0609-19 NY Times Crossword 9 Jun 19, Sunday

Constructed by: Seth A. Abel
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Don’t Quote Me

Today’s themed answers come in pairs. One element of each pair is a fictional character who purportedly made the statement that forms the second element of the pair. But, those words were never actually uttered by the individual:

  • 23A Line never said by 58-Across : FLY, MY PRETTIES, FLY!
  • 58A Film villain who never said 23-Across, with “the” : … WICKED WITCH
  • 36A Line never said by 83-Across : BEAM ME UP, SCOTTY
  • 83A Commander who never said 36-Across : CAPTAIN KIRK
  • 121A Line never said by 99-Across : JUST THE FACTS, MA’AM
  • 99A TV detective who never said 121-Across : SERGEANT FRIDAY
  • 44D Line never said by 17-Down : ME TARZAN, YOU JANE
  • 17D British noble who never said 44-Down : EARL OF GREYSTOKE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 21m 51s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • MRAZ (Meaz)
  • PATERNO (Pat Eeno!)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Exaggerated virility : MACHISMO

“Machismo” is an American-Spanish word meaning “virility, masculine pride”. The term comes from the Spanish “macho” meaning “male”.

9 Effortless assimilation : OSMOSIS

Osmosis is the movement of a solvent (often just water) across a semipermeable membrane. In the process of osmosis, the solvent tends to flow from an area of less concentration to an area of higher concentration. This sense of absorbing water effortlessly gives rise to the expression “learning by osmosis”.

16 Alternatives to H.S. diplomas : GEDS

The General Educational Development (GED) tests are a battery of five tests designed to demonstrate that a student has the academic skills of someone who has graduated from an American or Canadian high school.

25 Columnist Bombeck : ERMA

Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years. She produced more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns under the title “At Wit’s End”, with all describing her home life in suburbia.

26 Birth control option, briefly : IUD

It seems that it isn’t fully understood how the intrauterine device (IUD) works. The design that was most popular for decades was a T-shaped plastic frame on which was wound copper wire. It’s thought that the device is an irritant in the uterus causing the body to release chemicals that are hostile to sperm and eggs. This effect is enhanced by the presence of the copper.

28 Shopping center? : PEES

There are two letters P (pees) in the word “shopping”.

33 Lay an egg, say : ERR

Apparently the expression “to lay an egg”, meaning “to perform or play really badly” comes from the resemblance of the number 0 to an egg. One laying an egg scores zero.

34 Targets on “chest day” : PECS

“Pecs” is the familiar name for the chest muscle, which is more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

36 Line never said by 83-Across : BEAM ME UP, SCOTTY
(83A Commander who never said 36-Across : CAPTAIN KIRK)

There’s a story (not sure if it’s really true) about an Irishman who was being sentenced in the dock in a Dublin courtroom years ago. When asked by the judge, “Do you have anything to say before I pass sentence?”, the convicted man took out a pack of cigarettes from his pocket, flipped open the cardboard lid and brought the pack to his lips. He then said, “Beam me up, Scotty”.

William Shatner is a Canadian actor, one famous for playing Captain James T. Kirk in the original “Star Trek” television series. Shatner was trained as a classical Shakespearean actor, and appeared on stage in many of the Bard’s works early in his career. While playing the Kirk character, he developed a reputation for over-acting, really emphasizing some words in a speech and using an excessive number of pauses. He gave his name to a word “shatneresque”, which describes such a style.

41 Lobster ___ diavolo : FRA

Fra diavolo is a spicy sauce used for pasta and seafood that is usually made with chili peppers in a tomato base. The name “Fra diavolo” translates to “Brother devil”. The sauce may be named for the Italian revolutionary Michele Pezza who was also known as Fra Diavolo.

42 Official language of a U.S. territory : SAMOAN

There are sixteen US territories in all, but only five of them are inhabited:

  • Puerto Rico
  • Guam
  • Northern Mariana Islands
  • US Virgin Islands
  • American Samoa

Examples of US territories with no permanent or native inhabitants are Wake Island and Midway Islands.

45 Medical research org. : NIH

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) organization is made up of 27 different institutes that coordinate their research and services. Examples of member institutes are the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute on Aging.

55 Will who played Grandpa Walton on “The Waltons” : GEER

Actor Will Geer died in 1978 just after filming the sixth season of “The Waltons”, in which he played Grandpa Zeb Walton. Geer was a noted social activist and was blacklisted in the fifties for refusing to appear before the all-powerful House Committee on Un-American Activities.

56 Big name in applesauce : MOTT

Samuel R. Mott was a producer of apple cider and vinegar. In 1842 he founded his own company to market and sell his products. The Mott’s company owns brands such as Mr & Mrs T, Hawaiian Punch and ReaLime/ReaLemon.

58 Film villain who never said 23-Across, with “the” : .. WICKED WITCH
(23A Line never said by 58-Across : FLY, MY PRETTIES, FLY)

The top 5 movie villains in the American Film Institute’s list “100 Years … 100 Heroes & Villains” are:

  1. Dr. Hannibal Lecter in “The Silence of the Lambs”
  2. Norman Bates in “Psycho”
  3. Darth Vader in “The Empire Strikes Back”
  4. The Wicked Witch of the West in “The Wizard of Oz”
  5. Nurse Ratched in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”

64 Manhattan’s ___ Stadium : ICAHN

Carl Icahn has many business interests, and is probably best known in recent years for his dealings with Yahoo! Icahn has a reputation as a corporate raider, a reputation that dates back to his hostile takeover of TWA in 1985. He made a lot of money out of that deal, before being ousted in 1993 after the company filed for bankruptcy protection.

66 The “E” in Q.E.D. : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

69 Counterpart of pitch : YAW

On the world of flight dynamics, three critical angles of rotation are known as pitch, roll and yaw. Pitch describes the lift and descent of the nose and tail. Roll describes motion around the axis that runs along the length of the airplane. Yaw describes rotation of the aircraft around the vertical axis.

71 Title for two Beatles : SIR

Sir Ringo Starr’s real name is Richard Starkey. Before he joined the Beatles, replacing drummer Pete Best, Starkey played with the Raving Texans. It was with the Raving Texans that he adopted the name “Ringo Starr”, because he wore a lot of rings and he thought it sounded “cowboyish”. Back then his drum solos were billed as “Starr Time”.

The ex-Beatles bass player’s full name is Sir James Paul McCartney. “Paul” was knighted for his services to music in 1997.

72 ___-Locka, Fla. : OPA

Opa-Locka is a rather interesting city in Florida. Located near Miami, Opa-Locka has a themed city plan that is based on “One Thousand and One Nights”. The city hall has a very Arabian look, and some examples of street names are Ali Baba Avenue and Sesame Street.

75 Woodworker’s tool : ADZ

An adze (also “adz”) is similar to an axe, but is different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool’s shaft. An axe blade is set in line with the shaft.

76 Digital image format : BITMAP

A bitmap is an image file format used to store digital images. Basically, each pixel in a bitmap file is stored as a “bit” of information, hence the name “bitmap”. In 1987, CompuServe introduced a new type of image file called the Graphics Interchange Format (GIF). A GIF image takes the same information as a bitmap and then compresses it, resulting in a smaller file size. However, during compression the image may lose some resolution. The GIF format also handles short video clips, usually animations.

86 Former Mississippi senator Trent : LOTT

Trent Lott is a political figure who first went to Washington to work as an administrative assistant to Representative William M. Colmer, from Mississippi. After four years working for Colmer, Lott ran for the House seat that Colmer was to leave vacant on his retirement. Colmer endorsed Lott in that election, even though Colmer was a Democrat and Lott ran as a Republican. Lott won the race very handily, launching a 35-year career representing his home state of Mississippi in both the House and the Senate. Lott eventually ran into trouble for remarks he made that were interpreted as being racially motivated, and ended up resigning in 2007.

87 The first recorded one was noted by the Greek scientist Hipparchus in 134 B.C. : NOVA

A nova (plural “novae”) is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

89 2014 hit film featuring Oprah Winfrey : SELMA

“Selma” is a 2014 film about the Selma to Montgomery marches of 1965. Directed by Ava DuVernay, the movie stars David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Tom Wilkinson as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

92 Colorful fish : KOI

Koi are fish that are also known as Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

95 Word before check or drop : MIC …

A mic drop takes place when a performer has done particularly well and decides to celebrate by throwing or dropping the microphone to the floor. That doesn’t seem to happen at the performances I tend to frequent …

96 Overnighter : RED-EYE

A red-eye flight is one departing late at night and arriving early the next morning. The term is a reference to tired passengers disembarking with red eyes.

98 Chinese principle : TAO

The name of the Chinese character “tao” translates as “path”, but the concept of Taoism signifies the true nature of the world.

99 TV detective who never said 121-Across : SERGEANT FRIDAY
(121A Line never said by 99-Across : JUST THE FACTS, MA’AM)

Sgt. Joe Friday may have said “No, ma’am” and “I’m a cop” a lot on “Dragnet”, but he never actually said the oft-quoted “Just the facts, ma’am”.

106 Exercise done while sitting : ETUDE

An étude is a short instrumental composition that is usually quite hard to play and is intended to help the performer master a particular technique. “Étude” is the French word for “study”. Études are commonly performed on the piano.

108 Wax holders : EARS

“Cerumen” is the medical term for earwax. I’ve just been reading about some of the historical uses for earwax. However, I can’t bring myself to record them here, as each is more disgusting that the next …

110 Belief of Benjamin Franklin : DEISM

Deism (from the Latin “deus” meaning god) is the belief that a supreme being created the universe, a belief based on observation and reason and without the need for faith. Further, a deist does not accept divine intervention and rather believes that the supreme being, having created the universe, leaves the world to it own devices.

Benjamin Franklin came from a large family. He was his father’s fifteenth child (Josiah Franklin had seventeen children in all, with two wives). Benjamin was born in Boston in 1706. He had very little schooling, heading out to work for his father when he was ten years old. He became an apprentice printer to his older brother at the age of twelve. Benjamin did quite well with that limited education …

115 Lhasa ___ : APSO

The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after “Lhasa” (the capital city) and “apso” (a Tibetan word meaning “bearded”). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

116 May ordeal for some H.S. students : AP EXAM

The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

119 N.Y. engineering sch. : RPI

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the “application of science to the common purposes of life”, an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school’s sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

120 Pop singer Jason : MRAZ

Jason Mraz is a singer-songwriter from Mechanicsville, Virginia. Jason is of Czech descent, and his name “Mraz” translates as “frost”.

125 Last of the Stuarts : ANNE

Queen Anne was the last of the Stuarts to rule in Britain and Ireland, and the first sovereign of the Kingdom of Great Britain (after England and Scotland united). Anne was the last of the Stuart line because she died without any surviving children, despite having been pregnant seventeen times.

Down

1 Secret society : MAFIA

Apparently, “Cosa Nostra” is the real name for the Italian Mafia. “Cosa Nostra” translates as “our thing” or “this thing of ours”. The term first became public in the US when the FBI managed to turn some members of the American Mafia. The Italian authorities established that “Cosa Nostra” was also used in Sicily when they penetrated the Sicilian Mafia in the 1980s. The term “mafia” seems to be just a literary invention that has become popular with the public.

3 Half of an old crime duo : CLYDE

Bonnie and Clyde were criminals who robbed and killed their way across the central US during the Great Depression. Clyde Barrow was born a desperately poor young boy just south of Dallas, Texas. He was always in trouble with the law, first getting arrested at the age of 16. He met Bonnie Parker in 1930 at a friend’s house, and the smitten Parker followed Clyde into a life of crime. The pair were killed by a posse of Texas police officers just four years later in Louisiana.

4 Croque-monsieur ingredient : HAM

The “croque monsieur” is a French dish, a baked or fried ham and cheese sandwich. Before baking, the sandwich is dipped in whipped eggs. The cheese used is traditionally Emmental or Gruyère. If the sandwich is topped with a fried egg, then it referred to as a croque madame.

5 Plural suffix? : -ITY

“Plurality” is another word for “majority”. The term is often applied to the excess of votes received by one candidate over another candidate in an election.

9 German artist Dix : OTTO

Otto Dix was a German painter and printmaker. Dix fought in the military in WWI and was profoundly affected by his experiences. Many of his artistic works reflected those experiences.

10 “___ Love” (Cole Porter song) : SO IN

Cole Porter was a little unusual amongst his peers in that he was one of the few successful songwriters who wrote both lyrics and musics for his compositions. Porter was seriously injured in a riding accident when in his forties and was left disabled and in pain. Despite this, he continued to work and produced his most successful work after the accident.

11 G.I. grub : MRE

The Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE) comes in a lightweight package that’s easy to tote around. The MRE replaced the more cumbersome Meal, Combat, Individual (MCI) in 1981, a meal-in-a-can. In turn, the MCI had replaced the C-ration in 1958, a less sophisticated meal-in-a-can with a more limited choice.

12 Without a buyer lined up : ON SPEC

Something that is created on spec is done so without having a specific buyer or consumer in mind. Many crosswords are constructed on spec, and then submitted to the likes of the “New York Times” or “Los Angeles Times” in the hope of publication.

16 ___-Roman wrestling : GRECO

Greco-Roman wrestling was contested at the first modern Olympic Games, back in 1896. Back then there was relatively little regulation of the sport and Greco-Roman contests were noted for their brutality. Bouts also took a long time to finish, often lasting hours. In fact, two competitors in the final round of the event at the 1912 Olympic Games fought a match that lasted 11 hours and 40 minutes. The victor was so exhausted after the contest that he was unable to compete in the final bout.

17 British noble who never said 44-Down : EARL OF GREYSTOKE
(44D Line never said by 17-Down : ME TARZAN, YOU JANE)

In the stories by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes was actually Englishman John Clayton, Viscount Greystoke.

Tarzan is the title character in the series of books created by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The line “Me Tarzan, you Jane” never appeared in the books, and indeed doesn’t even figure in the movies. Apparently Johnny Weissmuller (who played Tarzan in the thirties and forties) saw Maureen O’Sullivan (“Jane”, to Weissmuller’s “Tarzan”) struggling with a suitcase in the parking lot during filming. He grabbed the bag from her, jokingly saying “Me Tarzan, you Jane”, and people have been quoting those words ever since.

18 Anastasia’s love in Disney’s “Anastasia” : DIMITRI

“Anastasia” is an animated musical from Don Bluth and Gary Goldman. The storyline is based on the urban myth that Anastasia, the youngest daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, survived the family’s execution by the Bolsheviks in 1918. Anastasia is voiced by Meg Ryan, although when Anastasia sings, her voice is dubbed by Liz Callaway.

24 Purchase for a lorry : TYRE

Here’s another example of terms that change as we cross the Atlantic Ocean. When talking about tires (“tyres” in Britain and Ireland), a defect can cause a “flat” (“puncture” in Britain and Ireland).

On the other side of the Atlantic, a truck is called a “lorry”, a term that probably comes from the English dialectal verb “to lurry” meaning “to drag, tug”.

31 Blood-typing letters : ABO

The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a universal donor.

35 London’s ___ Park : HYDE

Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in central London. A famous element in Hyde Park is Speakers’ Corner, which is located in the northeast corner of the park. Speakers’ Corner was the site of the infamous Tyburn gallows that was used for public executions in centuries past. Today, Speakers’ Corner is a site for public speeches and debate, and a center for public protest. Some say that the tradition of allowing free speech at the site dates back to the condemned man being allowed to say his final words prior to execution at the Tyburn gallows.

39 Varicolored : PIED

Something described as pied is patchy or blotchy in color, piebald. The term comes from the Middle English “pie”, an old name for the magpie, and is a reference to the bird’s black and white plumage.

40 Like BFFs : TIGHT

Best friend forever (BFF)

42 Formative : SEMINAL

Something that is seminal is creative and has the power to originate, is formative. The term comes from the Latin “semen” meaning “seed”.

43 Shade of green : AVOCADO

The wonderful avocado comes from a tree that is native to Mexico and Central America. The avocado fruit is sometime called an avocado pear, because of its shape, even though it is not related to the pear at all. The fruit might also be referred to as an alligator pear, due to the roughness of the green skin of some avocado cultivars.

47 Iraq War danger, for short : IED

Improvised explosive device (IED)

50 Rest of the afternoon : SIESTA

We use the word “siesta” to describe a short nap in the early afternoon, and imported the word into English from Spanish. In turn, the Spanish word is derived from the Latin “hora sexta” meaning “the sixth hour”. The idea is that the nap is taken at the sixth hour after dawn.

53 Common landscaping tree with acorns : PIN OAK

The pin oak is also called the swamp Spanish oak. The name “pin oak” may have been given because the tree has many small and slender twigs. The name may also come from the fact that the hard wood from the tree was traditionally used to make wooden pins used in building construction.

54 Puts the kibosh on something : STOPS IT

A kibosh is something that constrains or checks. “Kibosh” looks like a Yiddish word but it isn’t, and is more likely English slang from the early 1800s.

57 Active ingredient in marijuana : THC

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive in cannabis.

60 Number of Spanish kings named Carlos : CUATRO

In Spanish,“cuatro” is “four”.

68 Home to the Eads Bridge over the Mississippi: Abbr. : STL

James Eads was an American Civil Engineer and inventor. He designed and built the first road and rail bridge to cross the Mississippi River in St. Louis, a bridge which went into service in 1874 and is still used to this day. Aptly enough, it is known as the Eads Bridge.

77 Part of Caesar’s boast : I CAME …

The oft-quoted statement “Veni, vidi, vici” (“I came, I saw, I conquered”) is believed by many to have been written by Julius Caesar. The words date back to 47 BCE and refer to the short war between Rome and Pharnaces II of Pontus.

78 Las ___, Canary Islands : PALMAS

The Spanish province of Las Palmas comprises about half of the islands of Gran Canaria, and several other small islands, located off the northwest coast of Africa. Gran Canaria is perhaps better known as the “Canary Islands” in English. The province takes its name from Las Palmas, the capital city of Gran Canaria island.

82 Elmer, to Bugs : DOC

Bugs Bunny first said “What’s up, Doc?” in the 1940 cartoon short “A Wild Hare”, addressing the hunter Elmer Fudd.

Elmer Fudd is one of the most famous Looney Tunes cartoon characters, and is the hapless nemesis of Bugs Bunny. If you have never seen it, check out Elmer and Bugs in the marvelous “Rabbit of Seville”, a short cartoon that parodies Rossini’s “Barber of Seville”. Wonderful stuff …

85 Many a northern Iraqi : KURD

Most of the Kurdish people live in a region known as Kurdistan, which stretches into parts of Iran, Syria, Turkey as well as northern Iraq.

94 Former Penn State football coach : PATERNO

Joe Paterno was the head coach of the Penn State Nittany Lions from 1966 to 2011. He and his wife Sue wrote a children’s book together called “We Are Penn State!“

103 Feudal estate : FIEF

Feudalism was a legal and military system that flourished in medieval Europe. Central to the system were the concepts of lords, vassals and fiefs. Lords would grant fiefs (land or rights) to vassals in exchange for allegiance and service.

104 Cyrano de Bergerac’s love : ROXANE

Cyrano de Bergerac was a French dramatist who lived in the 17th century. Paintings and drawings show that Bergerac had a large nose, although the size was exaggerated by those who wrote about his life. Reputedly, Cyrano fought in over 1000 duels, mostly instigated by someone insulting his nose. In the play written about his life, Cyrano had a famous lover named Roxane. It is thought that the Roxane character was modeled on Cyrano’s cousin who lived with his sister in a convent.

111 Shiraz native : IRANI

The Iranian city of Shiraz has long been associated with wine, but there is no proven link between the city and the wine/grape we know today as “Shiraz” (also called “Syrah”). Having said that, some clay jars were found just outside of the city of Shiraz that contained wine; wine that was 7,000 years old!

117 Stinky Le Pew : PEPE

Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe accidentally painted down her back.

118 ___ Helens : MT ST

The active volcano in Washington state called Mount St. Helens was named by explorer George Vancouver for his friend, British diplomat Lord St Helens. 57 people died when When Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, making it the deadliest eruption in the history of the US.

122 Communication syst. for the deaf : TTY

TTY is an acronym describing a teletype writer, a device that is used at either end of a telephone line when one or both conversing parties is deaf. The teletype writer passes written messages to and fro between each of the terminals.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Exaggerated virility : MACHISMO
9 Effortless assimilation : OSMOSIS
16 Alternatives to H.S. diplomas : GEDS
20 Surgical removal procedure : ABLATION
21 What might raise the roof? : TORNADO
22 Come down, in a way : RAIN
23 Line never said by 58-Across : FLY, MY PRETTIES, FLY!
25 Columnist Bombeck : ERMA
26 Birth control option, briefly : IUD
27 “Please hold the line” : STAY ON
28 Shopping center? : PEES
29 Excerpt : CLIP
30 Subjects of expertise : AREAS
33 Lay an egg, say : ERR
34 Targets on “chest day” : PECS
35 Hollers : HOOTS
36 Line never said by 83-Across : BEAM ME UP, SCOTTY
41 Lobster ___ diavolo : FRA
42 Official language of a U.S. territory : SAMOAN
45 Medical research org. : NIH
46 “Gotcha, man!” : I DIG IT!
48 December 31, e.g. : EVE
49 Diminutive for Theresa : TESS
52 Takes the plunge : LEAPS
55 Will who played Grandpa Walton on “The Waltons” : GEER
56 Big name in applesauce : MOTT
58 Film villain who never said 23-Across, with “the” : .. WICKED WITCH
61 Some purchasers of expensive gowns : DEBS
64 Manhattan’s ___ Stadium : ICAHN
66 The “E” in Q.E.D. : ERAT
67 Noses out? : SNOUTS
69 Counterpart of pitch : YAW
70 Prefix with -lepsy : NARCO-
71 Title for two Beatles : SIR
72 ___-Locka, Fla. : OPA
73 Try, in a way : TASTE
75 Woodworker’s tool : ADZ
76 Digital image format : BITMAP
79 3:00 : EAST
80 Willowy : LITHE
81 Washer/dryer unit : LOAD
83 Commander who never said 36-Across : CAPTAIN KIRK
86 Former Mississippi senator Trent : LOTT
87 The first recorded one was noted by the Greek scientist Hipparchus in 134 B.C. : NOVA
89 2014 hit film featuring Oprah Winfrey : SELMA
90 Announcement from a band : TOUR
92 Colorful fish : KOI
93 Surveillance aid : SPYCAM
95 Word before check or drop : MIC …
96 Overnighter : RED-EYE
98 Chinese principle : TAO
99 TV detective who never said 121-Across : SERGEANT FRIDAY
106 Exercise done while sitting : ETUDE
108 Wax holders : EARS
109 What a plus sign may indicate : ION
110 Belief of Benjamin Franklin : DEISM
114 Already: Fr. : DEJA
115 Lhasa ___ : APSO
116 May ordeal for some H.S. students : AP EXAM
119 N.Y. engineering sch. : RPI
120 Pop singer Jason : MRAZ
121 Line never said by 99-Across : JUST THE FACTS, MA’AM
125 Last of the Stuarts : ANNE
126 Thoroughly enjoyed something : ATE IT UP
127 Birth : NASCENCE
128 Obstinate responses : NOES
129 “Oh, lordy!” : MERCY ME!
130 Corporations and partnerships, e.g. : ENTITIES

Down

1 Secret society : MAFIA
2 Moving too quickly to be seen clearly : ABLUR
3 Half of an old crime duo : CLYDE
4 Croque-monsieur ingredient : HAM
5 Plural suffix? : -ITY
6 Drinks in moderation : SIPS
7 Post-___ : MORTEM
8 Difficult kind of push-up : ONE-ARM
9 German artist Dix : OTTO
10 “___ Love” (Cole Porter song) : SO IN
11 G.I. grub : MRE
12 Without a buyer lined up : ON SPEC
13 Seattle-based insurance giant : SAFECO
14 Least productive : IDLEST
15 Some beans : SOYS
16 ___-Roman wrestling : GRECO
17 British noble who never said 44-Down : EARL OF GREYSTOKE
18 Anastasia’s love in Disney’s “Anastasia” : DIMITRI
19 Irritably answers : SNAPS AT
24 Purchase for a lorry : TYRE
31 Blood-typing letters : ABO
32 Politician’s goal : SEAT
34 Impatient dismissals : PSHAWS
35 London’s ___ Park : HYDE
37 All over again : ANEW
38 Not yet rented : UNLET
39 Varicolored : PIED
40 Like BFFs : TIGHT
42 Formative : SEMINAL
43 Shade of green : AVOCADO
44 Line never said by 17-Down : ME TARZAN, YOU JANE
47 Iraq War danger, for short : IED
50 Rest of the afternoon : SIESTA
51 Economizes : SCRIMPS
53 Common landscaping tree with acorns : PIN OAK
54 Puts the kibosh on something : STOPS IT
57 Active ingredient in marijuana : THC
59 Sport making its Olympic debut in Tokyo in 2020 : KARATE
60 Number of Spanish kings named Carlos : CUATRO
62 Small boat, maybe : BATH TOY
63 Angel : SWEETIE
65 Head, slangily : NOB
68 Home to the Eads Bridge over the Mississippi: Abbr. : STL
74 Suffer : AIL
77 Part of Caesar’s boast : I CAME …
78 Las ___, Canary Islands : PALMAS
79 Opposite of kill : ENACT
82 Elmer, to Bugs : DOC
84 “Sounds good to me!” : I’M IN!
85 Many a northern Iraqi : KURD
88 Rubin ___ (classic illusion) : VASE
91 Try for a part : READ
93 ___ Graham, Oprah’s longtime beau : STEDMAN
94 Former Penn State football coach : PATERNO
97 Go green, say : DYE
100 Standing : REPUTE
101 Hilarious joke, in slang : GASSER
102 Titillating : EROTIC
103 Feudal estate : FIEF
104 Cyrano de Bergerac’s love : ROXANE
105 How paint is usually sold : IN A CAN
107 Stuns : DAZES
111 Shiraz native : IRANI
112 #, to a proofreader : SPACE
113 Performers in old-fashioned dumb shows : MIMES
115 Stuck, after “in” : … A JAM
116 Buzzing : AHUM
117 Stinky Le Pew : PEPE
118 ___ Helens : MT ST
122 Communication syst. for the deaf : TTY
123 Comp ___ (coll. major) : SCI
124 Crossed : MET

11 thoughts on “0609-19 NY Times Crossword 9 Jun 19, Sunday”

  1. 35:09. Interesting theme. The only one that really surprised me was that BEAM ME UP SCOTTY was never uttered. A few misspellings cause me issues, but otherwise this was a pretty smooth solve.

    Best –

  2. 37:31, no errors. Initially found myself dreading this puzzle with its cross referenced theme answers. But once I caught on, I used the theme to help solve the puzzle more quickly. An unusual process for me.

  3. 2 errors. Couldn’t get off of GreystoNe even though I knew Noi (vs Koi) was wrong. Didn’t know StedMan or Mraz so guessed Stedfan/Fraz. Other than that very fun. 11 years in development! Pretty amazing.

  4. Canadian here, doing NY Times puzzle every weekend (usually printed in our paper a couple of weeks after it’s in the NY Times). I fight through some of the American references sometimes (i.e. your politicians, sports figures, etc) but managed to get them this time. However, I cannot for the life of me figure out why 95 Across (3:00) is EAST. What am I missing??

  5. No errors and enjoyed the theme. No bragging rights cuz my daughter had to help me with Oprah’s boyfriend. A team effort victory.

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