0329-20 NY Times Crossword 29 Mar 20, Sunday

Constructed by: Ricky Cruz
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Keep the Change

NOTE: As I solve online, and this is an unusual grid design, the numbers in my grid differ from that published on paper.

Today’s is a puzzling puzzle. Shaded squares (on paper) in the left-center of the grid include circled letters that spell out BLACK. The equivalent on the right spell out WHITE:

  • 26A Make heads or tails of a situation … or an alternative title for this puzzle : TELL LEFT FROM RIGHT
  • 110A Kind of visual puzzle … or what to do with each line in this puzzle’s two shaded areas : SPOT THE DIFFERENCE
  • 56D The circled letters in the first shaded area : BLACK
  • 62D The circled letters in the second shaded area : WHITE

… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 24m 29s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Company often cited in business studies about disruptive innovation : KODAK

George Eastman founded the Eastman Kodak Company, which he named after the Kodak camera that he had invented four years earlier. He came up with the name of Kodak after careful consideration. Firstly he was a big fan of the letter “K”, calling it “strong, incisive”. He also wanted a word that was short, easy to pronounce and difficult to mispronounce, and a word that was clearly unique with no prior associations. “Kodak” fit the bill.

18 Superman, for one : ALIEN

Jor-El was a scientist on the planet Krypton who was married to Lara. Jor-El and Lara had an infant son named Kal-El who they were able to launch into space towards Earth just before Krypton was destroyed. Kal-El became Superman. In the 1978 movie “Superman”, Jor-El was played by Marlon Brando, Lara was played by Susannah York, and Kal-El/Superman was played by Christopher Reeve.

19 Bit of Q.E.D. : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

20 Brian who created the Windows 95 start-up sound : ENO

Brian Eno started his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno’s most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft’s “startup jingle”, the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up. Eno might have annoyed the Microsoft folks when he stated on a BBC radio show:

I wrote it on a Mac. I’ve never used a PC in my life; I don’t like them.

26 Make heads or tails of a situation … or an alternative title for this puzzle : TELL LEFT FROM RIGHT

The two sides of a coin are known as the “obverse” and the “reverse”. The obverse is commonly referred to as “heads”, as it often depicts someone’s head. The reverse is commonly called “tails”, as it is the opposite of “heads”.

31 What an aglet is for a shoelace : TIP

An aglet is a plastic or metal sheath that is found on the end of a shoelace or perhaps a drawstring. The name “aglet” comes from the Old French word “aiguillette” meaning “needle”.

32 Some pain relievers : OPIOIDS

The name of the class of drugs called “opioids” comes from the word “opium”, which describes the dried latex obtained from the opium poppy. Drugs derived from opium are known as “opiates”. The broader term “opioids” covers both natural and synthetic drugs that behave in the same way as opiates, i.e. those drugs that bind to opioid receptors in the brain.

36 ___ parm : VEAL

Parmigiana is a dish from southern Italy. The original parmigiana was made with an aubergine (eggplant) filling, with cheese and tomato layers and then baked. Versions originating outside of Italy have replaced the aubergine with breaded cutlets of chicken or veal.

42 Food catcher : BIB

The word “bib” comes from the Latin “bibere” meaning “to drink”, as does our word “imbibe”. So, maybe a bib is less about spilling the food, and more about soaking up the booze …

48 Bearded beast : GNU

The gnu is also known as the wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. “Wildebeest” is a Dutch meaning “wild beast”.

51 Orange County’s ___ Beach : LAGUNA

Laguna Beach is a seaside resort city in Orange County in southern California. The city takes its name from nearby Laguna Canyon, and was originally known as Lagonas.

54 Whistle-blower in 2013 news : SNOWDEN

Edward Snowden is a former NSA contractor who leaked several top secret NSA documents to the media beginning in June 2013. After disclosing his name as the source of the leaks, Snowden tried to seek asylum in Ecuador. While travelling to Ecuador he had a layover in Moscow. While in Moscow, the US government revoked his passport, which effectively left him stranded in the transit area of Moscow Airport. The Russian government eventually granted him annually-renewable temporary asylum.

57 Donkey Kong and others : APES

The first video game featuring the ape called Donkey Kong was created in 1981. That same game introduced the world to the character known as Mario, four years before the game Super Mario Bros became such a big hit.

63 College town in Iowa : AMES

Iowa State University of Science and Technology (ISU) is located in Ames, Iowa. Among many other notable milestones, ISU created the country’s first school of veterinary medicine, in 1879. The sports teams of ISU are known as the Cyclones.

65 Units in linguistics : LEXEMES

“Lexeme” is a term from linguistics. A lexeme is a fundamental unit in a language, a set of forms of a particular word e.g. the lexeme “find” contains the forms “find, finds, found, finding.”

68 Home to the Alhambra : GRANADA

Granada is a city and province in Andalusia in the south of Spain. Granada should not to be confused with Grenada (note the different spelling), an island nation in the Caribbean that was invaded by the US in 1983.

Alhambra is a magnificent fortress and palace in Granada, Andalusia in the south of Spain. The large complex was completed in the 14th century in the days when the Moors ruled Andalusia.

72 The invaders in Space Invaders, in brief : ETS

Space Invaders is one of my favorite video games. It is truly a classic from the good old days (not that I play video games anymore). When Space Invaders was first released in video arcades in Japan in 1978, it was so popular that it caused a shortage of 100-yen coins.

73 Things held up to the ear : CONCHES

Although “conch” is now used as a generic term for largish sea snails and their shells, the true conch belongs to a specific group of gastropods. The “meat” is very popular, and so the conch is the second most popular edible snail after “escargot”. The conch shell can be used as a wind instrument, and the true conch is also a good source for pearls.

77 Nobel and Pulitzer winner Morrison : TONI

Writer Toni Morrison won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993. Amongst other things, Morrison is noted for coining the phrase “our first black President”, a reference to President Bill Clinton.

86 Slowpokes : SNAILS

Back in the early 1800s, a “poke” was a device attached to domestic animals such as pigs or sheep to keep them from escaping their enclosures. The poke was like a yoke with a pole, and slowed the animal down, hence the term “slowpoke”.

88 “30 for 30” network : ESPN

“30 for 30” is a series of ESPN documentary films that has aired since 2009. The series originated as a celebration of ESPN’s 30th birthday. To recognize that anniversary, the network commissioned 30 filmmakers to make 30 one-hour films covering the big stories in ESPN’s 30-year history. The series was so well received that ESPN continues to make similar documentaries using the “30 for 30” umbrella title.

90 Lab noise? : ARF

The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814, and the chocolate Labrador appeared over a century later in the 1930s. The name “Labrador Retriever” is simply a reference to the breed’s origin and behavior. Labs originally “retrieved” from the “Labrador Sea”.

91 Lazy ___ : SUSAN

A lazy Susan is a circular tray at the center of a dining table that can be rotated by those partaking in the meal. The term “lazy Susan” was introduced in the early 1900s, first appearing in an article in the magazine “Good Housekeeping”. Before this designation, the device had been called a “dumbwaiter”, a term that we now reserve for a small elevator used for transporting food from the kitchen to the dining room.

97 Free offering from a cafe : WI-FI

“Wi-Fi” is nothing more than a trademark, a trademark registered by an association of manufacturers of equipment that use wireless LAN (Local Area Network) technology. A device labeled with “Wi-Fi” has to meet certain defined technical standards, basically meaning that the devices can talk to each other. The name “Wi-Fi” suggests “Wireless Fidelity”, although apparently the term was never intended to mean anything at all.

99 Certain colors in printing : CYANS

Four-color printing uses four different color inks: cyan, magenta, yellow and black. The black ink is also known as the “key”. The first letter of the colors (with black being ”key”) give the more common name for four-color printing, namely CMYK.

107 ___-Tiki : KON

The Kon-Tiki is a raft used by Thor Heyerdahl in 1947 to cross the Pacific Ocean from South America to the Polynesian islands. The original raft used in the voyage is on display in the Kon-Tiki Museum in Oslo, Norway (Heyerdahl was a native of Norway).

108 One fighting against Thanos : AVENGER

The Avengers are a team of superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. The original lineup, which dates back to 1963, consisted of Ant-Man, Hulk, Iron Man, Thor and the Wasp. Soon after their formation, the Avengers rescued Captain America trapped in ice, and thereafter he joined the team. There is a 2012 movie called “The Avengers” that features Iron Man, Captain America, Hulk and Thor.

Thanos is a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. Thanos was portrayed by Damion Poitier in the 2012 movie “The Avengers”, and by Josh Brolin in several subsequent movies including 2014’s “Guardians of the Galaxy”.

115 Location in the Beach Boys’ “Kokomo” : BAHAMA

“Kokomo” is a song released by the Beach Boys in 1988. It describes a trip taken by a couple to a fictional island off the Florida Keys called Kokomo. The success of the song led to at least one Florida resort adopting the name.

Aruba, Jamaica, ooh I wanna take ya
Bermuda, Bahama, come on pretty mama
Key Largo, Montego,
baby why don’t we go,
Jamaica

117 Dog days of winter? : IDITAROD

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race covers an incredible 1,161 miles, from Anchorage to Nome in Alaska. The race starts every year on the first Saturday in March, with the first race having been held in 1973. Finishing times range from over 8 days to 15 days or more. The first few races only used a northern route, but then a southern route was added to the roster every second year. It’s kind of a good thing, because when the racers take the northern route they don’t even pass through the town of Iditarod!

118 House-elf in the Harry Potter books : DOBBY

In the “Harry Potter” universe, Dobby is a house elf (basically a slave) used by the Malfoy family.

121 Any one of the Magi, to Jesus : ADORER

“Magi” is the plural of the Latin word “magus”, a term applied to someone who was able to read the stars. Hence, “magi” is commonly used with reference to the “wise men from the East” who followed the star and visited Jesus soon after he was born. In Western Christianity, the three Biblical Magi are:

  • Melchior: a scholar from Persia
  • Caspar: a scholar from India
  • Balthazar: a scholar from Arabia

122 Cousin of Inc. : LLC

A limited liability company (LLC) has a structure that limits the liability of the owner or owners. It is a hybrid structure in the sense that it can be taxed as would an individual or partnership, while also maintaining the liability protection afforded to a corporation.

123 Mount ___, much-hiked peak in Yosemite : DANA

President Abraham Lincoln passed a bill in 1864 creating the Yosemite Grant, which was the first piece of federal legislature that set aside park land for preservation and public use. The Yosemite Grant paved the way for the creation of Yellowstone as the nation’s first national park in 1872. Yosemite was made a national park in 1890.

125 Applesauce brand : MOTT’S

Samuel R. Mott was a producer of apple cider and vinegar. In 1842 he founded his own company to market and sell his products. The Mott’s company owns brands such as Mr & Mrs T, Hawaiian Punch and ReaLime/ReaLemon.

126 Drano component : LYE

To clean out drains we might buy Crystal Drano, which is sodium hydroxide (lye) mixed with sodium nitrate, sodium chloride (table salt) and aluminum. The contents of Drano work in concert to clear the clog. The lye reacts with any fats creating soap which may be enough to break up the clog. Also, the finely-divided aluminum reacts with the lye generating hydrogen gas that churns the mixture. Any hair or fibers are cut by the sharp edges of the nitrate and chloride crystals. Having said all that, I find that boiling water poured down the drain quite often does the job …

127 Site for handmade goods : ETSY

Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

Down

1 Kick start? : KAY

The starting letter in the word “kick” is a letter K (kay).

2 World Cup cry : OLE!

The FIFA World Cup is the most prestigious tournament in the sport of soccer. The competition has been held every four years (excluding the WWII years) since the inaugural event held in Uruguay in 1930. The men’s World Cup is the most widely viewed sporting event in the world, even outranking the Olympic Games. And, the women’s World Cup is fast catching up …

3 2007 Shia LaBeouf thriller or a 2008 #1 hit by Rihanna : DISTURBIA

Shia LaBeouf is an actor who started out in the Disney television series “Even Stevens”. Adult audiences might be more familiar with his leading role in the 2003 film “Holes”.

Singer Rihanna was born and grew up on the island of Barbados and moved to the US when she was 16-years-old to pursue a singing career. “Rihanna” is her stage name, as she was born Robyn Rihanna Fenty. The name “Rihanna” is derived from the Welsh name “Rhiannon”. And, Rihanna sometimes goes by the nickname “RiRi”, which is also the name of her line of beauty products.

4 Hero of a Virgil epic : AENEAS

Aeneas was a Trojan hero of myth who traveled to Italy and became the ancestor of all Romans. Aeneas’s story is told in Virgil’s epic poem “The Aeneid”.

9 “Leave it be” : STET

“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

10 ___ the Entertainer (actor and comedian) : CEDRIC

“Cedric the Entertainer” is the stage name of actor and comedian Cedric Kyles from Jefferson City, MIssouri. Cedric is known as a co-star of “The Steve Harvey Show” sitcom and as a comedian showcased in the Spike Lee film “The Original Kings of Comedy” released in 2000.

13 Nintendo character with a green cap : LUIGI

Mario Bros. started out as an arcade game back in 1983, developed by Nintendo. The more famous of the two brothers, Mario, had already appeared in an earlier arcade game “Donkey Kong”. Mario was given a brother called Luigi, and the pair have been around ever since. In the game, Mario and Luigi are Italian American plumbers from New York City.

24 Little salamanders : EFTS

Salamanders are lizard-like amphibians found all across the northern hemisphere. They are the only vertebrate animals that can regenerate lost limbs.

28 Paris’s Musée ___ (art museum) : RODIN

The Musée Rodin is very special in that the building and garden that hold all of the works were Rodin’s actual home and studio. Well worth a visit if you make it to Paris …

29 No-goodnik : SOB

“SOB” is indeed a rude term, very rude … son of a b****.

30 Pounds : QUID

“Quid” is a slang term for a pound sterling (i.e. a UK pound). It’s not certain where the term comes from, but it is possibly derived somehow from the Latin phrase “quid pro quo” meaning “this for that”.

33 Brooks & ___ (country duo) : DUNN

Brooks & Dunn was a country music duo made up of Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn.

37 Like about half of the OPEC countries : ARAB

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) was founded in 1960 at a conference held in Baghdad, Iraq that was attended by Iraq, Kuwait, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Nine more countries joined the alliance soon after, and OPEC set up headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland and then Vienna, Austria in 1965. The basic aim of OPEC was to wrest control of oil prices from the oil companies and put it in the hands of the sovereign states that own the natural resource.

38 Danish tourist attraction since 1968 : LEGOLAND

There are currently six Legoland theme parks in the world, with two here in North America. One of the US parks is in Winter Haven, Florida and the other is in Carlsbad, California (which is the one that I’ve visited … a fun place).

44 ___ ranch : DUDE

Our term “dude” arose as slang in New York City in the 1880s, when it was used to describe a fastidious man. In the early 1900s, the term was extended to mean “city slickers”, easterners who vacationed in the West. The first use of the term “dude ranch” was recorded in 1921.

46 Promoter of gender equality, for short : NOW

The National Organization for Women (NOW) was founded in 1966. The NOW bylaws include a Statement of Purpose:

NOW’s purpose is to take action through intersectional grassroots activism to promote feminist ideals, lead societal change, eliminate discrimination, and achieve and protect the equal rights of all women and girls in all aspects of social, political, and economic life.

50 No-frills : SPARTAN

Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece that was famous for her military might. Spartan children had a tough upbringing, and newborn babies were bathed in wine to see if the child was strong enough to survive. Every child was presented to a council of elders that decided if the baby was suitable for rearing. Those children deemed too puny were executed by tossing them into a chasm. We’ve been using the term “spartan” to describe something self-disciplined or austere since the 1600s.

55 Humdingers : DOOZIES

A doozy is something extraordinary or bizarre. The exact origins of the word “doozy” aren’t clear, but it might be a derivative of the name Eleanora Duse, an Italian actress popular early in the 20th century. Some say that the term comes from the Duesenberg brand of automobile, which was indeed referred to as a “duesy”. However, the use of “doozy” in print occurs before the Duesenberg hit the market.

A humdinger or a pip is someone or something outstanding. “Humdinger” is American slang dating back to the early 1900s, and was originally used to describe a particularly attractive woman.

58 Title for many a W.H. aspirant : SEN

Senator (sen.)

The White House was designed by an Irishman. James Hoban from County Kilkenny emigrated to the US in his twenties, and won the design competition for the White House in 1792.

64 Ink container : SAC

Octopodes and squid have the ability to release a dark pigment into the water as a means of escape. The dark pigment is called cephalopod ink (the squid and octopus belong to the class cephalopoda). The dark color is created by melanin, the same substance that acts as a pigment in human skin.

71 Hopeless from the start, slangily : DOA

Dead on arrival (DOA)

74 Job seekers’ needs, in brief : CVS

A curriculum vitae (CV) is a listing of someone’s work experience and qualifications, and is used mainly in making a job application. The term “curriculum vitae” can be translated from Latin as “course of life”.

81 Jazz’s Fitzgerald : ELLA

Ella Fitzgerald, the “First Lady of Song”, had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Her mother died while Ella was still a schoolgirl, and around that time the young girl became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow Fitzgerald managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

83 Cartoon character who works at the Krusty Krab : SPONGEBOB

The Krusty Krab is a fast food restaurant frequented by SpongeBob Squarepants on his animated TV show.

84 Vim and vigor : BRIO

“Brio” is borrowed from Italian, in which language the term means “vigor and vivacity”. “Con brio” is a musical direction often found on a score, instructing the musicians to play “with energy, vigor”.

85 Article of apparel that’s an anagram of other articles of apparel : ASCOT

“ASCOT” is an anagram of “COATS”.

87 Length of time between noons : SOLAR DAY

A solar day is the time taken for a planet to rotate completely about its axis so the sun reappears in the same position in the sky. A solar day on Earth is 24 hours. A solar day on Mars is just under 24 hours, and is referred to as a “sol”.

105 Sights in the Jerusalem skyline : DOMES

Jerusalem is one of the oldest cities in the world, with the oldest part of Jerusalem having been settled in the 4th millennium BCE. The city is considered holy in all three of the big Abrahamic traditions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam and as a result is one of the crucial issues to be resolved in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

106 One of six in Subaru’s logo : STAR

Subaru is the automobile division of Fuji Heavy Industries, Japanese conglomerate. “Subaru” is the Japanese name for the Pleiades star cluster. As a result, the Subaru logo is also a cluster of stars.

115 Comic book onomatopoeia : BAM!

Onomatopoeia is the naming of something by vocally imitating the sound associated with it. Examples of onomatopoeia are chirp, clash, click and hiccups.

119 A/C spec : BTU

In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured using the British Thermal Units (BTU). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water’s temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Company often cited in business studies about disruptive innovation : KODAK
6 Barbecue applications : RUBS
10 Center of an ear : COB
13 Authorized : LICIT
18 Superman, for one : ALIEN
19 Bit of Q.E.D. : ERAT
20 Brian who created the Windows 95 start-up sound : ENO
21 Time machine option : FUTURE
22 Binary, as some questions : YES/NO
23 Settled on : AGREED TO
25 “Here’s the thing …” : LISTEN …
26 Make heads or tails of a situation … or an alternative title for this puzzle : TELL LEFT FROM RIGHT
29 Like a pigsty : SQUALID
31 What an aglet is for a shoelace : TIP
32 Some pain relievers : OPIOIDS
35 Sharer’s word : OURS
36 ___ parm : VEAL
39 Give a talking-to : SCOLD
41 Bit of letter-shaped hardware : T-NUT
42 Food catcher : BIB
43 Got misty-eyed, with “up” : TEARED
45 Tricksy maneuver : FEINT
48 Bearded beast : GNU
49 Satellite signal receiver : DISH
51 Orange County’s ___ Beach : LAGUNA
54 Whistle-blower in 2013 news : SNOWDEN
57 Donkey Kong and others : APES
59 Dresses’ upper sections : BODICES
61 Cherry, for one : WOOD
63 College town in Iowa : AMES
65 Units in linguistics : LEXEMES
67 Selfish sort : HOG
68 Home to the Alhambra : GRANADA
70 Confused : IN A DAZE
72 The invaders in Space Invaders, in brief : ETS
73 Things held up to the ear : CONCHES
77 Nobel and Pulitzer winner Morrison : TONI
78 Part of a mission : TASK
80 Unfavorable : ADVERSE
82 Some coolers : ADES
84 Surgeon’s tool : BONE SAW
86 Slowpokes : SNAILS
88 “30 for 30” network : ESPN
90 Lab noise? : ARF
91 Lazy ___ : SUSAN
93 Relied on no one else : SOLOED
95 [That knocked the wind out of me!] : [OOF!]
97 Free offering from a cafe : WI-FI
99 Certain colors in printing : CYANS
102 Beyoncé’s role in 2019’s “The Lion King” : NALA
103 Having as a hobby : INTO
104 No-goodnik : SO-AND-SO
107 ___-Tiki : KON
108 One fighting against Thanos : AVENGER
110 Kind of visual puzzle … or what to do with each line in this puzzle’s two shaded areas : SPOT THE DIFFERENCE
115 Location in the Beach Boys’ “Kokomo” : BAHAMA
117 Dog days of winter? : IDITAROD
118 House-elf in the Harry Potter books : DOBBY
121 Any one of the Magi, to Jesus : ADORER
122 Cousin of Inc. : LLC
123 Mount ___, much-hiked peak in Yosemite : DANA
124 Not hide one’s feelings : EMOTE
125 Applesauce brand : MOTT’S
126 Drano component : LYE
127 Site for handmade goods : ETSY
128 Introduction : DEBUT

Down

1 Kick start? : KAY
2 World Cup cry : OLE!
3 2007 Shia LaBeouf thriller or a 2008 #1 hit by Rihanna : DISTURBIA
4 Hero of a Virgil epic : AENEAS
5 Bit of raised land : KNOLL
6 Someone with all the desired qualities : REAL DEAL
7 Craving : URGE
8 “Eww, gross!” : BARF!
9 “Leave it be” : STET
10 ___ the Entertainer (actor and comedian) : CEDRIC
11 In addition to : ON TOP OF
12 [Out of nowhere!] : [BOOM!]
13 Nintendo character with a green cap : LUIGI
14 Summer complaint : IT’S HOT
15 State-of-the-art : CUTTING-EDGE
16 Fuming state : IRE
17 X : TEN
21 Word before phone or book : FLIP …
24 Little salamanders : EFTS
27 Word in the corner of a TV news broadcast : LIVE
28 Paris’s Musée ___ (art museum) : RODIN
29 No-goodnik : SOB
30 Pounds : QUID
33 Brooks & ___ (country duo) : DUNN
34 Man’s nickname found in consecutive letters of the alphabet : STU
37 Like about half of the OPEC countries : ARAB
38 Danish tourist attraction since 1968 : LEGOLAND
40 Tone down : LESSEN
43 Society at large : THE MASSES
44 ___ ranch : DUDE
46 Promoter of gender equality, for short : NOW
47 Like some tennis shots and most push-ups : TWO-HANDED
50 No-frills : SPARTAN
52 Strike out : NIX
53 Expert : ACE
55 Humdingers : DOOZIES
56 The circled letters in the first shaded area : BLACK
58 Title for many a W.H. aspirant : SEN
60 Substance discharged : EMISSION
62 The circled letters in the second shaded area : WHITE
64 Ink container : SAC
66 Went unused : SAT
68 Manage to heave the ball before time expires : GET OFF A SHOT
69 Dispense (with) : DO AWAY
71 Hopeless from the start, slangily : DOA
74 Job seekers’ needs, in brief : CVS
75 Egg maker : HEN
76 Long stretches : ERAS
79 The Golden Flashes of the Mid-American Conf. : KSU
81 Jazz’s Fitzgerald : ELLA
83 Cartoon character who works at the Krusty Krab : SPONGEBOB
84 Vim and vigor : BRIO
85 Article of apparel that’s an anagram of other articles of apparel : ASCOT
87 Length of time between noons : SOLAR DAY
89 Point out : NOTE
90 Cries of disappointment : AWS
92 With full disclosure : NAKEDLY
94 Roof part : EAVE
96 Supporting : FOR
98 Somewhat : IN PART
100 “That didn’t work!” : NO DICE!
101 Foul mood : SNIT
103 Earnings : INCOME
105 Sights in the Jerusalem skyline : DOMES
106 One of six in Subaru’s logo : STAR
109 Over : ENDED
111 Bit of raised land : HILL
112 Direction in a film script : FADE
113 ___ bro : FRAT
114 Long stretches : EONS
115 Comic book onomatopoeia : BAM!
116 Big whoop : ADO
119 A/C spec : BTU
120 Even so : YET

20 thoughts on “0329-20 NY Times Crossword 29 Mar 20, Sunday”

  1. Your numbers differ because you assigned numbers to the down answers BLACK and WHITE on the edges starting in row 9. Only the top number is assigned, but you have numbers for all of the letters (LACK and HITE).

  2. 30:01, no errors. A puzzling puzzle indeed! After I was done, I spent a couple of minutes trying to make sense out of the other letters in the shaded squares (ESO MES NADA SON SAD). I finally realized it’s probably too much to ask that they impart some clever message (perhaps in Spanish + ???) , but I’m still unconvinced that there isn’t one. (Now, about those tea leaves in the bottom of my cup … and the strange patterns in the specks of dust on my table top … 😳😜.)

    @Rick … I suspect that Bill did not “assign” the numbers to the grid, but is at the mercy of whatever tool he used to draw the grid … 😜.

  3. And I forgot: Given the answer (“QUID”), can someone explain why the clue for 30D is “Pounds” rather than just “Pound”? Just an editorial glitch or is there some other explanation? Any Brits out there?

    1. @Greg … I think I responded to this, but my response now seems to have disappeared, so let me try again …

      You nailed it! Twenty pounds = twenty quid! Silly me … 😜.

      I’ve been having lots of trouble with this site … probably as a result of increased internet traffic due to the coronavirus situation. (At least, that’s my guess.)

  4. 38:45. Very interesting and impressive construction. I would have guessed it wouldn’t be possible. On the NYT app, the matching letters were grayed out. I didn’t really take a look at them until I finished, but I could see right away from the revealer(s) what was going on. Without the circles and/or without the gray squares, understanding this theme would have been a much more difficult task.

    Best –

  5. Perhaps to make less confusing, while I solve this puzzle, there are two 5×5 boxes shaded, with the top-left corner of both boxes are the third letter of 57-A (the “E” of “APES”) and first letter of 60-D. You will notice both boxes shaded has the same letters and blanks, only the “black” and “white” being different.

  6. 47:23 Have totally screwed up my sleep schedule due to “stay at home” requests, so I finished this at 0300 hrs. My only hitch was having to go through the entire alphabet to arrive at”nix”, which chewed up a bit o’ time

  7. so i agree with above. is there more to the different letters on the two shaded boxes???what is the significance of Keep the Change???

  8. I finished this puzzle in 1:36:00 with no errors (somehow) but there were no circled squares in the shaded area of my edition of this puzzle…I (again somehow ) managed to figure out what should have been circled and got the black white answers for 56 and 62D…this one was really way out there but with no place to go I stayed with it.
    I don’t agree that a long stretch is an era…it could be very short or very long like the Trump era or this virus area with both hopefully be ing very short.

  9. The circled letters in the shaded squares are the ones that have been “changed” accounting for the “difference” between left and right. If one “keeps the change” the letters “kept” become the BLACK and WHITE on each side. That’s all I can figure out about the title.

  10. 38:37, no errors. Fortunately, my grid contained the circles in the shaded boxes. I can imagine that this was initially constructed without the circles, making the puzzle more difficult. The solver would then have to “SPOT THE DIFFERENCE(S)”, then “Keep the Change” to “TELL LEFT FROM RIGHT”. Perhaps someone took pity on us, and circled the differences to make the puzzle easier.

  11. My paper didn’t manage to print ANY of the circles for the letters that were meant to solve the uncrossed down squares. So, naturally, I was thinking what a cruel trick Mr. Cruz pulled on us “average” crossword solvers!

    The only thing I could think of, that might be meant, was that some letters in the shaded areas were “encircled” by their neighbors.

    As a result, my solution to the left column was OCEAN and the right column ATONE

    Which, of course, didn’t make a whole bunch of sense to me!

    But then, at my skill level, not many puzzles do because the puzzle makers are just so darned smarter than I am.

  12. I think this crossword is an allusion to those puzzles in the comics section sometimes where there are two almost identical scenes except for small differences — one house has a chimney, the other doesn’t; the bill on one boy’s cap is longer than the other, etc. In fact, sometimes the title of those kinds of puzzles is something like “Spot 5 Differences” (thus the 110-Across clue). You’re supposed to, then, circle the differences. In this crossword in each line of the shaded area, there is one difference between the left and the right (thus the 26-Across clue); that’s what you “circle” — that’s what 56- and 62-Down is referring to. As to the title, Keep The Change — don’t have a clue.

  13. I was proud of myself. I got this completed even though my paper (Long Beach Press-Telegram) didn’t have any circles – just shaded squares.

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