0623-19 NY Times Crossword 23 Jun 19, Sunday

Constructed by: David Liben-Nowell and Victor Barocas
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Take Two

Themed answers are grouped into (almost) identical pairs. The second of the pair needs the word “second” in order to make sense of the clue:

  • 25A One of three properties in Monopoly : PLACE
  • 26A Silver : (second) PLACE
  • 31A E, B, G, D, A or E : STRING
  • 32A B-team : (second) STRING
  • 53A Being : PERSON
  • 55A What you will always be (but he or she isn’t)? : (second) PERSON
  • 62A Clip : RATE
  • 64A Low-quality : (second) RATE
  • 76A Fruit that, surprisingly, is slightly radioactive : BANANA
  • 79A Supporting role : (second) BANANA
  • 98A “All ___ is but art, unknown to thee”: Alexander Pope : NATURE
  • 101A Deeply ingrained habit : (second) NATURE
  • 109A Impressive stylishness : CLASS
  • 110A Not having full rights, as a citizen : (second) CLASS
  • 115A Politician’s core support : BASE
  • 116A It’s halfway around a diamond : (second) BASE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 17m 43s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Word in Facebook and Disney Channel’s original names : THE …

“The Facebook” is now “Facebook”, and “The Disney Channel” is now “Disney Channel”.

8 Subj. of a National Historic Site outside Wall, S.D. : ICBM

That would be Minuteman Missile National Historic Site.

17 Bridge component : HAND

The version of the card game bridge that is played mostly today is contract bridge. Auction bridge is a similar game, and is a precursor to contract bridge.

23 Org. concerned with grades : USDA

The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) classifies meat into eight different grades:

  • Prime
  • Choice
  • Select
  • Standard
  • Commercial
  • Utility
  • Cutter
  • Canner

24 Certain warriors in Magic: The Gathering : ORCS

Magic: The Gathering is a card game, one played with a deck of themed cards. It is a relatively recent invention by a math professor named Richard Garfield. It was introduced to the public in 1993, and has a large following today.

25 One of three properties in Monopoly : PLACE

Those would be St. Charles Place, St. James Place and Park Place.

26 Silver : (second) PLACE

In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

27 Don at the Met : GIOVANNI

“Don Giovanni” is a comic opera by Mozart, with a libretto in Italian by Lorenzo Da Ponte. The opera follows the adventures of Don Giovanni, a young rakish nobleman who finally comes to a bad end.

The Metropolitan Opera (often simply “the Met”) of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you …

31 E, B, G, D, A or E : STRING

Those would be the strings on a guitar, for example.

32 B-team : (second) STRING

We’ve been using the phrases “first string” and “second string” in athletics since the mid-19th century. The expressions come from archery, in which a competitor would carry a second bowstring in case the first bowstring broke.

42 Part of Q.E.D. : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

45 ___ volente (God willing: Lat.) : DEO

“Deo volente” is Latin for “God willing”. If you read letters or emails from Ireland, you might come across “D.V.” in the text, as it is an abbreviation that we Irish commonly use to mean “God willing” or “Please God”.

49 It “isn’t so bad when you consider the alternative,” per Maurice Chevalier : OLD AGE

Maurice Chevalier was an actor and singer from Paris who had a remarkably successful career in Hollywood, particularly in the late fifties and early sixties. Chevalier’s most memorable roles were perhaps in “Gigi” (1958), “Can-Can” (1960) and “Fanny” (1961).

57 Provincial capital south of a lake with the same name : WINNIPEG

The Manitoba city of Winnipeg is the largest city in the province, and its capital. The city is named for the nearby Lake Winnipeg, which in turn is an anglicization of a Cree word meaning “muddy waters”.

59 Recurrent theme : TROPE

A trope is a figure of speech. The term “trope” comes from the Greek word “tropos” that has the same meaning.

61 Famed furrier : ASTOR

John Jacob Astor was the patriarch of the famous American Astor dynasty. He was the country’s first multi-millionaire, making his fortune in the trade of fur, real estate and opium. In today’s terms, it has been calculated that by the time of his death he has accumulated a fortune big enough to make him the fourth wealthiest man in American history (in the company of the likes of Andrew Carnegie, Cornelius Vanderbilt, Bill Gates, Henry Ford and John D. Rockefeller).

66 Major name in network hardware : CISCO

Cisco is a company that I really admire (in terms of innovation and management). Headquartered in San Jose, California, Cisco develops and sells products and services in the communications sector. The name “Cisco” was taken from the name of the city San Francisco.

70 ___ Tin Tin : RIN

The original Rin Tin Tin was a real-life dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, “Rinty” was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie “Where the North Begins”. Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go …

72 “If you can’t imitate him, don’t copy him” speaker : BERRA

Yogi Berra is regarded by many as the greatest catcher ever to play in Major League Baseball, and has to be America’s most celebrated “author” of malapropisms. Here are some greats:

  • It ain’t over till it’s over.
  • 90% of the game is half mental.
  • Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.
  • When you come to a fork in the road, take it.
  • It’s déjà vu all over again.
  • Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they won’t go to yours.
  • A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.

76 Fruit that, surprisingly, is slightly radioactive : BANANA

The banana is actually a berry, botanically speaking. And, bananas don’t really grow on trees. The “trunk” of the banana plant is in fact a pseudostem. The pseudostem is a false stem comprising rolled bases of leaves, and it can grow to 2 or 3 meters tall.

79 Supporting role : (second) BANANA

The expression “top banana” is used to mean “the main guy” or “Mr. Big”. The first person to use “top banana” was supposedly Vaudeville performer Harry Steppe in 1927, who applied it to the top comic on the bill. The phrase comes from a comedy routine in which three comics struggle to share two bananas.

87 It’s replicated during mitosis : DNA

Mitosis is the process by which the complement of chromosomes in a cell nucleus replicates and then divides into two identical sets of new chromosomes. Mitosis is followed by division of the cell itself, resulting in two identical cells. Meiosis is a special type of cell division that results in reproductive cells that have half the full complement of chromosomes. The reproductive cells join together, with one cell coming from each parent, to form a new cell with a full complement of chromosomes. That new cell develops into offspring that have characteristics of both parents.

88 URL ending : GOV

The .gov domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

90 Product from the Royal Small Arms Factory : STEN

The STEN gun is an iconic armament that was used by the British military. The name STEN is an acronym. The letters S and T come from the name of the gun’s designers, Shepherd and Turpin. The letters EN comes from the Enfield brand name, which in turn comes from the Enfield location where the guns were manufactured for the Royal Small Arms Factory, an enterprise owned by the British government.

94 Beatrix Potter’s Mrs. Tiggy-winkle, for one : HEDGEHOG

Beatrix Potter was an English author, famous for the children’s books she wrote and illustrated. The most famous character in her stories was Peter Rabbit, whose sisters were Flopsy, Mopsy and Cottontail. Potter put her talent as an artist to good use in the scientific world as well. She recorded many images of lichens and fungi as seen through her microscope. As a result of her work, she was respected as an expert mycologist.

98 “All ___ is but art, unknown to thee”: Alexander Pope : NATURE

Alexander Pope was an English poet who was famous for his own compositions as well as for a translation of Homer’s works.

112 Home team at Rice-Eccles Stadium : UTES

The Utah Utes are the athletic teams of the University of Utah.

113 San ___, Calif. : MATEO

San Mateo is a city located south of San Francisco, just across the other side of the Bay from where I live. San Mateo is Spanish for Saint Matthew.

114 Carpenter of note : KAREN

Karen Carpenter was an accomplished drummer, although she only started playing drums in high school, as a member of the school band. After she graduated she started playing jazz with her brother, Richard, and a college friend. Later, she and Richard played with a group called Spectrum, and submitted many demo tapes to recording companies, but all were unsuccessful. Finally, Karen and Richard got a recording contract with A&M Records, and when they had Karen take the lead on their songs, they hit the big time and toured as the Carpenters. Sadly, Karen passed away at only 32-years-old, dying from heart failure brought on by anorexia.

119 Carrier with King David Lounges : EL AL

The King David Club is the frequent flyer program of El Al Israel Airlines. El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. The term “el al” translates from Hebrew as “to the skies”.

120 Romulus, but not Remus, in ancient Rome : REX

According to tradition, Rome was founded by the twin brothers Romulus and Remus. The pair had a heated argument about who should be allowed to name the city and Romulus hit Remus with a shovel, killing him. And so, “Rome” was born, perhaps instead of “Reme”!

Down

6 Things that most people have eight of : INCISORS

The incisors are the front teeth, of which humans have eight. The term “incisor” comes from the Latin “incidere” meaning “to cut”.

7 Bear necessities, for short? : TDS

Touchdown (TD)

The Chicago Bears were founded in Decatur, Illinois in 1919 and moved to Chicago in 1921. The Bears are one of only two franchises in the NFL that were around at the time of the NFL’s founding (the other is the Arizona Cardinals, who were also based in Chicago in 1921).

8 Bank of China Tower architect : IM PEI

I. M. Pei (full name: Ieoh Ming Pei) was an exceptional American architect who was born in China. Of Pei’s many wonderful works, my favorite is the renovation of the Louvre in Paris, and especially the Glass Pyramid in the museum’s courtyard.

The Bank of China Tower (often “BOC Tower”) is a spectacular structure in Hong Kong that was designed by I. M. Pei. Opened in 1990, the BOC Tower was the tallest building in Hong Kong at that time, and was also the first building constructed outside of North America to reach a height of over 1,000 feet.

9 ___ Kaepernick, former N.F.L. QB : COLIN

Colin Kaepernick was the quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers. In high school, Kaepernick was known as a baseball pitcher rather than a football player. He was a two-time California all-state baseball player and received several offers of baseball scholarships. Kaepernick finally received an offer of a football scholarship by the University of Nevada, Reno.

10 Confederate general with a fort named after him : BRAGG

Fort Bragg in North Carolina is a very large army installation that covers over 250 square miles. The base is named for General Braxton Bragg, the native North Carolinian who commanded the Confederate Army forces during the Civil War.

13 Couple of high points? : UMLAUT

An “umlaut” (also “diaeresis”) is a diacritical mark consisting of two horizontal dots placed over a letter, usually a vowel. Here in the West, we are perhaps most familiar with umlauts in German, as in “Schön”.

14 Twice-monthly coastal phenomena : NEAP TIDES

Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon’s effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon’s gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

18 Ray or Dave of the Kinks : DAVIES

The Kinks were an English band who participated in the British Invasion of America in the sixties, although only briefly. After touring the US in the middle of 1965, the American Federation of Musicians refused permits for the Kinks to book concerts for four years, apparently in response to some rowdy on-stage behavior by the band.

29 Author Harte : BRET

Bret Harte was a storyteller noted for his tales of the American West, even though he himself was from back East, born in Albany, New York. One work attributed to him is “Ah Sin”, a disastrously unsuccessful play written by Bret Harte and Mark Twain. The two writers didn’t get on at all well during the writing process, and when the play was produced for the stage it was very poorly received. Nevertheless, Twain suggested a further collaboration with Harte, and Harte downright refused!

38 Objects spinning in an orrery : PLANETS

An orrery is an ingenious mechanical device that shows the relative motion and relative positions of the planets in our solar system. The first “modern” orrery was produced in 1704 and was presented to the Irish peer known as the Earl of Orrery, from whence the name “orrery” comes.

44 Drug treatment for Muhammad Ali : L-DOPA

The name of the drug L-3,4-DihydrOxyPhenylAlanine can be shortened, thankfully, to L-DOPA. Swedish scientist Arvid Carlsson won a Nobel Prize for showing that L-DOPA could be used to reduce the symptoms of Parkinson’s Syndrome.

Muhammad Ali won 56 professional fights, 37 of which were knockouts. He lost 5 fights, 4 being decisions and one being a technical knockout (TKO). The TKO-loss was Ali’s second-last fight, against Larry Holmes. By the time Ali took on Holmes, he was already showing signs of Parkinson’s Syndrome, although the diagnosis would not come until four years later.

46 Competitor of Sanyo and Bose : AIWA

Aiwa was a Japanese company that produced consumer electronics, mainly audio and video equipment. Sony bought Aiwa in 2002 and eventually discontinued the brand in 2006. The Aiwa trademark was acquired by a Chicago-based consumer electronics company in 2015.

49 Subject of a statue outside Boston’s TD Garden : ORR

Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking. While still 31 years old, in 1979, Orr became the youngest person inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Prior to that, in 1967, Orr became the youngest person named the NHL’s Rookie of the Year.

TD Garden is a sports arena that was built in the 1990s to replace the aging Boston Garden as home for the Boston Celtics basketball team and the Boston Bruins hockey team.

50 The two sides in chess, essentially : ARMIES

It is believed that the game of chess originated in northwest India. It evolved from a 6th-century game called “chaturanga”, a Sanskrit word meaning “four divisions”. These four (military) divisions were represented in the game:

  • Infantry (now “pawns”)
  • Cavalry (now “knights”)
  • Elephants (now “bishops”)
  • Chariots (now “rooks”)

52 Arctic wear : ANORAK

Anoraks aren’t very popular over here in America. Everyone has one in Ireland! An anorak is a heavy jacket with a hood, often lined with fur (or fake fur), and is an invention of the Inuit people.

56 Trick-taking game : EUCHRE

Euchre is a card game that probably came to the US from Germany, introduced by German farmers who settled in Wisconsin. Euchre is a trick-taking game usually played by four people in two partnerships. Unlike bridge, Euchre is played with a stripped down deck of 24 or 32 cards. The verb “to euchre” is slang for “to cheat, swindle”, a term that presumably comes from the card game.

63 What movie trailers do : TEASE

The term “trailer” was originally used in the film industry to describe advertisements for upcoming features. These trailers were originally shown at the end of a movie being screened, hence the name. This practice quickly fell out of favor as theater patrons usually left at the end of the movie without paying much attention to the trailers. So, the trailers were moved to the beginning of the show, but the term “trailer” persisted.

69 Actress Chaplin of “Game of Thrones” : OONA

Oona Chaplin is an actress from Madrid in Spain. Chaplin is getting a lot of airtime these days as she plays Talisa Maegyr on HBO’s hit fantasy series “Game of Thrones”. Oona is the granddaughter of Charlie Chaplin, and is named for her maternal grandmother Oona O’Neill, the daughter of playwright Eugene O’Neill.

71 1998 Winter Olympics host : NAGANO

Nagano is a city on Japan’s largest island, Honshu. Nagano hosted the 1998 Winter Olympic Games.

77 One way to run : AMOK

The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had a good reason for that frenzy …

84 Bush : OUTBACK

In Australia, the land outside of urban area is referred to as the outback or the bush. That said, I think that the term “outback” is sometimes reserved for the more remote parts of the bush.

89 Stieg who wrote “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” : LARSSON

Stieg Larsson was a Swedish journalist and writer. Indeed, one of the main characters in his “Millennium” series of novels is a journalist as well. The first two titles in the series are “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and “The Girl Who Played with Fire”. The last of the three titles in the Millennium series is “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest”, which was the most-sold book in the US in 2010. All of the books in the series were published after Larsson’s death. He passed away from a heart attack while climbing several flights of stairs, when he was just 50 years old.

93 Tricorder go-with : PHASER

A MASER is a device that was around long before LASERs came into the public consciousness. A MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is similar to a LASER, but microwaves are emitted rather than light waves. When the storyline for “Star Trek” was being developed, the writers introduced a weapon called a “phaser”, with the name “phaser” derived from PHoton mASER.

102 Eponymous cup maker : REESE

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups were invented by Harry Burnett “H.B.” Reese. Peanut Butter Cups were originally called penny cups, reflecting the price at which they were sold. Then inflation took over, and maybe that’s why they were broken into smaller “Pieces” …

103 Thomas Cromwell, Earl of ___ : ESSEX

Thomas Cromwell was the 1st Earl of Essex, and a trusted advisor of King Henry VIII of England. Cromwell very much drove the English Reformation, the break with the Catholic Church in Rome. He was also the man who arranged for the annulment of Henry’s first marriage so that the king could marry Anne Boleyn. But, like so many of those close to Henry VIII, Cromwell fell out of favor and was executed. Cromwell’s “crime” was that he arranged Henry’s fourth marriage, to Anne of Cleves, and this turned out to be a terrible match.

104 Musical miscue : BLAT

To blat is to cry, especially like a sheep. In other words, to “blat” is to “bleat”. The noun “blat” is often used for an overblown sound on a brass instrument.

108 Four-letter U.S. city with the highest population : MESA

The city of Mesa, Arizona is in effect a suburb of Phoenix. The original settlement of non-Native Americans was founded by Daniel Webster Jones who led a Mormon group from St. George, Utah. The settlement was first called Jonesville, then Fort Utah and eventually Lehi. A second group of Mormons arrived and formed a settlement on top of a nearby mesa. It was this use of a mesa that eventually gave the city its current name.

109 Ruler units: Abbr. : CMS

Centimeter (cm.)

111 Five Georges : ABE

The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Abraham Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

The nation’s first president, George Washington, is on the US one-dollar bills produced today. When the original one-dollar bill was issued in 1863, it featured a portrait of Salmon P. Chase, President Abraham Lincoln’s Secretary of the Treasury.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Word in Facebook and Disney Channel’s original names : THE …
4 Ninny : TWIT
8 Subj. of a National Historic Site outside Wall, S.D. : ICBM
12 Ditties : TUNES
17 Bridge component : HAND
19 Previously owned : (second) HAND
20 Upshot of a story : MORAL
22 Wolf howls, maybe : OMENS
23 Org. concerned with grades : USDA
24 Certain warriors in Magic: The Gathering : ORCS
25 One of three properties in Monopoly : PLACE
26 Silver : (second) PLACE
27 Don at the Met : GIOVANNI
29 Cream and others : BEIGES
30 Attire that flaps in the wind : CAPE
31 E, B, G, D, A or E : STRING
32 B-team : (second) STRING
34 Sports team employee : SCOUT
36 Shell station? : SEASHORE
38 Using without paying royalties, say : PIRATING
41 ___ amis (my friends: Fr.) : MES
42 Part of Q.E.D. : ERAT
43 Like a swished basketball shot : ALL NET
45 ___ volente (God willing: Lat.) : DEO
46 Aspire : AIM
47 Paroxysm : SPASM
49 It “isn’t so bad when you consider the alternative,” per Maurice Chevalier : OLD AGE
50 Designed to minimize drag : AERO
51 Cooked up : IDEATED
53 Being : PERSON
55 What you will always be (but he or she isn’t)? : (second) PERSON
57 Provincial capital south of a lake with the same name : WINNIPEG
59 Recurrent theme : TROPE
60 Indication of good taste? : YUM
61 Famed furrier : ASTOR
62 Clip : RATE
64 Low-quality : (second) RATE
66 Major name in network hardware : CISCO
70 ___ Tin Tin : RIN
72 “If you can’t imitate him, don’t copy him” speaker : BERRA
74 Introduce oneself : SAY “HELLO”
76 Fruit that, surprisingly, is slightly radioactive : BANANA
79 Supporting role : (second) BANANA
81 Kind of spring found in a mousetrap : TORSION
82 Reassuring words after an accident : I’M OK
83 Attacks : GOES AT
85 Fortitude : SPINE
87 It’s replicated during mitosis : DNA
88 URL ending : GOV
89 Winner’s wreath : LAUREL
90 Product from the Royal Small Arms Factory : STEN
91 Sound while being tickled : HEE
92 Warm winter wear : SKI PANTS
94 Beatrix Potter’s Mrs. Tiggy-winkle, for one : HEDGEHOG
97 Pulse : THROB
98 “All ___ is but art, unknown to thee”: Alexander Pope : NATURE
101 Deeply ingrained habit : (second) NATURE
104 Leaning : BIAS
105 Nails a test : ACES IT
107 Geniuses, informally : SMARTIES
109 Impressive stylishness : CLASS
110 Not having full rights, as a citizen : (second) CLASS
111 “Up and ___!” : AT ‘EM
112 Home team at Rice-Eccles Stadium : UTES
113 San ___, Calif. : MATEO
114 Carpenter of note : KAREN
115 Politician’s core support : BASE
116 It’s halfway around a diamond : (second) BASE
117 Unsmiling : STERN
118 “Hey!” : PSST!
119 Carrier with King David Lounges : EL AL
120 Romulus, but not Remus, in ancient Rome : REX

Down

1 Brutish sorts : THUGS
2 “That happened?” : HAS IT?
3 Signature : ENDORSEMENT
4 Some revealing beachwear : THONGS
5 Caution : WARN
6 Things that most people have eight of : INCISORS
7 Bear necessities, for short? : TDS
8 Bank of China Tower architect : IM PEI
9 ___ Kaepernick, former N.F.L. QB : COLIN
10 Confederate general with a fort named after him : BRAGG
11 Item carried in an academic procession : MACE
12 Bit of outerwear : TOPCOAT
13 Couple of high points? : UMLAUT
14 Twice-monthly coastal phenomena : NEAP TIDES
15 Suffix with defer or insist : -ENCE
16 About 5:00, directionally: Abbr. : SSE
18 Ray or Dave of the Kinks : DAVIES
21 Doris who won the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature : LESSING
28 “Gimme ___!” (Alabama cheerleader’s repeated call) : AN A
29 Author Harte : BRET
33 Walk with a firm, heavy step : TRAMP
35 Staring a bit too long, perhaps : CREEPY
37 Bad tumble : HEADER
38 Objects spinning in an orrery : PLANETS
39 Model for a bust at the Musei Capitolini : NERO
40 Continue : GO ON
41 Knee-covering skirts : MIDIS
43 Nonwinner : ALSO-RAN
44 Drug treatment for Muhammad Ali : L-DOPA
46 Competitor of Sanyo and Bose : AIWA
47 Add to the mix : STIR IN
48 Animation : PEP
49 Subject of a statue outside Boston’s TD Garden : ORR
50 The two sides in chess, essentially : ARMIES
52 Arctic wear : ANORAK
54 Never to be forgotten : ETERNAL
56 Trick-taking game : EUCHRE
58 Talkaholics : GABBERS
63 What movie trailers do : TEASE
65 What cibophobia is the fear of : EATING
67 Specialty of Muddy Waters and Blind Willie Johnson : SLIDE GUITAR
68 Copy : CLONE
69 Actress Chaplin of “Game of Thrones” : OONA
71 1998 Winter Olympics host : NAGANO
73 Teller? : RAT
75 Poetic direction : YON
76 Majors : BIGS
77 One way to run : AMOK
78 New brother or sister : NOVITIATE
80 Flower for a 20th wedding anniversary : ASTER
84 Bush : OUTBACK
86 Bust supporter : PEDESTAL
89 Stieg who wrote “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” : LARSSON
90 Out of business : SHUT
91 Somewhere to chill, paradoxically : HOT TUB
93 Tricorder go-with : PHASER
95 Nice finish, maybe : ENAMEL
96 Sarcastic syllable : HAR
98 Gets warmer, so to speak : NEARS
99 Jerks : ASSES
100 Quaint contradiction : ‘TISN’T
102 Eponymous cup maker : REESE
103 Thomas Cromwell, Earl of ___ : ESSEX
104 Musical miscue : BLAT
106 ___ eyes on (see) : CLAP
108 Four-letter U.S. city with the highest population : MESA
109 Ruler units: Abbr. : CMS
111 Five Georges : ABE

8 thoughts on “0623-19 NY Times Crossword 23 Jun 19, Sunday”

  1. 24:36, no errors. I paused for a bit as the first duplicate entry began to appear, wondering, “What the heck? I must have made an error.”, but all became clear as the second duplicate took shape. Cute idea.

  2. 32:12, no errors. I agree with @Dave, thought it must be error when the first theme twin appeared. It seemed to violate a basic tenet of crosswords, that you don’t use the same word twice. I liked the theme once I caught onto it. Had to smile seeing General Braxton BRAGG’s name next to COLIN Kaepernick. NYT better watch out, Kaepernick may organize a boycott against the crossword.

  3. Brutal south western corner. 113 across I had DIEGO and 117 across I had SOBER then STOIC aaarg. Took me forever to figure it out.

  4. It’s a real mystery why a US Army installation was named (in 1918) after Bragg. Nobody on either side had any reason to honor him. To the North, he was a traitor who broke his oath of loyalty and attacked his own country, and to the South, he was a thoroughly incompetent general partly responsible for the loss of the war!

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