0818-19 NY Times Crossword 18 Aug 19, Sunday

Constructed by: David Steinberg
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Revolutionary

Themed answers take four 90-degree TURNS at the letters circled in the grid. Those letters spell out the word “BALL”:

  • 24A Drives around awhile … as suggested by this puzzle’s circled squares? : GOES FOR A SPIN
  • 119A 1965 #1 Byrds hit … as suggested by this puzzle’s circled squares? : TURN! TURN! TURN!
  • 3D Kicks things off : GETS THE BALL ROLLING
  • 20D 1973 play featuring a sign with a burned-out “E” : THE HOT L BALTIMORE
  • 42D Baker or dry cleaner, maybe : SMALL BUSINESS OWNER
  • 49D Full of empty talk : ALL BARK AND NO BITE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 21m 15s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

14 Book in a mosque : QURAN

The Koran is also known as the “Qur’an” and “Quran” in English. “Qur’an” a transliteration of the Arabic name for the holy text of the Muslim faith. The literal translation of “Koran” is “the recitation”.

19 Antarctic mass : ICE SHEET

The polar ice cap at the north of our planet is floating pack ice in the Arctic Ocean. The southern polar ice cap is an ice sheet that covers the landmass known as Antarctica. About 70% of all the freshwater on Earth is held in the southern polar ice cap.

21 Major British tabloid : THE SUN

“The Sun” tabloid newspaper has the largest circulation of any daily newspaper in Britain. “The Sun” was the paper that introduced the infamous “Page 3”, a page almost completely taken up with a photo of a topless model. The feature was finally pulled in 2015, after 40 years.

26 If’s counterpart, in programming : ELSE

In the world of computer programming, an “if-then-else” construct is a type of conditional statement. The idea is that IF a particular condition is met THEN a particular action is executed. The additional ELSE statement can be used to define an alternative action.

27 “S.N.L.” alum Cheri : OTERI

Cheri Oteri was the SNL (“Saturday Night Live”) cast member who regularly appeared with Will Ferrell in the skit featuring a pair of Spartan cheerleaders.

29 Military alert system : DEFCON

The US military uses the DEFCON scale to move to different stages of readiness (DEFCON: the defense readiness condition). DEFCON 5 denotes normal peacetime readiness. DEFCON 1 is maximum readiness. The scale was created in 1959 by the Joint Chiefs. The highest DEFCON level ever reached (as far as we public folk know) was DEFCON 2 during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, although this only applied to Strategic Air Command. The military reached DEFCON 3 during the Yom Kippur War, and also during the attacks of September 11, 2001.

34 “Today” co-host Hoda : KOTB

Hoda Kotb is an Egyptian-American television journalist who is perhaps best known as co-host of the NBC morning show “Today”. She is also the author of the bestselling autobiography “Hoda: How I Survived War Zones, Bad Hair, Cancer, and Kathie Lee”.

51 Many a Stan Lee film role : CAMEO

Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to playing himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning it’s easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board. If you like superhero movies based on the characters from Marvel Comics, then you could spend a few hours trying to spot Stan Lee in those films as he had a penchant for making cameo appearances. Lee can be spotted in “X-Men” (2000), “Spider-Man” (2002), “Hulk” (2003), “Fantastic Four” (2005), “Iron Man” (2008) and many other films.

52 Capital NE of Casablanca : RABAT

Rabat is the capital city of the Kingdom of Morocco. After WWII, the United States maintained a major Air Force Base in Rabat, part of Strategic Air Command (SAC). Responding to pressure from the Moroccan government of King Mohammed V, the USAF pulled out in 1963.

Casablanca is a major city in western Morocco and sits on the Atlantic coast in Northern Africa. It is the country’s largest city (although the capital is Rabat), and the country’s largest port.

53 Idris of “The Dark Tower” : ELBA

English actor Idris Elba plays the drug lord Stringer Bell in the marvelous HBO drama series “The Wire”, and played the title character in the 2013 film “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”. Off the screen, Elba occasionally appears as a disk jockey using the name “DJ Big Driis”.

55 Ones or tens place : TILL

What we usually call a cash register here in North America, we mostly call a “till” in Ireland and the UK. I haven’t heard the word “till” used much here in that sense.

57 Wafer brand : NILLA

As one might expect, “Nilla” is a shortened form of “vanilla”. However, you won’t find any vanilla in Nilla brand cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, which is synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred …?

61 Beginning of the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet : ABLE

The Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet was introduced in 1941 and used by all branches of the US military until they transitioned to what’s usually referred to as the NATO phonetic alphabet. The Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet starts with Able, Baker, Charlie and ends with X-ray, Yoke, Zebra.

62 Camera type, for short : SLR

Single-lens reflex camera (SLR)

67 River through Pakistan : INDUS

The Indus river rises in Tibet and flows through the length of Pakistan before emptying into the Arabian Sea, a part of the Indian Ocean lying to the west of the Indian subcontinent. The Indus gives its name to the country of India as “India” used to be the name of the region along the eastern banks of the river, which paradoxically is now in modern-day Pakistan.

69 Sea creatures that may employ camouflage when hunting : OCTOPI

The name “octopus” comes from the Greek for “eight-footed”. The most common plural used is “octopuses”, although the Greek plural form “octopodes” is also quite correct. The plural “octopi” isn’t really correct as the inference is that “octopus” is like a second-declension Latin noun, which it isn’t. That said, dictionaries are now citing “octopi” as an acceptable plural. Language does evolve, even though it drives me crazy …

71 Blood type system : ABO

The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a universal donor.

72 Ones generating buzz in the music world? : KAZOOS

The modern instrument we know today as the kazoo was invented by one Alabama Vest of Macon, Georgia in the 1800s. The kazoo first came to the public’s attention at the Georgia State Fair of 1852, when it was known as the “Down-South Submarine” (because of its shape, I would imagine).

75 Super ___ (game series) : MARIO

Mario Bros. started out as an arcade game back in 1983, developed by Nintendo. The more famous of the two brothers, Mario, had already appeared in an earlier arcade game “Donkey Kong”. Mario was given a brother called Luigi, and the pair have been around ever since. In the game, Mario and Luigi are Italian American plumbers from New York City.

77 Help with a job : ABET

The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (it literally means “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

81 Eco-friendly car introduced in 2011 : VOLT

Despite being late entering the eco-friendly car market, Chevrolet today produces the most fuel-efficient compact car with a gasoline engine that is sold in the US. The Chevrolet Volt went on sale at the end of 2010, and is a plug-in hybrid car that runs on batteries. The Volt has a gasoline engine that can be used to run an electric generator when needed. The Volt also uses a regenerative braking system.

86 First name on the Supreme Court : SONIA

Sonia Sotomayor is the first Hispanic justice on the US Supreme Court, and the third female justice. Sotomayor was nominated by President Barack Obama to replace the retiring Justice David Souter.

90 Dennis the Menace, e.g. : BRAT

“Dennis the Menace” is a comic strip that first appeared in 1951, and was originally drawn by Hank Ketcham. The strip made the jump over the years from the newspaper to television and the silver screen. Dennis’s full name is Dennis Mitchell, and his parents are Henry and Alice (Johnson) Mitchell. Dennis’s nemesis is his neighbor, Mister George Everett Wilson. Hank Ketcham drew his inspiration for the story from his real life. When he introduced the strip he had a 4-year-old son called Dennis, and a wife named Alice.

92 Shooting stars, some think : OMENS

A meteoroid is a small rocky or metallic body travelling through space. Once in the atmosphere, the meteoroid is referred to as a “meteor” or “shooting star”. Almost all meteoroids burn up, but if one is large enough to survive and reach the ground then we call it a meteorite. The word “meteor” comes from the Greek “meteōros” meaning “high in the air”.

93 Kind of salami : GENOA

Genoa salami is made using preservation techniques that originated in ancient Rome.

96 Type units : ENS

In typography, there are em dashes and en dashes. The em dash is about the width of an “m” character, and an en dash about half that, the width of an “n’ character. An en dash is used, for example, to separate numbers designating a range, as in 5-10 years. The em dash seems to be going out of style, and indeed the application I am using to write this paragraph won’t let me show you one!

98 Diamond pattern : ARGYLE

The argyle pattern is based on the Campbell tartan. The Campbell clan is based in the Argyll region (note the spelling) in the west of Scotland, giving the Argyle pattern its name.

100 Slowly, musically : ADAGIO

An adagio is a piece of music with a slow tempo. The “adagio” marking on the score is an instruction to play the piece slowly and in a stately manner. The word “adagio” is Latin for “at ease”.

102 Some are liberal : ARTS

The term “liberal arts” dates back to classical antiquity. The liberal arts were those subjects deemed essential to master for a citizen to take an active part in civil life. “Citizens” were “free people”, hence the use of the term “liberal arts”. The list of subjects studied in olden times were generally sevenfold: grammar, logic, rhetoric, arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy/astrology.

103 Meyers of late-night : SETH

Seth Meyers is an actor and comedian who is perhaps best-known for his appearances on “Saturday Night Live” (SNL), for which program he served as head writer. Meyers now hosts his own late night talk show on NBC.

105 Producer of brown eggs : CADBURY

The Cadbury Creme Egg is the biggest-selling confectionery in the UK from New Year’s Day up to Easter every year, which is no surprise to me. They’re wickedly delicious …

107 Black ___ : OPS

“Black ops” is the name given to covert operations, activities that are usually outside of standard military protocol and may even be against the law. Funding for black ops is usually provided by a secret “black budget”.

117 “Spider-Man” director : RAIMI

Sam Raimi is a very successful director and producer. He was behind the “Spider-Man” series of films among others, and TV series’ such as “Xena: Warrior Princess”.

119 1965 #1 Byrds hit … as suggested by this puzzle’s circled squares? : TURN! TURN! TURN!

There aren’t many pop hits that have lyrics taking almost entirely from the Bible. Pete Seeger took some words from the Book of Ecclesiastes, and set them to music in 1959, using the title “To Everything There Is a Season”. He recorded the song in 1962 for one of his albums. It wasn’t until it was recorded by the Byrds as “Turn! Turn! Turn!” that the song climbed the charts. It’s a nice contemplative song, I always think …

The Byrds were a rock band that formed in Los Angeles in 1964. The band’s most successful songs were cover versions of earlier hits i.e. “Mr. Tambourine Man” (Bob Dylan) and “Turn! Turn! Turn!” (Pete Seeger).

122 Australia’s smallest state : TASMANIA

Tasmania is the large island lying off the southeast coast of Australia. In 1642, the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman became the first European to sail past the island. Tasman named his discovery Van Diemen’s Land after the Governor of the Dutch East Indies, Anthony van Diemen. The name was officially changed to Tasmania, after the discoverer himself, in 1856. In Australia, a more familiar name used is “Tassie”.

124 Upstate New York city : UTICA

Utica in New York is known as “Second Chance City” these days, due to the recent influx of refugees from war-torn parts of the world and from Bosnia in particular. These immigrants have helped revitalize the area and reverse a trend of population loss.

125 Topic of Article I, Section 3 of the Constitution : SENATE

Article One of the US Constitution establishes the US Congress. The second section of Article One establishes the House of Representatives, and the third section establishes the US Senate. Section 8 of Article One lists the powers delegated to the legislature.

127 Wrinkle treatment : BOTOX

Botulinum toxin is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The toxin is a protein that can cause botulism, an extremely dangerous illness in humans and animals. Botulinum toxin is sold under the trade name “Botox”. Botox is used therapeutically and in cosmetic applications to weaken muscles, perhaps muscles that are in an uncontrollable spasm. The cosmetic application involves the paralyzing of facial muscles in order to eliminate or reduce wrinkles, at least for a few months.

128 Shaman, for one : HEALER

A shaman is a supposed intermediary between the human world and the spirit world.

Down

2 Romaine concern : E COLI

Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

Romaine is also known as cos lettuce, with the “romaine” name being most common here in North America.

5 Mortgage org. : FHA

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) was set up in 1934 to insure loans made by lenders for the building and purchasing of homes. The FHA was created in response to the bank failures of the Great Depression, with the intent of creating a more favorable environment for lending.

6 Mountains just south of Yellowstone : TETONS

Grand Teton National Park (NP) is located just south of Yellowstone NP, and a must-see if you are visiting the latter. The park is named after the tallest peak in the magnificent Teton Range known as Grand Teton. The origins of the name “Teton” is not very clear, although my one story is that it was named by French trappers, as the word “tetons” in French is a slang term meaning “breasts”.

7 The Quakers and others : SECTS

Members of the Religious Society of Friends are known as Friends or Quakers. The Christian sect started in England in the 1640s, led by George Fox. The principal tenet at that point was that Christians could have direct experience of Jesus Christ without the mediation of clergy, a reflection of the increasing dissatisfaction with the established church at that time. The term “Quaker” is thought to have been used earlier in reference to foreign religious sects whose followers were given to fits of shaking during religious fervor. Somehow that term became used for members of the Religious Society of Friends.

8 Celebrity socialite : IT GIRL

Clara Bow was a fabulous star of silent film, with her most famous movie being “It” from 1927. Clara Bow’s performance was so celebrated in the movie that she was forever to be known as the “It girl”. The term “it” was a euphemism for “sex appeal”, and that is what Clara Bow was known to “exude”. Bow applied her red lipstick in the shape of a heart, and women who copied this style were said to put on a “Clara Bow”.

9 Comedian Margaret : CHO

Margaret Cho is a very successful stand-up comedian, but she is also a fashion designer with her own line of clothing. Cho acts as well, and you might have seen her in the John Travolta/Nicolas Cage movie “Face/Off” in which she played John Travolta’s FBI colleague.

11 “___ quam videri,” state motto of North Carolina : ESSE

The North Carolina motto “Esse quam videri” translates from Latin as “to be, rather than to seem to be”.

15 ___ Constitution : USS

“Old Ironsides” was a nickname given to the USS Constitution even though she is actually a wooden-hulled ship. The Constitution was launched in 1797 and can still be seen at sea today. She is the oldest commissioned naval vessel in the world. You can visit Old Ironsides at the Boston Navy Yard, where I had the privilege of touring her in 2011. As an old sailor, I’d say she is the best-maintained ship I’ve ever been on, and paradoxically, she is also the oldest. Really, really beautiful …

18 It contains M.S.G.: Abbr. : NY, NY

Madison Square Garden (MSG) is an arena in New York City used for a variety of events. In the world of sports it is home to the New York Rangers of the NHL, as well as the New York Knicks of the NBA. “The Garden” is also the third busiest music venue in the world in terms of ticket sales. The current arena is the fourth structure to bear the name, a name taken from the Madison Square location in Manhattan. In turn, the square was named for James Madison, the fourth President of the US.

20 1973 play featuring a sign with a burned-out “E” : THE HOT L BALTIMORE

“The Hot l Baltimore” is a play by Lanford Wilson about the manager and residents of a dilapidated hotel in Baltimore. The play’s name comes from the establishment’s neon sign which is meant to read “Hotel Baltimore”, but the burnt-out “e” in “Hotel” was never replaced.

25 Part of a king’s guard : ROOK

The corner piece in the game of chess is called a “rook”, a word coming from the Persian “rokh” meaning a “chariot”. The rook has also been called, perhaps incorrectly, the castle, tower, marquess and rector.

28 It charges to do some cleaning : ROOMBA

The Roomba vacuum cleaner is a cool-looking device that navigates its way around a room by itself, picking up dirt as it goes. Like I said, it’s cool-looking but I am not sure how effective it is …

33 Rebellion leader Turner : NAT

Nat Turner was a slave in Virginia who led a slave rebellion in 1831 that led to the deaths of over a hundred people. Half of the casualties were white,and half were black. The 55 white deaths took place on the day of the rebellion as a growing mob of slaves traveled from house-to-house freeing fellow slaves but also killing any white people they came across; men, women and children. The rebellion was suppressed within two days by a white militia. Slaves involved in the rebellion were tried for insurrection and related crimes, and a total of 56 blacks were executed on suspicion of involvement in the uprising. In the aftermath, life for slaves became even more difficult as any freedoms that they had earned were largely curtailed.

40 Baker with the 1986 hit “Sweet Love” : ANITA

Anita Baker is an R&B and soul singer who was raised in Detroit, Michigan. Baker’s most successful song is the Grammy-winning “Sweet Love” that was released in 1986.

44 Garden item that sounds like the plural of another garden item : HOSE

“Hose” sounds like “hoes”.

45 Dispensers at banquets : URNS

A banquet is an elaborate feast. “Banquet” is a term that seems to have reversed in meaning over time. Coming into English via French from Old Italian, “banquet” is derived from “banco” meaning “bench”. The original “banco” meal was simply a snack eaten on a bench, rather than at a table. I guess we eat more these days …

47 Author of “The Lion, the Bear and the Fox” : AESOP

Aesop is remembered today as a fabulist, a writer of fables. Aesop lived in ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

50 Royals’ org. : MLB

The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball team was founded in 1969. The team takes its name from the American Royal, a livestock show and rodeo held annually in Kansas City since 1899.

64 I as in Icarus : IOTA

Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet, and one that gave rise to our letters I and J. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small, as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

Daedalus was a master craftsman of Greek mythology who was tasked with creating the Labyrinth on the island of Crete that was to house the Minotaur. After the Labyrinth was completed, King Minos imprisoned Daedalus and his son Icarus in a tower, so that he could not spread word of his work. Daedalus fabricated wings so that he and Icarus could escape by flying off the island. Despite being warned by his father, Icarus flew too close to the sun so that the wax holding the wings’ feathers in place melted. Icarus drowned in the sea, and Daedalus escaped.

66 Something you might take a bow for in the theater? : OBI

The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied at the back in what is called a butterfly knot. The term “obi” is also used for the thick cotton belts that are an essential part of the outfits worn by practitioners of many martial arts. The color of the martial arts obi signifies the wearer’s skill level.

76 Whirlpool subsidiary since 2006 : AMANA

The Amana Corporation takes its name from the location of its original headquarters, in Middle Amana, Iowa. Today, the Amana name is very much associated with household appliances. The company was founded in 1934 to manufacture commercial walk-in coolers.

81 Summer Triangle star : VEGA

Vega is the brightest star in the constellation Lyra. Vega (along with Altair and Deneb from other constellations) is also part of the group of three stars that is called the Summer Triangle. Vega is the star at the right-angle of this triangle.

The Summer Triangle is the name given to a pattern of stars seen in the northern hemisphere. It is so named as it sits almost directly overhead at midnight in most northern latitudes. The points of the triangle are the bright stars Altair, Deneb and Vega.

83 The Notorious ___ : RBG

Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg serves on the US Supreme Court. Justice Ginsburg was the second woman to join the Court, and was nominated by President Bill Clinton. She was diagnosed with colon cancer in 1999 and underwent surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. During that time she did not miss one day on the bench. In 2009 Justice Ginsburg had surgery for pancreatic cancer, and was back to work 12 days later. She had left-lung lobectomy to remove cancerous nodules in 2018, which forced Justice Ginsburg to miss oral argument in January 2019, for the first time since joining the court 25 years earlier. Much of Ginsburg’s life is recounted in the excellent 2018 movie “On the Basis of Sex”.

85 Six Nations tribe : ONEIDA

The Oneida people originally lived in the area that is now Central New York. The Oneida were one of the five founding nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, also known as the Five Nations (the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca).

95 Squid’s ink holder : SAC

Octopodes and squid have the ability to release a dark pigment into the water as a means of escape. The dark pigment is called cephalopod ink (the squid and octopus belong to the class cephalopoda). The dark color is created by melanin, the same substance that acts as a pigment in human skin.

99 Latin rebuke : ET TU?

It was Shakespeare who popularized the words “Et tu, Brute?” (meaning “And you, Brutus?”). They appear in his play “Julius Caesar”, although the phrase had been around long before he penned his drama. It’s not known what Julius Caesar actually said in real life (if anything at all) as he was assassinated on the steps of the Senate in Rome.

101 Accumulate : GARNER

A garner is a granary, a building in which grain is stored. The related verb “to garner” means to gather into a granary. We also use the verb figuratively to mean “accumulate, collect” in general.

106 Savory taste : UMAMI

Umami is one of the five basic tastes, along with sweet, sour, bitter and salty. “Umami” is a Japanese word used to describe “a pleasant savory taste”. Umami was proposed as a basic taste in 1908, but it wasn’t until 1985 that the scientific community finally accepted it as such.

112 Judicial order : WRIT

A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in “written” form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

120 Cpl. or sgt. : NCO

A non-commissioned officer (NCO) might be a sergeant (sgt.) or a corporal (cpl.).

123 Virginia Woolf’s “___ Dalloway” : MRS

“Mrs. Dalloway” is a novel by Virginia Woolf that was first published in 1925. The story tells of a day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway, a day in which she is preparing for a party that she is hosting. The novel has been compared to “Ulysses” by James Joyce, a story about a day in the life of Leopold Bloom.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Passes along, as a present : REGIFTS
8 What 13-Down means in poker : I CHECK
14 Book in a mosque : QURAN
19 Antarctic mass : ICE SHEET
21 Major British tabloid : THE SUN
22 Yogurt container words : USE BY
23 Celebratory Native American feast : POTLATCH
24 Drives around awhile … as suggested by this puzzle’s circled squares? : GOES FOR A SPIN
26 If’s counterpart, in programming : ELSE
27 “S.N.L.” alum Cheri : OTERI
29 Military alert system : DEFCON
30 Sow’s home : STY
31 Small criticism : NIT
32 Baa-dly needing a haircut? : UNSHORN
34 “Today” co-host Hoda : KOTB
36 Challenges for infielders : HOPS
38 “De-e-e-eluxe!” : OO LA LA
41 Cherry brandy : KIRSCH
45 Certain rideshares : UBERS
47 Deposit box? : ATM
48 Morning hour : TEN AM
51 Many a Stan Lee film role : CAMEO
52 Capital NE of Casablanca : RABAT
53 Idris of “The Dark Tower” : ELBA
55 Ones or tens place : TILL
56 0 0 0 : OVALS
57 Wafer brand : NILLA
58 Hockey shot sound : SLAP
59 Shots in the dark : STABS
61 Beginning of the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet : ABLE
62 Camera type, for short : SLR
63 Very funny person : RIOT
65 Extremely cold : POLAR
67 River through Pakistan : INDUS
69 Sea creatures that may employ camouflage when hunting : OCTOPI
71 Blood type system : ABO
72 Ones generating buzz in the music world? : KAZOOS
74 Play at full volume : BLAST
75 Super ___ (game series) : MARIO
77 Help with a job : ABET
78 Wrath : IRE
81 Eco-friendly car introduced in 2011 : VOLT
82 Something the nose knows : AROMA
84 ___ Pictures : SONY
86 First name on the Supreme Court : SONIA
88 Quits a program : EXITS
90 Dennis the Menace, e.g. : BRAT
91 Burnt barbecue bits : ENDS
92 Shooting stars, some think : OMENS
93 Kind of salami : GENOA
94 Pool components : GENES
96 Type units : ENS
97 Like going all in, maybe : RISKY
98 Diamond pattern : ARGYLE
100 Slowly, musically : ADAGIO
102 Some are liberal : ARTS
103 Meyers of late-night : SETH
105 Producer of brown eggs : CADBURY
107 Black ___ : OPS
110 Arborist’s tool : SAW
113 Laid, as a claim : STAKED
117 “Spider-Man” director : RAIMI
118 Hit hard : SWAT
119 1965 #1 Byrds hit … as suggested by this puzzle’s circled squares? : TURN! TURN! TURN!
122 Australia’s smallest state : TASMANIA
124 Upstate New York city : UTICA
125 Topic of Article I, Section 3 of the Constitution : SENATE
126 Up-and-coming : EMERGENT
127 Wrinkle treatment : BOTOX
128 Shaman, for one : HEALER
129 Newspaper sections that often fall out : INSERTS

Down

1 Age : RIPEN
2 Romaine concern : E COLI
3 Kicks things off : GETS THE BALL ROLLING
4 Land in the water : ISLE
5 Mortgage org. : FHA
6 Mountains just south of Yellowstone : TETONS
7 The Quakers and others : SECTS
8 Celebrity socialite : IT GIRL
9 Comedian Margaret : CHO
10 Mind : HEED
11 “___ quam videri,” state motto of North Carolina : ESSE
12 Strike on the head : CUFF
13 See 8-Across : KNOCK
14 Home of the Marine Corps University : QUANTICO
15 ___ Constitution : USS
16 Individual curls, say : REPS
17 Slightly : A BIT
18 It contains M.S.G.: Abbr. : NY, NY
20 1973 play featuring a sign with a burned-out “E” : THE HOT L BALTIMORE
25 Part of a king’s guard : ROOK
28 It charges to do some cleaning : ROOMBA
32 Arrogant newcomers : UPSTARTS
33 Rebellion leader Turner : NAT
35 Swagger : BRAVADO
37 Freud’s first stage : ORAL
39 Plays hard after working hard : LETS LOOSE
40 Baker with the 1986 hit “Sweet Love” : ANITA
42 Baker or dry cleaner, maybe : SMALL BUSINESS OWNER
43 They multiply by dividing : CELLS
44 Garden item that sounds like the plural of another garden item : HOSE
45 Dispensers at banquets : URNS
46 Help (out) : BAIL
47 Author of “The Lion, the Bear and the Fox” : AESOP
49 Full of empty talk : ALL BARK AND NO BITE
50 Royals’ org. : MLB
54 Teleported, in the Harry Potter books : APPARATED
60 Drop-down menu in online shopping : SIZE
64 I as in Icarus : IOTA
66 Something you might take a bow for in the theater? : OBI
68 Unapologetic : NOT SORRY
70 Squeaky mice, e.g. : CAT TOYS
73 Chasm : ABYSS
74 Jabber? : BOXER
76 Whirlpool subsidiary since 2006 : AMANA
79 Place to lace up : RINK
80 “It’s a snap!” : EASY!
81 Summer Triangle star : VEGA
83 The Notorious ___ : RBG
85 Six Nations tribe : ONEIDA
87 Leave off, as the last word of a : OMIT
89 Line just above a total, say : SALES TAX
95 Squid’s ink holder : SAC
99 Latin rebuke : ET TU?
101 Accumulate : GARNER
102 Up : ARISEN
104 Like a zero-star review : HARSH
106 Savory taste : UMAMI
108 Coat that’s hard to take off : PAINT
109 Sports page fodder : STATS
110 Paycheck go-with : STUB
111 A plane might be flown on it : AUTO
112 Judicial order : WRIT
114 Pad site : KNEE
115 ___ Rosso (Sicilian wine) : ETNA
116 Kind of citizenship : DUAL
118 Kind of tea : SAGE
120 Cpl. or sgt. : NCO
121 Fwy., e.g. : RTE
123 Virginia Woolf’s “___ Dalloway” : MRS

12 thoughts on “0818-19 NY Times Crossword 18 Aug 19, Sunday”

  1. 39:31. Entertaining and not too bad for a David Steinberg creation. I first heard the term REGIFTer in a Seinfeld episode. I don’t know if the word existed before that.

    Best –

  2. 1 hour and 23 min with no errors…I have said it before, not that anyone cares, but I think that clues like 8A and 13D are very unfair to the solver…..then again it is David Steinberg

  3. Our newspaper publishes the NYT puzzle a week late. Alas was stymied by the poker reference. So DNF

    Its true our city Utica has been invigorated by an influx of immigrants beginning with Bosnians fleeing the horrors of war. Among their other accomplishments the renewal of failing neighborhoods. Because of the eclectic refugee immigrant population our local high school has expanded with scores of different languages being spoken. It’s unfortunate that welcoming refugees has now become a political negative. That will change.

    Another clue answer. “ONEIDA” a six nation neighbor. (Utica is the county seat of Oneida County) with its Casino/resort has brought fun, talent, and employment as well. Bright future for an old mill town

  4. No errors. Definitely one of the easier Steinbergs. Great fun on a Sunday morning. FWIW I don’t necessarily agree that clues like 8A/13D are inherently unfair. As long as the crossing clues are of reasonable difficulty I enjoy the challenge.

  5. 31:27, no errors. Echo Dave Kennison’s observation that this was an impressive construct; especially with the balls rotating 90 degrees.

  6. What a great puzzle in so many ways. I got all but two squares. Also; knock for Poker instead of Gin Rummy? Maybe I need to play more poker.

  7. After getting no where with Thursday and Friday’s puzzles I was shocked to find I finished this one with no errors. OK, it took me over and hour and a half but still….I finished a NY Sunday puzzle. Break open the prosecco.

  8. Worked this one on Sunday evening. Usually the sheer volume of the Sunday puzzle will leave me with a mystery cross or two but I was able to finish with no errors. Lotsa fun; I had a ball.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.