0510-22 NY Times Crossword 10 May 22, Tuesday

Constructed by: Lou Weiss
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: The Sound of Music

Themed answers each end with a class of musical instrument:

  • 63A Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Do-Re-Mi” show, with a hint to this puzzle’s theme : THE SOUND OF MUSIC
  • 17A Air currents from the most typical direction : PREVAILING WINDS
  • 27A Resorted to good old-fashioned know-who, say : PULLED STRINGS
  • 49A Top military leaders in Washington : PENTAGON BRASS

Bill’s time: 6m 51s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Media player debut of 2001 : IPOD

The iPod is Apple’s signature line of portable media players. The iPod first hit the market in 2001 with a hard drive-based device, now known as the iPod Classic. Later models all use flash memory, allowing a smaller form factor. The smallest of the flash-based models is the iPod Shuffle, which was introduced in 2005.

5 Sacred song : PSALM

The Greek word “psalmoi” originally meant “songs sung to a harp”, and gave us the word “psalms”. In the Jewish and Western Christian traditions, the Book of Psalms contains 150 individual psalms, divided into five sections.

16 Marathon, e.g. : RACE

The marathon commemorates the legendary messenger-run by Pheidippides from the site of the Battle of Marathon back to Athens, and is run over 26 miles and 385 yards. The first modern Olympic marathon races were run over a distance that approximated the length of the modern-day Marathon-Athens highway, although the actual length of the race varied from games to games. For the 1908 Olympics in London, a course starting at Windsor Castle and ending in front of the Royal Box at White City Stadium was defined. That course was 26 miles and 385 yards, the standard length now used at all Olympic Games. Organizers of subsequent games continued to vary the length of the race, until a decision was made in 1921 to adopt the distance used in London in 1908.

21 Bamboozled : HAD

It’s thought that the lovely word “bamboozle” came into English from the Scottish “bombaze” meaning “perplex”. We’ve been using “bamboozle” since the very early 1700s.

23 Texter’s response to a hilarious joke : LMAO!

Laughing my a** off (LMAO)

25 “___ go bragh!” : ERIN

“Erin go bragh!” is an anglicization of the Irish phrase “Éirinn go brách!”, which translates as “Ireland forever!”

32 Pub order, in brief : IPA

India pale ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

33 “The lady ___ protest too much …”: “Hamlet” : DOTH

“The lady doth protest too much, methinks” is a line spoken by Queen Gertrude, Hamlet’s mother in the play by William Shakespeare.

37 Ice cream brand : EDY’S

Dreyer’s ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyer’s in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dreyer and Joseph Edy.

41 Entrepreneur Musk : ELON

An entrepreneur is someone who takes on most aspects of a business venture, from the original idea to the execution. The term is imported from French, with “entreprendre” meaning “to undertake”. The original usage in English dates back to the early 1800s, when it applied to a manager and promoter of a theatrical production.

42 Some labor leaders? : DOULAS

A doula is a person who provides non-medical support for women and their families during childbirth as well as in the period immediately following the arrival. The term “doula” comes from the Ancient Greek word “doule” which means “female slave”. Given such a negative association, “doula” is often dropped in favor of “labor companion” or “birthworker”.

48 Club ___ (resort) : MED

Club Méditerranée is usually referred to as “Club Med”. It is a French company that started in 1950 with a resort on the Spanish island of Mallorca in the Mediterranean. It was originally a “club” with annual membership dues. Now it is an operator of numerous all-inclusive resorts located all over the world.

49 Top military leaders in Washington : PENTAGON BRASS

The incredible building known as the Pentagon was built during WWII, and dedicated on January 15, 1943. It is the largest office building in the world (by floor space) covering an area of about 6.5 million square feet. As it was built during the war years, a major requirement was that it use a minimum amount of steel. That steel shortage dictated that the building be no more than four stories in height, and hence cover an awful lot of real estate.

52 Dutch cheese : EDAM

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

54 Repeatedly comments (on) : HARPS

To harp on something is to talk about it too much. The original expression with the same meaning was “to harp on the same string”, which is a reference to the musical instrument.

63 Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Do-Re-Mi” show, with a hint to this puzzle’s theme : THE SOUND OF MUSIC

“The Sound of Music” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical that was made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on “The Story of the Trapp Family Singers”, a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war. One family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives in the same town in which I used to live in California.

The famous song that starts off with “Doe, a deer …” is a show tune from the 1959 musical “The Sound of Music”, by Rodgers and Hammerstein. The correct name of the song is “Do-Re-Mi”.

66 Not stereo : MONO

Monophonic sound (“mono”) is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers that are often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

69 City on the Rhône : LYON

The city of Lyon in France is sometimes known as “Lyons” in English. Lyon is the second-largest metropolitan area in the country, after Paris. It is located just to the north of the confluence of the Rhône and Saône Rivers.

71 Crafty website : ETSY

Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

Down

2 Land in the Andes : PERU

Peru’s name comes from the word “Biru”. Back in the early 1500s, Biru was a ruler living near the Bay of San Miguel in Panama. The territory over which Biru ruled was the furthest land south in the Americas known to Europeans at that time. The Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro was the first European to move south of Biru’s empire and the land that he found was designated “Peru”, a derivative of “Biru”.

The Andes range is the longest continuous chain of mountains in the world. It runs down the length of the west coast of South America for about 4,300 miles, from Venezuela in the north to Chile in the south. The highest peak in the Andes is Mt. Aconcagua in Argentina, at an elevation of 22,841 feet. Interestingly, the peak of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador is the furthest point on the Earth’s surface from the center of the planet. That’s because of the equatorial “bulge” around the Earth’s “waist”.

3 Universal donor’s blood type, in brief : O-NEG

In general, a person with type O-negative blood is a universal donor, meaning that his or her blood can be used for transfusion into persons with any other blood type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive (although there are other considerations). Also in general, a person with type AB-positive blood is a universal recipient, meaning that he or she can receive a transfusion of blood of any type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive.

4 “The Shining” actress Shelley : DUVALL

In the 1980 film “The Shining”, based on the Stephen King novel of the same name, the action takes place at the Overlook Hotel. Some of the scarier scenes take place in the hedge maze that grows on the hotel’s grounds. “The Shining” was directed by Stanley Kubrick and stars Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall. “Here’s Johnny!”

5 Mash prepared for a luau : POI

Nowadays, the word “luau” denotes almost any kind of party on the Hawaiian Islands, but to the purist a luau is a feast that always includes a serving of poi, the bulbous underground stems of taro.

6 Sketch show V.I.P.s who get a jacket for their fifth appearance : SNL HOSTS

The youngest person to host “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) was Drew Barrymore, at age 7 in 1982. The oldest host was Betty White, at 88 in 2010.

7 The East : ASIA

In geographical terms there are three “Easts”. “Near East” and “Middle East” are terms that are often considered synonymous, although “Near East” tends to be used when discussing ancient history and “Middle East” when referring to the present day. The Near/Middle East encompasses most of Western Asia and Egypt. The term “Far East” describes East Asia (including the Russian Far East), Southeast Asia and South Asia.

8 “Neither a borrower nor a ___ be”: “Hamlet” : LENDER

In William Shakespeare’s play “Hamlet”, Polonius gives some fatherly advice to his son Laertes before the young man heads off to France. Included among the numerous pearls of wisdom is the oft-quoted “Neither a borrower nor a lender be” and “to thine own self be true”.

Give thy thoughts no tongue,
Nor any unproportioned thought his act.
Be thou familiar but by no means vulgar.
Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
Grapple them unto thy soul with hoops of steel,
But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
Of each new-hatched, unfledged comrade. Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in,
Bear ’t that th’ opposèd may beware of thee.
Give every man thy ear but few thy voice.
Take each man’s censure but reserve thy judgment.
Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
But not expressed in fancy—rich, not gaudy,
For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
And they in France of the best rank and station
Are of a most select and generous chief in that.
Neither a borrower nor a lender be,
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.

9 Business appt. : MTG

Meeting (mtg.)

11 Screed : RANT

A screed is a long speech or piece of writing, often one that is full of anger and emotion.

12 Rock band name with a slash : AC/DC

The Heavy Metal band known as AC/DC was formed by two brothers Malcolm and Angus Young in Australia. Malcolm and Angus chose the name “AC/DC” after their sister Margaret noticed them on a sewing machine (the abbreviation for alternating current/direct current). The group is usually called “Acca Dacca” down under.

24 Kerfuffle : ADO

“Kerfuffle” comes from the Scottish “curfuffle”, with both words meaning “disruption”.

27 ___ Piper : PIED

The legend of the Pied Piper of Hamelin dates back to medieval times. Recently there have been suggestions that the story is rooted in some truth, that the town of Hamelin did in fact lose many of its children, perhaps to plague. The suggestion is that the tale is an allegory. The use of the word “pied” implies that the piper dressed in multi-colored clothing. Our contemporary idiom “to pay the piper” means “to bear the cost of a poor decision”. It is a reference to townsfolk of Hamelin who refused to pay the Pied Piper for ridding the town of rats. They ultimately paid the cost when the piper lured their children away.

28 Pageant coif : UPDO

A coif is a hairdo. The term “coif” comes from an old French term “coife” describing a skull-cap that was worn under a helmet back in the late 13th century.

29 Easy two-pointer : LAY-UP

That would be basketball.

31 Title city in a 2014 Ava DuVernay film : SELMA

“Selma” is a 2014 film about the Selma-to-Montgomery marches of 1965. Directed by Ava DuVernay, the movie stars David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Tom Wilkinson as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

35 Little piggies : TOES

This little piggy went to market,
This little piggy stayed home,
This little piggy had roast beef,
This little piggy had none,
And this little piggy went wee wee wee all the way home.

43 Segue before a conclusion : AND SO …

A segue is a transition from one topic to the next. “Segue” is an Italian word that literally means “now follows”. It was first used in musical scores directing the performer to play into the next movement without a break. The oft-used term “segway” is given the same meaning, although the word “segway” doesn’t really exist. It is a misspelling of “segue” that has been popularized by its use as the name of the personal transporter known as a Segway.

44 RR stop : STA

A station (“stn.” or “sta.”) is a railroad (RR) or bus stop.

46 Spike TV, previously : TNN

Spike TV was a 2003 relaunch of the Nashville Network (TNN) and was marketed as the first television channel for men. The station owners ran into trouble though as the director Spike Lee sued, claiming that viewers would assume he was associated with the channel because of the use of “Spike”. The suit was settled when Lee concluded that there was no intention to trade on his name.

47 Seat in the iconic photo “Lunch Atop a Skyscraper” : I-BEAM

“Lunch Atop a Skyscraper” is an iconic 1932 photograph showing eleven ironworkers eating their lunches while sitting on a girder suspended 840 feet about the streets of New York City. The photo was staged as part of a PR campaign about a skyscraper that was under construction, namely 30 Rockefeller Plaza.

50 Egyptian sun god : AMON-RA

Amun-Ra (also “Amon, Amen”) was a god in Egyptian mythology. Amun lends his name to our word “ammonia”. This is because the Romans called the ammonium chloride that they collected near the Temple of Jupiter Amun, “sal ammoniacus” (salt of Amun).

54 Website developer’s code : HTML

The initialism “HTML” stands for HyperText Markup Language. HTML is the language used to write most Internet web pages (including this one).

55 Sailor’s greeting : AHOY!

“Ahoy!” is a nautical term used to signal a vessel. When the telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell, he suggested that “ahoy” be used as a standard greeting when answering a call. However, Thomas Edison came up with “hello”, and we’ve been using that ever since.

56 Janet ___, first female attorney general : RENO

Janet Reno was Attorney General (AG) of the US from 1993 to 2001, and part of the Clinton administration. Reno was the second-longest holder of the office, and our first female Attorney General. In 2002, Reno ran for Governor of Florida but failed to win the Democratic nomination. Thereafter she retired from public life, and passed away at the end of 2016.

58 Thor’s father : ODIN

In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. He is usually depicted as having one eye, reflecting the story of how he gave one of his eyes in exchange for wisdom.

In Norse mythology, Thor was the son of Odin. Thor wielded a mighty hammer and was the god of thunder, lightning and storms. Our contemporary word “Thursday” comes from “Thor’s Day”.

60 Exam for an aspiring atty. : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

62 Frozen dessert chain owned by Mrs. Fields : TCBY

TCBY is a chain of stores selling frozen yogurt that was founded in 1981 in Little Rock, Arkansas. The acronym TCBY originally stood for “This Can’t Be Yogurt”, but this had to be changed due to a lawsuit being pressed by a competitor called “I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt”. These days TCBY stands for “The Country’s Best Yogurt”.

The Mrs. Fields brand of snack foods was founded in the late seventies by Debbi Fields. Fields opened her first store in Palo Alto, California.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Media player debut of 2001 : IPOD
5 Sacred song : PSALM
10 Transport between airport terminals : TRAM
14 Bill of fare : MENU
15 Beginning, as of symptoms : ONSET
16 Marathon, e.g. : RACE
17 Air currents from the most typical direction : PREVAILING WINDS
20 Big part of many kids’ cereals : SUGAR
21 Bamboozled : HAD
22 Way into a sub : HATCH
23 Texter’s response to a hilarious joke : LMAO!
25 “___ go bragh!” : ERIN
27 Resorted to good old-fashioned know-who, say : PULLED STRINGS
32 Pub order, in brief : IPA
33 “The lady ___ protest too much …”: “Hamlet” : DOTH
34 Cut, in editing : DELETE
37 Ice cream brand : EDY’S
39 Survive a round of musical chairs : SIT
41 Entrepreneur Musk : ELON
42 Some labor leaders? : DOULAS
45 Terse denial : NOT I!
48 Club ___ (resort) : MED
49 Top military leaders in Washington : PENTAGON BRASS
52 Dutch cheese : EDAM
53 One may be taken in protest : KNEE
54 Repeatedly comments (on) : HARPS
57 Lead-in to “la-la” : OOH-
59 G sharp equivalent : A-FLAT
63 Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Do-Re-Mi” show, with a hint to this puzzle’s theme : THE SOUND OF MUSIC
66 Not stereo : MONO
67 Interrogate : GRILL
68 Stuff to wear : GARB
69 City on the Rhône : LYON
70 Good at fixing leaky faucets and creaky hinges, say : HANDY
71 Crafty website : ETSY

Down

1 Little devils : IMPS
2 Land in the Andes : PERU
3 Universal donor’s blood type, in brief : O-NEG
4 “The Shining” actress Shelley : DUVALL
5 Mash prepared for a luau : POI
6 Sketch show V.I.P.s who get a jacket for their fifth appearance : SNL HOSTS
7 The East : ASIA
8 “Neither a borrower nor a ___ be”: “Hamlet” : LENDER
9 Business appt. : MTG
10 Shape describing a complex love relationship : TRIANGLE
11 Screed : RANT
12 Rock band name with a slash : AC/DC
13 Fit together well : MESH
18 Packing, so to speak : ARMED
19 Dog’s “Pleeeeze!” : WHINE
24 Kerfuffle : ADO
26 Clear (of) : RID
27 ___ Piper : PIED
28 Pageant coif : UPDO
29 Easy two-pointer : LAY-UP
30 “Sure ___!” (“You bet!”) : THING
31 Title city in a 2014 Ava DuVernay film : SELMA
35 Little piggies : TOES
36 Ceases : ENDS
38 Takes overnight to think about : SLEEPS ON
40 Gained influence, as an idea : TOOK HOLD
43 Segue before a conclusion : AND SO …
44 RR stop : STA
46 Spike TV, previously : TNN
47 Seat in the iconic photo “Lunch Atop a Skyscraper” : I-BEAM
50 Egyptian sun god : AMON-RA
51 Haven, as for endangered wildlife : REFUGE
54 Website developer’s code : HTML
55 Sailor’s greeting : AHOY!
56 Janet ___, first female attorney general : RENO
58 Thor’s father : ODIN
60 Exam for an aspiring atty. : LSAT
61 Pretenses one may “put on” : AIRS
62 Frozen dessert chain owned by Mrs. Fields : TCBY
64 “Awful, just awful!” : UGH!
65 Take to the sky : FLY

7 thoughts on “0510-22 NY Times Crossword 10 May 22, Tuesday”

  1. 7:15. Didn’t pay any attention to the theme until I was finished. They actually missed one class of instrument so they shouldn’t blow their own HORNS.

    It’s a safe assumption that I will never eat lunch on an IBEAM 800 feet in the air. Just the thought of it gives me the willies.

    Best –

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