1018-20 NY Times Crossword 18 Oct 20, Sunday

Constructed by: Miriam Estrin
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Title Basin’

Themed answers are fictional book TITLES BASED on, and sounding like, real titles:

  • 23A Yann Martel’s baking memoir? : LIFE OF PIE (“Life of Pi”)
  • 30A F. Scott Fitzgerald’s chivalric tale? : TENDER IS THE KNIGHT (“Tender is the Night”)
  • 46A Voltaire’s sweet novel? : CANDIED (“Candide”)
  • 63A Marcel Proust’s kitchen mystery? : IN SEARCH OF LOST THYME (“In Search of Lost Time”)
  • 90A Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s pet story? : THE LITTLE PRINTS (“The Little Prince”)
  • 112A William Shakespeare’s historical romance? : JULIUS SEES HER (“Julius Caesar”)

Bill’s time: 13m 03s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Dinosaur in the Mario games : YOSHI

Yoshi is a dinosaur-like character in some Nintendo video games. Yoshi first appeared as a sidekick to Mario and Luigi in the 1991 game called “Super Mario World”.

6 Titular film character opposite Harold : MAUDE

“Harold and Maude” is a somewhat dark comedy film released in 1971. I found the storyline to be quite bizarre when I saw it many years ago, with a death-obsessed young man taken to driving a hearse as his private vehicle. The young man makes friends with a 79-year-old woman who, like him, is in the habit of attending the funerals of people she never knew. It’s not my cup of tea, quite frankly …

11 Something offered in tribute : TOAST

The tradition of toasting someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

16 ___ Martin DB5 (“Bondmobile”) : ASTON

Aston Martin is a British car manufacturer founded in 1913 by Lionel Martin. The Aston part of the company name comes from Aston Hill, a famous site for hill-climbing cars that is nearby the original factory. Aston Martin cars are much loved by the British entertainment industry. James Bond was given one in “Goldfinger”, and Michael Caine drove one in the 1969 version of “The Italian Job”. Also, Roger Moore’s character drove a yellow Aston Martin in the seventies television show “The Persuaders!”.

22 Barack, Michelle, Hillary and Bill took them, for short : LSATS

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

23 Yann Martel’s baking memoir? : LIFE OF PIE (“Life of Pi”)

The 2012 movie “Life of Pi” is based on a 2001 novel of the same name by Yann Martel. The “Pi” in the title is an Indian boy named Pi Patel who finds himself adrift for 227 days in a small boat with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

25 Member of Britain’s upper house : LORD

The UK Parliament is divided into two houses, with the upper house known as the House of Lords and the lower house as the House of Commons. The members of the House of Commons are elected, but most new members of the House of Lords are appointed. Historically, a large proportion of the membership of the upper house were hereditary peers, but recent legislative changes are reducing the numbers who can sit in the House of Lords by virtue of birthright.

30 F. Scott Fitzgerald’s chivalric tale? : TENDER IS THE KNIGHT (“Tender is the Night”)

“Tender Is the Night” is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald that was adapted into a 1962 film starring Jennifer Jones, Jason Robards and Joan Fontaine.

43 Follower of “Je m’appelle” : NOM

In French, “Je m’appelle …” translates literally as “I am called …”, or perhaps more smoothly as “My name is …”

46 Voltaire’s sweet novel? : CANDIED (“Candide”)

“Candide, ou l’Optimisme” is a 1759 satirical novella by the French philosopher Voltaire. “Candide” was adapted into an operetta with music by American composer Leonard Bernstein.

50 Scan that excites hydrogen atoms, for short : MRI

An MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) machine uses powerful magnetic fields to generate images that can be used by medical professionals to diagnose injury and disease.

54 Alternative to de Gaulle : ORLY

Orly is a town on the outskirts of Paris, to the south of the city. It is home to the Paris-Orly Airport, the second busiest international airport for the city after the more recently built Charles de Gaulle Airport. That said, Orly is home to more domestic flights than Charles de Gaulle.

55 Debussy’s “___ d’Étoiles” : NUIT

Claude Debussy is one of my favorite composers, and someone who epitomises the Romantic Era and Impressionist Movement in music. One of my favorite CDs is a collection of some “lighter” Debussy pieces called “Debussy for Daydreaming”, and what an evocative collection it is. Included are “Syrinx”, “Maid with the Flaxen Hair”, “Rêverie” and everyone’s favorite, “Clair de Lune”.

63 Marcel Proust’s kitchen mystery? : IN SEARCH OF LOST THYME (“In Search of Lost Time”)

Marcel Proust was a French writer famous for the enormous and much respected novel “In Search of Lost Time”. Graham Greene called Proust “the greatest novelist of the twentieth century”, and W. Somerset Maugham dubbed “In Search of Lost Time” as the “greatest fiction to date”. “In Search of Lost Time” is a very, very long novel. It is divided into seven volumes and was first published in 1913-1927. The first of the volumes is called “Swann’s Way”.

72 “That’s ___!” (director’s cry) : A WRAP

When shooting of a film is concluded the movie is said to wrap, and everyone heads to the wrap party. There is one story that “wrap” is actually an acronym for “wind, reel and print”, a reference to the transition of the filming process into post-production. But, this explanation is disputed.

73 Halloween vis-à-vis November 1 : EVE

All Saints’ Day is November 1st each year. The day before All Saints’ Day is All Hallows’ Eve, better known by the Scottish term “Halloween”.

76 One of six parked on the moon : ROVER

Three countries have sent lunar rovers to the Moon. Famously, the Apollo Lunar Roving Vehicle (aka “moon buggy”) carried American astronauts across the Moon’s surface on the last three missions of the Apollo program in the early seventies. Before the landing of the Apollo vehicles, the Soviet Union sent two unmanned, remote-controlled rovers to the Moon called Lunokhod 1 & 2. Years later, in 2013, the Chinese landed a lunar rover called Yutu (or “Jade Rabbit”).

79 Author Ferrante : ELENA

Elena Ferrante is an Italian author, best known for her 4-part series known as the “Neapolitan Novels”. What is very interesting about “Ferrante” is that the moniker is a pseudonym, and no one seems to know the author’s real name. There is some speculation that “Elena” is in fact a man.

86 “When They See Us” director DuVernay : AVA

Ava DuVernay is a filmmaker who became the first African-American woman to win the Best Director Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, a feat she achieved in 2012 for her feature film “Middle of Nowhere”. “Middle of Nowhere” tells the story of a woman who drops out of medical school to focus on her husband when he is sentenced to 8 years in prison. DuVernay also directed the 2014 film “Selma” about the 1965 voting rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

89 Big e-commerce site : ETSY

Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

90 Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s pet story? : THE LITTLE PRINTS (“The Little Prince”)

“Le Petit Prince” is a celebrated French novella written by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry and first published in 1943. “Le Petit Prince” (The Little Prince) is the most read book in France, and the book most translated from French. The philosophical tale recounts the story of a stranded pilot meeting a young prince who falls to Earth from an asteroid. Saint-Exupéry was himself a pioneering aviator. He wrote “Le Petit France” while living in exile in the US due to the German occupation of France during WWII.

100 Semibiographical source for “Citizen Kane” : HEARST

William Randolph Hearst got into publishing when he took over “The San Francisco Examiner” from his father George Hearst. Beyond his work in the newspaper business, William Randolph Hearst was also a politician and represented a district of New York in the US House. His life was the inspiration for the lead role in the 1941 movie “Citizen Kane” with Orson Welles playing the Hearst-like character. If you’re ever driving along the coast between Los Angeles and San Francisco, I’d recommend a stop at Hearst Castle, William Randolph’s magnificent estate located near San Simeon.

101 Small trunks : SPEEDOS

Speedo brand swimwear was first produced in Australia in 1928, by a hosiery company that wanted to diversify. The brand name was chosen after a slogan competition among employees was won by “Speed on in your Speedos”. It was a long time ago, I guess …

105 Certain red wine : SHIRAZ

The Iranian city of Shiraz has long been associated with wine, but there is no proven link between the city and the wine/grape we know today as “Shiraz” (also called “Syrah”). Having said that, some clay jars were found just outside of the city of Shiraz that contained wine; wine that was 7,000 years old!

110 “___ is a wonderful thing if one does not have to earn one’s living at it”: Einstein : SCIENCE

After Albert Einstein moved to the US in 1933, he became quite a celebrity and his face was readily recognizable. Einstein was frequently stopped in the street by people who would naively ask him if he could explain what “that theory” (i.e. the theory of relativity) was all about. Growing tired of this, he finally learned to tell people that he was sorry, but folks were constantly mistaking him for Albert Einstein!

111 “Revenge ___ dish …” : IS A

The proverb “revenge is a dish best served cold” appears in literature in various forms, dating back at least to the 1841 novel “Mathilde” by Marie Joseph Eugène Sue.

112 William Shakespeare’s historical romance? : JULIUS SEES HER (“Julius Caesar”)

William Shakespeare’s play “Julius Caesar” is a little unusual, in that Julius Caesar is not the main character. The protagonist is actually Marcus Brutus, who plays a major role in Caesar’s assassination.

117 Classical singing venue : ODEON

In ancient Greece an odeon (also “odeum”) was like a small theater, with “odeon” literally meaning a “building for musical competition”. Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

119 Call to reserve? : LET

That would be tennis, a call to reserve, a call to serve again.

120 The final installment of “The Godfather” : III

“The Godfather” series of films is based on “The Godfather” novel by Mario Puzo, first published in 1969. Francis Ford Coppola worked with Puzo in partnership to adapt his novel into the screenplay for the first film, and to write the screenplays for the two sequels. Coppola holds that there are really only two films in “The Godfather” series, with “The Godfather Part III” actually being the epilogue.

122 Sierra Nevadas, e.g. : ALES

The Sierra Nevada Brewing Company is powered almost exclusively by solar energy, and even has a charging station for electric vehicles at its brewery. The company also uses the cooking oil from its restaurant as biodiesel for its delivery trucks. Discarded yeast is used to make ethanol fuel, and spent grain is used as food for livestock. For its efforts to preserve the environment, Sierra Nevada won the EPA’s “Green Business of the Year” award for 2010.

Down

2 Part of an Italian veal dish name : OSSO

“Osso” is the Italian word for bone, as in the name of the dish “osso buco” (bone with a hole), which features braised veal shanks.

8 What a weather balloon might be mistaken for : UFO

In 1952, the USAF revived its studies of reported sightings of unidentified flying objects (UFOs) in a program called Project Blue Book. Project Blue Book ran from 1952 until it was shut down in 1969 with the conclusion that there was no threat to national security and that there were no sightings that could not be explained within the bounds of modern scientific knowledge.

11 What Mrs. Potts and Chip serve in “Beauty and the Beast” : TEA

“Beauty and the Beast” is a fairy tale that was written by novelist Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont. Titled “La belle et la bête” in French, the story was first published in 1756. The “beauty” in the tale is named “Belle”.

12 Brit’s term of affection : OLD CHAP

“Chap” is an informal term meaning “lad, fellow” that is used especially in England. The term derives from “chapman”, an obsolete word meaning “purchaser” or “trader”.

15 Precious, to a Brit : TWEE

In the UK, something “twee” is cutesy or overly nice. “Twee” came from “tweet”, which is the cutesy, baby-talk way of saying “sweet”.

26 Critical time : D-DAY

The most famous D-Day in history was June 6, 1944, the date of the Normandy landings in WWII. The term “D-Day” is used by the military to designate the day on which a combat operation is to be launched, especially when the actual date has yet to be determined. What D stands for seems to have been lost in the mists of time although the tradition is that D just stands for “Day”. In fact, the French have a similar term, “Jour J” (Day J), with a similar meaning. We also use H-Hour to denote the hour the attack is to commence.

28 Queen who made Carthage prosper : DIDO

Dido was the founder of Carthage, and the city’s first queen. Some sources use the name “Elissa” for the same person.

33 Beat in a boxing match, in a way : TKOD

Technical knockout (TKO)

34 Corral : HEM IN

“Corral” is the Spanish word for an enclosure for livestock, and is a word we’ve imported into English. Ultimately, the term comes from the Vulgar Latin “currale” meaning “enclosure for carts”, itself coming from “currus”, the Latin for “cart”.

35 Command for a right turn, in mushing : GEE!

“Haw!” is a command given to a trained animal that is hauling something (like a horse or an ox). “Haw!” is used to instruct the animal to turn to the left. The equivalent command for a right turn is “Gee!” Just to confuse things, the same commands are used in Britain and Ireland, but with the opposite meanings. That must be pretty unsettling for jet-setting plow horses …

37 “You’ve Got Mail” director Ephron : NORA

Nora Ephron had many talents, including writing film scripts and novels. Many of the movies that she wrote, she also directed. These would include some of my favorite movies of all time like “Sleepless in Seattle”, “You’ve Got Mail” and most recently, the wonderful “Julie & Julia”. And, did you know that Nora Ephron’s second marriage was to journalist Carl Bernstein of Watergate fame? She wrote an autobiographical novel based on her life with Bernstein, which deals in particular with Bernstein’s affair with the daughter of British Prime Minister James Callaghan.

“You’ve Got Mail” is a 1998 romantic comedy film starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, directed by Nora Ephron. The film is an adaptation of the Miklos Laszlo play “Parfumerie”. The storyline of “Parfumerie” was also used for the movies “The Shop Around the Corner” (from 1940 starring James Stewart and Margaret Sullivan) and “In the Good Old Summertime” (from 1949 starring Van Johnson and Judy Garland).

40 Neutral paint color : ECRU

The color ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

46 Shoe with holes : CROC

Crocs are foam clogs that were originally designed as shoes to be worn at health spas.

48 Subject of Rick Steves’s travel guides : EUROPE

Rick Steves hosts the TV show “Rick Steves Europe” that airs on public television stations.

49 God, in Guadalajara : DIOS

Guadalajara is a populous city in the Mexican state of Jalisco. The Mexican city is named after the city of the same name in the center of Spain.

58 Dreyer’s ice cream partner : EDY

Dreyer’s ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyer’s in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dreyer and Joseph Edy.

64 Exploding star : NOVA

A nova (plural “novae”) is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

68 ___ & Chandon (Champagne) : MOET

Moët & Chandon is a French winery, and one of the world’s largest producers of champagne. The company was founded by wine trader Claude Moët in 1743. The name was changed to Moët & Chandon in the 1830s when Pierre-Gabriel Chandon, an in-law to the Moët family, was given co-ownership. Moët & Chandon owns the famous Dom Pérignon brand name, honoring the Benedictine monk who did so much to improve the quality of champagne.

75 Wray of “King Kong” : FAY

Fay Wray was a Canadian-American actress who is best known for her starring role in the classic 1933 film “King Kong”. When Wray passed away at the age of 96 in 2004, the lights of the Empire State Building were extinguished for 15 minutes. That fine gesture was a nod to the celebrated Empire State Building scene in “King Kong”.

77 Nonresident doctor : EXTERN

In the field of medicine, an extern is usually a visiting physician who is not a member of the regular staff of a hospital.

80 Lead role on “Parks and Recreation” : LESLIE

“Parks and Recreation” is a sitcom that started airing on NBC in 2009, and is a show that has grown on me. It stars the “Saturday Night Live” alum Amy Poehler. The creators of “Parks and Recreation” are part of the team responsible for the American version of “The Office”, so you’ll notice some similarities in the style of the two shows, and some actors that have appeared in both.

82 Writer Stein : GERTRUDE

Gertrude Stein was a great American writer who spent most of her life in France. Gertrude Stein met Alice B. Toklas in Paris in 1907, and the two were life partners until Stein died in 1946. Cleverly, Stein published her own memoir in 1933 but called the book “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas”. It was to become Stein’s best selling title.

83 Green and others : ALS

Al Green is a gospel and soul music singer. Green was born in Arkansas, where he started out as a gospel singer and moved into R&B. In 1974, he was assaulted by a girlfriend who burned him badly on much of his body by pouring boiling grits over him (and then she committed suicide). The incident changed Green’s life and he turned to the church, becoming a pastor in Memphis in 1976. He continued to record music, but never really enjoyed the same success that he had in the early seventies with hits like “Let’s Stay Together” and “I’m Still In Love With You”.

86 The Amazons were the daughter of this god, in myth : ARES

The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos (Fear), Deimos (Terror) and Eros (Desire). Ares was the son of Zeus and Hera, and the Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

The Amazons of Greek mythology were a tribe of female warriors who were the daughters of Ares and Harmonia.

92 Movie with the line “I feel the need … the need for speed” : TOP GUN

“Top Gun” is an entertaining action movie released in 1986 starring Tom Cruise and the lovely Kelly McGillis. The movie is all about pilots training at the US Navy’s Fighter Weapons School. A lot of footage was shot on board the Navy’s carrier the USS Enterprise during flight operations. At one point in a day’s shooting, the commander of the Enterprise changed course as needed for normal operations, but this altered the light for the cameras that were filming at the time. Director Tony Scott asked for the course to be changed back, but was informed that a course change would cost the Navy $25,000. Scott wrote out a check there and then, and he got another five minutes of filming with the light he needed.

95 Martial arts master : SENSEI

“Sensei” is a Japanese form of address used for figures of authority, from lawyers to martial arts instructors.

Something described as martial is suited for war. The term “martial” ultimately derives from Latin and means “Arts of Mars”, a reference to Mars, the Roman god of war.

96 Sushi condiment : WASABI

Sometimes called Japanese horseradish, wasabi is a root used as a condiment in Japanese cooking. The taste of wasabi is more like mustard than a hot pepper in that the vapors that create the “hotness” stimulate the nasal passages rather than the tongue. Personally, I love the stuff …

98 Traitor in the Revolutionary War : ARNOLD

Benedict Arnold was a general in the Continental Army during the American War of Independence who defected to the British Army. While serving with the Continental Army, Arnold was given command of the fort at West Point. He planned on surrendering the fort to the British, but his plot was discovered before he could do so and he made a narrow escape. Arnold was made a brigadier general in the British Army and he led British forces in several raids against American troops. After the war ended, Arnold moved to London and worked in the merchant business. He died there in 1791.

100 “S.N.L.” cast member Gardner : HEIDI

“Saturday Night Live” (SNL)

102 Lover of Orion, in myth : EOS

In Greek mythology, Eos was the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos was Aurora. Rather delightfully, Homer referred to Eos as “rosy-fingered dawn” in both “Iliad” and “Odyssey”.

According to Greek mythology, Orion was a giant hunter who was placed in the night sky by Zeus, the king of the gods. Orion is very recognizable as a constellation, especially with the three bright stars known as “Orion’s Belt”. The brightest star in the sky, Sirius, is said to be Orion’s hunting dog, and this star sits at Orion’s “foot”.

108 Where Zeno taught : ELEA

Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his paradoxes, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as “Achilles and the Tortoise”, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival. Or can he …?

110 Children’s poet Silverstein : SHEL

Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children’s books is “The Giving Tree”, which was first published in 1964. “The Giving Tree” tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Dinosaur in the Mario games : YOSHI
6 Titular film character opposite Harold : MAUDE
11 Something offered in tribute : TOAST
16 ___ Martin DB5 (“Bondmobile”) : ASTON
17 Knock-down-drag-out fights : SLUGFESTS
21 Nudge : ELBOW
22 Barack, Michelle, Hillary and Bill took them, for short : LSATS
23 Yann Martel’s baking memoir? : LIFE OF PIE (“Life of Pi”)
24 Have heart eyes for : ADORE
25 Member of Britain’s upper house : LORD
26 Tone-___ : DEAF
27 Shunned, with “out” : ICED …
29 “Don’t get ___!” : CUTE
30 F. Scott Fitzgerald’s chivalric tale? : TENDER IS THE KNIGHT (“Tender is the Night”)
36 Just like that : IN A SNAP
38 Zaps, as leftovers : NUKES
39 Brainstorms : IDEATES
42 Messes (with) : MONKEYS
43 Follower of “Je m’appelle” : NOM
44 What a figure skate has that a hockey skate lacks : TOE PICK
45 “___ you seeing this?” : ARE
46 Voltaire’s sweet novel? : CANDIED (“Candide”)
50 Scan that excites hydrogen atoms, for short : MRI
51 Can’t keep one’s mouth shut? : YAWNS
54 Alternative to de Gaulle : ORLY
55 Debussy’s “___ d’Étoiles” : NUIT
57 Prepare to go next : TEE UP
59 “You’re making me blush!” : OH STOP!
61 Lived (with) : ROOMED
63 Marcel Proust’s kitchen mystery? : IN SEARCH OF LOST THYME (“In Search of Lost Time”)
70 Trouble : ADO
71 I : EGO
72 “That’s ___!” (director’s cry) : A WRAP
73 Halloween vis-à-vis November 1 : EVE
74 “Yeesh!” : OOF!
76 One of six parked on the moon : ROVER
78 Nasty, in a way : SNIDE
79 Author Ferrante : ELENA
81 Neutral paint color : FLAX
82 Break : GAP
85 Societal problem : ILL
86 “When They See Us” director DuVernay : AVA
89 Big e-commerce site : ETSY
90 Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s pet story? : THE LITTLE PRINTS (“The Little Prince”)
95 Guarantees : SWEARS TO
97 [Doh!] : [HEADSLAP!]
100 Semibiographical source for “Citizen Kane” : HEARST
101 Small trunks : SPEEDOS
105 Certain red wine : SHIRAZ
107 Trap : ENSNARE
109 Had a friendly relationship (with) : GOT ON
110 “___ is a wonderful thing if one does not have to earn one’s living at it”: Einstein : SCIENCE
111 “Revenge ___ dish …” : IS A
112 William Shakespeare’s historical romance? : JULIUS SEES HER (“Julius Caesar”)
115 Gives one’s seal of approval : OKS
116 Woman’s name that’s a piece of furniture backward : DEB
117 Classical singing venue : ODEON
118 Beat : SPENT
119 Call to reserve? : LET
120 The final installment of “The Godfather” : III
121 Bit of coffee : BEAN
122 Sierra Nevadas, e.g. : ALES
123 Word that can precede or follow “run” : DRY

Down

1 “___ ready for this?” (opening of a pump-up jam by 2 Unlimited) : Y’ALL
2 Part of an Italian veal dish name : OSSO
3 Go back to square one : START ANEW
4 Share a workspace, in modern lingo : HOT-DESK
5 Helpful connections : INS
6 Breakfast order : MUFFIN
7 Long period : AGE
8 What a weather balloon might be mistaken for : UFO
9 Letters on the “3” button : DEF
10 Catches a glimpse of : ESPIES
11 What Mrs. Potts and Chip serve in “Beauty and the Beast” : TEA
12 Brit’s term of affection : OLD CHAP
13 “Finally!” : ABOUT TIME!
14 Resolve, with “out” : SORT …
15 Precious, to a Brit : TWEE
17 Goes undercover? : SLEEPS
18 Heated accusation : LIAR!
19 Sound effect during a bomb defusing, perhaps : TICK
20 “I watched that episode already” : SEEN IT
26 Critical time : D-DAY
28 Queen who made Carthage prosper : DIDO
31 Pittsburgh-to-Buffalo dir. : NNE
32 Fair forecast : SUNNY
33 Beat in a boxing match, in a way : TKOD
34 Corral : HEM IN
35 Command for a right turn, in mushing : GEE!
36 “It’s possible” : I MAY
37 “You’ve Got Mail” director Ephron : NORA
40 Neutral paint color : ECRU
41 Sound like a broken record : SKIP
46 Shoe with holes : CROC
47 Top dogs : ALPHAS
48 Subject of Rick Steves’s travel guides : EUROPE
49 God, in Guadalajara : DIOS
52 Bullet alternatives: Abbr. : NOS
53 Utter : SHEER
54 Como ningún ___ (unique, in Spanish) : OTRO
56 Pledge drive gift : TOTE
57 Giggle : TEHEE
58 Dreyer’s ice cream partner : EDY
60 ___ Harbor, first official port of entry to the United States : SAG
62 Channel that aired “Daria” and “The Hills” : MTV
63 Fan mail recipient : IDOL
64 Exploding star : NOVA
65 Take pride in something : OWN IT
66 Ruffle : FRILL
67 What can take a punch? : LADLE
68 ___ & Chandon (Champagne) : MOET
69 Long periods : EONS
70 Little bow-wow : ARF
75 Wray of “King Kong” : FAY
77 Nonresident doctor : EXTERN
80 Lead role on “Parks and Recreation” : LESLIE
82 Writer Stein : GERTRUDE
83 Green and others : ALS
84 Sets (against) : PITS
86 The Amazons were the daughter of this god, in myth : ARES
87 By way of : VIA
88 Director’s cry : AND … SCENE!
91 Is employed : HAS A JOB
92 Movie with the line “I feel the need … the need for speed” : TOP GUN
93 Dials : PHONES
94 Some concert tour merchandise : T-SHIRTS
95 Martial arts master : SENSEI
96 Sushi condiment : WASABI
98 Traitor in the Revolutionary War : ARNOLD
99 Warehouse employee : PACKER
100 “S.N.L.” cast member Gardner : HEIDI
102 Lover of Orion, in myth : EOS
103 8-Down pilots, in brief : ETS
104 Forest grazer : DOE
106 Full of spice : ZESTY
108 Where Zeno taught : ELEA
110 Children’s poet Silverstein : SHEL
113 ___ beam : ION
114 Place for a shvitz : SPA

7 thoughts on “1018-20 NY Times Crossword 18 Oct 20, Sunday”

  1. 35:41 after finding and fixing an error: Early on, I misspelled ASTON as ASTIN, which gave me HIT-DESK instead of HOT-DESK (something I’ve never heard of). Cute collection of puns.

    I’m not one to care much about solving times, but one can’t help but notice that Bill’s time is quite extraordinary! Kudos!

  2. 29:07. did not try to search thru the whole grid to find my error(s). Like @Nonny, unfamiliar with HOTDESK and thus YOSHI. I had COHABIT, then COEXIST, then COTDESK, which didn’t make sense, but didn’t take the time to guess the right letter instead of C and came here. Also had PAEAN before TOAST, CLARET before SHIRAZ, CUEUP before TEEUP, STARTOVER before STARTANEW, but worked all those out in short order.

    I like the clue for 119A – reserve, re-serve.

    Agree with Kudos for @Bill’s time.

  3. 31:44. Enjoyed the theme although I was wondering if there aren’t enough English language books to put as theme answers. We had to dive into French writers 3 times? Oh well, the setter is from my home town of St. Louis so I’ll give her a pass.

    The first Zeno paradox I ever encountered was the idea that if you shot an arrow to a target, it would never get there. It would first have to travel halfway there, then halfway again…and again…and again infinitely so it could never actually arrive.

    I have my own Jeff’s paradox coming up in about 2 weeks when we set our clocks back an hour. When it hits 2 AM, we set out clocks back to 1 AM. Well, an hour later it’s 2 AM again, and we have to do the same again. Then this happens over and over so we’re stuck in an infinite loop. By some miracle I always wake up, and it’s the next morning, but I have no idea how that’s possible…

    Best –

    Best –

  4. 1:12:58….holy crap, I’m pathetic! Especially compared to Fearless Leader’s excellent time!

    Jeff, I got a good laugh out of many of your recent comments👍 That said, now I’m fearful of setting my clock back…

  5. 1:21:33 and after going over and correcting multiple errors I still had eNtern for eXtern because I thought flan was a color not flax…only 7 times Bills time…yea for me.
    Stay safe😀
    Go Ravens.

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