’ll be with you shortly” : IN A MOMENT
45 Singing Simone : NINA
46 Cash coffers : TILLS
47 Whose performances were as astonishing as all get-out? : HOUDINI
49 Hotel room freebie : IRON
50 Go driving : TAKE A SPIN
51 Destroyer of a castle, perhaps : OCEAN TIDE
52 Autumn colors … or an alternative title for this puzzle? : FALL TONES
54 Term in both finance and linguistics : LOAN
58 Gladys Knight’s backup group : THE PIPS
59 Weep : SOB
62 Scotch sampling : SIP
65 Twirling one’s hair, e.g. : TIC
69 Part of a Battleship guess : ROW
70 Some special ops personnel : SEALS
71 Vegetable with a “dinosaur” variety : KALE
72 Like musical mixes that overly emphasize bass notes : BOTTOM HEAVY
75 Doing mess hall duties, for short : ON KP
77 Featured performances : SHOWCASES
79 One of a trio of famous Catherines : PARR
81 Hit (with), as a fine : SLAP
83 Closes, as a suitcase : ZIPS
84 Prepare to pop the question : KNEEL
85 Science exhibition : FAIR
88 Audience, to an advertiser : EYEBALLS
91 Barge type : SCOW
94 Trees that can grow multiple acres wide : BANYANS
96 Grocery checkout staple : GUM
98 Some Olds of old : CIERAS
99 Eldest of the Three Musketeers : ATHOS
100 Gregorian song : CHANT
101 More subdued : TAMER
102 1986 autobiography of the “Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll” : I, TINA
104 Comic pianist known as “The Clown Prince of Denmark” : BORGE
106 To the point : TERSE
108 Throwback hit : OLDIE
109 Speaker’s voice? : ALEXA
110 Jazz trumpeter Davis : MILES
112 Goof : SLIP
113 Corporate move, for short : RELO
115 Footwear retailer founded in Montreal : ALDO
117 Email folder : SENT
120 “The end” : FIN

7 thoughts on “0428-24 NY Times Crossword 28 Apr 24, Sunday”

  1. 38:29 after fixing an error: SLAM/MEG instead of SLAP/PEG (never heard of the Steely Dan hit). A little of my time was spent wondering what was wrong with the clue for 71-Down; in the app, it was (and still is) just “Vegetable with a”.

  2. 32:32, no errors. Figured out the shaded squares with PAVAROTTI & CINDERELLA. Pretty good solve today, 11:49 faster than my average Sunday. @Dave, my app says “Vegetable with a ‘dinosaur’ variety.” You’re welcome.

  3. 36:26, 2 errors: BR(A)/(A)PTIC. To my mind, a BRA has more in common with a Jock than a BRO. I realize that APTIC is not thing.

    I saw that the ‘notes’ didn’t appear to be in order, but then it dawned on me that they are in descending order: DO-TI-LA-SO-FA-MI-RE-DO.

  4. I went through a number of tries at “needle holder” (53 Across) and laughed out loud when I worked out “conifer.” Good clue.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *