1029-22 NY Times Crossword 29 Oct 22, Saturday

Constructed by: Daniel Okulitch
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 18m 28s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

12 Silence notifications? : MIRANDA RIGHTS

The Miranda warning is given by US police officers to suspects in order to ensure that any statements made by the suspect can be used at trial. The warning became part of police procedure after a 1966 Supreme Court decision in the case of Miranda v. Arizona. The crux of the court’s decision was that statements made by a suspect during interrogation were only admissible at trial if the defendant was informed of his or her right to consult an attorney, and right to remain silent. The “Miranda” in the case was Ernesto Miranda, who was arrested by the Phoenix PD on suspicion of kidnapping and rape. The Supreme Court decision set aside Miranda’s conviction as his confession was deemed inadmissible. Miranda was rearrested and retried. At the second trial he was convicted without the use of the contested confession.

17 Lifting units: Abbr. : LBS

The unit of mass that we know today as a pound is descended from the old Roman unit of weight known as a “libra”. That “libra” connection is why we abbreviate “pound” to “lb”. The name “pound” comes from the Latin “pondo” meaning “weight”. Our term “ounce” (abbreviated to “oz.”) comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a Roman “libra”.

18 First name on the Supreme Court : SONIA

Sonia Sotomayor was the first Hispanic justice appointed to the US Supreme Court, and the third female justice. Sotomayor was nominated by President Barack Obama to replace the retiring Justice David Souter.

19 Royal title of old : KHAN

A “khan” was a medieval sovereign, more specifically a ruler over Mongol, Turkish and Tatar tribes.

20 Holders of some radio aerials and signal lamps : MASTS

We tend to use the term “aerial” and “antenna” interchangeably. Strictly speaking, the aerial is the top part of an antenna. The lead-in is the lower part of the antenna, the part providing the electrical connection between the aerial and the instrument, radio or TV.

23 Word after White or Red : … SOX

The Chicago White Sox Major League Baseball team was established in Chicago in 1900 and originally was called the White Stockings. The name was changed because the abbreviation “Sox” for “Stockings” was regularly used in newspaper headlines.

The Boston Red Sox are one of the most successful Major League Baseball teams and so command a large attendance, but only when on the road. The relatively small capacity of Boston’s Fenway Park, the team’s home since 1912, has dictated that every game the Red Sox have played there has been a sell-out from May of 2003 to April 2013. I recently had the pleasure of touring Fenway Park. It’s quite a place …

24 Like the national anthem “La Dessalinienne” : HAITIAN

The Republic of Haiti occupies the smaller, western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean. The rest of the island is taken up by the Dominican Republic. Haiti is one of only two nations in the Americas to have French as an official language, the other being Canada.

32 “Holy moly!” : YIPES!

The mild expletive “Holy moly!” is a euphemism for “Holy Moses!”

35 Vin classification : CRU

“Cru” is a term used in the French wine industry that means “growth place”. So, “cru” is the name of the location where the grapes are grown, as opposed to the name of a specific vineyard. The terms “premier cru” and “grand cru” are also used, but the usage depends on the specific wine region. Generally it is a classification awarded to specific vineyards denoting their potential for producing great wines. “Grand cru” is reserved for the very best vineyards, with “premier cru” the level just below.

40 Cries from Homer : D’OHS

“The Simpsons” is one of the most successful programs produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. Homer Simpson’s catchphrase is “D’oh!”, which became such a famous exclamation that it has been included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) since 2001. “D’oh!” can be translated as “I should have thought of that!”

43 Bubbly bianco : ASTI

Asti is in the Piedmont region of northwestern Italy. It is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine. Moscato d’Asti is produced from the same grape (Moscato Bianco). Moscato is a much sweeter wine with a lower alcohol content, and is usually served as a dessert wine.

44 Suffix with gran- : -OLA

The names “Granola” and “Granula” were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole-grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

47 Certain gender identity, informally : CIS

The term “cisgender” is used as the opposite of “transgender”. Cisgender people have a gender identity that matches the sex they were assigned at birth.

51 Brûlée crust-breakers : DESSERT SPOONS

Crème brûlée is a classic French dessert consisting of a rich custard topped with a crusty layer of caramelized sugar. The name “crème brûlée” translates from French as “burnt cream”.

52 Vague feeling that something’s wrong : SPIDEY-SENSE

“Spidey-sense” is a term used to describe one’s intuition or instinct, especially when sensing something that might be dangerous. The term arises from the comic book hero Spider-Man’s ability to sense danger before others.

Down

1 Price for vice : SIN TAX

A sin tax is a levy placed on goods that are considered to be harmful. Examples might be taxes placed specifically on alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, sweetened beverages, fast food and gambling. Sin taxes are imposed to discourage use. The related Pigovian tax is imposed to offset the cost to society of using the “sinful” goods or services.

3 What’s raised in a ruckus : CAIN

As Cain was the first murderer according to the Bible, he is associated with evil or trouble. The idiom “raise Cain” is the equivalent of “raise Hell” and “raise the Devil”. In all cases, the meaning is to bring back evil or to cause trouble.

The word “ruckus” is used to mean “commotion”, and has been around since the late 1800s. “Ruckus” is possibly a melding of the words “ruction” and “rumpus”.

5 English queen who lent her name to a city of 1.3+ million in the British Commonwealth : ADELAIDE

Adelaide is the capital city of the state of South Australia. Adelaide was named after Queen Adelaide, wife of England’s King William IV.

7 “Little toasts,” in Italian : CROSTINI

Crostini are Italian appetizers (literally “little toasts”) made up of pieces of toasted bread with a topping.

8 Actress Tyler : LIV

Actress and model Liv Tyler is the daughter of Steven Tyler, lead singer with Aerosmith, and Bebe Buell, a celebrated model and singer. Liv Tyler plays the Elf maiden Arwen Undómiel in Peter Jackson’s “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy.

10 “Li’l Abner” creature : SHMOO

The Shmoo is a cartoon creature who first appeared in the Al Capp comic strip “Li’l Abner” in 1948. Apparently, shmoos are delicious to eat, and love to be eaten. They’ll even jump into the frying pan themselves!

11 Court figure, informally : STENOG

Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek “steno” (narrow) and “graphe” (writing).

13 Make a snarky remark : SNIPE

To snipe is to attack with snide criticism, especially from a safe distance. This usage of the term is an extension of the older meaning, to take a shot from a hidden position (as in “sniper”). Such a shot was originally taken when hunting the game birds called “snipes”.

14 Retailer whose logo is written in script : SAKS

Saks Fifth Avenue is a high-end specialty store that competes with the likes of Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. The original Saks & Company business was founded by Andrew Saks in 1867. The first Saks Fifth Avenue store was opened on Fifth Avenue in New York City in 1924. There are now Saks Fifth Avenue stores in many major cities in the US, as well in several locations worldwide.

15 Stun, in a way : TASE

Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called “Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle”. The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon partly named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym “TASER” stands for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle”.

20 Cézanne contemporary : MANET

Édouard Manet was a French painter whose works are mainly classified as Realist and Impressionist. Manet was friends with Impressionists masters like Edgar Degas, Claude Monet and Pierre-Auguste Renoir and greatly influenced the Impressionist movement. The list of Manet’s marvelous paintings includes “Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe”, “Le Repose” and “A Bar at the Folies-Bergère”.

Paul Cézanne was a post-impressionist artist who was born and worked in the beautiful city of Aix-en-Provence in the South of France. Cézanne has the reputation of being the artist who bridged the late 19th century Impressionist movement with the early 20th century Cubist movement. Both Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso are quoted as saying that Cézanne “is the father of us all”.

24 What the instruments erkencho and shofar are made of : HORNS

A shofar is a musical instrument used in Jewish rituals. It is a relatively simple instrument, made from an animal’s (usually a ram) horn.

25 Sodas in orange, grape and peach flavors : NEHIS

The Nehi cola brand has a name that sounds like “knee-high”, a measure of a small stature. Back in the mid-1900’s the Chero-Cola company, which owned the brand, went for a slightly different twist on “knee-high” in advertising. The logo for Nehi was an image of a seated woman’s stockinged legs, with her skirt pulled up to her knees to hint at “knee-high”.

27 Buds : CHUMS

A chum is a friend. The term “chum” originated in the late 1600s as an alternative spelling for “cham”. In turn, “cham” was a shortened form of “chambermate”, a roommate at university.

28 Nostalgic tint : SEPIA

Sepia is that rich, brown-gray color so common in old photographs. “Sepia” is the Latinized version of the Greek word for cuttlefish, as sepia pigment is derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish. Sepia ink was commonly used for writing and drawing as far back as ancient Rome and ancient Greece. The “sepia tone” of old photographs is not the result of deterioration over time. Rather, it is the result of a deliberate preservation process which converts the metallic silver in the photographic image to a more stable silver sulfide. Prints that have been sepia-toned can last in excess of 150 years.

30 When you might see a star’s moon? : SEX SCENE

The first recorded mooning incident took place in 66 AD during the First Roman-Jewish War. Roman soldiers decided to moon Jewish pilgrims as they traveled to the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem.

33 Slick fabrics : SATINS

The material known as “satin” takes its name from “Zayton”, the medieval Arabic name for the Chinese port city of Quanzhou. Quanzhou was used for the export of large amounts of silk to Europe.

39 Spritz : MIST

A spritz is a squirt, a brief spray of liquid. The term “spritz” ultimately comes from German, possibly via Yiddish, in which language “spritzen” means “to squirt, spout”. A spritzer is a glass of wine with a spritz of carbonated water, and is a drink we’ve been enjoying since the early sixties.

42 Home of one of the country’s largest state universities : TEMPE

Tempe is a city in the metropolitan area of Phoenix. The city is named for the Vale of Tempe in Greece.

Arizona State University (ASU) has a long history, and was founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885. The athletic teams of ASU used to be known as the Normals, then the Bulldogs, and since 1946 they’ve been called the Sun Devils.

49 Predict-able gift? : ESP

Extrasensory perception (ESP)

50 Ways of doing things, for short : MOS

“Modus operandi” (plural “modi operandi”) is the Latin for “mode of operating”, a term we’ve been using since the mid-1600s. It’s often used by the police when referring to the methods typically employed by a particular perpetrator of a crime, and is usually abbreviated to “M.O.”

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Bourgeoisie or proletariat : SOCIAL CLASS
12 Silence notifications? : MIRANDA RIGHTS
14 Environmental activist group with a Climate Mandate campaign : SUNRISE MOVEMENT
16 Be part of, as a show : ACT IN
17 Lifting units: Abbr. : LBS
18 First name on the Supreme Court : SONIA
19 Royal title of old : KHAN
20 Holders of some radio aerials and signal lamps : MASTS
22 Error message? : OOPS!
23 Word after White or Red : … SOX
24 Like the national anthem “La Dessalinienne” : HAITIAN
26 “I never knew!” : GEE!
27 Compacts : CONDENSES
29 Grant in folklore studies? : THREE WISHES
31 Move aside : SHUNT
32 “Holy moly!” : YIPES!
34 Objects : ITEMS
35 Vin classification : CRU
38 When some morning shows start : SIX AM
40 Cries from Homer : D’OHS
41 Boxer’s ploy : FEINT
43 Bubbly bianco : ASTI
44 Suffix with gran- : -OLA
45 Attire one might grapple with : SINGLET
47 Certain gender identity, informally : CIS
48 Ignore both what’s happened and what’s to come : LIVE IN THE MOMENT
51 Brûlée crust-breakers : DESSERT SPOONS
52 Vague feeling that something’s wrong : SPIDEY SENSE

Down

1 Price for vice : SIN TAX
2 ___ C. Evans, journalist who co-founded All-Negro Comics (1947) : ORRIN
3 What’s raised in a ruckus : CAIN
4 Networking assets : INS
5 English queen who lent her name to a city of 1.3+ million in the British Commonwealth : ADELAIDE
6 Hearty dish popular in Ireland : LAMB STEW
7 “Little toasts,” in Italian : CROSTINI
8 Actress Tyler : LIV
9 “___ 6 and up” : AGES
10 “Li’l Abner” creature : SHMOO
11 Court figure, informally : STENOG
12 It means a lot : MUCHO
13 Make a snarky remark : SNIPE
14 Retailer whose logo is written in script : SAKS
15 Stun, in a way : TASE
20 Cézanne contemporary : MANET
21 Cheeky : SASSY
24 What the instruments erkencho and shofar are made of : HORNS
25 Sodas in orange, grape and peach flavors : NEHIS
27 Buds : CHUMS
28 Nostalgic tint : SEPIA
29 Those with means : THE HAVES
30 When you might see a star’s moon? : SEX SCENE
31 Impassive : STOLID
33 Slick fabrics : SATINS
34 Word with false or fallen : … IDOL
35 Middle of France? : CENTRE
36 One of about 90% of the population, it’s said : RIGHTY
37 Word in an ultimatum : UNLESS
39 Spritz : MIST
41 Mulcted : FINED
42 Home of one of the country’s largest state universities : TEMPE
45 Enthusiastic assent abroad : SI! SI!
46 TV’s Rick or Morty : TOON
49 Predict-able gift? : ESP
50 Ways of doing things, for short : MOS

4 thoughts on “1029-22 NY Times Crossword 29 Oct 22, Saturday”

  1. 14:53. This was a hard one–I didn’t make much progress on the first go-through until I got to the bottom (CRUS, D’OHS, SIX AM, ASTI, SINGLET) that allowed me to work my way up.

  2. 21:34, no errors. Not often I come within a few minutes of Bill’s time. Biggest mistake was entering VICTORIA before ADELAIDE.

  3. 21:11. I kept trying to cram LIVE IN THE present instead of ….MOMENT, but there was always one too many letters. Otherwise, I thought this was a pretty smooth solve.

    Never knew of the Nehi/knee-high connection. Funny…I’m just 70 or so years too late.

    Best –

  4. 44:48 with two lookups, ergo, officially a DNF. Also tried Victoria first, and misspelled Spidey. Coming from WNY, the obvious answer to Red or White was “Hots” as in hot dogs. We have the option of beef or pork hot dogs in our culinary nirvana, but the rest of the world wanted “Sox”…. “sox” to be them :- )

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