1030-20 NY Times Crossword 30 Oct 20, Friday

Constructed by: Trenton Charlson
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 10m 22s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Jesus, Mary or Joseph : NAZARENE

Nazareth is a large city in northern Israel. The New Testament describes Nazareth as the childhood home of Jesus.

9 Some Eastern dignitaries : RAJAHS

“Raja” (also “rajah”) is a word derived from Sanskrit that is used particularly in India for a monarch or princely ruler. The female form is “rani” (also “ranee”) and is used for a raja’s wife.

16 Something worn for protection : AMULET

Amulets are items worn to ward off disease or to protect against harmful magic spells.

18 “Philosophy in the Bedroom” writer, 1795 : DE SADE

The Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat with a reputation for a libertine lifestyle. De Sade was also a writer, well known for his works of erotica. He fell foul of the law for some of his more extreme practices and for blaspheming the Catholic church. On and off, de Sade spent 32 years of his life in prison and in insane asylums.

19 “There’s the ___” : RUB

A rub is a difficulty or obstruction. The term comes from the game of lawn bowls in which a rub is a fault in the bowling surface. The most famous use of “rub” is in the “To be or not to be” soliloquy from William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”.

To die — to sleep.
To sleep — perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub!

20 Way to get around in Chicago : EL TRAIN

Elevated railroad (El)

22 Schedule abbr. : TBA

Something not yet on the schedule (“sked” or “sched.”) is to be advised/announced (TBA).

25 Scientist who was friends with Mark Twain : TESLA

Nikola Tesla was born in Serbia, but later moved to the US. Tesla’s work on mechanical and electrical engineering was crucial to the development of alternating current technology, the same technology that is used by equipment at the backbone of modern power generation and distribution systems.

“Samuel Langhorne Clemens” was the real name of the author Mark Twain. Twain wasn’t the only pen name used by Clemens. Early in his career he signed some sketches as “Josh”, and signed some humorous letters that he wrote under the name “Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass”. The name of Mark Twain came from the days when Clemens was working on riverboats on the Mississippi. A riverboatman would call out “by the mark twain” when measuring the depth of water. This meant that on the sounding line, according to the “mark” on the line, the depth was two (“twain”) fathoms, and so it was safe for the riverboat to proceed.

29 Floats are often made with them : ROOT BEERS

Root beer is a beverage that is very North American, and is rarely found elsewhere in the world. Root beer originated in the 1700s and was made from the root of the sassafras plant. The traditional root beer was a beverage with a very low alcohol content, and today there are many versions that contain no alcohol at all. The sassafras root was used as the primary flavor ingredient right up until 1960, when the FDA banned its use as tests determined that it was a carcinogen.

31 ___ Games, second-largest multisport event after the Olympics : ASIAN

Today’s Asian Games are run by the Olympic Council of Asia and are held every four years. They are the second largest, multi-sport event in the world after the Olympics. The first Asian Games were held in 1951 in Delhi, India. The first Asian Games to be held in the Middle East were in 1974 in Tehran, Iran.

33 Welcome offering : LEI

“Lei” is a Hawaiian word meaning “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a lei is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

45 Midwest city in the title of a 1942 Glenn Miller #1 hit : KALAMAZOO

“(I’ve Got a Gal in) Kalamazoo” is a song made famous by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra.

A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H
I got a gal in Kalamazoo
Don’t want to boast but I know she’s the toast of Kalamazoo
(Zoo, zoo, zoo, zoo, zoo)

46 Margaret ___, artist known for painting subjects with big eyes : KEANE

“Big Eyes” is a 2014 movie about the artist Margaret Keane (played by Amy Adams). Margaret’s husband Walter Keane (played by Christoph Waltz) fraudulently claimed that it was him who actually created the paintings. The title “Big Eyes” refers to the exaggerated size of the eyes of the subjects in Keane’s paintings. The movie’s title song was co-written and performed by Lana Del Rey.

48 Spoils : BOOTY

“Booty”, meaning “plunder, profit”, is derived from the Old French word “butin” that has the same meaning.

51 Open-house org. : PTA

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

52 Acts like a quidnunc : MEDDLES

A quidnunc is a nosy person. The term “quidnunc” comes from the Latin “quid nunc?” which means “what now?”

55 Support above a doorway : LINTEL

A lintel is a structural beam that spans an opening in a wall, usually a door or a window.

61 Writer who served as a senator in Chile : NERUDA

“Pablo Neruda” was the pen name, and eventually the legal name, used by Chilean writer Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. Basoalto chose the name as an homage to Czech poet Jan Neruda.

Down

1 Rhyming descriptor for Obama : NO-DRAMA

Barack Obama earned the nickname “No Drama Obama” during the 2007-2008 presidential campaign, as his progress towards the White Office was viewed by many as relatively cautious and error-free.

3 River through Victoria Falls : ZAMBEZI

The Zambezi is the largest African river flowing into the Indian Ocean, and the fourth-longest river on the continent. The most famous spot along the Zambezi is Victoria Falls.

Victoria Falls is located on the Zambezi River, right on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. The falls were named by Scottish explorer David Livingstone in honor of Queen Victoria of Britain. Victoria Falls isn’t the highest waterfall in the world, nor is it the widest. However, the total “area” of the sheet of falling water is the largest in the world, so it is usually recognized as the largest waterfall on the planet.

4 Krieger of the U.S. women’s soccer team : ALI

Ali Krieger was a member of the 2015 Women’s World Cup-winning US soccer team. Krieger lived for five years in Germany, playing for FFC Frankfurt.

7 Shoots the breeze : NATTERS

To shoot the breeze is to participate in casual inconsequential conversation. The idiom “shoot the breeze” arose in the US in the early- to mid-20th century. The phrase probably evolved from the use of “breeze” as a slang term meaning “rumor”.

8 Liberal arts college in Boston : EMERSON

Emerson College, located in Boston’s Washington Street Theater District, offers degree programs focused on Arts and Communication. The school was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as the Boston Conservatory of Elocution, Oratory and Dramatic Art.

11 Dip for a French dip : JUS

The French term “au jus” is usually translated as “with its own juice”.

12 Youth support group : ALATEEN

Al-Anon and Alateen are fellowships for relatives and friends of alcoholics. Alateen specifically supports teens who are affected by another’s drinking, whereas Al-Anon focuses on people of all ages.

13 Comedian Mitch who said “I haven’t slept for 10 days, because that would be too long” : HEDBERG

Mitch Hedberg was a stand-up comedian from Saint Paul, Minnesota. He made a lot of jokes about his drug use, and in 2003 he was arrested for possession of heroin. He was found dead in a hotel room in 2005, having overdosed on cocaine and heroin.

24 Plants whose name derives from the Greek for “dry” : AZALEAS

Azaleas are very toxic to most animals. If you go to Korea, you might come across “Tug Yonju”, which is azalea wine made from the plant’s blossoms. Azaleas are usually grown as shrubs, but are also seen as small trees, and often indoors.

26 Members of a pantheon : DEITIES

A pantheon is the set of all gods in a particular religion or mythology. The term comes from the Greek “pan” (all) “theon” (of gods). “Pantheon” is also the name given to a temple dedicated to all deities.

28 Two bells, nautically : ONE PM

On board a seagoing vessel, there is a system of watches that defines which specific compliment of the crew is on duty. Most of the watches last for four hours (the exception are the two dog watches that last for two hours each). During each watch, the ship’s bell is sounded every 30 minutes, starting with “one bell” thirty minutes into the watch, and finishing with eight bells that signals the end of the watch.

30 Allegro : BRISK

The tempo (plural “tempi”) of a piece of music is usually designated with an Italian word on the score. For example, “grave” is slow and solemn, “andante” is at a walking pace, “scherzo” is fast and light-hearted, and “allegro” is fast, quickly and bright.

37 ___ Smeal, three-term president of NOW : ELEANOR

The National Organization for Women (NOW) was founded in 1966. The NOW bylaws include a Statement of Purpose:

NOW’s purpose is to take action through intersectional grassroots activism to promote feminist ideals, lead societal change, eliminate discrimination, and achieve and protect the equal rights of all women and girls in all aspects of social, political, and economic life.

38 Polo alternative : IZOD

Jack Izod was a tailor of some repute over in England, producing shirts for King George V as well as other members of the Royal Family. As Izod was about to retire, he was approached for the use of his name by an American clothing manufacturer based in New York. The brand Izod of London was introduced to America in 1938.

René Lacoste was a French tennis player who went into the clothing business, and came up with a more comfortable shirt that players could use. This became known as a “tennis shirt”. When it was adopted for use in the sport of polo, the shirts also became known as “polo shirts”. The “golf shirt” is basically the same thing.

39 “Bravo!” : GOOD JOB!

To express appreciation for a male performer at an operatic performance, traditionally one calls out “bravo!”. Appreciation for a female performer is shown by using “brava!”, and for more than one performer of either sex by using “bravi!”

44 Copies, in a way : XEROXES

A xerox is a copy made on a xerography machine. Xerography is a dry photocopying technique that was invented in 1938 by Chester Carlson, although he originally referred to the process as electrophotography. Joseph Wilson commercialized Carlson’s process some years later, coining the term “Xerography” using the Greek words for “dry” and “writing”. Wilson changed the name of his own photographic company to Xerox.

45 Competitor of Peterson’s and Princeton Review : KAPLAN

Kaplan Inc. was founded in 1938 by Stanley Kaplan, who started out tutoring students for the New York State Regents Exam in the basement of his parents’ home in Brooklyn. He opened up locations for tuition around the country, and in 1984 sold the company to the Washington Post. Revenue for Kaplan was over 2½ billion dollars in 2009.

52 Renaissance Faire quaff : MEAD

Mead is a lovely drink that’s made from fermented honey and water.

A Renaissance faire (Ren faire) is an outdoor public event in which many participants recreate historical settings by dressing in costume. Usually held in North America, many such fairs are set during the English Renaissance, and more particularly during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. The definition of “Renaissance” is often stretched quite a bit, with fairs also set during the reign of Henry VIII, and maybe even during medieval times.

56 1989 one-man show : TRU

“Tru” was written by Jay Presson Allen and is a one-man play about Truman Capote that premiered in 1989. There is a classic anachronism in the piece. It is set in Capote’s New York City apartment at Christmas 1975. At one point the Capote character talks about suicide, saying that he has enough pills to stage his own Jonestown Massacre. The Jonestown Massacre didn’t happen until three years later, in 1978.

58 Devils’ advocate?: Abbr. : NHL

The New Jersey Devils are the professional ice hockey team based in Newark. The club was founded in 1974 in Kansas City, originally as the Mohawks, and then quickly renamed the Scouts. The franchise moved to Denver in 1976, becoming the Colorado Rockies. The move to Newark happened in 1982, when the team was renamed the New Jersey Devils.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Jesus, Mary or Joseph : NAZARENE
9 Some Eastern dignitaries : RAJAHS
15 Occasion for grilling : ORAL EXAM
16 Something worn for protection : AMULET
17 Own : DOMINATE
18 “Philosophy in the Bedroom” writer, 1795 : DE SADE
19 “There’s the ___” : RUB
20 Way to get around in Chicago : EL TRAIN
22 Schedule abbr. : TBA
23 On deck, say : ASEA
25 Scientist who was friends with Mark Twain : TESLA
26 Consider : DEEM
27 Half of Italy : MEZZO
29 Floats are often made with them : ROOT BEERS
31 ___ Games, second-largest multisport event after the Olympics : ASIAN
32 Contemptuous, in a way : SNEERING
33 Welcome offering : LEI
35 Portraitist’s request : SIT
36 [Ho-o-o boy, here we go again …] : [DEEP SIGH]
41 Heat-resistant glass : SILEX
45 Midwest city in the title of a 1942 Glenn Miller #1 hit : KALAMAZOO
46 Margaret ___, artist known for painting subjects with big eyes : KEANE
47 Those in favor : AYES
48 Spoils : BOOTY
50 Word with search or witness : STAR …
51 Open-house org. : PTA
52 Acts like a quidnunc : MEDDLES
54 Kind of rock : EMO
55 Support above a doorway : LINTEL
57 10-year-old boy of comics with glasses and blond hair : JASON FOX
59 Unprincipled : AMORAL
60 Words said with a wave : OVER HERE!
61 Writer who served as a senator in Chile : NERUDA
62 Like wild accusations : BASELESS

Down

1 Rhyming descriptor for Obama : NO-DRAMA
2 Turns on : AROUSES
3 River through Victoria Falls : ZAMBEZI
4 Krieger of the U.S. women’s soccer team : ALI
5 French name meaning “born again” : RENE
6 Apotheosize : EXALT
7 Shoots the breeze : NATTERS
8 Liberal arts college in Boston : EMERSON
9 Sends off : RADIATES
10 Last word of the New Testament : AMEN
11 Dip for a French dip : JUS
12 Youth support group : ALATEEN
13 Comedian Mitch who said “I haven’t slept for 10 days, because that would be too long” : HEDBERG
14 Decreases, in a way? : STEAMS
21 After-shave additive : ALOE
24 Plants whose name derives from the Greek for “dry” : AZALEAS
26 Members of a pantheon : DEITIES
28 Two bells, nautically : ONE PM
30 Allegro : BRISK
34 Actress Rossellini of “Blue Velvet” : ISABELLA
36 When it’s light : DAYTIME
37 ___ Smeal, three-term president of NOW : ELEANOR
38 Polo alternative : IZOD
39 “Bravo!” : GOOD JOB!
40 Flow down a mountain : HOT LAVA
42 Fine example? : LATE FEE
43 Charms : ENAMORS
44 Copies, in a way : XEROXES
45 Competitor of Peterson’s and Princeton Review : KAPLAN
49 Y Y Y Y, on a form : YESES
52 Renaissance Faire quaff : MEAD
53 Cross : SORE
56 1989 one-man show : TRU
58 Devils’ advocate?: Abbr. : NHL

19 thoughts on “1030-20 NY Times Crossword 30 Oct 20, Friday”

  1. 37:16. Struggled with this all the way around, but especially in the NW and SE corners. I stared at the completely blank 42D, 43D, and 44D for about 10 minutes then just started trying a few things to crawl my way out of that and get the jingle.

  2. 12:52 Very smooth sailing until I hit the SE. No idea on 41A, 46A, and 57A and for awhile I thought 54A was looking for an actual rock so I had ore there. I finally went with XEROXES and everything else fell into place.

    1. I also had ORE in and out for a while. Seems like EMO is showing up a lot lately (a crossword musical cousin of ENO??), so have to keep that somewhere in at least mid brain. Once I also put in XEROXES, it fell into place for me as well.

  3. 18:04, no errors. Did it last night before going to bed and got hung up for quite a while in the lower right, where the major problems were that I had confidently entered AMULETS instead of ENAMORS and I didn’t know SILEX or KEANE or (Jason) FOX. Like Marc and Ron, XEROXES finally came to the rescue. For me, a very good (i.e., very puzzling 😜) puzzle.

  4. 34:14. I really struggled with this one as I seem to have all week. I don’t know if it’s me or the puzzles this week. When in doubt, look in the mirror.

    I was absolutely certain of DEITIES (good), but I was equally certain that “Heat-resistant glass” was PYREX (not so good). I figured XEROXES confirmed it. Obviously those two can’t co-exist so I went back and forth as to which was wrong. I thought PIREX might be an alternate spelling I didn’t know about. DEITy.._ _ sounded better. Long long time to get that area right. Didn’t help that I didn’t know Allegro.

    In the end I had to do an alphabet run to get the H in HEDBERG/RAJAHS.

    Tomorrow is Saturday so this streak only gets worse. Yikes.

    Best –

  5. 22:29, no errors. I enjoyed this one. I really like a puzzle that “let’s” me get going, then slows me to a crawl in several sections. A little clue here and there, then I’m off again until the next roadblock. Final word was DESADE. Fitting perhaps?

  6. I’ve never heard of silex or Isabella Rossellini. Wish you’d have explained those two in your post instead of easy ones like “TBA” and “good job”

  7. Well folks, I’ll be the snail at 51:00. Xerox was easy for me, since their factory is in my back yard. Had Pyrex, which fell flat as it lead me to “martyrs” instead of “deities”….then I remembered Proctor-Silex to get the correct replacement. Did a lot of alphabet scrolling to fill in many squares. This has been a tough week, can’t wait to see what Saturday brings….

    1. I had about the same time so let’s say it’s a tie for the snail. The NW corner got me hung up the most. Stared at the grid with nothing (except RUB) until Glenn Miller. Ah! One of my favorites. KALAMAZOO came right on board and I was on the Chattanooga Choo Choo track for the duration. Still a slow ride, though.

  8. 1:12:50 with one error…I had a C for Kaplan and Kalamazoo…just to show you how brilliant I am I had DrRuth for 18A…now I know she’s up there in age but 1795?
    I struggled from top to bottom with this one and then got totally frustrated with my error…sometimes I take things to seriously.
    Stay safe😀

    1. Mezzo translates from Italian as ‘half or medium’. Most familiar with the term mezzo-soprano, which is the voice range between contralto (lower range) and soprano (higher range).

  9. 16:23, no errors. Very slow start, but started to get into the setters head about halfway through. A good Friday time for me.

    For the benefit of those who wanted an explanation for 41A SILEX: “In 1915, a vacuum coffee maker was made from Pyrex, the Corning Glass Work’s newly introduced ovenproof glass, and was marketed under the name “Silex.” The name reportedly derives from the phrase, “Sanitary and Interesting method of making Luscious coffee. It is Easy to operate on account of its being X-ray transparent.” The rights to the design had been acquired in 1909 by two sisters, Mrs. Ann Bridges and Mrs. Sutton, of Salem, Massachusetts who had it manufactured by the Frank E. Wolcott Manufacturing Company. With the availability of heatproof Pyrex glass, the Silex brewers did not suffer the same drawbacks as their French predecessors, and a new era of vacuum brewing was launched. By a fortuitous turn of events, a large number of these Silex brewers were sold to hotels and sandwich shops, providing large-scale exposure for the product. As a result, today the name Silex is almost synonymous with any glass vacuum pot.” Excerpted from an interesting article on coffee makers at https://baharris.org/coffee/History.htm .

  10. @Bill: might want to check a probable typo for 7D: The idiom “shoot the breeze” arose in the US in the early- to mid-10th century.

    Not sure what the correct reference is, but pretty sure US did not exist in the 10th century. I am a long time admirer of your excellent blog.

  11. I didn’t get access to Friday’s blog until this evening; not sure why.
    One of my first entries was PYREX for 41-A figuring it was a no-brainer. I changed it to SILEX, a name I only vaguely recall, as crosses dictated. Luckily, the comic strip “Fox Trot” appears in my Sunday paper so I was able to build from there. No errors, but lived on the edge for a bit.

  12. What a slog for me. DNF. I got pieces but just couldn’t enough of a grip to keep going.. lots of new words for me.. did several lookups and finished it out.. tail between my legs..

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