0315-20 NY Times Crossword 15 Mar 20, Sunday

Constructed by: Nancy Stark & Will Nediger
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Ready, Set … Gets Low!

Themed answers are spoonerisms, like “gets low” for “let’s go”:

  • 23A Cheer for beer on campus? : ALL HAIL, HALL ALE!
  • 38A Hoot at an out-of-focus nature photograph? : BOO BLURRED BLUEBIRD
  • 54A Antsy feeling when one is out of cellphone range? : SO NERVOUS, NO SERVICE
  • 78A Where a demanding dockworker gets supplies? : STEVEDORE DIVA STORE
  • 94A Landing in Rotterdam? : DUTCH-TOWN TOUCHDOWN
  • 114A Piano that plays only a certain three notes? : B-CHORD KEYBOARD

… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 28m 07s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Palindromic band with the palindromic song title “SOS” : ABBA

The ABBA song “SOS” was originally titled “Turn Me On”. In the movie “Mamma Mia!”, “SOS” is performed by Meryl Streep (brilliantly) and by Pierce Brosnan (terribly).

5 Place for an oxygen tent, for short : ICU

Intensive care unit (ICU)

8 A whole bunch : SCADS

The origin of the word “scads”, meaning “lots and lots”, is unclear. That said, “scads” was used to mean “dollars” back in the mid-1800s.

13 High-level H.S. math class : AP CALC

The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of an AP course, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

The Latin word “calculus” was originally used for a reckoning or an account, and originally applied to a pebble that was used to maintain a count. The Latin word came from the Greek for a pebble, “khalix”.

20 Dandy : FOP

A dandy is a man who is overly fastidious with regard to his personal appearance. There’s a suggestion that the term originated in Scotland, where “Dandy” is a diminutive of the name “Andrew”. Back in the early 1800s, when the use of “dandy” was at its height, the female equivalent was a dandizette.

26 Milan-based fashion brand : ARMANI

Giorgio Armani is an Italian fashion designer and founder of the company that has borne his name since 1975. Although Armani is famous for his menswear, the company makes everything from jewelry to perfume.

28 Put down in print : LIBEL

The word “libel” describes a published or written statement likely to harm a person’s reputation. It comes into English from the Latin “libellus”, the word for a small book. Back in the 1500s, libel was just a formal written statement, with the more damaging association arising in the 1600s. The related concept of slander is defamation in a transient form, such as speech, sign language or gestures.

31 West of Chicago : KANYE

Kanye West is a rap singer who was born in Atlanta and raised in Chicago. He also spent some time in Nanjing, China as a child, where his mother was teaching as part of an exchange program. West is married to reality star Kim Kardashian.

33 Author Calvino : ITALO

As well as being an author, Italo Calvino was a famous Italian journalist. He was a supporter of communism and so wasn’t very popular in the US nor in Britain.

37 Half-___ (rhyming order) : CAF

The first successful process for removing caffeine from coffee involved steaming the beans in salt water, and then extracting the caffeine using benzene (a potent carcinogen) as a solvent. Coffee processed this way was sold as Sanka here in the US. There are other processes used these days, and let’s hope they are safer …

43 Chicago university : DEPAUL

DePaul University is a private school in Chicago. It was founded in 1898 and originally named St. Vincent’s College, after French priest Saint Vincent de Paul. The name was changed to DePaul in 1907, the same year the school admitted its first female students.

46 Small three-legged table : TEAPOY

“Teapoy” is a term of Indian origin that is used in English to describe a small, three-legged table. Just because of the letters “tea” in “teapoy”, the table has come to be associated with the serving of tea.

47 Two-time Best Actor, 1954 and 1972 : BRANDO

Actor Marlon Brando really hit the big time with his Oscar-winning performance in the 1951 movie “A Streetcar Named Desire”. Brando went on to win another Best Actor Oscar for his performance in 1972’s “The Godfather”, which gave him the platform to establish himself as a political activist. He turned down the award and didn’t attend the ceremony. Instead he sent a Native American rights activist called Sacheen Littlefeather who made a speech protesting the depiction of Native Americans in Hollywood movies. Brando wasn’t the first person to refuse an Oscar. George C. Scott did the same thing when he won for playing the title role in 1970’s “Patton”. Scott just didn’t like the whole idea of “competing” with other actors.

48 “___ Old Cowhand” (Bing Crosby hit) : I’M AN

The phrase “Yippee Ki-Yay” is uttered very colorfully by the Bruce Willis character in the “Die Hard” series of films. It appears that the phrase is a variant of “yippie yi yo kayah”, a refrain in a 1930s Johnny Mercer song called “I’m an Old Cowhand”, which Bing Crosby performed in the movie “Rhythm on the Range”.

52 “If you ask me,” briefly : IMO

In my opinion (IMO)

53 Something populists revile : ELITISM

Populism is a political doctrine that appeals to the masses. Populists usually position themselves against the perceived “elite”.

59 Sport ___ : UTE

A utility vehicle is often called a “ute” for short. Nowadays one mainly hears about sport-utes and crossover-utes.

60 One of the dames in 2018’s “Tea With the Dames” : DENCH

Dame Judi Dench is an outstanding English actress who has appeared for decades in her home country on stage and screen. Dench’s film career took off in the nineties with a relatively trivial role as “M” in the James Bond series of films. Since then she has played leading roles in several excellent movies including “Shakespeare in Love”, “Mrs. Brown”, “Notes on a Scandal” and “Philomena”.

61 Like the lion slain by Hercules : NEMEAN

“The Twelve Labors of Hercules” is actually a Greek myth, although Hercules is the Roman name for the hero that the Greeks called “Heracles”. The first of these labors was to slay the Nemean lion, a monster that lived in a cave near Nemea. Hercules had a tough job as the lion’s golden fur was impenetrable to normal weapons. One version of the story is that Hercules killed the lion by shooting an arrow into its mouth. Another version says that Hercules stunned the monster with a club and then strangled him with his bare hands.

68 Jackie on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : CHAN

Jackie Chan is an actor from Hong Kong who is noted for his action and martial arts films. When Chan was 17-years-old he featured as a stunt actor in Bruce Lee movies. He also starred in the 1982 Hong Kong action film “Dragon Lord” which includes a fight scene that required an amazing 2900 takes, a record in the movie industry.

71 Spanish omelet ingredient : HUEVO

In Spanish, one needs at least one “huevo” (egg) to make an omelet.

72 Isaac’s firstborn : ESAU

Esau is a son of Isaac, and someone whose story is told in the Bible’s Book of Genesis. Esau had three wives, Adah, Aholibamah and Bashemath.

75 Bête ___ : NOIRE

“Bête noire” translates from French as “black beast”, and is used in English to describe something or someone that is disliked.

78 Where a demanding dockworker gets supplies? : STEVEDORE DIVA STORE

A stevedore, or longshoreman, is someone employed in the loading and unloading of ships at a port. The word “stevedore” comes from the Spanish “estibador”, meaning “one who loads cargo”, with the verb “to steeve” meaning to load cargo in a hold. The word “longshoreman”, is simply from a man who works “alongshore”.

82 Snack item with a salient anagram? : SALTINE

“Saltine” is an anagram of “salient”.

94 Landing in Rotterdam? : DUTCH-TOWN TOUCHDOWN

Rotterdam is the largest port in Europe, and the second-largest city in the Netherlands (after Amsterdam). Indeed, Rotterdam was the busiest port in the world from 1962 to 2004, when that honor went to Shanghai. Rotterdam’s economic importance is largely due to its location at the confluence of the Rhine, Meuse and Scheldt rivers that provide navigation into the Central European hinterland.

98 Curry or Rice : TIM

Tim Curry is a marvelous actor from England who is perhaps best known on this side of the Atlantic for playing Dr. Frank-N-Furter in the 1975 movie “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”. Curry also played the title role in the original Broadway play “Amadeus”.

Tim Rice is most famous as a lyricist, with his most celebrated collaborations being with Andrew Lloyd Webber. Lloyd Webber and Rice together wrote the hit musicals “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat”, “Jesus Christ Superstar” and “Evita”.

99 Snack items with their name on the top and bottom : OREOS

How the Oreo cookie came to get its name seems to have been lost in the mists of time. One theory is that it comes from the French “or” meaning “gold”, a reference to the gold color of the original packing. Another suggestion is that the name is the Greek word “oreo” meaning “beautiful, nice, well-done”.

101 Lotion bottle abbr. : SPF

In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

104 Native seal hunter : ALEUT

The Aleuts live on the Aleutian Islands of the North Pacific, and on the Commander Islands at the western end of the same island chain. The Aleutian Islands are part of the United States, and the Commander Islands are in Russia.

107 Part of a college application, informally : REC

Recommendation (rec.)

110 Roaster or toaster : EMCEE

The tradition of toasting someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

112 It’s not legal : LETTER

Our paper sizes here in North America don’t conform with the standards in the rest of the world. ISO standard sizes used elsewhere were chosen so that the ratio of width to length is usually one to the square root of two. This mathematical relationship means that when you cut a piece of paper in two each half preserves the aspect ratio of the original, which can be useful in making reduced or enlarged copies of documents. Our standard size of “letter” (ltr., 8.5 x 11 inches) was determined in 1980 by the Reagan administration to be the official paper size for the US government. Prior to this, the “legal” size (8.5 x 14 inches) had been the standard, since 1921.

117 Slips : ERRATA

“Errata” is the past participle of the Latin word “errare” meaning “to err”. We use “errata” (singular “erratum”) to describe a list of errors that have been noted in some publication.

121 Willie Mays phrase : SAY HEY

Willie Mays’ nickname was “Say Hey Kid”, although his friends and teammates were more likely to refer to him as “Buck”. When Mays was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, he was asked who was the best player he’d ever seen in the game. He replied, “I don’t mean to be bashful, but I was.”

122 A little tight : TIPSY

The term “tipsy” comes from the verb “to tip” meaning “to overturn, knock over”, and has been meaning “drunk” since the late 1500s.

123 Pseudoscientific subj. : ESP

Extrasensory perception (ESP)

124 Charon’s river : STYX

The River Styx of Greek mythology was the river that formed the boundary between the Earth and the Underworld (or “Hades”). The souls of the newly dead had to cross the River Styx in a ferry boat piloted by Charon. Traditionally, a coin would be placed in the mouths of the dead “to pay the ferryman”.

Down

2 It has a button in the middle : BELLY

The navel is basically the scar left behind when the umbilical cord is removed from a newborn baby. One interesting use of the umbilicus (navel, belly button) is to differentiate between identical twins, especially when they are very young.

4 Reason that some students struggle in school, for short : ADHD

The “official” name for the condition we sometimes still refer to as “attention deficit disorder” (ADD) is “attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder” (ADHD).

10 Pseudonymously : AKA

Also known as (aka)

11 Manny’s last name on “Modern Family” : DELGADO

On the sitcom “Modern Family”, the character named Manny Delgado is Gloria’s young son from her first marriage. Manny is played by Rico Rodriguez.

14 Bill padding : PORK

Pork-barrel politics have been around for a long time. The term “pork barrel” originated in 1863 in a story by Edward Everett Hale called “The Children of the Public”. Hale used the phrase in a positive way, describing any public spending by government for the benefit of citizens. By the 1870s the term “pork” had negative connotations, with references in the press to “pork-barrel bills” in Congress. Nowadays “pork” really applies to any government project designed to benefit a relatively small group of citizens (usually potential voters for a particular politician) with the bill being paid by the citizenry as a whole.

36 World capital settled by Vikings circa the ninth century : DUBLIN

The city of Dublin, the capital of Ireland, is known as “Baile Átha Cliath” in Irish (“town of the hurdled ford”). The English name “Dublin” is an anglicized form of the older Irish name for the city “Dubh Linn”, meaning “black pool”.

38 Scourge : BANE

Today, we tend to use the word “bane” to mean anathema, a source of persistent annoyance. A few centuries ago, a bane was a cause of harm or death, perhaps a deadly poison.

40 Martin Sheen’s real first name : RAMON

“Martin Sheen” is the stage name of actor Ramón Estévez. Despite all of his great performances, Sheen has never even been nominated for an Academy Award. Isn’t that something? I thought he was outstanding in his starring role in television’s “The West Wing”.

41 Name of seven Danish kings : ERIC

The constitutional monarchy of Denmark consists of not only the country of Denmark, but also the autonomous constituent countries of the Faroe Islands and Greenland.

42 “Le ___,” Matisse work that hung upside down at the Museum of Modern Art for 47 days : BATEAU

“Le Bateau” is an interesting work by Henri Matisse. The 1953 picture is made from pieces of painted paper arranged to look like a boat (“bateau”). The Museum of Modern Art acquired the piece in 1961 and put it on display. Matisse’s “Le Bateau” actually hung on the wall upside down for 47 days before anyone noticed the error …

45 Bakery/cafe chain : PANERA

Panera Bread is a chain of bakery/coffeehouses. A Panera restaurant is a good place to get online while having a cup of coffee. Back in 2006 and 2007, Panera was the largest provider of free Wi-Fi access in the whole of the US.

51 Cheat, informally : EUCHRE

Euchre is a card game that probably came to the US from Germany, introduced by German farmers who settled in Wisconsin. Euchre is a trick-taking game usually played by four people in two partnerships. Unlike bridge, Euchre is played with a stripped down deck of 24 or 32 cards. The verb “to euchre” is slang for “to cheat, swindle”, a term that presumably comes from the card game.

55 Suggested intake level, for short : RDA

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

57 Correct : EMEND

The verb “to amend” means “to change for the better, put right, alter by adding”. The related verb “to emend” is used more rarely, and mainly in reference to the editing of professional writing. Both terms are derived from the Latin “emendare” meaning “to remove fault”.

58 “Two Sisters” or “Two Young Girls at the Piano” : RENOIR

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was a French painter who was very much at the forefront of the Impressionist Movement. Renoir was a prolific artist, with several thousand works attributed to him. The largest collection of Renoirs is actually in the United States. You can see 181 of his paintings at the Barnes Foundation just outside Philadelphia.

65 Site of a 1976 South African uprising : SOWETO

Soweto is an urban area in the city of Johannesburg, South Africa. The name comes from SOuth WEstern TOwnship, a black township that was set up the days of apartheid. The famous Soweto Uprising took place in 1976, triggered by government policy forcing education to be given in Afrikaans rather than in English.

69 Virtual animals in an early 2000s fad : NEOPETS

Neopets.com is a website where one can own a virtual pet. I wouldn’t bother …

71 “___ Got the Whole World in His Hands” : HE’S

“He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands” is an American spiritual. The song was first published in 1927, and gained popularity in 1958 when English singer Laurie London released a version that topped the charts on both sides of the Atlantic. London was only 13 years old when he had that number one hit.

74 Alternative to a snake : DRANO

To clean out drains we might buy Crystal Drano, which is sodium hydroxide (lye) mixed with sodium nitrate, sodium chloride (table salt) and aluminum. The contents of Drano work in concert to clear the clog. The lye reacts with any fats creating soap which may be enough to break up the clog. Also, the finely-divided aluminum reacts with the lye generating hydrogen gas that churns the mixture. Any hair or fibers are cut by the sharp edges of the nitrate and chloride crystals. Having said all that, I find that boiling water poured down the drain quite often does the job …

76 They catch waves : RADIOS

When German physicist Heinrich Hertz first demonstrated radio waves in 1887, he used the simplest form of antenna, namely a dipole antenna. A dipole antenna comprises two metal rods that are usually pointing away from each other. Ideally, the length of each rod is one half of the wavelength off the signal to be received.

79 Nickname on “The Addams Family” : TISH

Gomez and Morticia (“Tish”) Addams were the parents in “The Addams Family”, a creation of cartoonist Charles Addams. In the sixties television show, Gomez was played by John Astin and Morticia was played by Carolyn Jones.

80 Shakespeare’s “You, too?” : ET TU?

It was Shakespeare who popularized the words “Et tu, Brute?” (meaning “And you, Brutus?”). They appear in his play “Julius Caesar”, although the phrase had been around long before he penned his drama. It’s not known what Julius Caesar actually said in real life (if anything at all) as he was assassinated on the steps of the Senate in Rome.

81 Bugs Bunny, e.g. : TOON

Bugs Bunny first said “What’s up, Doc?” in the 1940 cartoon short “A Wild Hare”, while addressing the hunter Elmer Fudd.

83 Christina of pop : AGUILERA

Christina Aguilera is a singer who got her start on television’s “Star Search”. From there she took a role on Disney’s “The Mickey Mouse Club”. Like several singers today it seems, Aguilera developed a more provocative alter ego for herself. She had a few body piercings, dyed her hair black and adopted the name “Xtina”.

90 Trattoria dumplings : GNOCCHI

Gnocchi are small dumplings in Italian cuisine that can be made from various ingredients including potato, my personal favorite. The name “gnocchi” might be derived from the Italian “nocchio” meaning “knot in wood”.

91 New England fish : SCROD

Scrod is the name given to fish that has been “scrawed” i.e. split open, dried and then broiled.

93 Dork : DWEEB

“Dweeb” is relatively recent American slang that came out of college life in the late sixties. Dweeb, squarepants, nerd; they’re all not-nice terms that mean the same thing, i.e. someone excessively studious and socially inept.

95 “Catch-22” pilot : ORR

The bomber pilot in Joseph Heller’s “Catch-22” is named Orr. He has no other name, just “Orr”.

96 Cloth that may get a lot of tears : HANKIE

A kerchief is a triangular or square piece of cloth used as a covering for the head. So, a handkerchief (“hand-kerchief”) is a square piece of cloth held in the hand and used for personal hygiene.

97 Handy types : DIY’ERS

Back in Ireland, we don’t have “hardware stores” as such, but rather “DIY centres” (and that’s the spelling of “centres”). “DIY” is an initialism standing for “do-it-yourself”.

103 Shipping option : FEDEX

FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it’s more catchy, abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis with its “SuperHub” at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world’s largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

105 Sundance state : UTAH

Sundance is a ski resort that lies just over ten miles northeast of Provo, Utah. The resort was named Timp Haven until it was bought over by the actor Robert Redford in 1969. Redford gave it the name “Sundance” after the part he played in “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid”, a movie released in the same year that Redford purchased the resort.

106 Place for un béret : TETE

In French, one wears a “chapeau” (hat), a “béret” (beret) perhaps, on one’s “tête” (head).

108 Concessions : SOPS

Cerberus is a dog with three heads that appears in both Greek and Roman mythology. Cerberus had the job of guarding the gates of Hades and preventing those who had crossed the River Styx from ever escaping. A sop is a piece of food that has been dipped in some liquid, as one might sop a piece of bread in soup. There is an idiomatic expression, “to give a sop to Cerberus”, which means “to give someone a bribe, pay someone off”. The idea is that if one could bribe Cerberus, give him a sop to eat, then he would let you pass and escape from Hades.

109 It beats a deuce : TREY

A trey is a three in a deck of cards. The term “trey” can also be used for a domino with three pips, and even for a three-point play in basketball.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Palindromic band with the palindromic song title “SOS” : ABBA
5 Place for an oxygen tent, for short : ICU
8 A whole bunch : SCADS
13 High-level H.S. math class : AP CALC
19 Exploit : DEED
20 Dandy : FOP
21 Like many barrels : OAKEN
22 “Yay!” : HOORAH!
23 Cheer for beer on campus? : ALL HAIL, HALL ALE!
26 Milan-based fashion brand : ARMANI
27 Skate effortlessly : GLIDE
28 Put down in print : LIBEL
29 Part of a strip : GAG
31 West of Chicago : KANYE
32 Discerning judgment : EYE
33 Author Calvino : ITALO
35 Played the fall guy? : RAKED
37 Half-___ (rhyming order) : CAF
38 Hoot at an out-of-focus nature photograph? : BOO BLURRED BLUEBIRD
43 Chicago university : DEPAUL
46 Small three-legged table : TEAPOY
47 Two-time Best Actor, 1954 and 1972 : BRANDO
48 “___ Old Cowhand” (Bing Crosby hit) : I’M AN
49 Put away : ICE
52 “If you ask me,” briefly : IMO
53 Something populists revile : ELITISM
54 Antsy feeling when one is out of cellphone range? : SO NERVOUS, NO SERVICE
59 Sport ___ : UTE
60 One of the dames in 2018’s “Tea With the Dames” : DENCH
61 Like the lion slain by Hercules : NEMEAN
62 Cans : AXES
66 “Tilted Arc” sculptor Richard : SERRA
68 Jackie on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : CHAN
70 Places to sleep : DENS
71 Spanish omelet ingredient : HUEVO
72 Isaac’s firstborn : ESAU
73 Fought : WARRED
75 Bête ___ : NOIRE
77 Counterpart of frost : DEW
78 Where a demanding dockworker gets supplies? : STEVEDORE DIVA STORE
82 Snack item with a salient anagram? : SALTINE
85 Word that’s its own synonym in reverse : PAT
86 Symbol of danger or anger : RED
87 Boot : OUST
88 Discriminating against elders : AGEIST
89 They’ve got talent : AGENTS
92 “Ditto!” : I DO TOO!
94 Landing in Rotterdam? : DUTCH-TOWN TOUCHDOWN
98 Curry or Rice : TIM
99 Snack items with their name on the top and bottom : OREOS
100 Result of union negotiations, often : RAISE
101 Lotion bottle abbr. : SPF
104 Native seal hunter : ALEUT
107 Part of a college application, informally : REC
108 Unfeeling : STONY
110 Roaster or toaster : EMCEE
112 It’s not legal : LETTER
114 Piano that plays only a certain three notes? : B-CHORD KEYBOARD
117 Slips : ERRATA
118 “Fingers crossed!” : I HOPE!
119 Wrath : IRE
120 A long time ago : ONCE
121 Willie Mays phrase : SAY HEY
122 A little tight : TIPSY
123 Pseudoscientific subj. : ESP
124 Charon’s river : STYX

Down

1 “Waste not, want not,” e.g. : ADAGE
2 It has a button in the middle : BELLY
3 Show to be untrue : BELIE
4 Reason that some students struggle in school, for short : ADHD
5 “___ were you …” : IF I
6 Joint effort, slangily : COLLAB
7 Requiring difficult pedaling, say : UPHILL
8 Exclusive : SOLE
9 Phone : CALL
10 Pseudonymously : AKA
11 Manny’s last name on “Modern Family” : DELGADO
12 Slip through : SNEAK BY
13 “Of course!” : AHA!
14 Bill padding : PORK
15 Time out? : COMA
16 Stuffed and deep-fried rice balls, in Italian cuisine : ARANCINI
17 Name tag holders : LANYARDS
18 Political system with a paramount leader : CHIEFDOM
24 Vocal quintet? : A-E-I-O-U
25 More or less : ABOUT
30 Work well together : GEL
34 Translation of the French “vivre” or German “leben” : TO LIVE
35 Rested : REPOSED
36 World capital settled by Vikings circa the ninth century : DUBLIN
38 Scourge : BANE
39 Apt rhyme for “constrain” : REIN
40 Martin Sheen’s real first name : RAMON
41 Name of seven Danish kings : ERIC
42 “Le ___,” Matisse work that hung upside down at the Museum of Modern Art for 47 days : BATEAU
43 Neglect : DISUSE
44 Acts dramatically : EMOTES
45 Bakery/cafe chain : PANERA
50 Like a bowl : CONCAVE
51 Cheat, informally : EUCHRE
53 Refusing to answer directly : EVASIVE
55 Suggested intake level, for short : RDA
56 Glass fragment : SHARD
57 Correct : EMEND
58 “Two Sisters” or “Two Young Girls at the Piano” : RENOIR
63 Struck : X’ED OUT
64 Exceedingly : EVER SO
65 Site of a 1976 South African uprising : SOWETO
67 Quaintly countrified : RUSTIC
69 Virtual animals in an early 2000s fad : NEOPETS
71 “___ Got the Whole World in His Hands” : HE’S
73 Attended : WENT TO
74 Alternative to a snake : DRANO
76 They catch waves : RADIOS
79 Nickname on “The Addams Family” : TISH
80 Shakespeare’s “You, too?” : ET TU?
81 Bugs Bunny, e.g. : TOON
82 Sob stories : SAD TALES
83 Christina of pop : AGUILERA
84 “Here, move over” : LET ME TRY
89 Not much at all : A WEE BIT
90 Trattoria dumplings : GNOCCHI
91 New England fish : SCROD
93 Dork : DWEEB
95 “Catch-22” pilot : ORR
96 Cloth that may get a lot of tears : HANKIE
97 Handy types : DIY’ERS
101 Meager : SCANT
102 Walker ___, 1962 National Book Award winner : PERCY
103 Shipping option : FEDEX
105 Sundance state : UTAH
106 Place for un béret : TETE
108 Concessions : SOPS
109 It beats a deuce : TREY
111 Stock sounds : MOOS
113 Bit of sun : RAY
115 Short flight : HOP
116 Informal affirmative : YEP

10 thoughts on “0315-20 NY Times Crossword 15 Mar 20, Sunday”

  1. 40:32, no errors. In general, I didn’t have quite as much trouble with this one as I did with yesterday’s … except … the upper right corner stopped me cold for several minutes. (I’m unfamiliar with ARANCINI and it took me forever to think of LANYARDS.) There’s always tomorrow … 😜.

  2. 59:52. Very tough overall. I never felt comfortable. I took a long time to get the theme (I should start looking at titles once in a while) , and the fill was often out of my wheelhouse. Was able to get ITALO, NEMEAN and a few others from previous crosswords. TEAPOY was new to me.

    I’ve never heard EUCHRE to mean cheat so that made no sense to me when I filled it. Also “tight” meaning TIPSY was new to me. I looked and it was about the 20th definition of “tight”. Tight can also mean “angry” btw, which I also didn’t know.

    I got a lot out of this puzzle. It was an excellent one, but it also wore me out. Happy Monday tomorrow.

    Best –

  3. 1:19:03. Had it finished in just under an hour, except for not knowing how to spell “Aguilera”, hence 20 minutes looking for my error, which, yes, should have be obvious with “latter” instead of”letter”…..but then again, I am an idiot… 🙂

  4. sorry, i want to just say it was tough but i felt it was tough because it was forced. even when i got the fill i was at a loss to see the pattern or get the theme. for me, a waste except for some very good, unusual clues.

    1. I agree with Bob K. I filled in all squares and still didn’t get it. Not one of the most rewarding puzzles. The play on words seemed labored to me.
      Sylvie R.

  5. I wasted 2 hours on this horrible puzzle…When I see two setters and Will Shortz that should be my clue to find something else to do but like the idiot that keeps sticking his finger in the electric socket I just keep coming back.

  6. DNF after 50:38. Upper right corner eluded me. Although I had AP CALC and CHIEFDOM, everything else north of CAF was blank.

  7. Hello. Brando fan here. He didn’t win the Oscar for “Streetcar.” His “Streetcar” co-stars all won: Leigh for Actress, Malden and Hunter for Supporting Actor and Actress. But Brando lost Best Actor to Humphrey Bogart in “The African Queen.” Brando won for “On the Waterfront” in 1954, as the clue states…

  8. What a slog… Like Jeff. I never got comfortable. I finished it but what a tortuous slog… Couldn’t find the rhythm. Seemed contrived in several places..

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