0512-19 NY Times Crossword 12 May 19, Sunday

Constructed by: Victor Barocas
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Measure for Measure

Themed answers are things that are MEASURED. The intersecting circled letters SLIDE away in the grid and are SCALES used to make those measurements:

  • 112A Adjusted to some index – or how 23-, 35-, 66- and 93-Across are measured per this puzzle? : ON A SLIDING SCALE
  • 23A What’s measured by [circled letters] : MINERAL HARDNESS [MOHS]
  • 35A What’s measured by [circled letters] : TEMPERATURE [CELSIUS]
  • 66A What’s measured by [circled letters] : WIND SPEED [BEAUFORT]
  • 93A What’s measured by [circled letters] : EARTHQUAKES [RICHTER]

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 19m 44s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

9 Early 20th-century author who foresaw TV and wireless telephones : BAUM

L. Frank Baum (the “L” is for Lyman) is of course famous for writing “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”. Writing early in the 20th century, Baum actually described in his books things that had yet to be invented, like television, laptop computers and wireless telephones.

20 Multitask command : MACRO

A macroinstruction (usually shortened to “macro”) is a set of instructions in a computer program that are abbreviated to one simple command.

23 What’s measured by [circled letters] : MINERAL HARDNESS [MOHS]

The Mohs scale of mineral hardness was developed in 1812 by Friedrich Mohs. Basically Mohs took minerals and scratched them with other minerals. In this way he was able to determine which minerals were hardest (most scratch resistant) and which softest.

28 Employ cajolery on : COAX

To coax is to cajole, to influence using gentle persuasion. Back in the 16th century, “coax” was a noun meaning “fool”, and was used in the sense of “make a coax of, make a fool of”.

34 Coveted Scrabble tile : ESS

The game of Scrabble has been around since 1938, the invention of an architect named Alfred Mosher Butts. Butts determined how many tiles of each letter, and the point value of each tile, by analyzing letter distributions in publications like “The New York Times”.

35 What’s measured by [circled letters] : TEMPERATURE [CELSIUS]

Anders Celsius was a Swedish astronomer. The temperature scale that Celsius created was the reverse of that used today, with “zero” representing the boiling point of water and “100” representing water’s freezing point. This scale was “upended” (in 1744) just after Celsius died, by the Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus. The resulting temperature scale then became known as the centigrade scale for over 200 years, until in 1948 it was decided to adopt the “degree Celsius”. So, anyone still using “degrees centigrade” is actually way behind the times …

39 D.C. nine : NATS

The Washington Nationals (“Nats”) baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969, and were the first Major League Baseball team in Canada. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

43 2006 novel for which Cormac McCarthy won a Pulitzer Prize : THE ROAD

“The Road” is a Pulitzer winning novel by Cormac McCarthy. It tells of a man and his son trekking across a grim landscape after most life has been destroyed on Earth by some apocalyptic event. In the movie adaptation of the book, Viggo Mortensen has the starring role of “the man” (we never learn his name).

47 Org. with Sharks and Penguins : NHL

The San Jose Sharks hockey team play their home games at the HP Pavilion in San Jose, a venue that we locals call “the Shark Tank”.

The Penguins are the professional hockey team based in Pittsburgh. They have been around since 1967, and were one of the first expansion teams when the NHL grew from six to twelve teams. The expansion team were to play in Pittsburgh’s Civic Arena, a domed structure known locally as the Igloo. It was the “Igloo” name that inspired a fan to suggest the “Penguins” moniker, which won a contest to choose the name of the new franchise.

54 Besmirch : TAR

“Besmirch” is a derivative of “smirch”, with both words meaning to “make dirty”. In particular, to besmirch is to sully someone’s reputation.

55 ___ colada : PINA

“Piña colada” is a Spanish term that translates into “strained pineapple”. The piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

58 Chemical compound : ENOL

An enol is an alkene with a hydroxyl group, and so is part-alkene and part-alcohol. The term “enol”, therefore, is a portmanteau of “alkene” and “alcohol”.

61 “Ora pro ___” : NOBIS

“Ora pro nobis” translates from Latin as “pray for us”. It is a common phrase used in the Roman Catholic tradition and is often shortened to “OPN”.

66 What’s measured by [circled letters] : WIND SPEED [BEAUFORT]

The Beaufort wind scale is named after Irishman Sir Francis Beaufort, a Rear-Admiral in the Royal Navy. Beaufort was a hydrographer as well as a career navy man.

69 Nascar ___ (demographic group) : DADS

“NASCAR dad” is one of those phrases that is used to broadly describe a perceived demographic, the “typical” person who enjoys watching NASCAR. It is often used to describe a bloc of voters, and is akin to “soccer mom”.

73 Brand pitched as “Always Comfortable” : SERTA

Serta was founded in 1931 when a group of 13 mattress manufacturers came together, essentially forming a cooperative. Today, the Serta company is owned by eight independent licensees in a similar arrangement. Serta advertisements feature the Serta Counting Sheep. Each numbered sheep has a different personality, such as:

  • #1 The Leader of the Flock
  • #½ The Tweener
  • #13 Mr. Bad Luck
  • #53 The Pessimist
  • #86 Benedict Arnold

76 Heroic poetry : EPOS

“Epos” is a Greek word for a story or a poem. We have absorbed the term into English with the same meaning. We also use it in English to mean “epic”, i.e. a long narrative poetic work featuring heroic deeds and ventures.

77 Hatfield haters : MCCOYS

The Hatfield and McCoy families of West Virginia and Kentucky were involved in a notorious feud that lasted from 1863 to 1891. The feud was somewhat resurrected in 1979 when representatives from both families appeared on the game show “Family Feud”. The McCoys came out ahead on TV and went home with over $11,000 and a pig.

85 Kitchen wraps : TIN FOILS

Before thin sheets of aluminum metal were available as aluminum foil, thin sheets of tin were used in various applications. Tin foil isn’t a great choice for wrapping food though, as it imparts a tinny taste. On the other side of the pond, aluminum foil has a different name. No, it’s not just the different spelling of aluminum (“aluminium”). We still call it “tin foil”. You see, we live in the past …

88 Tundra’s lack : TREES

Tundra is an ecosystem that is treeless, or very nearly so. There are three types of tundra. Arctic and Antarctic tundra can’t support the growth of trees as the ground is pretty much frozen. Alpine tundra cannot support tree-growth due to high altitude.

93 What’s measured by [circled letters] : EARTHQUAKES [RICHTER]

The Richter scale was developed in 1935, by Charles Richter at the California Institute of Technology. The Richter Scale has largely been abandoned, replaced by the moment magnitude scale (MMS). Even though the US Geological Survey has been reporting earthquakes using the MMS since 2002, the media is prone to mix things up and use phrases such as “Richter magnitude”.

99 Home of Sinbad Island : BASRA

Basra is a Iraq’s main port, and is located in the southeast of the country, just 34 miles from the Persian Gulf. Access to the gulf is via the Shatt al-Arab waterway, a river that discharges into the gulf in the port city of Umm Qasr.

101 Bee or Em : AUNT

Aunt Bee is a character in “The Andy Griffith Show”. The character’s full name is Beatrice Taylor but everyone in Mayberry calls her “Aunt Bee”. In the storyline, she is the aunt of protagonist Sheriff Andy Taylor, and is great-aunt to Andy’s son Opie. Aunt Bee was played by actress Frances Bavier.

In the children’s novel “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum, Dorothy Gale lives with her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry.

107 Pushback : FLAK

“Flak” was originally an acronym standing for the German term for an aircraft defense cannon (FLiegerAbwehrKanone). “Flak” then became used in English as a general term for antiaircraft fire and ultimately a term for verbal criticism, as in “to take flak”.

108 Coffee-flavored liqueur : TIA MARIA

Tia Maria is a coffee liqueur that was invented just after WWII in Jamaica, using Jamaican coffee beans, Jamaican rum, vanilla and sugar. The drink’s name translates to “Aunt Maria”.

111 Coffin supports : BIERS

Biers are the stands on which one rests a coffin for a service, or perhaps if the corpse is to lie in state. A bier may have wheels on it so that it can be used to transport the coffin to the graveside. The original biers were just flat pieces of wood on which the body was placed, covered with a shroud. Nowadays, we place the body in a casket, and then onto the bier.

115 El primer mes : ENERO

In Spanish, “el primer mes” (the first month) is “enero” (January).

117 Twilled fabric : SERGE

Serge is a type of twill fabric with diagonal ridges on both sides. The name “serge” comes from the Greek word for “silken”.

119 Gas whose name comes from the Greek for “strange” : XENON

Xenon was the first of the noble gases to be made into a compound, which was somewhat remarkable in that the noble gases were thought by many to be completely inert, unreactive.

121 Overcoat material : TWEED

Tweed is a rough woolen fabric that is very much associated with Scotland in the UK, and with County Donegal in Ireland. The cloth was originally called “tweel”, the Scots word for “twill”. Apparently a London merchant misinterpreted some handwriting in the early 1800s and assumed the fabric was called “tweed”, a reference to the Scottish River Tweed, and the name stuck …

122 Nevada’s largest county by area : NYE

Nye County, Nevada is home to the Nevada Test Site that was used for testing nuclear weapons from the fifties through the nineties.

Down

1 City famous for its Cuban sandwiches : TAMPA

The Florida city of Tampa has been known as “the Big Guava” since the seventies. The term is imitative of New York’s “Big Apple”, and refers to the unsuccessful search for the reported wild guava trees that were once hoped to be the basis of a new industry for the area. Tampa has also been called “Cigar City”, a reference to the cigar industry that fueled the area’s growth starting in the 1880s.

2 Serving no practical purpose : OTIOSE

“Otiose” means “lazy, indolent”, and comes from the Latin word “otium” meaning “leisure”. Use of the term has extended to mean “without profit, futile”.

3 Individual tic-tac-toe squares : NINTHS

When I was growing up in Ireland we played “noughts and crosses” … our name for the game tic-tac-toe.

4 Desktop item since 1998 : IMAC

The iMac is a desktop computer platform that Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

5 Beat the rap : WALK

A rap sheet is a criminal record. “Rap” is a slang term dating back to the 1700s that means “blame, responsibility” as in “to take the rap”, “bad rap” and “to beat the rap”. This usage morphed into “rap sheet” in the early 1900s.

6 Phil who sang “Love Me, I’m a Liberal” : OCHS

Phil Ochs was an American protest singer who was active in the days of the Vietnam War. Sadly, the singer’s mental health declined at the very time the war was winding down. Saigon fell in 1975, and Ochs committed suicide in 1976.

7 Packers’ org.? : NRA

National Rifle Association (NRA)

“Packing” and “packing heat” are underworld slang for “carrying a gun”.

9 One of a bunch? : BANANA

The banana is actually a berry, botanically speaking. And, bananas don’t really grow on trees. The “trunk” of the banana plant is in fact a pseudostem. The pseudostem is a false stem comprising rolled bases of leaves, and it can grow to 2 or 3 meters tall.

11 Letters at sea : USS

The abbreviation “USS” stands for “United States Ship”. The practice of naming US Navy vessels in a standard format didn’t start until 1907 when President Theodore Roosevelt issued an executive order that addressed the issue.

12 Crustaceans that carry their own camouflage : MOSS CRABS

Crustaceans are a subphylum of animals that are quite closely related to insects. Crustaceans all have exoskeletons, and most live in aquatic environments.

13 Performing whale, once : SHAMU

Shamu was the name of the third orca (aka “killer whale”) ever to be featured in a public exhibition. Shamu starred in a popular SeaWorld show in San Diego in the sixties. After she died in 1971, her name lived on as the “stage name” of orca shows in different SeaWorld parks. That original Shamu was retired after she grabbed and refused to let go of the leg of one of her trainers.

14 Establishment frequented by Falstaff : TAVERN

Sir John Falstaff is the lead character in Shakespeare’s “The Merry Wives of Windsor” and a supporting character in the two “Henry IV” plays. Falstaff is a self-promoting, obese and cowardly man. In “King Henry IV, part I”, Falstaff refers to his portly size, saying, “thou seest I have more flesh than another man, and therefore more frailty.”

15 Really binged, briefly : OD’ED

Overdose (OD)

16 Yuri Zhivago’s love : LARA

The heroine of Boris Pasternak’s epic novel “Doctor Zhivago” is Lara. The Lara character was inspired by Pasternak’s mistress Olga Ivinskaya.

17 Competitor of Amazon Handmade : ETSY

Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

19 Moon of Saturn named after a Greek Oceanid : TELESTO

In Greek mythology, Telesto was a sea goddess. She was the daughter of the Titan Oceanus and the Titaness Tethys. Telesto lent her name to one of the moons of Saturn.

30 Predators of armadillos and rabbits : OCELOTS

The ocelot is a wildcat found mainly in South and Central America, although there have been sightings as far north as Arkansas. An ocelot doesn’t look too different from a domestic cat, and some have been kept as pets. Perhaps most famously, Salvador Dali had one that he carried around everywhere with him.

32 Places where cucumber slices are not for salad : SPAS

Apparently scientists have shown that the inside of a cucumber (“cuke” for short) growing in a field can be up to twenty degrees cooler than the surrounding air. That’s something that was believed by farmers as early as the 1730s, at which time the phrase “cool as a cucumber” was coined.

33 Openly gay : OUT

Back in the 1950s, to come “out of the closet” was to admit to being an alcoholic. By the seventies, the phrase mainly referred to gay people shrugging off secrecy about their sexual orientation.

37 Rick of “Ghostbusters” : MORANIS

Rick Moranis is a Canadian actor who got his break with on the “Second City Television” show in the eighties. On the big screen, he is perhaps best known for his prominent roles in “Ghostbusters” and in the “Honey, I Shrunk the Kids” series of films.

41 Former Showtime series about Henry VIII : THE TUDORS

“The Tudors” is a very entertaining period drama that is perhaps mistitled, as it focuses on the life of King Henry VIII as opposed to the whole Tudor dynasty. Produced for Showtime, the entire series was filmed in Ireland. Irish actor Jonathan Rhys Meyers plays Henry VIII.

42 Camera inits. : SLR

Single-lens reflex camera (SLR)

46 Symbol of craziness : LOON

The slang term “loon” for a deranged person probably comes from the loud cry of the bird, the loon, but it is also probably influenced by the word “lunatic”.

48 Home of Hearst Castle : SAN SIMEON

San Simeon is a town on the Pacific coast of California between San Francisco and Los Angeles. Most notably, San Simeon is home to Hearst Castle, the magnificent mansion and estate built by newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst. Stop by if you’re ever in the area. It’s well worth your time …

49 Alee, at sea : PROTECTED

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

54 Maryland athlete, for short : TERP

The sports teams of the University of Maryland are called the Maryland Terrapins, or “the Terps” for short. The name dates back to 1932 when it was coined by the the university’s president at the time, Curley Byrd. He took the name from the diamondback terrapins that are native to the Chesapeake Bay.

56 Singer Bocelli : ANDREA

Andrea Bocelli is a classically-trained tenor from Italy who sings popular music, and hence is a so-called cross-over artist. Bocelli was born with poor eyesight and then became totally blind at the age of 12 when he had an accident playing soccer.

59 Bad thing to be left in, with “the” : LURCH

To leave someone “in the lurch” is to abandon them in a difficult position. The phrase comes from an old French game called “lourche” or “lurch”, which was similar to backgammon. A player left “in the lurch” was in a hopeless position from which he or she could only lose the game.

71 Actor Bud of “Harold and Maude” : CORT

Bud Cort is the actor who played the title role in the 1970 film “Brewster McCloud”, and Harold in the 1971 movie “Harold and Maude”.

“Harold and Maude” is a somewhat dark comedy film released in 1971. I found the storyline to be quite bizarre when I saw it many years ago, with a death-obsessed young man taken to driving a hearse as his private vehicle. The young man makes friends with a 79-year-old woman who, like him, is in the habit of attending the funerals of people she never knew. It’s not my cup of tea, quite frankly …

75 45 things : HI-FIS

Hi-fi systems were introduced in the late forties. A hi-fi is a piece of audio equipment designed to give a much higher quality reproduction of sound than cheaper systems available up to that point. “Hi-fi” stands for “high fidelity”.

The first vinyl records designed to play at 33⅓ rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first long play (LP) 33⅓ rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm “single” the following year, in 1949.

83 Line on a map: Abbr. : RTE

Route (rte.)

90 Big brand in soft drinks : SUNKIST

Sunkist Growers is a cooperative of citrus growers from California and Arizona that was founded in 1893 as the Southern California Fruit Exchange. The Sunkist name was adopted in 1952, using the highly successful Sunkist brand that the cooperative introduced in 1907.

92 Pizza chain since 1956 : SBARRO

The Sbarro chain of pizza restaurants was founded by Italian immigrants, Gennaro and Carmela Sbarro.

94 W.W. II admiral nicknamed “Bull” : HALSEY

Fleet Admiral William “Bull” Halsey was sailing on his flagship the USS Enterprise en route to Pearl Harbor when the Japanese launched their surprise attack on Dec 7th, 1941. The Enterprise slipped back into Pearl on the evening of the following day. Perhaps it was fitting that Japan’s formal surrender was accepted on Halsey’s flagship the USS Missouri, on September 2nd 1945.

97 Transport to Sugar Hill, in a classic song : “A” TRAIN

The A Train in the New York City Subway system runs from 207th Street, through Manhattan and over to Far Rockaway in Queens. The service lends its name to a jazz standard “Take the ‘A’ Train”, the signature tune of Duke Ellington and a song much sung by Ella Fitzgerald. One version of the lyrics are:

You must take the A Train
To go to Sugar Hill way up in Harlem
If you miss the A Train
You’ll find you’ve missed the quickest way to Harlem
Hurry, get on, now, it’s coming
Listen to those rails a-thrumming (All Aboard!)
Get on the A Train
Soon you will be on Sugar Hill in Harlem.

98 Unlike most of Perry Mason’s clients : GUILTY

I must have read all of the “Perry Mason” books when I was in college. I think they kept me sane when I was facing the pressure of exams. Author Erle Stanley Gardner was himself a lawyer, although he didn’t get into the profession the easy way. Gardner went to law school, but got himself suspended after a month. So, he became a self-taught attorney and opened his own law office in Merced, California. Understandably perhaps, Gardner gave up the law once his novels became successful.

102 Roster builders, briefly : GMS

General manager (GM)

Our word “roster”, meaning “list, register”, actually comes from the same root as our word “roast”, would you believe. “Roster” came into English from the Dutch “rooster”, meaning “table, list”. An alternative use of the Dutch “rooster” was “gridiron”, from the “roosten” meaning “to roast”. The connection is that a roster of names is often listed on a sheet of paper that has grid lines resembling the marks left by a gridiron on roasted meat. Quite interesting …

103 Bel ___ cheese : PAESE

Bel Paese is a mild Italian cheese that was developed in 1906. The name “bel paese” means beautiful country in Italian, and is taken from the title of a book written by Antonio Stoppani.

104 Wild goat : IBEX

“Ibex” is a common name for various species of mountain goat. “Ibex” is a Latin name that was used for wild goats found in the Alps and Apennines in Europe.

105 Word before and after “all” : MINE

Mine, all mine.

106 Round part of a tool : PEEN

The peen of a hammer is on the head, and is the side of the head that is opposite the striking surface. Often the peen is in the shape of a hemisphere (as in a ball-peen hammer), but usually it is shaped like a claw (mainly for removing nails).

107 ___ bean : FAVA

The fava bean is also known as the broad bean. “Broad bean” is used “broadly” (pun!) in the UK, whereas “fava bean” is common in the US. “Fava” is the Italian name for the broad bean.

109 “Bus Stop” playwright : INGE

“Bus Stop” is a marvelous play written by William Inge in 1955. The famous 1956 movie of the same name, starring Marilyn Monroe, is only very loosely based on the play.

110 Like bourbon : AGED

Bourbon is a whiskey made here in North America, with the primary ingredient being corn. Production of the whiskey has for centuries been associated with Bourbon County in Kentucky, which gave its name to the drink.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Whole lot : TON
4 Recalcitrant child’s cry : I WON’T!
9 Early 20th-century author who foresaw TV and wireless telephones : BAUM
13 Moved surreptitiously : STOLE
18 Squabbling : AT IT
20 Multitask command : MACRO
21 As well : ALSO
22 Assailed : HAD AT
23 What’s measured by [circled letters] : MINERAL HARDNESS [MOHS]
26 States as fact : AVERS
27 Some group dinners : POTLUCKS
28 Employ cajolery on : COAX
29 In the indeterminate future : SOME DAY
31 Wan : ASHEN
32 Have nothing to do with : SHUN
33 Take place : OCCUR
34 Coveted Scrabble tile : ESS
35 What’s measured by [circled letters] : TEMPERATURE [CELSIUS]
39 D.C. nine : NATS
43 2006 novel for which Cormac McCarthy won a Pulitzer Prize : THE ROAD
45 In the least : AT ALL
47 Org. with Sharks and Penguins : NHL
48 Parts of reviews you might not want to read : SPOILERS
50 Philosophy : ISM
52 Follow-up shot : BOOSTER
54 Besmirch : TAR
55 ___ colada : PINA
56 Grad : ALUM
57 “I said enough!” : STOP IT!
58 Chemical compound : ENOL
60 One side of an argument : CON
61 “Ora pro ___” : NOBIS
63 Grab quickly : SNAP UP
65 Q-V link : -R-S-T-U-
66 What’s measured by [circled letters] : WIND SPEED [BEAUFORT]
69 Nascar ___ (demographic group) : DADS
70 Puncture : PIERCE
73 Brand pitched as “Always Comfortable” : SERTA
74 Contented sound : AAH!
76 Heroic poetry : EPOS
77 Hatfield haters : MCCOYS
79 Small dam : WEIR
80 Clubs, e.g. … or entry requirement for some clubs : SUIT
82 Work on a wall, maybe : ART
83 Pitched over : RETHREW
84 Not fast : EAT
85 Kitchen wraps : TIN FOILS
87 Ballerina’s support : TOE
88 Tundra’s lack : TREES
90 Ticket information : SECTION
91 They may be bitter or defensive : ENDS
93 What’s measured by [circled letters] : EARTHQUAKES [RICHTER]
96 Lousy newspaper : RAG
99 Home of Sinbad Island : BASRA
101 Bee or Em : AUNT
102 Outfit : GETUP
104 Communicates : IMPARTS
107 Pushback : FLAK
108 Coffee-flavored liqueur : TIA MARIA
111 Coffin supports : BIERS
112 Adjusted to some index – or how 23-, 35-, 66- and 93-Across are measured per this puzzle? : ON A SLIDING SCALE
115 El primer mes : ENERO
116 Time to knock off work, maybe : FIVE
117 Twilled fabric : SERGE
118 Online search metric : HITS
119 Gas whose name comes from the Greek for “strange” : XENON
120 Whip : FLAY
121 Overcoat material : TWEED
122 Nevada’s largest county by area : NYE

Down

1 City famous for its Cuban sandwiches : TAMPA
2 Serving no practical purpose : OTIOSE
3 Individual tic-tac-toe squares : NINTHS
4 Desktop item since 1998 : IMAC
5 Beat the rap : WALK
6 Phil who sang “Love Me, I’m a Liberal” : OCHS
7 Packers’ org.? : NRA
8 Set aflame : TORCHED
9 One of a bunch? : BANANA
10 Women’s soccer star ___ Morgan : ALEX
11 Letters at sea : USS
12 Crustaceans that carry their own camouflage : MOSS CRABS
13 Performing whale, once : SHAMU
14 Establishment frequented by Falstaff : TAVERN
15 Really binged, briefly : OD’ED
16 Yuri Zhivago’s love : LARA
17 Competitor of Amazon Handmade : ETSY
19 Moon of Saturn named after a Greek Oceanid : TELESTO
24 Hightail it : RUN
25 Gloomy : DOUR
30 Predators of armadillos and rabbits : OCELOTS
32 Places where cucumber slices are not for salad : SPAS
33 Openly gay : OUT
35 Tending toward an outcome : TELIC
36 Before, old-style : ERE NOW
37 Rick of “Ghostbusters” : MORANIS
38 Nickname for Thomasina : TAMMIE
40 Like Henry VIII, religiously : ANTI-PAPAL
41 Former Showtime series about Henry VIII : THE TUDORS
42 Camera inits. : SLR
44 Cool : HIP
46 Symbol of craziness : LOON
48 Home of Hearst Castle : SAN SIMEON
49 Alee, at sea : PROTECTED
50 Dubious excuse for not turning in homework : I LOST IT
51 Poor : SUBPAR
53 Powerful queen, in hearts : SPADE
54 Maryland athlete, for short : TERP
56 Singer Bocelli : ANDREA
59 Bad thing to be left in, with “the” : LURCH
62 Feeling unsettled, in a way : SEASICK
64 “Hey, over here!” : PSST!
67 Like Indiana Dunes among the U.S.’s 61 national parks : NEWEST
68 Three-time Pro Bowler Culpepper : DAUNTE
71 Actor Bud of “Harold and Maude” : CORT
72 Break from screen viewing : EYE REST
75 45 things : HI-FIS
78 Gives up for good : SWEARS OFF
81 Excessively : TOO
83 Line on a map: Abbr. : RTE
85 Nipple : TEAT
86 Attainable : IN REACH
89 Great time : ERA
90 Big brand in soft drinks : SUNKIST
92 Pizza chain since 1956 : SBARRO
94 W.W. II admiral nicknamed “Bull” : HALSEY
95 Preliminary exam: Abbr. : QUAL
97 Transport to Sugar Hill, in a classic song : “A” TRAIN
98 Unlike most of Perry Mason’s clients : GUILTY
100 Setting for fraud, maybe : ARSON
102 Roster builders, briefly : GMS
103 Bel ___ cheese : PAESE
104 Wild goat : IBEX
105 Word before and after “all” : MINE
106 Round part of a tool : PEEN
107 ___ bean : FAVA
108 Lose steam : TIRE
109 “Bus Stop” playwright : INGE
110 Like bourbon : AGED
113 Zip : NIL
114 Morning coat : DEW

9 thoughts on “0512-19 NY Times Crossword 12 May 19, Sunday”

  1. 47:09. Once I got the theme, I used it to help solve the puzzle in various places. But overall, there were not a whole lot of layups in this one so I had to slog through it. Enjoyable solve nonetheless.

    A note about the solver I saw in Wordplay – Victor Barocas is a professor of Biomedical Engineering at the U of Minnesota. He just went up in stature in my book as I’ve had some involvement in that industry although I had more of a natural science background (physics).

    We forget that some of these constructors are more than just crossword geeks…

    Best –

  2. 36:19, nice Sunday workout. I enjoy puzzles which look like I won’t be able to finish them, but provide just enough handholds to eventually complete them. To be consistent with my pet peeve, I have to register my complaint with 115A.

  3. “The circled letters” were not circled. Was that a printing mistake or my misunderstanding? I also saw a couple of questionable clues. 105 Down . A fun puzzle, anyway. I got most of it!

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