1114-21 NY Times Crossword 14 Nov 21, Sunday

Constructed by: Aimee Lucido & Ella Dershowitz
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme Heads of State

Themed answers come in pairs, with one element including a synonym of “MIND”, and the other a state of “MATTER”. The MIND synonyms sit OVER the states of MATTER in the grid:

  • 124A Slogan about willpower … or a hint to four pairs of answers in this puzzle : MIND OVER MATTER
  • 23A Forgetfulness experienced by soon-to-be moms, informally : PREGNANCY BRAIN
  • 28A What a baby might start eating at around six months : SOLID FOOD
  • 47A Worldly wisdom : STREET SMARTS
  • 53A Juice cleanse, essentially : LIQUID DIET
  • 65A Common sense : MOTHER WIT
  • 75A Jovian planets, by another name : GAS GIANTS
  • 92A Simple flotation device : POOL NOODLE
  • 97A TV display option : PLASMA SCREEN

Bill’s time: 16m 50s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 Fairy tale monster : OGRE

An ogre is a monster of mythology and folktales that has the appearance of a man, and which eats human beings. The term “ogre” comes to us via French from the name of the Etruscan god Orcus, who feasted on the flesh of humans.

19 Lincoln or Ford : AUTO

Lincoln is a high-end brand belonging to the Ford Motor Company. The Lincoln Motor Company was founded in 1917 by Henry M. Leland, who chose the “Lincoln” name in honor of the celebrated American president. Lincoln was acquired by Ford just five years later, in 1922.

Industrialist Henry Ford was born in Michigan, and was the son of an Irish immigrant from County Cork. Ford’s most famous vehicle was the one that revolutionized the industry: the Model T. Ford’s goal with the Model T was to build a car that was simple to drive, and cheap to purchase and repair. The Model T cost $825 in 1908, which isn’t much over $20,000 in today’s money.

20 Purchase in the board game Catan worth one wood and one brick : ROAD

The Settlers of Catan (now just “Catan”) is a board game that was introduced in 1995, in Germany as “Die Siedler von Catan”. The game is very popular in the US and was called “the board game of our time” by the “Washington Post”. My son plays it a lot, and as a lover of board games, I am going to have to check it out …

21 Singer Guthrie : ARLO

Arlo Guthrie is the son of Woody Guthrie. Both father and son are renowned for singing protest songs about social injustice. Arlo is most famous for his epic “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, a song that lasts a full 18m 34s. In the song Guthrie tells how, after being drafted, he was rejected for service in the Vietnam War based on his criminal record. He had only one incident on his public record, a Thanksgiving Day arrest for littering and being a public nuisance when he was 18-years-old.

22 Genre for Nirvana and Soundgarden : GRUNGE

Grunge is a form of what is called “alternative rock” music. It originated in the state of Washington in the mid-eighties and is also known as the Seattle sound.

Nirvana was a rock band formed in Washington in 1987 by Kurt Cobain and Krist Novoselic. The band effectively disbanded in 1994 after Cobain committed suicide.

26 Final innings, usually : NINTHS

That would be baseball.

27 Heinie : PATOOTIE

Back in the 1920s, the term “patootie” was used for a sweetheart, a very pretty girl. Somehow, the term has evolved into slang for the posterior, rear end.

The slang term “heinie”, meaning “rear end”, is probably a contraction of “hind end”.

30 Universal donor’s blood type, informally : O-NEG

In general, a person with type O-negative blood is a universal donor, meaning that his or her blood can be used for transfusion into persons with any other blood type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive (although there are other considerations). Also in general, a person with type AB-positive blood is a universal recipient, meaning that he or she can receive a transfusion of blood of any type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive.

31 A, in Aachen : EIN

Aachen is a city in the very west of Germany, right on the border with Belgium and the Netherlands. In English, we quite often refer to this city by its French name, Aix-la-Chapelle.

32 “Dancing With ___ Hands Tied” (Taylor Swift song) : OUR

Singer Taylor Swift had one of her first gigs at the US Open tennis tournament when she was in her early teens. There she sang the national anthem and received a lot of favorable attention for the performance.

37 Scented plug-in brand : GLADE

Glade is a brand of air fresheners that was introduced in 1956.

46 Response to a texted joke : LOL

Laugh out loud (LOL)

49 Deg. for a creative type : MFA

Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

55 Cocktail made from gin, vermouth and Campari : NEGRONI

The Negroni is a lovely cocktail, one that hails from Italy. A classic recipe calls for equal parts gin, sweet vermouth and Campari. According to legend, the drink was first made by bartender Forsco Scarselli at the request of Count Camillo Negroni, hence the name. The count wanted a stronger version of an Americano, and so Scarselli dropped the Americano’s soda water and replaced it with gin!

56 Big letters in home security : ADT

ADT is a home and small-business security company based in Boca Raton, Florida. The company was founded back in 1874 by Edward Calahan. Calahan invented the stock ticker several years earlier, and ran the Gold and Stock Telegraph Company. Calahan was awoken one morning by the sound of a burglar in his house, and so he decided to develop a telegraph-based security alarm system. The success of the system led to the founding of American District Telegraph, later known as ADT.

59 In Latin, it’s “stannum” : TIN

The Latin word for tin is “stannum”, and so tin’s atomic symbol is “Sn”. One of the ores used as a source of tin is “stannite”.

60 Pound part : OUNCE

Our term “ounce” comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a “libra”, the Roman “pound”. “Uncia” is also the derivation of our word “inch”, 1/12 of a foot.

61 Church council : SYNOD

The word “synod” comes from the Greek word for “assembly, meeting”. A synod is a church council, usually one in the Christian faith.

68 The “gone girl” in “Gone Girl” : AMY

“Gone Girl” is a thriller novel written by Gillian Flynn that was first published in 2012. The story tells of a man whose wife has disappeared, with the reader not being certain if the husband is involved in the disappearance. The book was adapted into a movie of the same name released in 2014, starring Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike.

75 Jovian planets, by another name : GAS GIANTS

The eight planets of our solar system can be sorted into two categories. Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars are “terrestrials” as they are largely composed of rock. Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are “gas giants”, as they are largely composed of gaseous material. Uranus and Neptune can be called “ice giants”, a subcategory of gas giants. Ice giants have a lower mass than other gas giants, with very little hydrogen and helium in their atmospheres and a higher proportion of rock and ice.

81 Figure in the iconic “We Can Do It!” poster : ROSIE

Rosie the Riveter is a cultural icon who represented women working in factories across the country during WWII as part of the war effort. The term “Rosie the Riveter” first appeared as the title of a 1942 song that was a national hit. The image that we bring to mind today that supposedly depicts “Rosie” is a wartime poster with the words “We Can Do It!”, which shows a woman in blue overalls and a red and white polka-dot headscarf. However, this image was used by Westinghouse as an internal motivation tool only for a two-week period in 1943, and was never associated with the Rosie the Riveter persona. The “Rosie” association to that image came decades later, in the 1980s. The best-known WWII representation of Rosie the Riveter was a “Saturday Evening Post” cover drawn by Norman Rockwell in 1943. This image shows a female worker with a rivet gun, and a lunch box bearing the name “Rosie”.

89 Suffix with quack and mock : -ERY

A quack is a person who pretends to have knowledge that he or she does not in fact possess. The term especially applies to someone fraudulently pretending to have medical skills. Our modern word is an abbreviation of “quacksalver”, an archaic term with Dutch roots that translates as “hawker of salve”, Back in the Middle Ages, quacksalvers would shout out (quack) as they sold their pseudo-medical wares.

90 National law enforcement, informally : THE FEDS

A fed is an officer of a US federal agency, although the term “fed” usually applies to an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

92 Simple flotation device : POOL NOODLE

Pool noodles are foam flotation devices and swim-toys much-loved by kids.

96 URL ending : EDU

The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

97 TV display option : PLASMA SCREEN

Plasma televisions are so called because the screen is made up of tiny cells containing electrically charged ionized gases (plasmas). Each of the cells is effectively a tiny fluorescent lamp.

101 ___ tai : MAI

The mai tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic’s restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum. “Maita’i” is the Tahitian word for “good”.

107 Theoretical primordial substance : YLEM

Back in the 1940s, cosmologists George Gamow and Ralph Alpher used the term “ylem” to describe the primordial plasma that was presumed to exist right after the Big Bang.

108 Word on an Irish plane : AER

Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn’t that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with “Aer Lingus” being a phonetic spelling of the Irish “aer-loingeas” meaning “air fleet”. These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland’s oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline Ryanair.

110 Oscar-winning director Lee : ANG

Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as “Sense & Sensibility” (my personal favorite), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, “Hulk”, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi”.

111 Obama’s birthplace : OAHU

Despite rumors to the contrary, Barack Hussein Obama II was indeed born in Hawaii. Future US President Obama was born on August 4, 1961 at Kapi’olani Maternity & Gynecological Hospital in Honolulu.

113 Playing to the crowd : PANDERING

To pander is to cater to the lower desires of someone, perhaps to exploit a weakness. The verb comes from the noun “pander”, which was basically a pimp, someone who arranged sexual liaisons. The term ultimately derives from a Trojan aristocrat named Pandarus who appears in Homer’s “Iliad”. In medieval literature, Pandarus was portrayed as a bawdy figure who helped Prince Troilus have an affair with young Cressida.

127 “Something From Nothing: The Art of Rap” director : ICE-T

Rapper Ice-T must be tired of having his name come up as an answer in crossword puzzles (I know I am!). Born Tracy Marrow, Ice-T has been interested in acting for decades and made his film debut in the 1984 movie about breakdancing called “Breakin’”. He has also played Detective Fin Tutuola in the TV show “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” since the year 2000.

128 Aptly named bus driver on “The Simpsons” : OTTO

Otto Mann drives the school bus on the TV show “The Simpsons”. Otto is a Germanic character voiced by Harry Shearer, and his name is a play on “Ottoman Empire”. Whenever Bart sees him, he greets Otto with the words “Otto, man!”

131 Unilever tea brand : TAZO

The Tazo Tea Company was founded in 1994 in Portland, Oregon. Tazo was purchased in 1999 by Starbucks, and then by Unilever in 2017.

132 Bert who played the Cowardly Lion : LAHR

Bert Lahr’s most famous role was the cowardly lion in “The Wizard of Oz”. Lahr had a long career in burlesque, vaudeville and on Broadway. Lahr also starred in the first US production of Samuel Beckett’s play “Waiting for Godot”, alongside Tom Ewell.

133 Children’s author DiCamillo with two Newbery Medals : KATE

The Newbery is an annual award given by the Association for Library Service to Children for “distinguished contributions to American literature for children”. The award was inaugurated in 1922, and was named for John Newbery, an English 18th-century publisher of books for juveniles and children. Newbery is sometimes referred to as “the Father of Children’s Literature”.

Down

1 Nordic native : LAPP

Lapland is a geographic region in northern Scandinavia, largely found within the Arctic Circle. Parts of Lapland are in Norway, Sweden and Finland. The people who are native to the region are called the Sami people. The Sami don’t like to be referred to as “Lapps” and they regard the term as insulting.

Someone is described as Nordic if he or she is a native of Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland or Iceland.

2 Invisible energy field : AURA

An aura (plural “aurae”) is an intangible quality that surrounds a person or thing, a “je ne sais quoi”. “Je ne sais quoi” is French for “I don’t know what”.

3 Proofreader’s directive : STET

“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

8 Ice cream surname : EDY

Dreyer’s ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyer’s in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dreyer and Joseph Edy.

9 British nobleman : BARONET

The British title of baronet has been awarded since the 14th century. The present-day hereditary baronets date back to 1611 when James I basically sold the title, awarding it to gentlemen of good birth who were willing to pay for the upkeep of thirty soldiers for three years.

12 Sonata movement : RONDO

A rondo was often chosen by composers in the classical period for the last movement of a sonata (or symphony or concerto, for that matter). In rondo form there is a principal theme that alternates with a contrasting theme(s). So, the original theme anchors the whole piece in between secondary digressions.

A cantata is a piece of music that is sung, as opposed to a sonata, which is a piece that is played on some instrument, often a piano. A sonatina is in effect a sonata that has been labelled as something lighter and shorter.

14 The Jonas Brothers, e.g. : TRIO

A young neighbor of mine went to see the Jonas Brothers in concert not so long ago. She came home swooning …

15 Dish named for a day of the week : SUNDAE

There’s a lot of speculation about how the dessert called a sundae got its name, but there seems to be agreement that it is an alteration of the word “Sunday”.

16 Toronto’s prov. : ONT

Beautiful Toronto, Ontario is the largest city in Canada, and the fourth most populous city in North America (after Mexico City, New York and Los Angeles).

25 Queen’s “We Will Rock You,” e.g. : B-SIDE

Queen is an English rock band that formed back in 1970. With the help of lead singer Freddie Mercury (now deceased), Queen has a long list of great hits, including “Bohemian Rhapsody”, “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions”. “Bohemian Rhapsody” spent a total of nine weeks at number one in the UK. “Bohemian Rhapsody” is also the title of an outstanding 2018 biographical film about the band.

41 URL ending : ORG

An Internet address (like NYXCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) is more correctly called a uniform resource locator (URL).

42 Alternative to fiber or satellite : DSL

The initialism “DSL” originally stood for Digital Subscriber Loop, but is now accepted to mean (Asymmetric) Digital Subscriber Line. It is a technology that allows Internet service to be delivered down the same telephone line as voice service, by separating the two into different frequency signals.

45 Early PC software : MS-DOS

MS-DOS (short for “Microsoft Disk Operating System”) was the main operating system used by IBM-compatible PCs in the eighties and for much of the nineties.

47 Planting more than one kind of seed in a field, per Deuteronomy : SIN

Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible. The English title “Deuteronomy” comes from a Greek word that translates as “second law”.

48 Pollution stat : AQI

The air quality index (AQI) is monitored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

51 Historical subject of Hilary Mantel’s 2009 novel “Wolf Hall” : CROMWELL

Thomas Cromwell was the 1st Earl of Essex, and a trusted advisor of King Henry VIII of England. Cromwell very much drove the English Reformation, the break with the Catholic Church in Rome. He was also the man who arranged for the annulment of Henry’s first marriage so that the king could marry Anne Boleyn. But, like so many of those close to Henry VIII, Cromwell fell out of favor and was executed. Cromwell’s “crime” was that he arranged Henry’s fourth marriage, to Anne of Cleves, and this turned out to be a terrible match.

56 Home of Guinea and Guinea-Bissau: Abbr. : AFR

The Carthaginian Republic was centered on the city of Carthage, the ruins of which are located on the coast of modern-day Tunisia. The Latin name for the people of Carthage was “Afri”. When the Romans took over Carthage, they created a province they called “Africa”. That name extended over time to include the whole continent.

Guinea lies north of Liberia on the west African coast. Like much of Africa, it was for many years a French Colony (as “French Guinea”). Guinea declared independence in 1958, but has suffered from autocratic rule since then, and is now one of the poorest countries in Africa.

The Republic of Guinea-Bissau is in West Africa, bordered by the countries of Senegal and Guinea. The country was a Portuguese colony for centuries under the name Portuguese Guinea. When independence was granted in 1974, the name Guinea-Bissau was chosen for the new country, as Bissau is the nation’s capital. The double-barrelled name helps to prevent confusion with the neighboring Republic of Guinea.

57 “Yo ___” (internet meme with rapper Xzibit) : DAWG

Xzibit is the stage name of rapper Alvin Joiner from Detroit. Xzibit is the host of the show “Pimp My Ride”, which airs on MTV. The show covers the restoration of cars in poor condition.

58 Prioritization process : TRIAGE

Triage is the process of prioritizing patients for treatment, especially on the battlefield. The term “triage” is French and means “sorting”.

64 Author Rand : AYN

Ayn Rand was a Russian-American novelist born “Alisa Rosenbaum”. Her two best known works are her novels “The Fountainhead” published in 1943 and “Atlas Shrugged” from 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, “Atlas Shrugged”. This group called itself “The Collective”, and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan. Rand described herself as “right-wing” politically, and both she and her novel “Atlas Shrugged” have become inspirations for the American conservatives, and the Tea Party in particular.

67 Title that comes from “Caesar” : TSAR

The term “czar” (also “tsar”) is a Slavic word that was first used as a title by Simeon I of Bulgaria in 913 AD. “Czar” is derived from the word “caesar”, which was synonymous with “emperor” at that time. We tend to use the “czar” spelling, as opposed to “tsar”, when we describe a person today with great power or authority, e.g. “Drug Czar”.

69 Day celebrated by “Star Wars” fans : MAY THE FOURTH

The Force is a metaphysical power much cited in all of the “Star Wars” movies. We may even hear someone in real life say “May the Force be with you”. Fans of the movie franchise even celebrate May 4th every year as Star Wars Day, using the pun “May the 4th be with you”!

71 Curtains : DRAPERY

When I was growing up on the other side of the pond, a drapery was a shop where one could buy cloth for making clothes or curtains. It was only when I came to America that I heard the term “drapes” used for curtains.

77 Like bacon and lobster, in Jewish law : TREF

According to Jewish dietary laws, kosher food is fit to eat, and food that is not fit to eat is referred to as treif (or “tref”). The usage of “kosher” has extended to include anything considered legitimate.

79 Prime-time slot : TEN PM

In the world of television, prime time is that part of the day when networks and advertisers maximize revenues due to the high number of viewers. Prime time is often defined as 7-10 p.m. Mountain and Central Time, and 8-11 p.m. Pacific and Eastern Time.

82 Home of the National Voting Rights Museum : SELMA

The Bloody Sunday march took place between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama on 7 March 1965. The 600 marchers involved were protesting the intimidation of African-Americans registering to vote. When the marchers reached Dallas County, Alabama they encountered a line of state troopers reinforced by white males who had been deputized that morning to help keep the peace. Violence broke out with 17 marchers ending up in hospital, one nearly dying. Because the disturbance was widely covered by television cameras, the civil rights movement picked up a lot of support that day. The route of the march is memorialized as a US National Historic Trail called the Selma to Montgomery Voting Rights Trail.

84 Nail polish brand : ESSIE

Essie Cosmetics is a company that was founded by Essie Weingarten, and which is now owned by L’Oreal. Apparently, Queen Elizabeth II will only wear Essie’s Ballet Slippers color nail polish. Well, that’s what Wikipedia claims …

86 Like some nachos and questions : LOADED

The dish known as “nachos” was supposedly created by the maître d’ at a restaurant called the Victory Club in the city of Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico. The name of the maître d’ was Ignacio “Nacho” Anaya.

87 “Real” ones were first issued in the 2010s : IDS

What Americans know today as “Real IDs” are the result of the Real ID Act of 2005. One of the most visible results of the law are state-issued drivers’ licenses that meet new minimum security standards set by the federal government.

88 Muppet who hosts the “Not-Too-Late Show” : ELMO

The “Sesame Street” character named Elmo has a birthday every February 3rd, and on that birthday he always turns 3½ years old. The man behind/under Elmo on “Sesame Street” for many years was Kevin Clash. If you want to learn more about Elmo and Clash, you can watch the 2011 documentary “Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey”.

91 Fifth-century invader : HUN

The Huns were a nomadic people who originated in Eastern Europe in the 4th century. Under the command of Attila the Hun they developed a unified empire that stretched from modern-day Germany across to the steppes of Central Asia. The whole of the Hunnic Empire collapsed within a year of Attila’s death in 453 AD.

93 Poisonous shrub : OLEANDER

The oleander shrub or tree is extremely toxic, especially to humans and dogs. That said, rodents and birds seem to be relatively insensitive to the toxic compounds found in the plant.

94 Suffix with Euclid : -EAN

Euclid of Alexandria was a Greek mathematician who lived in the first millennium, often referred to as the “Father of Geometry”. He wrote a famous book called “Elements” on the subject of mathematics, and the title was so enduring that it was used as the main textbook for the subject right up to the late 19th century.

95 Metric for online traffic, in brief : SEO

Search engine optimization (SEO)

99 The “C” of D.R.C. : CONGO

The African nation once called Zaire is a neighbor of Rwanda. The genocide and war in Rwanda spilled over into Zaire in 1996, with the conflict escalating into what is now called the First Congo War. As part of the war’s fallout there was a regime change, and in 1997 Zaire became the Democratic Republic of Congo.

100 World of Warcraft, e.g., for short : RPG

Role-playing game (RPG)

World of Warcraft is an online role-playing game (RPG). My son informs me that the game is not that great. Like I would know …

103 One who’s at home on the job? : UMPIRE

Back in the 15th century, “an umpire” was referred to as “a noumpere”, which was misheard and hence causing the dropping of the initial letter N. The term “noumpere” came from Old French “nonper” meaning “not even, odd number”. The idea was that the original umpire was a third person called on to arbitrate between two, providing that “odd number” needed to decide the dispute.

105 Branch of Islam : SHIA

The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favored the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

114 Actress Taylor-Joy of “The Queen’s Gambit” : ANYA

Actress Anya Taylor-Joy had quite the international upbringing. She was born in Miami, and raised in Buenos Aires and then London. She is perhaps best known for playing the title character in the 2020 film adaptation of Jane Austen’s “Emma”, and the lead role in the Netflix miniseries “The Queen’s Gambit”.

115 Costa ___ : RICA

Costa Rica is a country in Central America that is bordered by Nicaragua to the north and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the “greenest” country in the world, the “happiest” country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

116 Mother of Don Juan : INEZ

Lord Byron wrote the poem “Don Juan” based on the legend of Don Juan the libertine. For the poem, Byron created the character Donna Inez, Don Juan’s mother. Supposedly Inez was based on Byron’s own wife, Annabella Milbanke.

117 Cheese on a meze platter : FETA

Meze is a platter of small dishes served as appetizers in several Mediterranean locales.

118 Gillette razor : ATRA

Fortunately for crossword constructors, the Atra was introduced by Gillette in 1977, as the first razor with a pivoting head. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

119 Daily Planet reporter : KENT

The “Daily Planet” is the fictional newspaper for which Clark Kent and Lois Lane work in the “Superman” universe. Clark and Lois’ editor-in-chief is Perry White.

120 Gaelic tongue : ERSE

A Gael is anyone of a race that speaks or spoke one of the Erse tongues. There are actually three Erse languages. Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be “Gaeilge” (in Ireland), “Gaelg” (on the Isle of Man) and “Gaidhlig” (in Scotland).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Miss : LASS
5 Fairy tale monster : OGRE
9 Meat in ragù al cinghiale : BOAR
13 “Everyone knows the secret now” : IT’S OUT
19 Lincoln or Ford : AUTO
20 Purchase in the board game Catan worth one wood and one brick : ROAD
21 Singer Guthrie : ARLO
22 Genre for Nirvana and Soundgarden : GRUNGE
23 Forgetfulness experienced by soon-to-be moms, informally : PREGNANCY BRAIN
26 Final innings, usually : NINTHS
27 Heinie : PATOOTIE
28 What a baby might start eating at around six months : SOLID FOOD
30 Universal donor’s blood type, informally : O-NEG
31 A, in Aachen : EIN
32 “Dancing With ___ Hands Tied” (Taylor Swift song) : OUR
33 What well-connected people may have : AN IN
37 Scented plug-in brand : GLADE
40 “Afternoon, pardner!” : HOW-DE-DO!
44 “Oh yeah? Give me an example!” : NAME ONE!
46 Response to a texted joke : LOL
47 Worldly wisdom : STREET SMARTS
49 Deg. for a creative type : MFA
50 Booting : EVICTING
53 Juice cleanse, essentially : LIQUID DIET
55 Cocktail made from gin, vermouth and Campari : NEGRONI
56 Big letters in home security : ADT
59 In Latin, it’s “stannum” : TIN
60 Pound part : OUNCE
61 Church council : SYNOD
62 Succeed in life : GO FAR
64 Portfolio listings : ASSETS
65 Common sense : MOTHER WIT
68 The “gone girl” in “Gone Girl” : AMY
70 A negative one might be positive : TEST
71 Used colored pencils, say : DREW
74 “___ be a real shame …” : IT’D
75 Jovian planets, by another name : GAS GIANTS
78 Changes back to factory defaults, say : RESETS
80 Way too loud : GAUDY
81 Figure in the iconic “We Can Do It!” poster : ROSIE
85 Quite enough : AMPLE
86 Bit of fiction : LIE
89 Suffix with quack and mock : -ERY
90 National law enforcement, informally : THE FEDS
92 Simple flotation device : POOL NOODLE
95 Arranges in random order : SHUFFLES
96 URL ending : EDU
97 TV display option : PLASMA SCREEN
101 ___ tai : MAI
102 Picked up : RESUMED
104 Above : ON TOP OF
105 Like the bread ideal for bread pudding : STALE
107 Theoretical primordial substance : YLEM
108 Word on an Irish plane : AER
110 Oscar-winning director Lee : ANG
111 Obama’s birthplace : OAHU
113 Playing to the crowd : PANDERING
117 Japanese condiment sprinkled on rice : FURIKAKE
121 Go back to the start, in a way : REWIND
124 Slogan about willpower … or a hint to four pairs of answers in this puzzle : MIND OVER MATTER
126 Courtroom cry : HEAR YE!
127 “Something From Nothing: The Art of Rap” director : ICE-T
128 Aptly named bus driver on “The Simpsons” : OTTO
129 Catering vessels : URNS
130 “Whatever you say, sweetheart” : OK, DEAR
131 Unilever tea brand : TAZO
132 Bert who played the Cowardly Lion : LAHR
133 Children’s author DiCamillo with two Newbery Medals : KATE

Down

1 Nordic native : LAPP
2 Invisible energy field : AURA
3 Proofreader’s directive : STET
4 Words moaned while eating a cheeseburger, maybe : SO GOOD
5 Give one’s address : ORATE
6 Get ready to sleep, cutesily : GO NIGHT-NIGHT
7 Candidate’s focus : RACE
8 Ice cream surname : EDY
9 British nobleman : BARONET
10 Like some traditions : ORAL
11 Et ___ (and others) : ALII
12 Sonata movement : RONDO
13 The uninformed masses, colloquially : IGNORATI
14 The Jonas Brothers, e.g. : TRIO
15 Dish named for a day of the week : SUNDAE
16 Toronto’s prov. : ONT
17 “What a mess!” : UGH!
18 Your: Fr. : TES
24 Bar ___ : NONE
25 Queen’s “We Will Rock You,” e.g. : B-SIDE
29 2K, for one : FUN RUN
31 Sheep : EWE
34 Award hopeful : NOMINEE
35 Passes along to, in a way : INFECTS
36 Like the winner of a handwriting contest : NEATEST
37 Narrow valleys : GLENS
38 Very affectionate : LOVEY
39 Get on the same page, in corporate-speak : ALIGN
41 URL ending : ORG
42 Alternative to fiber or satellite : DSL
43 Leave off : OMIT
45 Early PC software : MS-DOS
47 Planting more than one kind of seed in a field, per Deuteronomy : SIN
48 Pollution stat : AQI
51 Historical subject of Hilary Mantel’s 2009 novel “Wolf Hall” : CROMWELL
52 Action item : TO-DO
54 Brings back to use : DUSTS OFF
56 Home of Guinea and Guinea-Bissau: Abbr. : AFR
57 “Yo ___” (internet meme with rapper Xzibit) : DAWG
58 Prioritization process : TRIAGE
63 It added “essential worker” in March of 2021: Abbr. : OED
64 Author Rand : AYN
66 Quaint contraction : ‘TIS
67 Title that comes from “Caesar” : TSAR
68 Assist : AID
69 Day celebrated by “Star Wars” fans : MAY THE FOURTH
71 Curtains : DRAPERY
72 Interior design job : REMODEL
73 Support, as a belief : ESPOUSE
76 Fellow : GUY
77 Like bacon and lobster, in Jewish law : TREF
79 Prime-time slot : TEN PM
82 Home of the National Voting Rights Museum : SELMA
83 Perfect : IDEAL
84 Nail polish brand : ESSIE
86 Like some nachos and questions : LOADED
87 “Real” ones were first issued in the 2010s : IDS
88 Muppet who hosts the “Not-Too-Late Show” : ELMO
91 Fifth-century invader : HUN
93 Poisonous shrub : OLEANDER
94 Suffix with Euclid : -EAN
95 Metric for online traffic, in brief : SEO
98 Get ready for action : STAND TO
99 The “C” of D.R.C. : CONGO
100 World of Warcraft, e.g., for short : RPG
103 One who’s at home on the job? : UMPIRE
105 Branch of Islam : SHIA
106 Thai taxi with a repetitive name : TUK-TUK
109 Send, as payment : REMIT
112 Mail, e.g. : ARMOR
114 Actress Taylor-Joy of “The Queen’s Gambit” : ANYA
115 Costa ___ : RICA
116 Mother of Don Juan : INEZ
117 Cheese on a meze platter : FETA
118 Gillette razor : ATRA
119 Daily Planet reporter : KENT
120 Gaelic tongue : ERSE
121 Sorority letter : RHO
122 “Yikes!” : EEK!
123 Pile of cash : WAD
125 TV button: Abbr. : VOL

9 thoughts on “1114-21 NY Times Crossword 14 Nov 21, Sunday”

  1. 24:19, no errors. Totally neglected to check out the theme after I finished the puzzle last night, but enjoyed it this morning.

  2. 20:42. Zipped through this one but had no idea as to the theme until I had finished.

    I assumed the CROMWELL in 51D was Oliver. Never knew about Thomas CROMWELL. Turns out they are related but are distant relatives.

    Interesting evolution of the word “pandering”.

    Can you even buy PLASMA screens anymore?

    Best –

  3. 41:43 after just inserting letters until hitting “k” on “tuktuk”. Had to read the theme discussion twice before I realized where it was going

  4. This puzzle is one of the more unsatisfying ones. The pairs don’t make much sense, e.g. 65 A Wit and 75A Gas. Only 23A and 28A make sense, Brain and Gas.

  5. Holy cow what an array of “what the .. what the .. whattawhatta??”
    I’m shocked I had only 1/2 errors. 131A TALO vs TAZO..

    Totally ignored the theme. Was of no use. With words like NEGRONI IGNORATI YLEM TAZO TUTTUT I didn’t have time to look for any theme.
    Never heard of PREGNANCY BRAIN or MOTHER WIT

    HOWDEDO?

    once you give in to the writers mindset, it flows much easier.

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