0830-19 NY Times Crossword 30 Aug 19, Friday

Constructed by: Trent H. Evans
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: None

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 15m 45s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

11 One with a handle on the transportation industry? : CB’ER

A CB’er is someone who operates a citizens’ band (CB) radio. In 1945, the FCC set aside certain radio frequencies for the personal use of citizens. The use of the Citizens’ Band increased throughout the seventies as advances in electronics brought down the size of transceivers and their cost. There aren’t many CB radios sold these days though, as they have largely been replaced by cell phones.

15 Alternative to Mountain Dew : MELLO YELLO

Like so many beverages introduced by the Coca-Cola Company, Mello Yello was launched to compete against a successful drink already on the market. Mello Yello first hit the shelves in 1979, and was designed to take market share from Pepsico’s “Mountain Dew”.

19 X or Y preceder : GEN-

The term “Generation X” originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication “Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture”. By one definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

The Millennial Generation are sometimes referred to as “Generation Y” (Gen-Y). Millennials were born after the “Gen-Xers”, from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.

20 Walks or runs : STAT

That would be baseball.

22 Like a Hail Mary pass : ARCED

A Hail Mary pass (also called “the long bomb”) is a desperation move in American football in which a long pass is thrown with very little chance of success, right at the end of a game or at the end of a half. The term dates back to the thirties, and was probably first used at Notre Dame. The “Hail Mary” is a prayer in the Christian tradition that is of particular significance Roman Catholicism.

27 Kissing in a restaurant or on a bus, for short : PDA

Public display of affection (PDA)

28 Lad : SHAVER

“Shaver” is a slang term for a “fellow”, from the sense of “one who shaves”.

34 Bit of protective wear? : AMULET

Amulets are items worn to ward off disease or to protect against harmful magical spells.

35 Name given to toughen up a boy, in a song : SUE

“A Boy Named Sue” is a classic song by Shel Silverstein that was made famous by Johnny Cash. Famously, Cash recorded the song at a live concert he gave in 1969 at San Quentin State Prison.

39 Writer Deighton : LEN

I used to walk my dog right past author Len Deighton’s house years ago, as we lived in the same seaside village in Ireland (probably my only claim to “fame”). Deighton wrote the excellent espionage thriller “The IPCRESS File”, which was made into a 1965 movie starring Michael Caine.

42 Bris officiant : MOHEL

A mohel is a man who has been trained in the practice of brit milah (circumcision). Brit milah is known as “bris” in Yiddish. The brit milah ceremony is performed on male infants when they are 8-days old.

46 Paparazzi targets, briefly : CELEBS

The title of the celebrated 1960 Federico Fellini film “La Dolce Vita” translates from Italian as “The Good Life”. There is a character in the film called Paparazzo who is a news photographer. It is this character who gives us our word “Paparazzi”, a term used for photographers who make careers out of taking candid shots of celebrities.

49 Orch. section : STR

An orchestra (orch.) has a string (str.) section.

56 Gospel singer Winans : CECE

CeCe Winans (real name “Priscilla”) is a Gospel music singer. She is part of a duo with her brother, BeBe Winans (real name Benjamin).

58 ___ Balls (Hostess product) : SNO

The Hostess cakes called Sno Balls are usually pink in color, although in its original form each packet of two cakes contained one white and one pink. Around Halloween you can buy Sno Balls in the form of Scary Cakes and Glo Balls that are colored orange and green. and on St. Paddy’s Day there’s a green one available. Yoo hoo!

59 Ancient Norse work : EDDA

The Poetic Edda and Prose Edda are two ancient works that are the source for much of Norse mythology. Both Eddas were written in the 13th century in Iceland.

64 Question always best answered “no” : DO I LOOK FAT?
Oh, yes I do …

Down

1 End of fraternity row? : OMEGA

Omega is the last letter of the Greek alphabet and is the one that looks like a horseshoe when in uppercase. The lowercase omega looks like a Latin W. The word “omega” literally means “great O” (O-mega). Compare this with the Greek letter Omicron, meaning “little O” (O-micron).

2 101, 102 and others : FEVERS

The medical symptom of elevated body temperature is called fever, febrile response or pyrexia.

8 Related to the hip : ILIAL

The sacrum and the two ilia are three bones in the human pelvis.

9 Set at a cocktail party : FLUTES

The narrow bowl of a champagne flute is preferred over the wide bowl of a champagne coupe as the smaller surface area of the wine helps retain its carbonation.

10 Canon camera : EOS

I’ve been using Canon EOS cameras for decades now, and have nothing but good things to say about both the cameras and the lenses. The EOS name stands for Electro-Optical System, and was chosen because it evokes the name of Eos, the Titan goddess of dawn from Greek mythology.

12 Home of the Met … or the Mets : BIG APPLE

Apparently, the first published use of the term “Big Apple” to describe New York City dates back to 1909. Edward Martin wrote the following in his book “The Wayfarer in New York”:

Kansas is apt to see in New York a greedy city. . . . It inclines to think that the big apple gets a disproportionate share of the national sap.

Over ten years later, the term “big apple” was used as a nickname for racetracks in and around New York City. However, the concerted effort to “brand” the city as the Big Apple had to wait until the seventies and was the work of the New York Convention and Visitors Bureau.

The Metropolitan Opera (often simply “the Met”) of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you …

The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962 as a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then along came the “Miracle Mets” (aka “Amazin’ Mets”) who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

13 “Hunger Games” protagonist Katniss ___ : EVERDEEN

Katniss Everdeen is a protagonist in “The Hunger Games” trilogy by Suzanne Collins. The character’s name is taken from the edible plant called katniss. On the big screen, Everdeen is played by actress Jennifer Lawrence.

24 TiVo, for one : DVR

TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world’s first commercially successful digital video recorder (DVR).

29 One edition of The Wall Street Journal : EUROPE

“The Wall Street Journal” (WSJ) is a daily newspaper with a business bent that is published in New York City by Dow Jones & Company. The WSJ has a larger US circulation than any other newspaper, with “USA Today” coming in a close second place.

31 Retro hairstyle : MULLET

A mullet haircut is one that is short at the front and sides, and is long in the back.

33 Uncle ___ : SAM

The Uncle Sam personification of the United States was first used during the War of 1812. The “Uncle Sam” term was so widely accepted that even the Germans used it during WWII, choosing the code word “Samland” for “America” in intelligence communiques.

43 Two-time U.S. Open champ of the 1990s : ELS

Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. He is a former World No. 1 and has won four majors: the US Open (1994 & 1997) and the British Open (2002 & 2012).

45 French leader after Hollande : MACRON

When Emmanuel Macron became President of France in 2017, he was 39 years of age, and so became the youngest person to ever hold that office.

François Hollande was elected President of France in 2012. During the election cycle in 2011, Hollande had been trailing in the polls behind front-runner Dominique Strauss-Kahn. Hollande took over the lead following Strauss-Kahn’s arrest on New York City on suspicion of sexual assault.

48 “Where the Wild Things Are” author : SENDAK

Maurice Sendak is an American writer and illustrator of children’s books. Sendak’s best known work is “Where the Wild Things Are”, published in 1963. The “Wild Things” of the tale are beasts conjured up in the imagination of a young boy named Max, after he is sent to bed without supper.

55 X-ray units : RADS

A rad is a unit used to measure radiation levels that is largely obsolete now. The “rad” has been superseded by the “rem”.

57 Popular “Star Wars” doll : EWOK

The Ewoks are creatures that live on the moon of Endor in the “Star Wars” universe. First appearing in “Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi”, they’re the cute and cuddly little guys that look like teddy bears.

61 Problem for an infielder, maybe : HOP

That would be baseball.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Certain “work spouse” : OFFICE WIFE
11 One with a handle on the transportation industry? : CB’ER
15 Alternative to Mountain Dew : MELLO YELLO
16 Caption on breaking news : LIVE
17 One who might cackle “Mwa-ha-ha-ha!” : EVIL GENIUS
18 Years and years : AGES
19 X or Y preceder : GEN-
20 Walks or runs : STAT
21 “Nice thinking!” : SMART!
22 Like a Hail Mary pass : ARCED
25 Amplify, with “out” : FLESH …
27 Kissing in a restaurant or on a bus, for short : PDA
28 Lad : SHAVER
30 Scurry : SCAMPER
32 Levels : TRUES
34 Bit of protective wear? : AMULET
35 Name given to toughen up a boy, in a song : SUE
37 What a person with a poker face doesn’t do : REACT
39 Writer Deighton : LEN
40 With complete care : JUST SO
42 Bris officiant : MOHEL
44 Friday and Saturday Broadway showtime : EIGHT PM
46 Paparazzi targets, briefly : CELEBS
49 Orch. section : STR
50 Island of myth in Homer’s “Odyssey” : AEAEA
52 Soak : STEEP
54 On the verge of crying : TEARY
56 Gospel singer Winans : CECE
58 ___ Balls (Hostess product) : SNO
59 Ancient Norse work : EDDA
60 Old Native American carvings : ARROWHEADS
63 Like comments that require apologies : RUED
64 Question always best answered “no” : DO I LOOK FAT?
65 Springs : SPAS
66 Previews : SNEAK PEEKS

Down

1 End of fraternity row? : OMEGA
2 101, 102 and others : FEVERS
3 Draw back : FLINCH
4 “___ say!” : I’LL
5 Small part of the works : COG
6 Things in orbits : EYES
7 Was released : WENT FREE
8 Related to the hip : ILIAL
9 Set at a cocktail party : FLUTES
10 Canon camera : EOS
11 Shut (up) : CLAM
12 Home of the Met … or the Mets : BIG APPLE
13 “Hunger Games” protagonist Katniss ___ : EVERDEEN
14 Common fix for computer problems : RESTART
21 Bogus : SHAM
23 Consumes, biblically : EATETH
24 TiVo, for one : DVR
26 Give a withering review : SCATHE
29 One edition of The Wall Street Journal : EUROPE
31 Retro hairstyle : MULLET
33 Uncle ___ : SAM
35 Dressed for the game : SUITED UP
36 Highest-quality, according to govt. food regulators : US GRADE A
38 Longest continuous sponsor of the Olympics (since 1928) : COCA COLA
40 Court players : JESTERS
41 Pause in a legal process : STAY
43 Two-time U.S. Open champ of the 1990s : ELS
45 French leader after Hollande : MACRON
47 “Take care!” : BE SAFE!
48 “Where the Wild Things Are” author : SENDAK
51 Spooky : EERIE
53 Parts of earrings : POSTS
55 X-ray units : RADS
57 Popular “Star Wars” doll : EWOK
60 Them’s the breaks! : ADS
61 Problem for an infielder, maybe : HOP
62 Barely manage, with “out” : EKE

16 thoughts on “0830-19 NY Times Crossword 30 Aug 19, Friday”

  1. 24:02….never heard of “flesh out” for amplify, but I finished a Friday in less than an hour, so I’m happy 👍

      1. Mr. Butler, I never finish the NYT in anywhere near your time. But sometimes I like to smile at myself when I catch you in some minor error! Seriously, thank you for this blog…I read it everyday! I learn a lot from your comments. Go raibh maith agat! (I hope that app worked) 🙂

  2. 16:54, no errors. Interrupted by a phone call that I had to take. (Grrr … 😳😜) I’ve deducted the two minutes it took me to deal with it.

  3. 29:24. One of those – “it was easy and straightforward except when it wasn’t” puzzles. 101, 102…I had “levels” for that as in physics 101 and physics 102…etc. Took me a while to get FEVERS.

    64A reminded me of the riddle “to what question can you never give the answer “yes” truthfully?”…Answer: “Are you asleep?” But that didn’t fit. DO I LOOK FAT was more amusing anyway.

    Best –

  4. 58:03 no errors….I stared at the upper right corner for a long time until CBER finally came to me…also never heard of AEAEA but it will be in my “notes” for future reference

  5. No matter how you answer the Fat question, you will be in trouble. A woman I knew asked that once as she was coming down the stairs, and I luckily had a drink it my hand, so I spilled a little and jumped up to wipe it up, making enough fuss to avoid the question. Try telling some one, no, it isn’t the dress.
    By the way, the dress she had on was just plain unattractive, but she was not fat

  6. 15:26, no errors. The N in LEN/EVERDEEN was a total guess; and AEAEN was filled entirely by crosses. Just happened to be in sync with the setter on most of the long entries. 18A entered AEON before AGES; and FREAK before FLESH in 25A.

    I’m from an era where PDA meant Personal Digital Assistant. The EWOK’s started my falling out with the Star Wars series; break up was complete with Jar Jar Binks.

    It’s true, never answer the question ‘DO I LOOK FAT?’ with a yes. I usually answer: You look great!. On a completely different note, I never made the connection between omicron and OMEGA. 😉

  7. Took more time than usual to finish this challenging and mostly enjoyable Friday puzzle. Saturday? We’ll see …. or won’t.

  8. I also never heard of AEAEA; got it by crosses. But what I couldn’t wrap my head around was 63A — was convinced it had to be RUDE, then thought the setter had misdefined RUED, then FINALLY got to aha! a comment that you might rue. Funny how you get hung up on something and can’t see past it….

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