0207-19 NY Times Crossword 7 Feb 19, Thursday

Constructed by: Morton J. Mendelson
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answers: Go Over the Edge

Themed answers include the letters “GO” written outside the EDGE of the grid:

  • 58A. Flip out … or a hint to eight answers in this puzzle : GO OVER THE EDGE
  • 20A. “No one can get in a fight by himself,” informally : TAKES TWO TO TANGO
    • 32A. Classic song with the lyric “I’ll see you in my dreams” : GOODNIGHT, IRENE
    • 42A. World traveler since 1985 : CARMEN SANDIEGO
    • 47A. What’s honed on the range? : GOLF GAME
    • 5D. Some expensive dental work : GOLD TEETH
    • 13D. Babies in a pond : GOSLINGS
    • 55D. Second-longest-running Broadway musical ever (after “The Phantom of the Opera”) : CHICAGO
    • 57D. A very long time back : AGES AGO

    Bill’s time: 10m 11s

    Bill’s errors: 0

    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    1. Wrangler, for one : JEEP

    Chrysler’s Jeep Wrangler is a direct descendent of the military “Jeep” vehicle that was heavily relied on during WWII.

    The Jeep is the original off-road vehicle. It was developed by the American Bantam Car Company in 1940 at the request of the US government who recognized the upcoming need for the armed forces as American involvement in WWII loomed. The Bantam Company was too small to cope with demand, so the government gave the designs to competing car companies. The design and brand eventually ended up with AMC in the seventies and eighties.

    9. Carriages in Kew Gardens : PRAMS

    Another word used in the UK that’s rarely used over here is “pram”, which in my day was the most common term for what is called a baby carriage in the US. “Pram” is short for “perambulator”.

    Kew Gardens is a beautiful location in southwest London that was formerly known as the Royal Botanic Gardens. Kew Gardens has the world’s largest collection of living plants.

    14. Band with a slash in its name : AC/DC

    The Heavy Metal band known as AC/DC was formed by two brothers Malcolm and Angus Young in Australia. The group is usually called “Acca Dacca” down under.

    18. Snap, Crackle and Pop, e.g. : TRIO

    Snap, Crackle and Pop are three elves employed as the mascots for Kellogg’s Rice Krispies. The trio first appeared in an ad campaign in 1933, although the phrase “snap, crackle and pop” had been used for the cereal for some time in radio ads. By the way, the elves are selling “Rice Bubbles” in Australia, and the elves have different names in other parts of the world (like “Cric!, Crac! and Croc! in Quebec).

    19. Dweller on the Arabian Sea : OMANI

    Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

    The Arabian Sea is an arm of the Indian Ocean that lies off the south coasts of Oman, Yemen, Pakistan and Iran. It is bounded in the west by Somalia, and in the east by India.

    25. Robert Burns’s “since” : SYNE

    The song “Auld Lang Syne” is a staple at New Year’s Eve (well, actually in the opening minutes of New Year’s Day). The words were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

    Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
    And never brought to mind?
    Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
    And auld lang syne!

    For auld lang syne, my dear,
    For auld lang syne.
    We’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
    For auld lang syne.

    26. Starting point for a platypus : EGG

    The platypus (plural “platypuses” or “platypi”) is one of only five mammalian species that we know of that lay eggs rather than give birth to live young. The platypus is a native of Eastern Australia, and it is a weird creature to say the least. It’s appearance is bizarre enough, with its bill that resembles that of a duck, but it is also poisonous. The platypus has a spur on it hind foot that can inject venom and cause severe pain in humans.

    28. Some Windows systems : NTS

    Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7, 8 and 10; they’re all based on the Windows NT operating system. There is a common perception that Windows NT (WNT) takes its name from VMS, an earlier operating system developed by Digital Equipment Corporation. “WNT” is what’s called a “Caesar cypher” of “VMS”, as you just augment the letters of VMS alphabetically by one to arrive at WNT. Bill Gates disputes this derivation of the name, and in a 1998 interview stated that the NT originally stood for N-Ten and that the marketing folks at Microsoft revised history by changing it to “New Technology”.

    32. Classic song with the lyric “I’ll see you in my dreams” : GOODNIGHT, IRENE

    “Goodnight, Irene”, also known as “Irene, Goodnight”, is a lovely American folk song that was first recorded commercially back in 1932 by blues singer Lead Belly. The song made it to number one in the charts for the Weavers in 1950 and for Frank Sinatra in the same year.

    37. S. Amer. land : ECU

    “Ecuador” is the Spanish word for “equator”, which gives the country its name.

    52. Goethe’s “The ___-King” : ERL

    “Der Erlkönig” (“The Erl King”) is a poem by the German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. The poem tells of the death of child attacked by the Erl King, a supernatural being. The Austrian composer Franz Schubert made a musical adaptation of Goethe’s poem using the same title.

    53. Like the German article “der”: Abbr. : MASC

    The definite article in German is der, die or das, for masculine, feminine and neuter nouns. The indefinite article is ein, eine or ein, again depending on the gender of the noun. A further complication, relative to English, is that the masculine form (and only the masculine form) of the article changes when used in the accusative case, when used with the object of a sentence. The accusative forms are “den” and “einen”.

    63. Progenitor of the Edomites, in the Bible : ESAU

    Edom was an ancient Iron Age kingdom located in the south of modern-day Jordan. The area is known for its red-colored sandstone, which gave the kingdom its name. According to the Bible, the Edomites were the descendants of Esau. “Edom” translates from Hebrew as “red”, and was the name given to Esau when he ate the “red pottage”.

    66. Old Scottish title : THANE

    Thanes were Scottish aristocrats. The most famous thanes have to be the Shakespearean characters Macbeth (the Thane of Glamis, later Thane of Cawdor, and still later King of Scotland) and MacDuff (the Thane of Fife). Other thanes in “Macbeth” are Ross, Lennox and Angus, as well as Menteith and Caithness.

    68. Staples of “Poor Richard’s Almanack” : SAWS

    “Poor Richard’s Almanack” was an annual publication authored by none other than Benjamin Franklin. The first edition hit the shelves in 1732, and was very, very successful, selling about 10,000 copies a year. Apparently Napoleon Bonaparte was a big fan.

    69. Sir William ___, medical pioneer : OSLER

    Sir William Osler was a Canadian physician, and one of the principal founders of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    70. Far from subtle actors : HAMS

    The word “ham”, describing a performer who overacts, is a shortened form of “hamfatter” and dates back to the late 1800s. “Hamfatter” comes from a song in old minstrel shows called “The Ham-Fat Man”. It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the “acting” qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

    Down

    2. Writer Umberto ___ : ECO

    Umberto Eco is an Italian writer who is probably best known for his novel “The Name of the Rose”, published in 1980. In 1986, “The Name of the Rose” was adapted into a movie with the same title starring Sean Connery.

    7. Jerks : TWITS

    “Twit” is a word not used very often here in America. It’s a slang term that was quite common in England where it was used for “someone foolish and idiotic”.

    10. San ___, Italy : REMO

    The Italian city of San Remo sits on the Mediterranean, right on the border with France. In Italian, the city is named “Sanremo”, just one word. That said, the spelling “San Remo” dates back to ancient times.

    11. Banded stones : AGATES

    Agate is a micro-crystalline form of quartz (and so is related to sand/silica). Some agate samples have deposited layers that give a striped appearance, and these are called “banded agate”.

    13. Babies in a pond : GOSLINGS

    A male goose is called a gander, with the female simply being referred to as a “goose”. Young geese are called goslings.

    21. Powerful checker : KING

    “Checkers” is yet another word that I had to learn moving across the Atlantic. In Ireland the game is called “draughts”.

    23. National park in Utah : ZION

    To me, the most spectacular feature of Zion National Park, in southwestern Utah, is the magnificent Zion Canyon. The canyon cuts through red Navajo sandstone and is a truly beautiful sight.

    24. Latin word on a dollar bill : ORDO

    The Latin phrase “novus ordo seclorum” means “new order of the ages”. These words appear on the reverse of the Great Seal of the United States, a device used to authenticate some US federal documents. “Novus ordo seclorum” also appears on the back of one-dollar bills. The phrase itself is lifted from one of the works of the ancient Roman poet Virgil.

    31. Basted, e.g. : SEWN

    To baste is to sew loosely, just holding a join in a fabric together temporarily using large running stitches.

    33. Indigenous Peruvian : INCA

    The Inca people emerged as a tribe around the 12th century, in what today is southern Peru. The Incas developed a vast empire over the next 300 years, extending along most of the western side of South America. The Empire fell to the Spanish, finally dissolving in 1572 with the execution of Tupac Amaru, the last Incan Emperor.

    34. Whack : ICE

    “To ice” or “to off” is to murder.

    35. Littlest piggy : RUNT

    Back around 1500, a runt was an old or decayed tree stump, and by the early 1600s “runt” was being used to describe animals that were similarly old and decayed. Ultimately “runt” came to mean the smallest and often sickest in a litter.

    43. Current device : AMMETER

    An ammeter measures electrical current. The term “ammeter” comes from “ampere meter”).

    45. Silky cottons : SATEENS

    Sateen is a cotton fabric. It has a weave that is “four over, one under”, meaning that most of the threads come to the surface to give it a softer feel.

    47. Opposite of staccato : LEGATO

    Staccato is a musical direction signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato, indicating long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

    55. Second-longest-running Broadway musical ever (after “The Phantom of the Opera”) : CHICAGO

    The wonderful 1975 musical “Chicago” is based on a 1926 play of the same name written by a news reporter called Maurine Dallas Watkins. Watkins had been assigned to cover the murder trials of Beulah Annan and Belva Gaertner for the “Chicago Tribune”, and used the story that unfolded as the basis for her play. Annan became the character Roxie Hart, and Gaertner became Velma Kelly. I’ve only ever seen the movie version of “Chicago” and never a live performance …

    60. Mild cheese : EDAM

    Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

    65. ___ Constitution : USS

    “Old Ironsides” was a nickname given to the USS Constitution even though she is actually a wooden-hulled ship. The Constitution was launched in 1797 and can still be seen at sea today. She is the oldest commissioned naval vessel in the world. You can visit Old Ironsides at the Boston Navy Yard, where I had the privilege of touring her in 2011. As an old sailor, I’d say she is the best-maintained ship I’ve ever been on, and paradoxically, she is also the oldest. Really, really beautiful …

    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1. Wrangler, for one : JEEP
    5. Things kids sometimes draw : LOTS
    9. Carriages in Kew Gardens : PRAMS
    14. Band with a slash in its name : AC/DC
    15. Occur to, with “on” : DAWN
    16. ___ Cinemas, second-largest theater chain in the U.S. : REGAL
    17. Be hot under the collar : BOIL
    18. Snap, Crackle and Pop, e.g. : TRIO
    19. Dweller on the Arabian Sea : OMANI
    20. “No one can get in a fight by himself,” informally : TAKES TWO TO TANGO
    23. Rum cocktail : ZOMBIE
    25. Robert Burns’s “since” : SYNE
    26. Starting point for a platypus : EGG
    27. Steam : IRE
    28. Some Windows systems : NTS
    30. Is nostalgic for : MISSES
    32. Classic song with the lyric “I’ll see you in my dreams” : GOODNIGHT, IRENE
    36. What you may call it? : NOUN
    37. S. Amer. land : ECU
    38. Air condition? : WIND
    42. World traveler since 1985 : CARMEN SANDIEGO
    47. What’s honed on the range? : GOLF GAME
    50. Put pressure on : TAX
    51. Downed a sub? : ATE
    52. Goethe’s “The ___-King” : ERL
    53. Like the German article “der”: Abbr. : MASC
    56. Welled (up) : TEARED
    58. Flip out … or a hint to eight answers in this puzzle : GO OVER THE EDGE
    61. Diamond datum : AT BAT
    62. Adjutant : AIDE
    63. Progenitor of the Edomites, in the Bible : ESAU
    66. Old Scottish title : THANE
    67. What optical readers do : SCAN
    68. Staples of “Poor Richard’s Almanack” : SAWS
    69. Sir William ___, medical pioneer : OSLER
    70. Far from subtle actors : HAMS
    71. Pro side : AYES

    Down

    1. Dig, in a way : JAB
    2. Writer Umberto ___ : ECO
    3. Where Copy and Paste appear : EDIT MENU
    4. School tech class site : PC LAB
    5. Some expensive dental work : GOLD TEETH
    6. Rows : OARS
    7. Jerks : TWITS
    8. Having a white blanket : SNOWY
    9. Body building block : PROTEIN
    10. San ___, Italy : REMO
    11. Banded stones : AGATES
    12. Get along : MANAGE
    13. Babies in a pond : GOSLINGS
    21. Powerful checker : KING
    22. “I’ll spring for it” : ON ME
    23. National park in Utah : ZION
    24. Latin word on a dollar bill : ORDO
    29. Pipe part : STEM
    31. Basted, e.g. : SEWN
    33. Indigenous Peruvian : INCA
    34. Whack : ICE
    35. Littlest piggy : RUNT
    39. “My assumption is …” : I DARE SAY …
    40. Time of day, in ads : NITE
    41. Archived document : DEED
    43. Current device : AMMETER
    44. Delivery door location, often : REAR
    45. Silky cottons : SATEENS
    46. Fired : AXED
    47. Opposite of staccato : LEGATO
    48. Foams : FROTHS
    49. Universal : GLOBAL
    54. Supply that no one’s supposed to find : STASH
    55. Second-longest-running Broadway musical ever (after “The Phantom of the Opera”) : CHICAGO
    57. A very long time back : AGES AGO
    59. Provider of directions to a farmer : VANE
    60. Mild cheese : EDAM
    64. Wow : AWE
    65. ___ Constitution : USS

    21 thoughts on “0207-19 NY Times Crossword 7 Feb 19, Thursday”

    1. 21:24, no errors. Stared at “CARMEN SANDIEGO” for a while; I think I’ve heard of the game (show?), but it certainly wasn’t a gimme.

    2. 28:27. I got the theme with TAKES TWO TO TAN.., but then I went to the reveal and saw there were 7 others I almost just walked away. I eventually finished, however.

      Never heard of “basted” used that way. That’s how tailor made suits are started…by basting them? Who knew?

      Best –

    3. Having a daughter that used to watch Carmen SanDiego helped get the theme….totally lost with “at bat”, went with facet and carat…. oops

    4. 42:40 no errors…..was going along kinda blind until I got the theme.
      It’s Thursday and it’s the NYT sooooo…

    5. Thought I had woken up on Saturday but eventually got the theme. My mom sewed so I was familiar with basting. Her name was also Irene and we heard that song frequently.

    6. Made a mistake by putting the first two letters (GO) of 58 across to the left of the grid looking for GOes over the edge. Stubbornly stuck to that which doomed the south west for me. Hate to throw in the towel on a Thursday; oh well.

      1. @Janice … One of the meanings of “saw” is “an adage; a pithy saying”. “Poor Richard’s Almanack” was full of them.

    7. DNF after 28 minutes. Everything filled correctly, except the bottom left corner, which was almost completely blank. I, too, went with GOES OVER THE EDGE (trying to keep with the theme). Also insisted on CARAT or KARAT for diamond stat. Couldn’t see GOLF GAME at all. One of my many Achilles heels is music, and LEGATO was unfamiliar.

    8. Bill — just to add a further complication to the German “der” — it’s also the definite article for the feminine dative and genitive, and the plural genitive. Have you ever read Mark Twain’s “The Awful German Language”? Very amusing, especially if you have a little knowledge of German or have tried to acquire some!

    9. No errors. Tough but doable for me. GOODNIGHT IRENE was the tipping point for when I realized what the theme was going to be. Knowing that there were eight GO’s outside the margins was a huge assist to finishing.

      5-Across was my last fill just because I thought it was a bit of a stretch. Kids, I don’t believe, would say LOTS. It was always “draw straws”. “LOTS” it seems would be an adult word that kids would not likely know.

    10. Enjoyed this clever and tough one, the kind to look forward to on Thursday. Felt good to come away with a clean solve after spending quite a bit time and effort. SW was last to go. Wondered about what or who CARMEN SANDIEGO is. Went to Wiki to find out that it is a video game series.

    11. I got the “go” theme but it didn’t occur to me it would be outside the grid. Finally peeked and finished, but it took a while. Fun though.

    12. I love these kinds of puzzles, especially when I manage to finish without any errors. It is interesting to hear people’s personal connections that help them solve the puzzle on this blog.

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