0526-19 NY Times Crossword 26 May 19, Sunday

Constructed by: Ruth Bloomfield Margolin
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Buzz Cut

Themed answers sound like common phrases, but a ZZ-sound has been CUT, and replaced with a SS-sound:

  • 23A Facebook friends weighing in on the new belly button ring? : JURY OF YOUR PIERCE (from “jury of your peers”)
  • 44A L’eggs brand bikini? : TWO-PIECE IN A POD (from “two peas in a pod”)
  • 70A Final scene of “Antony and Cleopatra”? : HISS AND HEARSE (from “his and hers”)
  • 96A Like a confirmed peacenik? : DOWN ON ALL FORCE (from “down on all fours”)
  • 120A “Our driveway has been incredibly slippery since the storm!”? : CAN’T BELIEVE MY ICE (from “can’t believe my eyes”)
  • 16D Parent’s fervent prayer to the school nurse? : TELL ME, “NO LICE” (from “tell me no lies”)
  • 64D Like a sick baby? : WARM AND FUSSY (from “warm and fuzzy”)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 20m 22s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Mythical hunter : DIANA

Diana was the Roman goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing. The Greek equivalent of Diana was the goddess Artemis. According to Roman mythology, Diana was the twin sister of Apollo, and the daughter of Jupiter and Latona.

6 Curmudgeon : CRAB

“Curmudgeon” is a favorite word used by my wife to describe me. A curmudgeon is a bad-tempered person full of resentment and stubborn notions. I am sure she uses the term very affectionately …

10 Famous Musketeer : ATHOS

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is the trio’s young protégé D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

20 Houston university : RICE

Rice University is a private school in Houston, Texas. William Marsh Rice had made a will endowing the funds for the establishment of the school at the time of his death. When he was found dead one morning in his bed, his lawyer announced that his will had been changed, with the bulk of Rice’s estate actually going to the lawyer making the announcement. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the lawyer had paid Rice’s valet to murder his employer using chloroform and a fake will was written. Eventually, the original will was deemed valid and the funds were disbursed so that the school could be built.

21 Bond film staple : CHASE

The character James Bond was the creation of writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number 007 was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th century English spy called John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized “007” to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”. There’s an entertaining miniseries that aired on BBC America called “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond” that details Ian Fleming’s military career, and draws some nice parallels between Fleming’s experiences and aspirations and those of his hero James Bond. Recommended …

22 “Other people,” per Sartre : HELL

“Huis Clos” means “behind closed doors” in French. It is the title of the Jean-Paul Sartre play that we in the English-speaking world would better recognize as “No Exit”. The play features four characters who are trapped in a room that they discover is actually located in Hell. One of the characters is Estelle Rigault, a society woman who married her husband for her money, and then has an affair that results in a child whom she murders. Heavy stuff! “No Exit” is the source for one of Sartre’s most famous quotations, “Hell is other people”, meaning that Hell isn’t found in torture or physical punishment, but in the torment inflicted by others.

26 Gymnast Korbut : OLGA

Olga Korbut is from modern-day Belarus, but was born during the days of the Soviet Union. Korbut competed for the USSR team in the 1972 and 1976 Olympic Games. She was 17 when she appeared in the 1972 Munich Games, and had been training in a sports school since she was 8-years-old. The world fell in love with her as she was a very emotional young lady, readily expressing joy and disappointment, something that we weren’t used to seeing in athletes from behind the Iron Curtain. Korbut immigrated to the US in 1991 and now lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

29 Woodwind category : REED

Woodwind instruments are a subcategory of wind instruments that were traditionally made of wood, although some are now made from metal. There are two main classes of woodwind: flutes and reed instruments. Flutes produce sound by blowing air across the edge of a hole in a cylindrical tube. Reed instruments produce sounds by blowing into a mouthpiece, which then directs the air over a reed or reeds, causing them to vibrate.

30 Cellphone user’s choice : DATA PLAN

What we mostly know as a “cell phone” here in North America is more usually referred to as a “mobile phone” in Britain and Ireland. My favorite term for the device is used in Germany, where it is called a “Handy”.

35 Fish dish : SCROD

Scrod is the name given to fish that has been “scrawed” i.e. split open, dried and then broiled.

37 Princess who makes a plea via a hologram : LEIA

In the first “Star Wars” movie, Princess Leia hides plans for the Galactic Empire’s Death Star in the droid named R2-D2. She also records a holographic message, so when it is played we can see Princess Leia as a hologram, asking for help to destroy the Death Star:

I have placed information vital to the survival of the Rebellion into the memory systems of this R2 unit. My father will know how to retrieve it. You must see this droid safely delivered to him on Alderaan. This is our most desperate hour. Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi. You’re my only hope.

40 Jacques of French comedy : TATI

Jacques Tati was a very famous filmmaker and comic actor in his homeland of France. Even though he only directed six feature-length movies, Tati is often cited by insiders as one of the greatest movie directors of all time.

42 Mozart’s “___ Pastore” : IL RE

“Il re pastore” is an opera seria by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The title translates into “The Shepherd King”. Mozart wrote the whole thing in six weeks.

44 L’eggs brand bikini? : TWO-PIECE IN A POD (from “two peas in a pod”)

L’eggs is such a clever brand name, I think. L’eggs is a brand of pantyhose (L’eggs = legs), with its product sold, well it used to be, in egg-shaped containers (L’eggs = “the” eggs). The brand was introduced in 1969 and was an instant hit. The inventive marketing of L’eggs pantyhose led to a competitive response by Kayser-Roth who introduced the No Nonsense brand in 1973. The idea behind No Nonsense was that the packaging of L’eggs was just a gimmick, and here was a No Nonsense alternative. L’eggs won the battle though.

48 Typical fan of Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand” : TEENER

“American Bandstand” aired from 1952 to 1989, and for the last thirty two years (!) of its run, it was hosted by Dick Clark.

51 Blue material : DENIM

Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase “de Nimes” (meaning “from Nimes”) gives us the word “denim”. Also, the French phrase “bleu de Genes” (meaning “blue of Genoa”) gives us our word “jeans”.

52 Arafat’s grp. : PLO

The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) was founded in 1964. The PLO’s early stated goal was the liberation of Palestine, with Palestine defined as the geographic entity that existed under the terms of the British Mandate granted by the League of Nations back in 1923. The PLO was granted observer status (i.e. no voting rights) at the United Nations in 1974.

Yasser (also “Yasir”) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father’s funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat’s explanation was that he wanted to “study the mentality” of the Jewish people.

53 Nickname of a 2010s pop idol, with “the” : BIEB

Justin Bieber is a young pop singer from London, Ontario. Bieber was actually discovered on YouTube by talent manager Scooter Brown. Fans of Bieber call themselves “Beliebers”. Personally, I’m no believer in Bieber …

55 Valerie Harper title role : RHODA

The seventies sitcom “Rhoda” starring Valerie Harper was a spin-off of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. The eighth episode of the show was an hour-long special in which Rhoda married her fiance Joe (played by David Groh). At the time of airing it was the second-most watched television episode in history, second only to the 1953 birth of Little Ricky on “I Love Lucy”.

61 “Interviewer” who asked Buzz Aldrin whether people on the moon were friendly : ALI G

“Da Ali G Show” is a satirical TV series featuring English comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. I wouldn’t be a big fan …

Buzz Aldrin was a true American hero, I’d say. He flew 66 combat missions in Korea, shot down two MiGs, earned his Sc. D. degree from MIT, and was one of the two men who landed on the moon for the first time. Now that man, he lived a life worth living.

67 Bugs and Thumper : RABBITS

Bugs Bunny first said “What’s up, Doc?” in the 1940 cartoon short “A Wild Hare”, addressing the hunter Elmer Fudd.

Thumper is a rabbit in the Disney animated feature “Bambi”.

70 Final scene of “Antony and Cleopatra”? : HISS AND HEARSE (from “his and hers”)

“Antony and Cleopatra” is one of William Shakespeare’s tragedies. It tells the story of the relationship between Mark Antony and Cleopatra after the death of Julius Caesar.

75 1979 World Series opponents of the 63-Downs : PIRATES
(63D 1979 World Series opponent of the 75-Across : ORIOLE

The Pittsburgh Pirates (nicknamed the Bucs or Buccos) joined baseball’s National League in 1887 just six years after the league was formed. The Pirates played in the first ever World Series in 1903, and won their first World Series in 1909.

The Baltimore Orioles were expected by almost everyone to win the 1969 World Series. They were fielding one of their finest ever teams, and were playing the New York Mets, a team that had only been in existence for eight years. But it was the Mets who won the series, 4 games to 1, earning the team the name “Miracle Mets”.

77 Big-spending demographic group : YUPPIES

The term “yuppie” first appeared in the 1980s and is short for “young urban professional”. Yuppies are generally regarded as upper middle class or upper class men and women in their twenties or thirties.

79 Lake in “Casino Royale” : COMO

Lake Como is a glacial lake in Lombardy in Italy. Lake Como has long been a retreat for the rich and famous. Lakeside homes there are owned by the likes of Madonna, George Clooney, Gianni Versace, Sylvester Stallone and Richard Branson.

2006’s “Casino Royale” is the 21st film in the “James Bond” series, and the first to star Daniel Craig in the lead role. The film was directed by New Zealander Martin Campbell, someone who my next door neighbor for a couple of years (my claim to fame!). Campbell also directed “GoldenEye” in 1995, which introduced Pierce Brosnan as James Bond. I find it interesting that Campbell was asked back to oversee the introduction of Daniel Craig to the role.

90 Illusory illustration : OP ART

Op art is also known as optical art, and puts optical illusions to great effect.

100 Swimmer Torres with 12 Olympic medals : DARA

Dara Torres is a US swimmer who has won twelve Olympic medals. Torres is also the only American swimmer to have competed in five Olympic Games, and is the oldest swimmer to have made it onto the Olympic team, at 41.

102 Mideast land: Abbr. : UAE

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates (states) in the Middle East. Included in the seven are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with the city of Abu Dhabi being the UAE capital and cultural center.

103 Mideast land : OMAN

Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

104 Klutz : OAF

A klutz is an awkward individual, with the term “klutz” coming from Yiddish. The Yiddish word for a clumsy person is “klots”.

108 Stick on a Christmas tree : CANDY CANE

Apparently, candy canes were created at the behest of the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral in Germany in 1672. The sweet sticks were basically used as bribes to keep children quiet during services. The choirmaster specified that the candy sticks should have a crook at the top so that they reminded the children of the three shepherds who visited the infant Jesus just after his birth.

112 Actor with a famous side kick : BRUCE LEE

Bruce Lee was born not far from here in San Francisco, although he was raised in Hong Kong, returning to the US to attend college. Sadly, Bruce Lee died when he was only 32 years old, due to cerebral edema (a swelling of the brain) attributed to adverse reactions to the pain killing drug Equagesic.

114 Coat-of-arms border : ORLE

In heraldry, an orle is a decorative band that lies close to the edge of the front-surface of a shield. With such a design, the orle necessarily takes on the shape of the shield.

115 Physics unit : OHM

The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm’s Law.

125 Shaw of 1930s-’40s swing : ARTIE

Artie Shaw was a composer, bandleader and jazz clarinetist. Shaw’s real name was Arthur Jacob Arshawsky, born in New York City in 1910. One of his many claims to fame is that he (a white bandleader) hired Billie Holiday (a black vocalist) and toured the segregated South in the late thirties. Holiday chose to leave the band though, due to hostility from Southern audiences back then. Artie Shaw was married eight times in all. The list of his wives includes the actresses Lana Turner and Ava Gardner, as well as Betty Kern, daughter of songwriter Jerome Kern.

127 Title role in a Christmas opera : AMAHL

The composer Gian Carlo Menotti’s “Amahl and the Night Visitors” has a special place in the repertoire, in that it is the first opera specifically composed for American television. “Amahl and the Night Visitors” was commissioned by NBC and had its debut at the NBC studios in Rockefeller Center on Christmas Eve, 1951. In today’s world of commercially-driven television, I can’t imagine a network commissioning a classical work …

128 “The Cherry Orchard” daughter : ANYA

“The Cherry Orchard” was Anton Chekhov’s last play. Chekhov wrote the play as a comedy, but when it was first staged in Moscow in 1904 it was directed as a tragedy!

131 Small iPods : NANOS

The iPod Nano was the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There were seven versions of the Nano, until it was discontinued in 2017.

Down

1 ___ vu : DEJA

“Déjà vu” is French for “already seen”.

2 Shock jock Don : IMUS

Don Imus’s syndicated radio show “Imus in the Morning” used to broadcast from New York City. Imus has been described as a “shock jock”, a disc jockey who deliberately uses provocative language and humor that many would find offensive . I’m not a big fan of shock jocks …

4 Marshal at Waterloo : NEY

Michel Ney was one of the first 18 Marshals of France created by Napoleon. When Bonaparte was eventually defeated for the last time, Ney was arrested and sentenced to death. He was executed in Paris by firing squad. Nay refused to wear a blindfold, and demanded that he himself be allowed to give the order to fire.

7 Agua source : RIO

In Spanish, “agua” (water) is found in a “río” (river), and around an “isla” (island).

8 Honda line : ACURA

Acura is the luxury brand of the Honda Motor Company. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

11 Alternative to café : THE

In French, a “tasse” (cup) might contain perhaps “thé” (tea) or “café” (coffee).

13 Famous grouch : OSCAR

Oscar the Grouch is the Muppet that lives in a garbage can. Oscar’s persona comes from various sources. He is named after Oscar Brand who was one of the board members of the Children’s Television Workshop, the backers for “Sesame Street” as the Muppets were being developed in the sixties. Oscar’s personality was inspired by an angry waiter that once served Jim Henson (father of the Muppets). The voice was modeled on a grumpy New York cab driver encountered one day by Caroll Spinney, the puppeteer who brings Oscar to life.

16 Parent’s fervent prayer to the school nurse? : TELL ME, “NO LICE” (from “tell me no lies”)

Lice (singular “louse”) are small wingless insects of which there are thousands of species, three of which are human disease agents. The three kinds of lice affecting humans are head lice, body lice and pubic lice. Most lice feed on dead skin found on the body of the host animal, although some feed on blood. Ick …

24 Loud : FORTE

A person’s forte is his or her strength. The term “forte” came into English via French from the Latin “fortis” meaning strong. “Forte” is also a musical direction meaning “loud”.

25 Katniss’s partner in “The Hunger Games” : PEETA

“The Hunger Games” is a 2008 novel by Suzanne Collins, and the first in a trilogy of titles that also includes “Catching Fire” (2009) and “Mockingjay” (2010). “The Hunger Games” was adapted into a very successful movie released in 2012, with the sequels following soon after. Amazon.com reports more sales of “The Hunger Games” series books than even the “Harry Potter” series.

33 Animal with a prehensile snout : TAPIR

All four species of tapir are endangered. Even though the tapir looks much like a pig, it is more closely related to the horse and the rhinoceros.

35 Seneca, philosophically : STOIC

Zeno of Citium was a Greek philosopher famous for teaching at the Stoa Poikile, the “Painted Porch”, located on the north side of the Ancient Agora of Athens. Because of the location of his classes, his philosophy became known as stoicism (from “stoa”, the word for “porch”). And yes, we get our adjective “stoic” from the same root.

Seneca the Younger was a tutor and advisor to Nero, emperor of ancient Rome. Although maybe innocent, Seneca was forced to commit suicide by Nero as it was alleged that Seneca participated in a plot to kill the emperor. To kill himself, Seneca cut into a number of veins in order to bleed to death.

37 Relative of Inc. : LTD

In Britain and Ireland the most common type of business (my perception anyway) is one that has private shareholders whose liability is limited to the value of their investment. Such a company is known as a private limited company, and has the letters “Ltd” after the name. If the shares are publicly traded, then the company is a public limited company, and has the letters “plc” after the name.

41 Police dept. alerts : APBS

An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

46 Actress Glazer of “Broad City” : ILANA

Ilana Glazer is a comedian from Long Island, New York. Glazer is the co-creator of the Comedy Central sitcom “Broad City” along with comedian Abbi Jacobson.

54 Latin quarter : BARRIO

“Barrio” is the name given to an urban district in Spanish-speaking countries.

58 Group of mountains : MASSIF

“Massif” is a geological term describing a section of the earth’s crust that moves upwards due to the action of tectonic plates. The whole massif retains its structure, with movement taking place at surrounding fault lines. The term “massif” is also used for a group of mountains formed by such geological action. “Massif” is French for “massive”.

60 Atomic clock timekeeper : MASER

A MASER is a device that was around long before LASERs came into the public consciousness. A MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is similar to a LASER, but microwaves are emitted rather than light waves. When the storyline for “Star Trek” was being developed, the writers introduced a weapon called a “phaser”, with the name “phaser” derived from PHoton mASER.

An atomic clock is the most accurate tool known for keeping track of time. Most clocks work using some sort of an oscillation that takes place at a regular interval, like a pendulum. In the case of an atomic clock, the oscillation that is measured is between the nucleus of an atom (usually a cesium atom) and its surrounding electrons.

62 One into jive : HEP CAT

The slang term “hep” meaning “cool” has the same meaning as the later derivative term “hip”. The origins of “hep” seem unclear, but it was adopted by jazz musicians of the early 1900s.

66 Ice cream eponym : EDY

Dreyers’ ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dreyer and Joseph Edy.

71 Tortilla española ingredient : HUEVO

In Spanish, one needs at least one “huevo” (egg) to make an omelet.

72 Printer brand : EPSON

Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, and one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

76 Main line : AORTA

The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

91 Like the Kardashians, ethnically : ARMENIAN

Armenia is a landlocked country found east of Turkey, and is a former Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR). Back in the year 301 CE, the ancient Kingdom of Armenia became the first nation in the world to adopt Christianity as its national religion.

93 Pin number? : TEN

Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

97 Mother-of-pearl : NACRE

Nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl, is the strong iridescent material laid down by some mollusks on the inside of their shells, and it’s also what makes up pearls. The creature lays down nacre as a defensive mechanism, protecting the soft tissue of its body from the rough surface of the outer shell. Similarly, it uses nacre to encapsulate harmful debris or a parasite that penetrates the shell, and that’s how a pearl is formed.

99 Milk from una vaca : LECHE

In Spanish, one might have “café con leche” (coffee with milk).

104 Author of the 2018 best seller “Becoming” : OBAMA

“Becoming” is a 2018 autobiographical memoir by former First Lady Michelle Obama.

105 “The Wizard of Oz” composer Harold : ARLEN

Harold Arlen is a composer of popular music who will forever be associated with his composition “Over the Rainbow” from the movie “The Wizard of Oz”. Arlen also composed the music to “Come Rain or Come Shine”, “It’s Only a Paper Moon”, “Lydia the Tattooed Lady” and the wonderful “Stormy Weather”.

107 Stiller’s comic partner : MEARA

Anne Meara married fellow comedic actor Jerry Stiller in 1954. The couple’s children are actors Ben and Amy Stiller. Meara co-starred with Carroll O’Connor and Martin Balsam in the eighties sitcom “Archie Bunker’s Place”, a spin-off from “All in the Family”.

110 Sound on Old MacDonald’s farm : NEIGH

There was an old American version of the English children’s song “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” (E-I-E-I-O) that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the older US version goes “Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o”.

111 Mideast capital : AMMAN

Amman is the capital city of Jordan, and is one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in the world. Amman has been occupied by a number of different civilizations over the centuries, including the Greeks who called it “Philadelphia”, a name retained by the Romans when they occupied the city just after 100 AD.

113 ___ Nostra : COSA

Apparently, “Cosa Nostra” is the real name for the Italian Mafia. “Cosa Nostra” translates as “our thing” or “this thing of ours”. The term first became public in the US when the FBI managed to turn some members of the American Mafia. The Italian authorities established that “Cosa Nostra” was also used in Sicily when they penetrated the Sicilian Mafia in the 1980s. The term “mafia” seems to be just a literary invention that has become popular with the public.

117 NATO alphabet “E” : ECHO

The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. It goes Alfa, Bravo, Charlie … X-ray, Yankee, Zulu.

122 Country music’s ___ Young Band : ELI

The Eli Young Band is a country group from Texas founded by Mike Eli and James Young when they were roommates in the University of North Texas.

123 Singer Sumac : YMA

Yma Sumac was a Peruvian soprano. Sumac had a notable vocal range of five octaves.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Mythical hunter : DIANA
6 Curmudgeon : CRAB
10 Famous Musketeer : ATHOS
15 Crack : STAB
19 Glowing reminder : EMBER
20 Houston university : RICE
21 Bond film staple : CHASE
22 “Other people,” per Sartre : HELL
23 Facebook friends weighing in on the new belly button ring? : JURY OF YOUR PIERCE (from “jury of your peers”)
26 Gymnast Korbut : OLGA
27 Flat pancake filling? : … AS A …
28 Custodian’s need : MOP
29 Woodwind category : REED
30 Cellphone user’s choice : DATA PLAN
32 When something goes live : START DATE
35 Fish dish : SCROD
36 Dr.’s order : MED
37 Princess who makes a plea via a hologram : LEIA
39 Draw : TIE
40 Jacques of French comedy : TATI
42 Mozart’s “___ Pastore” : IL RE
44 L’eggs brand bikini? : TWO-PIECE IN A POD (from “two peas in a pod”)
48 Typical fan of Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand” : TEENER
51 Blue material : DENIM
52 Arafat’s grp. : PLO
53 Nickname of a 2010s pop idol, with “the” : BIEB
55 Valerie Harper title role : RHODA
56 Extension of a chicken breast : RIB MEAT
59 “Git!” : SCRAM!
61 “Interviewer” who asked Buzz Aldrin whether people on the moon were friendly : ALI G
62 Scientific inquiry? : HOW?
65 Family nickname : GRANNIE
67 Bugs and Thumper : RABBITS
69 End of an ___ : ERA
70 Final scene of “Antony and Cleopatra”? : HISS AND HEARSE (from “his and hers”)
74 Speak lovingly : COO
75 1979 World Series opponents of the 63-Downs : PIRATES
77 Big-spending demographic group : YUPPIES
78 South end? : -ERN
79 Lake in “Casino Royale” : COMO
80 Axes : FIRES
84 Competitive video gaming : E-SPORTS
86 It routinely goes off when you’re out : ALARM
88 Seethe : FUME
89 3-D measurement: Abbr. : VOL
90 Illusory illustration : OP ART
94 Camper without a camper, say : TENTER
96 Like a confirmed peacenik? : DOWN ON ALL FORCE (from “down on all fours”)
100 Swimmer Torres with 12 Olympic medals : DARA
101 “___ miracle!” : IT’S A
102 Mideast land: Abbr. : UAE
103 Mideast land : OMAN
104 Klutz : OAF
106 Easy question to answer : GIMME
108 Stick on a Christmas tree : CANDY CANE
112 Actor with a famous side kick : BRUCE LEE
114 Coat-of-arms border : ORLE
115 Physics unit : OHM
116 Born : NEE
119 Additionally : ALSO
120 “Our driveway has been incredibly slippery since the storm!”? : CAN’T BELIEVE MY ICE (from “can’t believe my eyes”)
124 Shambles : MESS
125 Shaw of 1930s-’40s swing : ARTIE
126 Gawk at : OGLE
127 Title role in a Christmas opera : AMAHL
128 “The Cherry Orchard” daughter : ANYA
129 Hoarse : RASPY
130 Blender sound : WHIR
131 Small iPods : NANOS

Down

1 ___ vu : DEJA
2 Shock jock Don : IMUS
3 Scrape : ABRASION
4 Marshal at Waterloo : NEY
5 It may be carried by the wind : AROMA
6 Puzzling : CRYPTIC
7 Agua source : RIO
8 Honda line : ACURA
9 Hat for un artiste : BERET
10 Anything but basic : ACID
11 Alternative to café : THE
12 Brew made from apples : HARD CIDER
13 Famous grouch : OSCAR
14 Get the job done : SEE TO IT
15 Class with drills : SHOP
16 Parent’s fervent prayer to the school nurse? : TELL ME, “NO LICE” (from “tell me no lies”)
17 Fish tank film : ALGAE
18 Vanilla : BLAND
24 Loud : FORTE
25 Katniss’s partner in “The Hunger Games” : PEETA
31 Famed acting coach Stella : ADLER
33 Animal with a prehensile snout : TAPIR
34 Reinforces, as convictions : DEEPENS
35 Seneca, philosophically : STOIC
37 Relative of Inc. : LTD
38 Ram dam : EWE
41 Police dept. alerts : APBS
43 New-joint joint? : REHAB
45 “It depends on my schedule” : I MIGHT
46 Actress Glazer of “Broad City” : ILANA
47 Away : NOT IN
49 Job in media : EDITOR
50 Teases : RAGS ON
54 Latin quarter : BARRIO
57 Provide essential info to : BRIEF
58 Group of mountains : MASSIF
60 Atomic clock timekeeper : MASER
62 One into jive : HEP CAT
63 1979 World Series opponent of the 75-Across : ORIOLE
64 Like a sick baby? : WARM AND FUSSY (from “warm and fuzzy”)
66 Ice cream eponym : EDY
68 Greatest hits opener : BEST OF …
71 Tortilla española ingredient : HUEVO
72 Printer brand : EPSON
73 Loudly commend : APPLAUD
76 Main line : AORTA
81 ABCs : RUDIMENTS
82 Cry too much, say : EMOTE
83 Stitches : SEWS
85 Nestle : SPOON
87 Blend : MERGE
91 Like the Kardashians, ethnically : ARMENIAN
92 Pioneer in color TV : RCA
93 Pin number? : TEN
95 Training wheels? : RAIL CAR
97 Mother-of-pearl : NACRE
98 Part of a long travel day, maybe : LAYOVER
99 Milk from una vaca : LECHE
104 Author of the 2018 best seller “Becoming” : OBAMA
105 “The Wizard of Oz” composer Harold : ARLEN
107 Stiller’s comic partner : MEARA
109 Permit : ALLOW
110 Sound on Old MacDonald’s farm : NEIGH
111 Mideast capital : AMMAN
113 ___ Nostra : COSA
114 Heed : OBEY
117 NATO alphabet “E” : ECHO
118 Slinky swimmers : EELS
121 Good thing coming to those who wait : TIP
122 Country music’s ___ Young Band : ELI
123 Singer Sumac : YMA

12 thoughts on “0526-19 NY Times Crossword 26 May 19, Sunday”

  1. 56:39. I found this to be a tough but enjoyable Sunday challenge. I ended up having to do an alphabet run at PEETA/TATI as I knew neither. Clever theme, but I had to have most of them filled in before I could guess them very well.

    I always assumed SCROD was a species of fish. Oh well, they’re darn good when cooked right whatever it means

    Best –

    1. @hugh. I think the use of the singular “opponent” was an attempt to lead you to Oriole, as in just one of the players.

  2. 1 hr and30 min. with 7 errors….I would love to work one puzzle where I didn’t have to speak several foreign languages or know anything about the hunger games or Harry Potter.
    My paper lists this puzzle as 0602

  3. As does the Charleston SC Post & Courier . Typically is the previous Sunday edition.

    And thanks Cathi for ASA!

  4. 40:12, no errors. A lot of curveballs, misdirects and head-slappers. “112A Actor with a famous sidekick” = BRUCE LEE. I’m thinking Bruce Lee played Cato in the Green Lantern, he WAS a famous sidekick. Oh wait! Martial arts: sidekick. (HEADSLAP). Agree with @Jeff, the T cross in PEETA/TATI was a wild guess for me as well.

  5. No errors. My paper has had a different listing number for several weeks. This was No. 0602. Anyone know what is going on?

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