1124-19 NY Times Crossword 24 Nov 19, Sunday

Constructed by: Frank Longo
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Open Wide!

Well, the title is “Wide Open!”, but there is no theme that I can see! The grid is “wide open”, with very few black squares.

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 22m 13s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Bondsman, of late? : DANIEL CRAIG

English actor Daniel Craig rocketed to fame in 2005 when he was chosen to replace Pierce Brosnan as James Bond in the series of films based on Ian Fleming’s character. One of Craig’s most famous appearances as Bond was alongside Queen Elizabeth II in the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics. Craig married actress Rachel Weisz in 2011.

23 A.P. courses, e.g. : COLLEGE PREP

The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of an AP course, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

25 Emily Dickinson’s “I heard ___ buzz – when I died” : A FLY

Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1800 poems in her lifetime, with less than a dozen published before she died in 1886. Emily’s younger sister discovered the enormous collection, and it was published in batches over the coming decades.

26 Wonder-working biblical prophet : ELISHA

The prophet Elisha is mentioned both in the Hebrew Bible and the Qur’an. In the Islamic tradition, Elisha is usually known by his Arabic name, Alyasa.

28 Creator of Mike Hammer : SPILLANE

Mike Hammer is the protagonist in a series of private detective novels by Mickey Spillane. The novels have been adapted for radio, television and the big screen. The actor most associated with Mike Hammer is Stacy Keach, who played the role in the TV series “Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer” from 1984 to 1987.

31 In the mood for love : AMATIVE

The adjective “amative” means “inclined toward love, amorous”.

33 Main theme of “Othello” : JEALOUSY

William Shakespeare was one of the first to associate the color green with envy. He called jealousy the “green-eyed monster” in his play “Othello”.

37 Climax of “The Shawshank Redemption” : PRISON ESCAPE

Stephen King’s novella “Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption” was adapted into a 2009 stage play and a 1994 film, both of which were titled “The Shawshank Redemption”. The Ohio State Reformatory was used for exterior shots of the fictional Shawshank Prison. That same facility was used for the prison scenes in the 1997 film “Air Force One”.

42 Picnic, e.g. : OUTING

Our term “picnic” comes from the French word that now has the same meaning, namely “pique-nique”. The original “pique-nique” was a fashionable potluck affair, and not necessarily held outdoors.

43 Bumming, as cigarettes : CADGING

To cadge is to get something by begging.

45 Clicking counters : ABACI

The abacus (plural “abaci”) was used as a counting frame long before man had invented a numbering system. It is a remarkable invention, particularly when one notes that abaci are still widely used today across Africa and Asia.

52 Insulation and sealing material : SILICONE

Silicones are synthetic polymers that include the element silicon. The words “silicone” and “silicon” are sometimes confused and used incorrectly. Silicones are used as sealants and adhesives all around the house. Silicones are also used to fill breast implants, although implants are more likely to contain saline these days due to safety concerns.

54 Thrice due : SEI

In Italian, “due” (two) times “tre” (three) is “sei” (six).

69 James who starred in 1970s TV’s “How the West Was Won” : ARNESS

James Arness played the role of Matt Dillon, Marshal of Dodge City, on “Gunsmoke” for twenty years. If you count the occasions when he reprised the role for specials, he actually performed as Matt Dillon over five decades. Did you know that the real name of Peter Graves, the actor who played Jim Phelps on “Mission: Impossible”, was Peter Arness, as he and James were brothers.

“How the West Was Won” is an epic Western movie released in 1962. It follows the lives of a family through four generations, from 1830 to 1889. The family starts off in western New York, and ends up in San Francisco. The film is narrated by Spencer Tracy, and has a tremendous cast led by the likes of James Stewart, Gregory Peck, George Peppard and Henry Fonda.

70 Name originally proposed (but not adopted) for Utah : DESERET

When Mormon pioneers were settling what is today the state of Utah, they referred to the area as Deseret, a word that means “beehive” according to the Book of Mormon. Today Utah is known as the Beehive State and there is a beehive symbol on the Utah state flag. In 1959, “Industry” was even chosen as the state motto, for the term’s association with the beehive.

77 Event that usually has gate crashers? : SLALOM

“Slalom” is an anglicized version of the Norwegian word “slalam” that translates as “skiing race”. There is a longer version of the traditional slalom that is called giant slalom

78 Methods of studying pooled data : META-ANALYSES

Meta-analysis is the statistical analysis of pooled data, data obtained in multiple experiments studying similar subjects.

81 Peak in 1980 headlines : ST HELENS

The active volcano in Washington state called Mount St. Helens was named by explorer George Vancouver for his friend, British diplomat Lord St Helens. 57 people died when When Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, making it the deadliest eruption in the history of the US.

84 NASA’s spacecraft Dawn began orbiting it in 2015 : CERES

Ceres is the smallest dwarf planet in our solar system. Ceres was discovered in 1801 and is the largest body in the asteroid belt, and is the only asteroid that is classified as a dwarf planet. For fifty years, Ceres was classified as the eighth planet circling our sun. The Dawn space probe launched by NASA entered Ceres orbit in March 2015, becoming the first mission to study a dwarf planet at close range.

89 List-ending phrase : ET ALII

“Et alii” (et al.) is the equivalent of “et cetera” (etc.), with “et cetera” being used in place of a list of objects, and “et alii” used for a list of names. In fact, “et al.” can stand for “et alii” (a group of males, or males and females), “et aliae” (a group of women) and “et alia” (a group of neuter nouns, or a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

97 Subscription service with an arrow in its logo : AMAZON PRIME

Amazon Prime is a membership service that Amazon introduced in 2005.

103 Petty officers on police duty while a ship is in port : SHORE PATROL

The word “petty”, meaning “small-minded”, comes from the French word for small, “petit”. When “petty” first came into English it wasn’t used disparagingly, and was used more literally giving us terms like “petty officer” and “petty cash”. The word “petty” evolved into a prefix “petti-” with the meaning of “small”, as in the word “petticoat”.

Down

1 Nobleman above un conte : DUCA

The Italian word for “duke” is “duca”.

“Conte” is Italian for “count”, with “contessa” translating as “countess”.

3 Dickens orphan : NELL

“The Old Curiosity Shop” by Charles Dickens tells the story of 14-year-old “Little Nell” Trent and her grandfather who live in the Old Curiosity Shop in London. If you visit London, there actually is an “Old Curiosity Shop”, in Westminster. It is an establishment selling odds and ends, old curiosities, and is believed to have been the inspiration for the shop in the Dickens story. The building has been around since the 1500s, but the name “The Old Curiosity Shop” was added after the book was published.

6 Certain Thanksgiving turkey serving : LEG

The tradition of the US President “pardoning” a Thanksgiving turkey was only formalized in 1989, during the administration of President George H, W. Bush. The pardoned turkey is taken to a farm where is gets to live out its life. Prior to 1989, the tradition was more focused on the presentation of a turkey to the White House, and less on the fate of the bird. President Eisenhower was presented with a turkey in each year of his two terms, and he ate them all …

8 Founder of New York’s Odditorium in 1939 : RIPLEY

“Ripley’s Believe It or Not!” is a huge franchise on television that is affiliated to a worldwide chain of museums. The franchise started out as cartoon feature appearing in newspapers in 1918.

10 Les Aléoutiennes, e.g. : ILES

In French, “Les Aléoutiennes” (the Aleutians) are “îles” (islands).

13 Sitcom/film star who was named People’s “Most Beautiful Woman” twice : ANISTON

Jennifer Aniston won a 2002 Emmy for playing Rachel on the great sitcom “Friends”. Jennifer’s parents are both actors, and her godfather was the actor Telly Savalas.

15 Chicory variety : ENDIVE

Endive is a leaf vegetable belonging to the chicory genus, and so is in the daisy family. Endive is also known as “escarole”.

17 Elevator near an arch? : HEEL

Those would be parts of a shoe.

18 Something that can be performed da capo : ARIA

An “aria da capo” is an operatic aria which has three sections, with the final section being very similar to the first, a “recap” as it were. This form was very popular during the Baroque era. The composer quite often wrote out the first and second sections in full, and then simply specified “da capo” for the third section (literally “from the head”) indicating that the first section should be played and sung again in full.

19 Campus abutting Drexel, informally : PENN

The University of Pennsylvania (also “Penn” and “UPenn”) was founded in 1740 by Benjamin Franklin. Penn was the first school in the country to offer both graduate and undergraduate courses. Penn’s sports teams are known as the Quakers, and sometimes the Red & Blue.

Drexel University is a private school in Philadelphia, but with a campus in Sacramento. It was founded in 1891 by philanthropist Anthony J. Drexel who was a Philadelphia financier. The school was originally known as the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry.

27 Pal : AMIGO

In Spanish, an “amigo” is a male friend, and an “amiga” is a female friend.

29 What all NaCl molecules have : IONIC BONDS

Sodium chloride (NaCl, common salt) is an ionic compound. It comprises a crystal lattice made up of large chloride (Cl) ions in a cubic structure, with smaller sodium (Na) ions in between the chlorides.

33 Steinbeck family : JOADS

John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath” is set during the Great Depression. The novel tells the story of the Joad family from Oklahoma, farmers who had to leave their home and head for California due to economic hardship.

34 Blake who composed “I’m Just Wild About Harry” : EUBIE

James Hubert “Eubie” Blake was a composer and pianist from Baltimore, Maryland. Blake was a noted composer and performer of ragtime music. The 1978 musical revue “Eubie!” features his music. Apparently Blake claimed to have started smoking cigarettes at the age of 10 years, and died 85 years later in 1983. Blake’s celebrity status and long life as a smoker was often cited by politicians who opposed anti-tobacco legislation.

35 Early employer of Steve Jobs : ATARI

Steve Jobs certainly was a business icon in Silicon Valley. I don’t think it is too surprising to learn that the brilliant Jobs didn’t even finish his college education, dropping out of Reed College in Oregon after only one semester. Steve Jobs co-founded Apple in 1976, but in 1985 he was basically fired from his own company during the computer sales slump in the mid-eighties. Jobs then founded NeXT Computer, a company focused on supplying workstations to the higher education and business markets. Apple purchased NeXT in 1996, and that’s how Jobs found himself back with his original company.

36 Head residents? : LICE

Lice (singular “louse”) are small wingless insects, of which there are thousands of species. There are three species of lice affecting humans, i.e. head lice, body lice and pubic lice. Most lice feed on dead skin found on the body of the host animal, although some feed on blood. Ick …

38 Spherical bacterium : COCCUS

Bacteria can be classified into three groups, according to shape:

  • Round-shaped (coccus)
  • Rod-shaped (bacillus)
  • Spiral-shaped

39 Not regularly standing : AD HOC

The Latin phrase “ad hoc” means “for this purpose”. An ad hoc committee, for example, is formed for a specific purpose and disbanded after making its final report.

41 Cousins of kites : ERNES

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also known as the white-tailed eagle or the sea eagle.

Kites are birds of prey that feed mainly on carrion.

43 Bird on California’s state quarter : CONDOR

The condor is actually a vulture, and is the largest flying land bird in the Western Hemisphere. There are two species, the Andean Condor found in the Andes in South America, and the California Condor found in the west of the US and Mexico.

46 Satisfies : SLAKES

To slake is to satisfy a craving, as in “slaking one’s thirst”.

49 Standard features of almanacs : TIDE TABLES

Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon’s effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon’s gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

51 Department capital SE of Paris : TROYES

The city of Troyes is located on the River Seine just under 100 miles southeast of Paris. The popular board game called “Troyes” was released in 2010 and is named for the historic city.

53 2004 sci-fi thriller inspired by a classic 1950 book : I, ROBOT

“I, Robot” is an interesting 2004 science fiction film starring Will Smith that is loosely based on the excellent collection of short stories of the same name by Isaac Asimov.

Science fiction author Isaac Asimov wrote a marvelous collection of short stories called “I, Robot” that were first published together in 1950. In the stories, he makes repeated reference to the Three Laws of Robotics, which he introduced in the story “Runaround”, first published in 1942. The three laws are:

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

56 Bigeye, on some menus : AHI

Yellowfin and bigeye tuna are usually marketed as “ahi”, the Hawaiian name. They are both big fish, with yellowfish tuna often weighing over 300 pounds, and bigeye tuna getting up to 400 pounds.

58 Wine components : ESTERS

Esters are very common chemicals. The smaller, low-molecular weight esters are usually pleasant smelling and are often found in perfumes. At the other end of the scale, the higher-molecular weight nitroglycerin is a nitrate ester and is very explosive, and polyester is a huge molecule and is a type of plastic. Fats and oils found in nature are fatty acid esters of glycerol known as glycerides.

59 Mother ___ : TERESA

Mother Teresa was born in 1910 in the city that is now called Skopje, the capital of Macedonia. At birth she was given the names Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu (“Gonxha” means “little flower” in Albanian). She left home at the age of 18 and joined the Sisters of Loreto, and headed to Loreto Abbey in Rathfarnham in Dublin, Ireland in order to learn English. Her goal was to teach in India, and English was the language used there for instruction by the nuns. After Mother Teresa passed away in 1997 she was beatified by Pope John Paul II. She was canonized by Pope Francis in 2016, and is now known as Saint Teresa of Calcutta.

64 Par ___ : AVION

“Par avion” is a French term meaning “by airplane”. We’re used to seeing “par avion” on a blue sticker under the words “Air Mail” on our mail.

68 Shade akin to turquoise : TEAL

The beautiful color teal takes it name from the duck called a teal, which has dark greenish-blue (teal) markings on its head and wings.

70 Word after old or dog : … DAYS

“Dog Days” is the term given to the warmest and most humid days of summer. The term derives from the ancient belief that hot weather was caused when Sirius (the Dog Star) was in close proximity to the sun.

71 Longtime dairy aisle mascot : ELSIE

Elsie the Cow is the mascot of the Borden Company. Elsie first appeared at the New York World’s Fair in 1939, introduced to symbolize the perfect dairy product. She is so famous and respected that she has been awarded the degrees of Doctor of Bovinity, Doctor of Human Kindness and Doctor of Ecownomics. Elsie was also given a husband named Elmer the Bull. Elmer eventually moved over to the chemical division of Borden where he gave his name to Elmer’s Glue.

76 Onetime Procter & Gamble product on Time magazine’s list of “The 50 Worst Inventions” : OLESTRA

Olean is a brand name for the fat substitute, Olestra. Naturally-occurring fats are made of a glycerol molecule holding together three fatty acids. Olestra is instead made of several fatty acid chains held together by a sucrose molecule. Olestra has a similar taste and consistency as natural fat, but has zero caloric impact as it is too large a molecule to pass through the intestinal wall and passes right out of the body. Personally, I would steer clear of it. Olestra is banned in Britain and Canada due to concerns about side effects, but I guess someone knows the right palms to grease (pun intended!) here in the US, and so it’s in our food.

79 Rare and valuable instruments : AMATIS

The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons, Antonio and Girolamo. In turn, the two brothers were succeeded by Girolamo’s son Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another was the famed Antonio Stradivari.

80 Like restaurants with three Michelin stars : NICEST

Michelin is a manufacturer of tires that is based in France. The company was founded by brothers Édouard and André Michelin in 1888. The brothers were running a rubber factory at the time, and invented the world’s first removable pneumatic tire, an invention that they used to launch their new company. Michelin is also noted for rating restaurants and accommodation in its famous Michelin Travel Guides, awarding coveted Michelin “stars”.

81 Usurper : SEIZER

To usurp is to seize and hold by force. The term “usurp” comes to us from Latin via French, from “usus” (a use) and “rapere” (to seize).

82 Amplifier of radio signals : TRIODE

A triode is like a diode, in that it has a cathode from which electrons flow to the anode. However, there is a third terminal, called a grid, between the cathode and anode. By applying a potential to the grid, the flow of electrons can be regulated.

84 Mild, light-colored cigar : CLARO

A claro is mild cigar made with light-colored tobacco. The name “claro” comes from the Spanish for “clear”.

85 German industrial region : SAAR

The Saar is a river that rises on the border between Alsace and Lorraine in France, flows through western Germany and finally enters the Moselle. Historically the Saar river valley was an important source for coal, iron and steel.

86 Dolly in “Hello, Dolly!,” e.g. : ALTO

“Hello, Dolly!” is a Broadway musical that was first produced in 1964, and adapted into a hugely successful movie in 1969. The title role of Dolly Levi was played by Barbra Streisand in the film, with Gene Kelly directing and a leading part for a young Michael Crawford. The stage show was revived on Broadway in 2017, with Bette Midler in the title role.

87 Paris’s Place ___ Bastille : DE LA

The Bastille is a former fortress in Paris that was used as a prison by the kings of France. On 14 July 1789, an angry mob stormed the Bastille during the French Revolution. The mob was actually after the stores of gunpowder in the fortress, but while inside the building freed seven prisoners and killed the Bastille’s governor. The storming of the Bastille became a symbol of the French Revolution and has been celebrated in France on every July 14th since 1790. That celebration is referred to as “la fête nationale” (the national day) in France, but in English-speaking countries it is usually known as “Bastille Day”.

88 Neighbor of Lucy and Ricky on “I Love Lucy” : FRED

In the hit television show “I Love Lucy”, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz play Lucy and Ricky Ricardo. The Ricardos’ best friends are also their landlords, Fred and Ethel Mertz. The Mertzes are played by William Frawley and Vivian Vance.

90 Nanny, in Nanjing : AMAH

“Amah” is an interesting word in that we associate it so much with Asian culture and yet the term actually comes from the Portuguese “ama” meaning “nurse”. Ama was imported into English in the days of the British Raj in India when a wet-nurse became known as an amah.

Nanjing is a city in eastern China that has been the nation’s capital several times. The name “Nanjing” means “southern capital”, whereas “Beijing” translates as “northern capital”.

96 Publication whose first ed. took more than 70 years to complete : OED

Work started on what was to become the first “Oxford English Dictionary” (OED) in 1857. Several interim versions of the dictionary were published in the coming years with the first full version appearing, in ten bound volumes, in 1928. The second edition of the OED appeared in 1989 and is made up of twenty volumes. The OED was first published in electronic form in 1988 and went online in 2000. Given the modern use of computers, the publishing house responsible feels that there will never be a third print version of the famous dictionary.

99 “Don’t text and drive” ad, e.g., in brief : PSA

Public service announcement (PSA)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Bondsman, of late? : DANIEL CRAIG
12 Unfold : TAKE SHAPE
21 It has some miles on it : USED VEHICLE
22 Not yet in the database : UNENTERED
23 A.P. courses, e.g. : COLLEGE PREP
24 Summer camp activity : TIE-DYEING
25 Emily Dickinson’s “I heard ___ buzz – when I died” : A FLY
26 Wonder-working biblical prophet : ELISHA
28 Creator of Mike Hammer : SPILLANE
29 Cross : IRKED
31 In the mood for love : AMATIVE
33 Main theme of “Othello” : JEALOUSY
37 Climax of “The Shawshank Redemption” : PRISON ESCAPE
42 Picnic, e.g. : OUTING
43 Bumming, as cigarettes : CADGING
44 Rotting evidence : ODOR
45 Clicking counters : ABACI
46 Lacking : SHORT OF
48 Imprint permanently : ETCH IN
50 Means of communication without interference : DIRECT LINE
52 Insulation and sealing material : SILICONE
54 Thrice due : SEI
55 Not generics : BRAND-NAME PRODUCTS
59 Went skiing : TOOK TO THE SLOPES
60 Hit 1997 film condemned by the Chinese government : SEVEN YEARS IN TIBET
63 Fixture in a chocolate factory : VAT
66 Least normal : WEIRDEST
67 Like some arts : DECORATIVE
69 James who starred in 1970s TV’s “How the West Was Won” : ARNESS
70 Name originally proposed (but not adopted) for Utah : DESERET
73 Paint a false picture of : BELIE
74 Weigh station lineup : RIGS
75 Fuel-carrying ships : COALERS
77 Event that usually has gate crashers? : SLALOM
78 Methods of studying pooled data : META-ANALYSES
81 Peak in 1980 headlines : ST HELENS
83 Representation of the real world in literature and art : MIMESIS
84 NASA’s spacecraft Dawn began orbiting it in 2015 : CERES
85 Clowns sometimes put them on : SAD FACES
89 List-ending phrase : ET ALII
91 Big to-do : FLAP
95 Given a heads-up about : ALERTED TO
97 Subscription service with an arrow in its logo : AMAZON PRIME
100 Free : AT LEISURE
101 Something that’s not contracted very often : RARE DISEASE
102 Partly sheltered area near land in which vessels ride at anchor : ROADSTEAD
103 Petty officers on police duty while a ship is in port : SHORE PATROL

Down

1 Nobleman above un conte : DUCA
2 From : AS OF
3 Dickens orphan : NELL
4 One way to stand by : IDLY
5 Anticipatory time : EVE
6 Certain Thanksgiving turkey serving : LEG
7 “Nice and rosy” things in the song “Sleigh Ride” : CHEEKS
8 Founder of New York’s Odditorium in 1939 : RIPLEY
9 Like burning rubber : ACRID
10 Les Aléoutiennes, e.g. : ILES
11 House minority leader before Pelosi (1995-2003) : GEPHARDT
12 Half of a reproach : TUT
13 Sitcom/film star who was named People’s “Most Beautiful Woman” twice : ANISTON
14 Staying fresh : KEEPING
15 Chicory variety : ENDIVE
16 Topics for fashion magazines : STYLES
17 Elevator near an arch? : HEEL
18 Something that can be performed da capo : ARIA
19 Campus abutting Drexel, informally : PENN
20 Beat by a whisker : EDGE
27 Pal : AMIGO
29 What all NaCl molecules have : IONIC BONDS
30 Persian, e.g. : RUG
32 “Yeah, right!” : AS IF!
33 Steinbeck family : JOADS
34 Blake who composed “I’m Just Wild About Harry” : EUBIE
35 Early employer of Steve Jobs : ATARI
36 Head residents? : LICE
37 Many T-ball coaches : PARENTS
38 Spherical bacterium : COCCUS
39 Not regularly standing : AD HOC
40 Something to drive home : POINT
41 Cousins of kites : ERNES
43 Bird on California’s state quarter : CONDOR
46 Satisfies : SLAKES
47 Suggest : HINT AT
48 Running mate? : ELOPER
49 Standard features of almanacs : TIDE TABLES
51 Department capital SE of Paris : TROYES
52 Get married, in slang : SPLICE
53 2004 sci-fi thriller inspired by a classic 1950 book : I, ROBOT
56 Bigeye, on some menus : AHI
57 Some sewers : MENDERS
58 Wine components : ESTERS
59 Mother ___ : TERESA
60 Buzzy body? : SWARM
61 Like some coincidences : EERIE
62 French for “twenty” : VINGT
63 End of many town names : -VILLE
64 Par ___ : AVION
65 Is thick (with) : TEEMS
68 Shade akin to turquoise : TEAL
70 Word after old or dog : … DAYS
71 Longtime dairy aisle mascot : ELSIE
72 What a big sock might make you do : SEE STARS
75 Reached maturity : CAME DUE
76 Onetime Procter & Gamble product on Time magazine’s list of “The 50 Worst Inventions” : OLESTRA
77 “___ Said,” 2019 best seller on the #MeToo movement : SHE
79 Rare and valuable instruments : AMATIS
80 Like restaurants with three Michelin stars : NICEST
81 Usurper : SEIZER
82 Amplifier of radio signals : TRIODE
84 Mild, light-colored cigar : CLARO
85 German industrial region : SAAR
86 Dolly in “Hello, Dolly!,” e.g. : ALTO
87 Paris’s Place ___ Bastille : DE LA
88 Neighbor of Lucy and Ricky on “I Love Lucy” : FRED
90 Nanny, in Nanjing : AMAH
91 Lose sleep, so to speak : FRET
92 “Not true!” : LIAR!
93 Schoolyard retort : AM SO!
94 Spa offering : PEEL
96 Publication whose first ed. took more than 70 years to complete : OED
98 Beat by a whisker : NIP
99 “Don’t text and drive” ad, e.g., in brief : PSA

10 thoughts on “1124-19 NY Times Crossword 24 Nov 19, Sunday”

  1. 48:27. One look up. Toughest for me was lower left. Finally had to look up SAAR to finish. These themeless Sunday puzzles are brutal.

    SPLICE for “get married”? Really?

    Best –

  2. 39:06, no errors. Very difficult puzzle for me, wasn’t even sure I had everything correct at the end (my pencil doesn’t give an all finished alert). Several wrong initial guesses made the puzzle more difficult: TAKES PLACE before TAKES SHAPE; TSK before TUT; AMOROUS before AMATIVE; NAME BRAND PRODUCTS before BRAND NAME PRODUCTS; RUHR before SAAR; just to name a few.

    Still don’t care for the heavy reliance on foreign languages.

  3. My paper said this was a record for a Sunday puzzle as it only had 122 answers. Seeing as how there were 202 clues I’m not sure how that can be.

    1. There are not 202 clues as there is not a clue for each number. For example there is 1 Across and then 12 Across. That skips 10 numbers right away.

      1. Actually, this explanation a little off. There is a clue for each number, some for an “across” entry and some for a “down” entry (and some numbers do double duty, being used for both an “across” clue and a “down” clue). In any case, the above explanation does correctly point out that, in each list, some numbers are missing, so you can’t just add the largest numbers in the two lists to get the full number of entries/clues.

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