0519-19 NY Times Crossword 19 May 19, Sunday

Constructed by: Natan Last
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Hook-Ups

Themed answers are all in the down-direction. We “hook” a fish that is a hidden word in each themed answer, and pull it to the surface, to the top of of the answer. Those fish are shown using circled letters in the gird:

  • 1D Gym rat’s development : WORKOUT ROUTINE (moving up “trout”)
  • 4D Act overprotectively toward : MOLLYCODDLE (moving up “cod”)
  • 12D Role for a biology grad student, perhaps : LAB ASSISTANT (moving up “bass”)
  • 26D The “Aladdin” song “A Whole New World” takes place on one : MAGIC CARPET RIDE (moving up “carp”)
  • 48D Surprised : CAUGHT UNAWARES (moving up “tuna”)
  • 56D Gave extra juice : SUPERCHARGED (moving up “perch”)
  • 63D What might get you a “ladle” drunk? : SPIKED PUNCH (moving up “pike”)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 22m 33s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 “Full Frontal With Samantha Bee” channel : TBS

Samantha Bee is a comedian from Toronto who found fame as a correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” starting way back in 2003. Bee left “The Daily Show” in 2015 to host her own late-night talk show “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee” on TBS.

4 Counterpart of “highway” in an m.p.g. rating : CITY

Miles per gallon (mpg)

8 Little rapscallions : IMPS

We might call a little imp a “rapscallion”, an evolution from “rascallion” that in turn comes from “rascal”.

12 Weapon that’s thrown : BOLAS

Bolas are heavy balls connected by cords that constitute a throwing weapon. Bolas are often used to capture animals by tripping them as they run. The weapon is usually associated with gauchos, the South American cowboys, although there is evidence that the Inca army used them in battle.

18 Source of some penetrating notes : OBOE

When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance, you’ll note (pun!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an “A”. The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe’s “A”.

25 He hosted the second-ever episode of “Saturday Night Live” : PAUL SIMON

The first seven hosts of “Saturday Night Live” (in 1975) were

  1. George Carlin
  2. Paul Simon
  3. Rob Reiner
  4. Candice Bergen
  5. Robert Klein
  6. Lily Tomlin
  7. Richard Pryor

30 Braves’ division, briefly : NL EAST

The Atlanta Braves are the only team to have won baseball’s World Series in three different home cities. They won as the Boston Braves in 1914, the Milwaukee Braves in 1957 and the Atlanta Braves in 1995.

31 Pirouette : WHIRL

We took our word “pirouette” directly from French, in which language it has the same meaning, i.e. a rotation in dancing. “Pirouette” is also the French word for “spinning top”.

33 War loser, usually : TREY

War is a card game, one played mainly by children.

34 Like beer and baking dough : YEASTY

Yeasts are unicellular microorganisms in the kingdom Fungi. The species of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for centuries in the making of wine and beer, and in breadmaking. Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates into carbon dioxide and alcohol in the process of fermentation. When making beer and wine, the carbon dioxide and alcohol may be captured by the liquid. When making bread, the carbon dioxide and alcohol is driven off by heat.

35 Try Sinatra at karaoke, say : CROON

Frank Sinatra was the only child of Italian immigrants living in Hoboken, New Jersey. Like so many of our heroes, Sinatra had a rough upbringing. His mother was arrested several times and convicted of running an illegal abortion business in the family home. Sinatra never finished high school, as he was expelled for rowdy conduct. He was later arrested as a youth on a morals charge for carrying on with a married woman, which was an offence back then. But Sinatra straightened himself out by the time he was twenty and started singing professionally.

40 Member of a South Asian diaspora : DESI

People from the Indian subcontinent might refer to themselves as “desi”.

Diaspora is a Greek word meaning “a scattering of seeds”. I guess I’m one of the Irish seeds …

43 Fate, in Greek myth : MOIRA

The three Fates of Greek mythology were white-robed deities, and were also called the Moirai. The three Fates were Clotho the spinner, Lachesis the allotter and Atropos the unturnable.

52 Depiction in Bosch’s “The Garden of Earthly Delights” : EDEN

Hieronymus Bosch was a Dutch painter who worked late 15th and early 16th centuries. Perhaps his most recognized work is his triptych titled “The Garden of Earthly Delights”.

53 Presage : AUGUR

The verb “to augur” means “to bode, serve as an omen”. The term comes from the name of religious officials in Ancient Rome called augurs whose job it was to interpret signs and omens.

55 Vietnamese soup : PHO

Pho is a noodle soup from Vietnam that is a popular street food.

57 Vittles : GRUB

“Victuals” is a term for food that is fit for consumption. We tend to pronounce “victuals” as “vittles”, and we use the term “vittles” and “victuals” interchangeably.

59 1972 Bill Withers hit : USE ME

Bill Withers was working as an assembly operator while he was trying to make a name for himself in the music industry. Even as he found success with his glorious 1971 single “Ain’t No Sunshine”, he held onto his day job, worried that the music industry was unpredictable.

61 The miser’s daughter in Molière’s “The Miser” : ELISE

“Molière” was the stage name of French actor and playwright Jean-Baptiste Poquelin. It is amazing how well the comedies of Molière, written in the 1600s, entertain us on stage today. Among his best-known plays are “The Misanthrope”, “The School for Wives” and “Tartuffe or the Hypocrite”.

63 Cuddly-looking bear : PANDA

Taxonomic classification of the giant panda has been a subject of great debate for years, the main question being whether it belongs to the bear or raccoon family. The accepted opinion these days, based on molecular studies, seems to be that the panda is in fact a true bear.

66 Shoe with lots of holes : CROC

Crocs are foam clogs that were originally designed as shoes to be worn at health spas.

72 Alternative to Corinthian : IONIC

The Ionic was one of the three classical orders of architecture, the others being the Doric and the Corinthian. An Ionic column is relatively ornate. It usually has grooves running up and down its length and at the top there is a “scroll” design called a “volute”. The scroll motif makes Ionic columns popular for the design of academic buildings. The term “Ionic” means “pertaining to Ionia”, with Ionia being an ancient territory that is located in modern-day Turkey.

73 First word in many a limerick : THERE

No one knows for sure how the limerick got its name, although there does seem to be agreement the name does indeed come from the city or county of Limerick in Ireland. Try this one for size:

There was a young lady named Bright
who traveled much faster than light.
She set out one day
in a relative way,
and came back the previous night.

74 H. H. Munro’s pseudonym : SAKI

H. H. Munro was a British writer who actually was born in Burma. He was most famous for his short stories, which he published using the pen name “Saki”.

75 ___ Club : SAM’S

Sam’s Club is owned and operated by Walmart, and is named after the company’s founder Sam Walton.

78 Sci-fi subgenre with “retrofuturistic” technology : STEAMPUNK

I could go on for ages about retrofuturistic STEAMPUNK, but I wouldn’t want to bore everyone …

84 Shield of Greek myth : AEGIS

Someone is said to be under the aegis (also “egis”) of someone else if that other person provides protection, or perhaps sponsorship. The word “aegis” comes from the Greek word for a goat (“aigis”). The idea is that the goatskin shield or breastplate, worn by both Zeus and Athena, gave some measure of protection.

88 Doppelgänger : TWIN

A doppelgänger is a ghostly double of a living person. The literal translation of the German word “Doppelgänger” is double (Doppel) walker (Gänger).

90 Oscar winner for “Shakespeare in Love” : DENCH

Dame Judi Dench is an outstanding English actress who has appeared for decades in her home country on stage and screen. Dench’s film career took off in the nineties with a relatively trivial role as “M” in the James Bond series of films. Since then she has played leading roles in several excellent movies including “Shakespeare in Love”, “Mrs. Brown”, “Notes on a Scandal” and “Philomena”.

I found the 1998 movie “Shakespeare in Love” to be an entertaining romantic comedy. It is a fictional account of Shakespeare having a love affair while in the middle of writing his famous “Romeo and Juliet”. The great cast includes Gwyneth Paltrow, Colin Firth and Judi Dench, with Joseph Fiennes in the title role.

95 Digital world : WEB

In essence, the World Wide Web is a vast collection of documents that is accessible using the Internet, with each document containing hyperlinks which point to other documents in the collection. So the “Web” is different from the Internet, although the terms are often used interchangeably. The Web is the collection of documents, and the Internet is global network of computers on which the documents reside. The Web was effectively the invention of British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee. The key to Berner-Lee’s invention was bringing together two technologies that already existed: hypertext and the Internet. I, for one, am very grateful …

98 French toast : A VOTRE SANTE

“À votre santé” is French for “to your health”. Cheers!

100 Hot chili designation : FOUR-ALARM

The spiciness or “heat” of a serving of chili is often designated by an unofficial scale ranging from one-alarm upwards.

103 Steinbeck novel featuring the madam Dora Flood : CANNERY ROW

“Cannery Row” is a novel by John Steinbeck that was first published in 1945. The title refers to the street in Monterey, California known as Cannery Row that is home to now-defunct sardine canning factories. Back in 1945 the street was called Ocean View Avenue, but it was renamed in 1958 in recognition of the Steinbeck novel.

104 Title in “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” : LIEGE

A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. “Liege” was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Apparently the term is influenced by the Latin verb “ligare” meaning “to tie, bind”. So, I guess both lord and servant were “bound” to each other.

“Monty Python and the Holy Grail” was released as a movie in 1975, and was a great success. Some thirty years later the film’s storyline was used as inspiration for the hit musical “Spamalot”. I saw “Spamalot” on stage not that long ago and wasn’t that impressed. But, mine was very much a minority opinion …

105 Hoodwink : FOOL

“To hoodwink” has had the meaning “to deceive” since about 1600. Prior to that it meant simply “to blindfold”, and is simply a combining of the words “hood” and “wink”.

110 Peace Nobelist Walesa : LECH

Lech Walesa worked as an electrician in the Gdansk Shipyards in Poland. Walesa was active in the trade union movement in the days when unions were not welcome behind the Iron Curtain. His efforts resulted in the founding of Solidarity, the first independent trade union in Soviet-controlled territory. For his work, Walesa was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1983, and in 1990 he became the first democratically elected President of Poland. He has lost support in Poland in recent years, but he is a very popular booking on the international speaking circuit.

Down

2 High pitch, maybe : BALL

That would be baseball.

3 1984 Steve Perry hit : SHE’S MINE

Steve Perry was the lead singer of the band Journey for much of the eighties and nineties.

4 Act overprotectively toward : MOLLYCODDLE (moving up “cod”)

To mollycoddle is to be overprotective. Back in the mid-1700s, “mollycoddle” was an insulting term used to describe a man who was weak and effeminate.

5 Bygone Apple laptop : IBOOK

From 1996 to 2006, Apple sold a relatively cost-effective line of laptops called iBooks. Basically, an iBook was a stripped-down version of the high-end PowerBook, in a different form factor and targeted at the consumer and education markets. The iBook was replaced by the MacBook in 2006.

9 Ragtag : MOTLEY

Something described as motley is mottled, is marked with different-colored spots. The term probably comes from the Old English word “mot” meaning “speck”. We can use the term “motley” figuratively to mean “diverse, heterogeneous”.

“Ragtag and bobtail” is a colorful phrase that’s used to describe the lowest classes, or the rabble. A “bobtail” is a horse that has had its tail cut short, a word that goes back as least as far as Shakespeare as he used it in “King Lear”. A “tag” is a piece of cloth that is torn and hanging, which was readily combined with “rag” in the original phrase “tag, rag and bobtail”. This idiom, perhaps originally quoted from Samuel Pepys in his diary in 1659, referred to the lower classes as “tag, rag and bobtail, dancing, singing and drinking”. The phrase evolved, giving us our contemporary word “ragtag” meaning ragged and unkempt.

11 One working on an estate : SERF

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

13 Works with numbers : OPUSES

The Latin for “work” is “opus”, with the plural being “opera”. We sometimes also use the plural “opuses” in English.

14 One might be thrown from a horse : LARIAT

Our word “lariat” comes from the Spanish “la reater” meaning “the rope”.

15 Flotilla of merchant ships : ARGOSY

A large merchant ship might be referred to as an “argosy”, especially if it carries a rich cargo. The term comes from the Croatian city of Dubrovnik, which lies on the Adriatic coast. Once called Ragusa (“Arragosa” in English), the city was the departure point for ships laden with goods imported into 16th-century Britain.

A flotilla is a formation of smaller warships, one that might be part of a larger fleet. The term “flotilla” is Spanish, and is the diminutive of “flota” meaning “fleet”, which in turn comes from “flotar” meaning “to float”.

16 Hospital tube : STENT

In the world of surgical medicine, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, in order to reduce the effects of a local restriction in the body’s conduit.

21 Worker with numbers, for short : CPA

Certified public accountant (CPA)

22 French fashion icon : DIOR

Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, drawing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped re-establish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

26 The “Aladdin” song “A Whole New World” takes place on one : MAGIC CARPET RIDE (moving up “carp”)

The Disney animated feature “Aladdin” was released in 1992 and is one of the best movies to come out of the studio, in my opinion, largely due to the great performance by Robin Williams who voiced the Genie. “Aladdin” was the most successful film of 1992, earning over $500 million worldwide, an unusual feat for an animated movie.

29 Approx. 1,055 joules : BTU

In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured using the British Thermal Units (BTU). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water’s temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

James Joule was an English physicist who spent much of his life working in the family brewing business. Joule used his work in the brewery to study the relationship between heat and mechanical work. In honor of his achievements, his name is used for the unit of energy in the International System of Units (i.e. the joule).

38 Fencing sword : EPEE

The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

40 Clobber : DRUB

A drubbing is a beating, one given either literally or figuratively. The term “drub” dates back in English to the 17th century when it was imported from the Arabic word for a beating, i.e. “darb”.

42 Cowboys and Spurs : TEAMS

The Dallas Cowboys play in the National Football Conference (NFC) of the NFL. The Cowboys are famous for a lengthy streak of 20 consecutive winning seasons, from 1966 to 1985. They are the highest-valued sports franchise in the country. The only team in the world that’s worth more money is the UK’s Manchester United soccer team.

The Spurs are the professional basketball team based in San Antonio, Texas. The team was founded as the Dallas Chaparrals of the American Basketball Association (ABA) in 1967.

44 Barbra Streisand album “A Love Like ___” : OURS

Barbra Streisand has recorded 31 top-ten albums since 1963, more than any other female recording artist. In fact, she has had an album in the top ten for the last five decades, a rare achievement in itself.

47 Like the central planet in “Dune” : ARID

The less than successful 1984 movie “Dune” (directed by David Lynch) was an adaptation of the spectacularly successful 1965 novel of the same name written by Frank Herbert.

50 Rival of BAL and BOS : NYY

The Baltimore Orioles (BAL), Boston Red Sox (BOS) and New York Yankees (NYY) are all baseball teams.

58 Family business : MAFIA

Apparently, “Cosa Nostra” is the real name for the Italian Mafia. “Cosa Nostra” translates as “our thing” or “this thing of ours”. The term first became public in the US when the FBI managed to turn some members of the American Mafia. The Italian authorities established that “Cosa Nostra” was also used in Sicily when they penetrated the Sicilian Mafia in the 1980s. The term “mafia” seems to be just a literary invention that has become popular with the public.

60 Tres y tres : SEIS

In Spanish, “tres y tres” (three plus three) is “seis” (six).

62 Actress Petty of “A League of Their Own” : LORI

Lori Petty is the actress who played the character Kit Keller in the fabulous movie “A League of Their Own”. Petty also played the title role in a 1995 science fiction film called “Tank Girl”.

64 Handyperson’s inits. : DIY

Back in Ireland, we don’t have “hardware stores” as such, but rather “DIY centres” (and that’s the spelling of “centres”). “DIY” is an initialism standing for “do-it-yourself”.

66 Quaff quickly : CHUG

“Quaff” is both a verb and a noun. One “quaffs” (takes a hearty drink) of a “quaff” (a hearty drink).

68 Engineer who coined the term “horsepower” : WATT

James Watt was a Scottish inventor. He figured prominently in the Industrial Revolution in Britain, largely due to the improvements he made to the fledgling steam engine. The SI unit of power is called the watt, and was named in his honor.

The unit of horsepower was introduced along with the steam engine, where the output of the engine was compared with the power of draft horses. Largely, this comparison with the horse was a marketing ploy, as the intent was to demonstrate that one steam engine could negate the need for a number of draft horses used for work.

70 Hilton alternative : OMNI

Omni Hotels & Resorts is headquartered in Irvine, California and has properties in the US, Canada and Mexico.

73 Larrups : TANS

To larrup is to beat or thrash.

75 Something journalists may work on : SPEC

Something that is created on spec is a done so without having a specific buyer or consumer in mind. Many crosswords are constructed on spec, and then submitted to the likes of the “New York Times” or “Los Angeles Times” in the hope of publication.

79 Its wingspan can reach 30 feet : MANTA RAY

The manta ray is the largest species of ray, with the largest one recorded at over 25 feet across and weighing 5,100 pounds. It is sometimes referred to as the sea devil.

81 Problem usually encountered at night : APNEA

Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

83 Aetna’s business: Abbr. : INS

When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mount Etna, the Italian volcano.

85 Say uncle : GIVE IN

“To say uncle” is an American expression meaning “to submit, yield”. Its usage dates back to the early 1900s, but nobody seems to know how “uncle!” came to mean “stop!”

86 Searched for truffles, maybe : ROOTED

Truffles are rooted out by pigs, or specially trained dogs. The reason why pigs, especially sows, are so attracted to truffles is that there is a chemical compound found within the truffle that is very similar to androstenol, a sex pheromone found in the saliva of boars.

88 Stretching or tightening muscle : TENSOR

A tensor muscle is one that tightens or stretches a part of the body.

89 Dangling part of a rooster : WATTLE

A wattle is that ugly (at least I think it’s ugly) appendage hanging below the neck of some birds, like say a turkey.

91 Isle named for a Gaelic goddess : EIRE

“Éire” is the Irish name for Ireland, coming from “Ériu”. Ériu was the matron goddess of Ireland in Irish mythology.

92 Shade of black : SABLE

Sables are small mammals, about two feet long, that are found right across northern Europe and northern Asia. The sable’s black pelt is highly prized in the fur trade. Sable is unique among furs in that it feels smooth no matter which direction it is stroked.

93 Capital once known as Thang Long (“Ascending Dragon”) : HANOI

Hanoi (“Hà Nội” in Vietnamese) was the capital of North Vietnam, and Saigon the capital of South Vietnam. After the Vietnam War, Hanoi was made capital of the reunified state. Saigon, the larger metropolis, was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City. Hanoi is located in the delta of the Red River, and is just over 50 miles from the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea.

94 Like some booms : SONIC

The Mach number of a moving object (like say an airplane) is its speed relative to the speed of sound. A plane travelling at Mach 2, for example, is moving at twice the speed of sound. The term “Mach” takes its name from the Austrian physicist Ernst Mach who published a groundbreaking paper in 1877 that even predicted the “sonic boom”.

96 Bow-wielding god : EROS

The name of Eros, the Greek god of love, gives rise to our word “erotic” meaning “arousing sexual desire”. Eros was referred to in Latin as both Amor (meaning “love”) and Cupid (meaning “desire”).

97 Mini manufacturer : BMW

The initialism “BMW” stands for Bayerische Motoren Werke, which translates into Bavarian Motor Works. BMW was making aircraft engines during WWI, but had to cease that activity according to the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. The company then started making motorcycles, and moved into automobile production starting in 1928. BMW moved back into aircraft engine manufacturing during the build-up of the Luftwaffe prior to WWII.

The original mini was a fabulous car, one that I drove all over Ireland in my youth. It had a unique front-wheel-drive layout that took up very little space, allowing for a lot of room (relatively speaking) for passengers and baggage. One space-saving trick was to mount the engine transversely, so it sits rotated 90 degrees from the norm. That engine had a capacity of only 848cc. In 1961, a Mini Cooper model was introduced, which was a sporty version. The Mini Cooper was a phenomenal hit, especially after repeated wins in the Monte Carlo Rally. The Mini marque has been owned by BMW since 1994.

99 Winnow : SIFT

We use the verb “to winnow” in a figurative sense to describe the separation of something good from a collection of worthless things. The more literal meaning is the freeing of grain from the lighter chaff by blowing on the mixture, or by throwing it in the air.

100 Meter reading : FARE

We call cabs “taxis”, a word derived from “taximeter cabs” that were introduced in London in 1907. A taximeter was an automated meter designed to record distance travelled and fare to be charged. The term “taximeter” evolved from “taxameter”, with “taxa” being Latin for “tax, charge”.

101 Erato’s instrument : LYRE

The lyre is a stringed instrument that is most closely associated with Ancient Greece, and with the gods Hermes and Apollo in particular. According to myth, Hermes slaughtered a cow from a sacred herd belonging to Apollo and offered it to the gods but kept the entrails. Hermes used the entrails to make strings that he stretched across the shell of a tortoise, creating the first lyre. Apollo liked the sound from the lyre and agreed to accept it as a trade for his herd of cattle.

In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry. She is often depicted with a wreath of myrtle and roses, and playing a lyre.

103 Bit of old-fashioned animation : CEL

In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 “Full Frontal With Samantha Bee” channel : TBS
4 Counterpart of “highway” in an m.p.g. rating : CITY
8 Little rapscallions : IMPS
12 Weapon that’s thrown : BOLAS
17 Male buddy, in slang : BRAH
18 Source of some penetrating notes : OBOE
19 Infiltrator : MOLE
20 In two pieces : APART
21 Took a chill pill : COOLED DOWN
23 Danger for coastal residents : STORM SURGE
25 He hosted the second-ever episode of “Saturday Night Live” : PAUL SIMON
26 Event in nuclear physics : COLD FISSION
27 It “should comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfortable,” according to a saying : ART
28 Incompetent sort, slangily : MOOK
29 Reveals : BARES
30 Braves’ division, briefly : NL EAST
31 Pirouette : WHIRL
33 War loser, usually : TREY
34 Like beer and baking dough : YEASTY
35 Try Sinatra at karaoke, say : CROON
37 Boost : LEG UP
40 Member of a South Asian diaspora : DESI
41 Format accommodating poor vision : LARGE TYPE
43 Fate, in Greek myth : MOIRA
46 Like some sheets : SATIN
51 Requests : ASKS
52 Depiction in Bosch’s “The Garden of Earthly Delights” : EDEN
53 Presage : AUGUR
54 “I kid you not!” : TRULY!
55 Vietnamese soup : PHO
56 Went white : PALED
57 Vittles : GRUB
58 For the most part : MAINLY
59 1972 Bill Withers hit : USE ME
61 The miser’s daughter in Molière’s “The Miser” : ELISE
63 Cuddly-looking bear : PANDA
64 They’re full of hot air : DRIERS
66 Shoe with lots of holes : CROC
67 Fleet-footed : SWIFT
69 Crash site? : COT
72 Alternative to Corinthian : IONIC
73 First word in many a limerick : THERE
74 H. H. Munro’s pseudonym : SAKI
75 ___ Club : SAM’S
76 “You’ve gotta be kidding” : YEESH
77 It may lead to tax evasion charges : AUDIT
78 Sci-fi subgenre with “retrofuturistic” technology : STEAMPUNK
80 Blabbed : SANG
82 Widespread unrest : RIOTS
84 Shield of Greek myth : AEGIS
85 Facebook users’ multitude : GROUPS
88 Doppelgänger : TWIN
90 Oscar winner for “Shakespeare in Love” : DENCH
92 Language family that includes Crow and Lakota : SIOUAN
93 Helms : HEADS
94 Rain unsteadily : SPIT
95 Digital world : WEB
98 French toast : A VOTRE SANTE
100 Hot chili designation : FOUR-ALARM
102 Not like the odds of, say : BET AGAINST
103 Steinbeck novel featuring the madam Dora Flood : CANNERY ROW
104 Title in “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” : LIEGE
105 Hoodwink : FOOL
106 Comedic actor Wareheim : ERIC
107 “Wonder Woman” antagonist : ARES
108 Over : ENDED
109 Feature of an old-fashioned swing : TIRE
110 Peace Nobelist Walesa : LECH
111 What the Czech word “ano” means in English, paradoxically : YES

Down

1 Gym rat’s development : WORKOUT ROUTINE (moving up “trout”)
2 High pitch, maybe : BALL
3 1984 Steve Perry hit : SHE’S MINE
4 Act overprotectively toward : MOLLYCODDLE (moving up “cod”)
5 Bygone Apple laptop : IBOOK
6 Word with boom or skip : TOWN
7 Ache : YEN
8 Acher’s lament : I’M SORE
9 Ragtag : MOTLEY
10 Lumbers (along) : PLODS
11 One working on an estate : SERF
12 Role for a biology grad student, perhaps : LAB ASSISTANT (moving up “bass”)
13 Works with numbers : OPUSES
14 One might be thrown from a horse : LARIAT
15 Flotilla of merchant ships : ARGOSY
16 Hospital tube : STENT
17 Animal with tusks : BOAR
21 Worker with numbers, for short : CPA
22 French fashion icon : DIOR
24 Does groundbreaking work? : MINES
26 The “Aladdin” song “A Whole New World” takes place on one : MAGIC CARPET RIDE (moving up “carp”)
29 Approx. 1,055 joules : BTU
32 Refuses to share : HOGS
34 What a cake candle often represents : YEAR
35 Give it up, so to speak : CLAP
36 Reckless : RASH
38 Fencing sword : EPEE
39 Like “mailman” and “waitress” : GENDERED
40 Clobber : DRUB
42 Cowboys and Spurs : TEAMS
44 Barbra Streisand album “A Love Like ___” : OURS
45 “Uh … sure” : I GUESS SO …
47 Like the central planet in “Dune” : ARID
48 Surprised : CAUGHT UNAWARES (moving up “tuna”)
49 Not 100% : ILL
50 Rival of BAL and BOS : NYY
56 Gave extra juice : SUPERCHARGED (moving up “perch”)
58 Family business : MAFIA
60 Tres y tres : SEIS
62 Actress Petty of “A League of Their Own” : LORI
63 What might get you a “ladle” drunk? : SPIKED PUNCH (moving up “pike”)
64 Handyperson’s inits. : DIY
65 Sushi topper : ROE
66 Quaff quickly : CHUG
68 Engineer who coined the term “horsepower” : WATT
70 Hilton alternative : OMNI
71 Sounds of disappointment : TSKS
73 Larrups : TANS
75 Something journalists may work on : SPEC
79 Its wingspan can reach 30 feet : MANTA RAY
81 Problem usually encountered at night : APNEA
83 Aetna’s business: Abbr. : INS
85 Say uncle : GIVE IN
86 Searched for truffles, maybe : ROOTED
87 Delightful event? : OUTAGE
88 Stretching or tightening muscle : TENSOR
89 Dangling part of a rooster : WATTLE
91 Isle named for a Gaelic goddess : EIRE
92 Shade of black : SABLE
93 Capital once known as Thang Long (“Ascending Dragon”) : HANOI
94 Like some booms : SONIC
96 Bow-wielding god : EROS
97 Mini manufacturer : BMW
99 Winnow : SIFT
100 Meter reading : FARE
101 Erato’s instrument : LYRE
103 Bit of old-fashioned animation : CEL

10 thoughts on “0519-19 NY Times Crossword 19 May 19, Sunday”

  1. 42:25 after fixing a typo. (Given the nature of the gimmick and the fact that I was tired, I had a little trouble entering the theme answers correctly.)

  2. My timer ran out at 2 hrs and I kept going to somehow finish with no errors…..12A was not listed in my paper as plural but the answer was…..IMO this was a ridiculously hard puzzle and anyone who finished it without some “lookups” I want their autograph

  3. OK, I got this with no errors or look-ups but I might be cross-eyed for 24 hours. Cruel, but props to the constructor.

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