1119-19 NY Times Crossword 19 Nov 19, Tuesday

Constructed by: Ross Trudeau
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Top Hat

We have some grid art today, with a TOP HAT depicted in the lower-middle part of the grid. Themed answers are people who are known for wearing TOP HATS:

  • 45D Something worn by the answer to each starred clue, as represented graphically in this puzzle’s grid : TOP HAT
  • 34A *Cartoon billionaire : SCROOGE MCDUCK
  • 5D *1971 role for Gene Wilder : WILLY WONKA
  • 9D *U.S. leader who said “Do I not destroy my enemies when I make them my friends?” : ABE LINCOLN
  • 43D *”A jolly happy soul,” in a holiday song : FROSTY
  • Read on, or jump to …
    … a complete list of answers

    Bill’s time: 9m 00s

    Bill’s errors: 0

    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    1 Feeling at the Grand Canyon, say : AWE

    The Grand Canyon is in Arizona. The canyon continues to be carved out of layers of rock by the Colorado River. It is 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and over a mile deep.

    11 Music sales largely replaced by streaming, in brief : CDS

    The compact disc (CD) was developed jointly by Philips and Sony as a medium for storing and playing sound recordings. When the first commercial CD was introduced back in 1982, a CD’s storage capacity was far greater than the amount of data that could be stored on the hard drive of personal computers available at that time.

    15 Scuba diver’s need : AIR TUBE

    The self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) was co-invented by celebrated French marine explorer Jacques Cousteau.

    16 MSN alternative : AOL

    Founded as Quantum Computer Services in 1983, the company changed its name in 1989 to America Online. As America Online went international, the acronym AOL was used in order to shake off the “America-centric” sound to the name. During the heady days of AOL’s success the company could not keep up with the growing number of subscribers, so people trying to connect often encountered busy signals. That’s when users referred to AOL as “Always Off-Line”.

    17 Roadside assistance org. : AAA

    The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

    19 Genetic inits. : RNA

    Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA. An added complication is that small changes in the sequence of amino acids specified by DNA sometimes takes place in a process known as RNA editing. This RNA editing occurs after the nucleotide sequence has been transcribed from DNA, but before it is translated into protein.

    20 E.M.T.s may insert them : IVS

    Intravenous drip (IV)

    Emergency medical technician (EMT)

    21 “Treasure Island” writer’s monogram : RLS

    I’d say that the most celebrated work from the pen of Robert Louis Stevenson (RLS) is “Treasure Island”, which was originally written as a series for a children’s magazine in 1881. I remember “Treasure Island” as the first “real” novel I read as a youngster …

    22 American ___ (beetle target) : ELM

    Dutch elm disease is a fungus devastating to all species of elm trees that is transmitted by the elm bark beetle. The disease is thought to have originated in Asia and is now rampant in Europe and North America. Even though there is a hybrid of elm known as the Dutch elm, the disease isn’t named after the tree. Rather, the disease is called “Dutch” as it was identified in 1921 by a phytopathologist (plant pathologist) in the Netherlands.

    Bark beetles are so named because some species reproduce in the bark of trees. This can be a problem for the elm tree, as bark beetles are known to transmit the devastating Dutch elm disease. There is another species of bark beetle that is known as the coffee berry borer, and it is the major pest attacking coffee plants around the world.

    23 Chronic drinker’s ailment, informally : DTS

    The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called delirium tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is “trembling madness”.

    24 Salary after deductions : NET PAY

    It has been suggested that out term “salary” comes from the Latin “sal” meaning “salt”. The idea is that a Roman soldier’s “salarium” might have been an allowance to purchase salt.

    26 Book after Song of Solomon : ISAIAH

    The Book of Isaiah is part of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. Isaiah is not mentioned in the Qur’an, but many Muslim scholars consider Isaiah a prophet. Isaiah is widely regarded as the most eloquent of the prophets, earning him the moniker “Shakespeare of the Prophets”.

    28 Narrow waterway : RIA

    A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, and both are formed as sea levels rise. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

    33 Courtroom V.I.P.s : DAS

    District Attorney (DA)

    34 *Cartoon billionaire : SCROOGE MCDUCK

    Scrooge McDuck is the rich uncle of Donald Duck. Donald first hit the screens in 1934, and Uncle Scrooge made his debut performance in 1947.

    40 Grassy plain : LLANO

    “Llano” is the Spanish word for “plain”.

    43 Lingua ___ (common tongue) : FRANCA

    A lingua franca is a common language used to communicate among those who do not routinely speak each other’s native tongue. The term “lingua franca” originally applied to the common language used in commerce around the Eastern Mediterranean from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance. This ancient Lingua Franca was a simplified form of Italian, with a generous sprinkling of loanwords from Greek, French, Portuguese, Spanish and other local languages.

    44 Swimming : NATANT

    Something described as natant is floating or swimming. The term “natant” come from the Latin “natare” meaning “to swim”.

    55 “The Raven” writer’s monogram : EAP

    Edgar Allan Poe (EAP) lived a life of many firsts. Poe is considered to be the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He was also the first notable American author to make his living through his writing, something that didn’t really go too well for him as he was always financially strapped. In 1849 he was found on the streets of Baltimore, delirious and in dire need of medical help. Poe died a few days later in hospital at 39 years of age.

    “The Raven” is a narrative poem by Edgar Allan Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student’s bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven’s shadow and shall be lifted “nevermore” …

    56 Sport that takes place in a dohyo : SUMO

    Sumo is a sport that is practiced professionally only in Japan, the country of its origin. There is an international federation of sumo wrestling now, and one of the organization’s aims is to have the sport accepted as an Olympic event.

    58 Kind of vote for a shareholder : PROXY

    Our word “proxy”, meaning “the agency of one who acts instead of another”, comes from the Latin “procurare” meaning “to manage”. So, “proxy” has the same root as our word “procure”.

    59 10th grader, informally : SOPH

    The term “sophomore” has been used for a student in the second year of university since the 1680’s. The original meaning of the word was “arguer”. The term has Greek roots, from two Greek words that have been artificially combined in English. The Greek “sophos” means “wise”, and “moros” means “foolish”.

    62 Fit for military service : ONE-A

    The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System (SSS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

    64 Small silvery fish : SMELT

    Smelt is the name given to several types of small silvery fish, with examples being Great Lake smelts and whitebait smelts.

    Down

    2 Finchlike birds that build intricate nests : WEAVERS

    Weavers are small birds related to finches. Weavers are so called because they are known to weave the most elaborate nests of any bird.

    3 Like a bungee cord : ELASTIC

    The elastic cord known as bungee cord is also known as shock cord. The term “bungee” probably comes from Britain where it was schoolboy slang for “rubber eraser”, and likely came from the words “bouncy” and “spongy”.

    4 Hummus and guacamole brand : SABRA

    Sabra Dipping is a company that specializes in the production of hummus and guacamole. If I can’t get homemade hummus or guacamole, then Sabra is the way to go …

    5 *1971 role for Gene Wilder : WILLY WONKA

    Willy Wonka is the lead character in the 1964 novel by Roald Dahl called “Charlie & the Chocolate Factory”. Willy Wonka has been portrayed on the big screen twice. Gene Wilder was a fabulous Wonka in the 1971 version titled “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory”, and Johnny Depp played him in the Tim Burton movie from 2005 called “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”. I’m not too fond of Tim Burton movies, so I haven’t seen that one …

    Gene Wilder was an actor noted for his comedic roles. Wilder had a successful collaboration with Mel Brooks on three great films: “The Producers”, “Blazing Saddles” and my favorite, “Young Frankenstein”. For a while, Wilder dated his “Young Frankenstein” co-star Teri Garr, but he was married most famously to “Saturday Night Live” star Gilda Radner.

    9 *U.S. leader who said “Do I not destroy my enemies when I make them my friends?” : ABE LINCOLN

    Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the US, elected in 1860 as the first president from the Republican Party. Lincoln’s electoral support came almost exclusively from the north and west of the country, winning only 2 out of 996 counties in the Southern slave states. Lincoln led the country through the Civil War, and then was assassinated in 1865 just a few days after Robert E. Lee surrendered his army of Northern Virginia. President Lincoln was succeeded in office by Vice President Andrew Johnson.

    25 Dissecting grammatically : PARSING

    The verb “to parse” means “to state the parts of speech in a sentence”. “Parse” comes from the Latin word “pars” meaning “part”.

    30 F.B.I. worker: Abbr. : AGT

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was set up in 1908 as the Bureau of Investigation (BOI), with the name changing in 1935. The Bureau was set up at the behest of President Theodore Roosevelt. President Roosevelt was largely moved to do so after the 1901 assassination of President McKinley, as there was a perception that anarchists were threatening law and order. The FBI’s motto uses the organization’s initialism, and is “Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity”.

    31 Home of the kraken : SEA

    Kraken are huge sea monsters of legend that were reputed to live off the coasts of Iceland and Norway. It’s possible that the kraken legend was inspired by real-life giant squid.

    32 Every, in an Rx : OMN

    “Omni” is Latin for “all”, or “every” in the context of a medical prescription. On a prescription, “omni” is usually abbreviated to “omn”.

    38 Great technical skill : BRAVURA

    “Bravura” is an Italian word meaning “bravery, spirit”. We started using the term in English to describe a piece of music that is florid and colorful, and requires great skill to play. The meaning was extended in the early 1800s to also describe a show of brilliancy or daring.

    39 Went wild : RAN AMOK

    The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had a good reason for that frenzy …

    43 *”A jolly happy soul,” in a holiday song : FROSTY

    “Frosty the Snowman” is a song that was first ecorded by Gene Autry, in 1950. The song was specifically written in the hope that it would become a follow-up hit to Autry’s “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” that topped the charts the previous year.

    45 Something worn by the answer to each starred clue, as represented graphically in this puzzle’s grid : TOP HAT

    A stovepipe hat is also known as a top hat.

    51 Apothecary’s weight : DRAM

    I think that the dram is a confusing unit of measurement. It has one value as an ancient unit of mass, and two different values as a modern unit of mass, another value as a unit of fluid volume, and yet another varying value as a measure of Scotch whisky!

    52 “Heads up!,” to a golfer : FORE!

    No one seems to know for sure where the golfing term “fore!” comes from. It has been used at least as far back as 1881, and since then has been called out to warn other golfers that a wayward ball might be heading their way. My favorite possibility for its origin is that it is a contraction of the Gaelic warning cry “Faugh a Ballagh!” (clear the way!) which is still called out in the sport of road bowling. Road bowling is an Irish game where players bowl balls along roads between villages, trying to reach the end of the course in as few bowls as possible, just like in golf!

    53 Skating leap : AXEL

    An axel is a forward take-off jump in figure skating. The maneuver was first performed by Norwegian Axel Paulsen at the 1882 World Figure Skating championships.

    57 “Fifth quarters,” in sports: Abbr. : OTS

    Overtime (OT)

    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1 Feeling at the Grand Canyon, say : AWE
    4 Curse : SWEAR AT
    11 Music sales largely replaced by streaming, in brief : CDS
    14 Get along well (with) : GEL
    15 Scuba diver’s need : AIR TUBE
    16 MSN alternative : AOL
    17 Roadside assistance org. : AAA
    18 Grounder that squeezes between two infielders, in baseball slang : BLEEDER
    19 Genetic inits. : RNA
    20 E.M.T.s may insert them : IVS
    21 “Treasure Island” writer’s monogram : RLS
    22 American ___ (beetle target) : ELM
    23 Chronic drinker’s ailment, informally : DTS
    24 Salary after deductions : NET PAY
    26 Book after Song of Solomon : ISAIAH
    28 Narrow waterway : RIA
    29 Had a base, as a runner in baseball : WAS ON
    33 Courtroom V.I.P.s : DAS
    34 *Cartoon billionaire : SCROOGE MCDUCK
    37 Bronzer in a bottle : SUNTAN OIL
    38 Cliff’s edge : BRINK
    40 Grassy plain : LLANO
    43 Lingua ___ (common tongue) : FRANCA
    44 Swimming : NATANT
    46 Something an opera singer and a rancher have : RANGE
    47 Pace : TEMPO
    48 Lab eggs : OVA
    49 :’-( : SAD FACE
    55 “The Raven” writer’s monogram : EAP
    56 Sport that takes place in a dohyo : SUMO
    58 Kind of vote for a shareholder : PROXY
    59 10th grader, informally : SOPH
    60 Easy pace : TROT
    61 Trims : PARES
    62 Fit for military service : ONE-A
    63 Gabs : YAKS
    64 Small silvery fish : SMELT
    65 Sassy : PERT

    Down

    1 Not for the first time : AGAIN
    2 Finchlike birds that build intricate nests : WEAVERS
    3 Like a bungee cord : ELASTIC
    4 Hummus and guacamole brand : SABRA
    5 *1971 role for Gene Wilder : WILLY WONKA
    6 You are, in Spain : ERES
    7 Had : ATE
    8 “Great manners you’ve got!” : RUDE
    9 *U.S. leader who said “Do I not destroy my enemies when I make them my friends?” : ABE LINCOLN
    10 Contract details : TERMS
    11 Heart-related : CARDIAC
    12 Terse response to “Rough day?” : DON’T ASK
    13 Mark separating lines of poetry : SLASH
    25 Dissecting grammatically : PARSING
    27 Put on a pedestal : ADULATE
    30 F.B.I. worker: Abbr. : AGT
    31 Home of the kraken : SEA
    32 Every, in an Rx : OMN
    35 Roughly 1.5, in a standard shot of alcohol : OUNCES
    36 Widen : DILATE
    38 Great technical skill : BRAVURA
    39 Went wild : RAN AMOK
    41 “Oh yeah? Give me a single example!” : NAME ONE
    42 Theoretically : ON PAPER
    43 *”A jolly happy soul,” in a holiday song : FROSTY
    45 Something worn by the answer to each starred clue, as represented graphically in this puzzle’s grid : TOP HAT
    50 iPhone purchases : APPS
    51 Apothecary’s weight : DRAM
    52 “Heads up!,” to a golfer : FORE!
    53 Skating leap : AXEL
    54 Skin abnormality : CYST
    57 “Fifth quarters,” in sports: Abbr. : OTS
    59 Soak (up) : SOP

    9 thoughts on “1119-19 NY Times Crossword 19 Nov 19, Tuesday”

    1. 14:14. When I got the first part of 34A “Cartoon billionaire” as SCROOGE.. my first thoughts were SCROOGE isn’t a first name and he wasn’t really a cartoon. Then I got the MCDUCK part and knew I was in for a tough Tuesday.

      Best –

    2. 22:06 no errors….also was slowed by the upper middle….I haven’t heard of an air hose referred to as an air tube before….I am a baseball fan and don’t recall the term bleeder before and never have eaten hummus or guacamole before so sabra was new to me…..HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO ALL.

    3. No errors. The only term that I was not familiar with was BLEEDER. I looked it up and it seems that it is one of several different words that can be used for that type of hit. Personally I would probably just call that a “grounder”.

      I had the theme before even putting in the first answer. A glance at the grid led me to think “that looks like a TOP HAT” and soon thereafter it became clear. I thought that today’s Tuesday was easier than yesterday’s Monday.

      I suppose we will get a Christmas theme in about five weeks from now. But it sure was nice to have FROSTY the Snowman make an accidental appearance today.

    4. 10:18, no errors. Had to recover from entering 15A AIR TANK and 29A GOT ON.

      A very Merry Christmas eve and Happy Hanukkah to all you syndicatees!

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