0728-19 NY Times Crossword 28 Jul 19, Sunday

Constructed by: Christopher Adams
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Anagrammar

Themed answers include the letters string “METAPHORS”, but the order of those letters has been MIXED up:

  • 105A Some laughable language mistakes – as found literally (in consecutive letters) in 24-, 37-, 55-, 75- and 92-Across : MIXED METAPHORS
  • 24A Aura : ATMOSPHERE
  • 37A Real nostalgia trip : BLAST FROM THE PAST
  • 55A Generally speaking : FOR THE MOST PART
  • 75A Sometime collaborator with William Shakespeare, per the Oxford University Press : CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE
  • 92A Easy way that might lead to error : PRIMROSE PATH

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 20m 39s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Moth attractors : LAMPS

It isn’t really understood why moths are attracted to artificial lights. There is one theory that sounds plausible to me though. It is suggested that moths navigate at night by maintaining the moon (the brightest celestial object) at a fixed angle. When a moth finds a brighter light source, like an artificial light, it gets confused.

6 Rescue site for a polar bear : BERG

An iceberg is a large piece of freshwater ice that is floating freely after having broken away from a glacier or ice shelf. Out use of “iceberg” comes from the Dutch word for the same phenomenon “ijsberg”, which translates literally as “ice mountain”.

Polar bears are close cousins of brown bears, and are thought to have evolved from a population of brown bears that became isolated during a period of glaciation. Most polar bears live north of the Arctic Circle, and live mainly on seals that they capture near the edge of ice floes.

14 Word with grand or identity : … THEFT

In the US, there is a dividing line between felony grand theft (a more serious crime) and misdemeanor petty theft (a lesser crime). That dividing line is a dollar amount, and that dollar amount varies from state to state.

19 Netflix crime drama set in a small town in Missouri : OZARK

“Ozark” is an excellent TV crime show starring Jason Bateman and Laura Linney as a married couple who relocate from Chicago to the Missouri Ozarks. The couple fall foul of Mexican drug lord after a money laundering scheme goes awry. The show is set at lake resort in the Ozarks, although filming actually takes place at lakes in the Atlanta area in order to take advantage of tax breaks offered by the State of Georgia.

20 “Hahahahahaha!” : LMAO!

Laughing my a** off (LMAO)

22 Sun: Prefix : HELIO-

Helios was the god of the Sun in Greek mythology. He was the brother of Selene, the goddess of the moon, and Eos, the goddess of the dawn. Helios drove his chariot of the sun across the sky during the day, returning to the East at night be travelling through the ocean. The Roman equivalent to Helios was Sol.

27 Weasley family owl in the Harry Potter books : ERROL

Harry Potter, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger are the principal characters in the “Harry Potter” series of fantasy novels by J. K. Rowling. The three are the best of friends.

30 It’s SW of the Pyrenees : IBERIA

The Iberian Peninsula in Europe is largely made up of Spain and Portugal. However, also included is the Principality of Andorra in the Pyrénées, a small part of the south of France, and the British Territory of Gibraltar. Iberia takes its name from the Ebro, the longest river in Spain, which the Romans named the “Iber”.

36 Source of the line “A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread – and Thou” : RUBAIYAT

Here are some lines by 11th-century poet Omar Khayyam:

A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread–and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness–
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!

40 Mobile : CELL

What we mostly know as a “cell phone” here in North America is more usually referred to as a “mobile phone” in Britain and Ireland. My favorite term for the device is used in Germany, where it is called a “Handy”.

42 Mao-___ (Chinese liquor) : TAI

Maotai is a Chinese liquor that is distilled from fermented sorghum. It is named for the the town of Maotai in Guizhou Province, where there is a long history of distilling alcoholic spirits in volume.

43 L.G.B.T. History Mo. : OCT

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)

44 Bite-size chocolate candy : KISS

The Hershey Company produces over 80 million chocolate Kisses each day, and has been making them since 1907.

47 Home for doves and pigeons : COTE

The Old English word “cote” was used for a small house. Our modern word “cottage” comes from “cote”. We now use “cote” to mean a small shelter on a farm for sheep or birds.

48 Home for herons and egrets : MARSH

Herons are birds with long legs that inhabit freshwater and coastal locales. Some herons are routinely referred to as egrets, and others as bitterns. Herons look a lot like storks and cranes, but differ in their appearance in flight. Herons fly with their necks retracted in an S-shape, whereas storks and cranes have their necks extended.

Egrets are a group of several species of white herons. Many egret species were faced with extinction in the 1800s and early 1900s due to plume hunting, a practice driven by the demand for egret plumes that could be incorporated into hats.

52 Group on the dark side of the Force : SITH

The Sith are characters in the “Star Wars” universe who use the “dark side” of “the Force”, and as such are the antithesis of the Jedi Knights. Members of the Sith use the title “Darth” before their name, as in Darth Vader. The last made of the six “Star Wars” movies is called “Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith”.

54 “Alas!,” in Austria : ACH!

The German exclamation “ach!” is usually translated into English as “oh!”

60 Pompous pronoun : ROYAL WE

The “royal we” is more correctly called the “majestic plural”, and is the use of a plural pronoun to describe a single person in a high office. I suppose the most often quoted phrase that uses the majestic plural is “We are not amused”, which is often attributed to Queen Victoria. The editorial we is a similar concept, in which a newspaper editor or columnist refers to himself or herself as “we” when giving an opinion.

62 Vicuña product : WOOL

The vicuña is a South American camelid that lives in the Andes. The vicuña produces very little wool, and that wool can only be collected every three years. So, vicuña wool is very expensive due to the shortage of supply. And, the vicuña us the national animal of Peru.

65 Creature slain in the Mines of Moria by Gandalf : BALROG

Gandalf is an important character in the J. R. R. Tolkien novels “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy. He is a wizard known as Gandalf the Grey during his lifetime, and as Gandalf the White after he returns from the dead.

66 “A Little Night Music” composer : SONDHEIM

Stephen Sondheim has won more Tony Awards than any other composer, a total of eight. He has a long list of stage (and big screen) successes including “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum”, “A Little Night Music”, “Sweeney Todd” and “Into the Woods”. Sondheim is a big fan of crosswords and had a whole series of cryptic crosswords published in “New York” magazine in the sixties.

75 Sometime collaborator with William Shakespeare, per the Oxford University Press : CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE

Christopher Marlowe was an English dramatist and poet around in the Elizabethan era. Marlowe was born in the same year as William Shakespeare, and it seems that Shakespeare was heavily influenced by Marlowe’s work. Marlowe achieved success and prominence at a relatively young age. It was only after Marlowe’s early death (at 29 years of age) that Shakespeare became extremely successful. There is one theory, now considered somewhat outlandish, that Marlowe faked his death and continued to work under the name “William Shakespeare”.

81 Deepest lake in the U.S. after Crater Lake : TAHOE

Lake Tahoe (often referred to simply as “Tahoe”) is up in the Sierra Nevada mountains, and is located right on the border between California and Nevada. Lake Tahoe is the largest alpine lake in the country, and the largest lake in general, behind the five Great Lakes. It’s also the second deepest lake, with only the beautiful Crater Lake in Oregon being deeper. Given its location, there are tall casinos that sit right on the shore on the Nevada side of the state line where gambling is legal.

Crater Lake is my favorite locale in the whole country. Crater lake sits in a volcanic crater giving it a near perfect circular shape. The water appears to have a deep, deep blue color and is extremely pure. There are no rivers running into the lake, so man hasn’t really had the chance to contaminate it with pollutants.

83 Place where musical talent may be wasted? : KARAOKE BAR

“Karate” is a Japanese word meaning “empty hand”, and the related word “karaoke” translates as “empty orchestra”.

To be wasted or lit is to be drunk.

89 Comics debut of 1963 : X-MEN

The X-Men are a team of superheroes created by Stan Lee for Marvel Comics. Nowadays, the X-Men are perhaps best known as the subject of a series of movies, with Hugh Jackman playing Wolverine and Patrick Stewart playing Professor Xavier (or simply “Professor X”). Some very respected actors have also played the villains whom the X-Men have to battle. For example, the enemy called Magneto is portrayed by veteran Shakespearean actor Sir Ian McKellen.

91 It’s all downhill from here : ACME

The acme is the highest point. The term comes from the Greek word “akme” that has the same meaning.

92 Easy way that might lead to error : PRIMROSE PATH

According to the idiom, one might be “led down the primrose path”, meaning that one can be led astray or deceived. It’s likely that the phrase “primrose path” was coined by William Shakespeare, in “Hamlet”. Ophelia says:

Do not, as some ungracious pastors do,

Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven,
Whiles, like a puff’d and reckless libertine,
Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads

And recks not his own rede.

99 Printing measurement : PICA

A pica is a unit of measure used in typography. One pica is equivalent to 1/6 of an inch. Also, each pica unit contains 12 points.

100 Dead letters? : RIP

Rest in peace (RIP)

101 “It’s bulls and blood, it’s dust and mud,” per a Garth Brooks hit : RODEO

Country singer Garth Brooks retired from recording and performing in 2001. He came back out of retirement in 2009, signing a five-year concert deal with the Encore Hotel on the Las Vegas Strip.

102 Enthusiastic enjoyment : GUSTO

“Gusto” is an Italian word meaning “taste”. We use it in English in the phrase “with gusto” meaning “with great enjoyment”.

109 Small, rectangular candy : PEZ

PEZ is an Austrian brand of candy sold in a mechanical dispenser. Famously, PEZ dispensers have molded “heads”, and have become very collectible over the years. The list of heads includes historical figures like Betsy Ross and Paul Revere, characters from “Star Wars” and “Star Trek”, and even British royalty like the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (“William and Kate”). The name “PEZ” comes from the first, middle and last letters of “Pfefferminz”, the German word for “peppermint”.

112 Gave the pink slip : AXED

The term “pink-slip” can be used as a verb meaning “to terminate an employee”. No one really seems to know for sure where the phrase originated, but there are lots of stories.

115 Bening with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : ANNETTE

The marvelous actress Annette Bening is from Topeka, Kansas. Bening has been married to actor Warren Beatty since 1992. The pair married about a year after starring together in the 1991 film “Bugsy”.

116 Statistician Silver : NATE

Nate Silver is a statistician who gained celebrity by developing a forecasting system that predicted the future performance of baseball players. He then made a name for himself in the world of politics by predicting the outcome of the 2008 US presidential race on his website FiveThirtyEight.com. Silver successfully predicted the outcome of the election in 49 of the 50 states, missing out on Indiana, which Barack Obama won by less than 1% of the vote. FiveThirtyEight was less successful in predicting the specifics of the 2012 presidential election, but came closer than almost all other pollsters. In 2016, FiveThirtyEight predicted a victory for Hillary Clinton, but with a much lower probability than other poll aggregators. And, they all got it wrong. Oh, and why the name FiveThirtyEight.com? Because there are 538 electors in the US electoral college.

118 Angioplasty inserts : STENTS

In the world of surgical medicine, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, in order to reduce the effects of a local restriction in the body’s conduit.

Angioplasty is the mechanical widening of a narrowed artery. In the surgical procedure, a balloon catheter is inflated at the point of the obstruction to open up the artery. A stent may then be inserted to make sure the vessel remains open.

119 Big 12 college town : AMES

Iowa State University of Science and Technology (ISU) is located in Ames, Iowa. Among many other notable milestones, ISU created the country’s first school of veterinary medicine, in 1879. The sports teams of ISU are known as the Cyclones.

120 Bounty hunter shot by Han Solo in “Star Wars: A New Hope” : GREEDO

The epic sci-fi film “Star Wars” was released in 1977. When the movie was re-released in 1981, the subtitle “Episode IV: A New Hope” was added.

Down

1 One-named singer with the 2017 #1 album “Melodrama” : LORDE

Lorde is a stage name of the singer-songwriter Ella Yelich-O’Connor from New Zealand. Lorde’s cover version of the great Tears for Fears song “Everybody Wants to Rule the World” was used in the soundtrack for “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” (2013). Her song “Yellow Flicker Beat” is included in the soundtrack for “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1”.

2 Longtime Hyundai model : AZERA

The Hyundai Azera was the name used worldwide for the model known as the Hyundai Grandeur in its homeland of South Korea. The Azera was produced from 1986 to 1992.

5 Business with perpetually high sales? : SKYMALL

SkyMall is a shopping catalog found in the airplane seat pockets of many airlines in North America.

7 CPR administrator : EMT

An emergency medical technician (EMT) might administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

10 Easily split rock : SCHIST

Schists are a family of metamorphic rocks. The name “schist” comes from the Greek word “schízein” meaning “to split”, and is a reference to the ease at which schists can be cleaved. Back in the mid-1700s, miners tended to use the terms “slate”, “shale” and “schist” interchangeably.

11 Which train goes to Harlem, in song : THE “A”

The A Train in the New York City Subway system runs from 207th Street, through Manhattan and over to Far Rockaway in Queens. The service lends its name to a jazz standard “Take the ‘A’ Train”, the signature tune of Duke Ellington and a song much sung by Ella Fitzgerald. One version of the lyrics are:

You must take the A Train
To go to Sugar Hill way up in Harlem
If you miss the A Train
You’ll find you’ve missed the quickest way to Harlem
Hurry, get on, now, it’s coming
Listen to those rails a-thrumming (All Aboard!)
Get on the A Train
Soon you will be on Sugar Hill in Harlem.

13 Wedding agreement : PRENUPTIAL

Our word “nuptial” is an adjective meaning “of marriage, of the wedding ceremony”. The term derives from “nuptiae”, the Latin for “wedding, marriage”.

14 Title movie role for Jim Carrey : THE MASK

“The Mask” is a 1994 film that is based on a comic book character. Jim Carrey plays the title role. Cameron Diaz also appears in the cast, making her film debut.

Jim Carrey is a comedian and actor from Newmarket, Ontario. Carrey’s big break in films came with the title role the first “Ace Ventura” film, in 1994. My favorite of his big screen performances is in the fascinating film “The Truman Show”, released in 1998.

16 Jane Jetson’s son : ELROY

“The Jetsons” is an animated show from Hanna-Barbera that had its first run in 1962-1963, and then was recreated in 1985-1987. When it debuted in 1963 on ABC, “The Jetsons” was the network’s first ever color broadcast. “The Jetsons” is like a space-age version of “The Flintstones”. The four Jetson family members are George and Jane, the parents, and children Judy and Elroy. Residing with the family in Orbit City are Rosie the household robot and Astro the pet dog.

17 Shrek’s love : FIONA

Princess Fiona is the title character’s love interest in the “Shrek” series of films.

25 Beehive State bloomer : SEGO

The sego lily is the state flower of Utah, and is a perennial plant found throughout the Western United States.

When Mormon pioneers were settling what is today the state of Utah, they referred to the area as Deseret, a word that means “beehive” according to the Book of Mormon. Today Utah is known as the Beehive State and there is a beehive symbol on the Utah state flag. In 1959, “Industry” was even chosen as the state motto, for the term’s association with the beehive.

32 Org. in a 1976 sports merger : ABA

The American Basketball Association (ABA) merged with the National Basketball Association (NBA) in 1976. The ABA used a ball with the colors red, white and blue. The NBA uses a more traditional orange ball.

34 Be on the court for tipoff, say : START

That would be basketball.

36 Précis : RECAP

A “precis” is an abstract, a concise summary. The term comes from the French “précis” meaning “cut short”.

38 Bouillabaisse base : FISH

Bouillabaisse is a traditional seafood stew that originated in the port city of Marseille on the Mediterranean coast of France. The term “bouillabaisse” comes from Provençal dialect meaning “boil and simmer”, or more literally “boil and lower (heat)”.

39 Myriad : HOST

The term “myriad”, meaning “innumerable”, comes from the Greek “muraid”, meaning “ten thousand”. “Myriad” is one of those words that sparks heated debate about the correct usage in English. “Myriad” can be used both as an adjective and a noun. One can have “a myriad of” engagements around the holidays, for example, or “myriad” engagements around those same holidays.

40 Drink stirred with a spoon : COCOA

The beverages hot cocoa and hot chocolate differ from each other in that the latter contains cocoa butter, whereas the former does not.

41 Kind of alcohol used as biofuel : ETHYL

Ethyl alcohol is more usually known as ethanol. Ethanol is the alcohol found in intoxicating beverages, and nowadays is also used as a fuel for cars. It is also found in medical wipes and hand sanitizer, in which it acts as an antiseptic.

45 It borders the Suez Canal : SINAI

The Sinai Peninsula is in the eastern part of Egypt, and is a triangular peninsula bounded by the Mediterranean to the north and the Red Sea to the south. It is the only part of Egypt that lies in Asia as opposed to Africa. The eastern land border of the peninsula is shared with Israel, and Israel occupied the Sinai during the 1956 Suez Crisis and the Six Day War of 1967.

The Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Red Sea. The canal took ten years to construct, and opened in 1869. The northern terminus of the waterway is Port Said, and the southern is Port Tewfik in the city of Suez, which gives the canal its name. There are no locks on the Suez Canal, and there is only “one-lane” navigation available. There are two spots in the canal where ships travelling in opposing directions can pass each other. A second canal is now under construction that will cover half the route of the existing canal. When completed, the Suez Canal will be able to handle 97 ships a day, up from the current capacity of 49 ships per day.

46 Premium movie channel : STARZ

The Starz premium cable channel is owned by the same company that owns the Encore cable channel. Starz was launched in 1994 and mainly shows movies.

47 Keto diet no-no : CARB

A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. When a body consumes insufficient carbohydrates to meet the need for energy, then the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies in order to make up the energy deficit. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the bloodstream is known as “ketosis”, a term that gives rise to the name “ketogenic diet”. Medical professionals sometimes prescribe a ketogenic diet in order to control epilepsy in children. A condition of ketosis can reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures.

48 “The Jungle Book” boy : MOWGLI

“The Jungle Book” by Rudyard Kipling was originally published in 1894, and is a collection of adventure stories or fables featuring the animals of the jungle and a young boy named Mowgli. Baloo is a sloth bear that teaches the cubs of a wolf pack the Law of the Jungle. His most challenging pupil however is no lupine, but rather the man-cub Mowgli.

51 University in downtown Philadelphia : DREXEL

Drexel University is a private school in Philadelphia, but with a campus in Sacramento. It was founded in 1891 by philanthropist Anthony J. Drexel who was a Philadelphia financier. The school was originally known as the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry.

66 “Go ___ Watchman” (Harper Lee novel) : SET A

Nelle Harper Lee was an author from Monroeville, Alabama. For many years, Lee had only one published novel to her name, i.e. “To Kill a Mockingbird”. That contribution to the world of literature was enough to earn her the Presidential Medal of Freedom and a Pulitzer Prize. Harper Lee was a close friend of fellow author Truman Capote who was the inspiration for the character named “Dill” in her novel. Lee was all over the news in 2015 as she had published a second novel, titled “Go Set a Watchman”. The experts seem to be agreeing that “Go Set a Watchman” is actually a first draft of “To Kill a Mockingbird”. Lee passed away less than a year after “Go Set a Watchman” hit the stores.

68 One of two in “The Grapes of Wrath” : IAMB

An iamb is a metrical foot containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The lines in William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 18” use five sequential iambs, e.g. “Shall I / compare / thee to / a sum- / -mer’s day?” With that sequence of five iambs, the poem’s structure is described as iambic pentameter.

John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath” is set during the Great Depression. The novel tells the story of the Joad family from Oklahoma, farmers who had to leave their home and head for California due to economic hardship.

69 Film-rating org. : MPAA

The Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) film-rating system (PG-13, R, etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

74 Like the verb “to be”: Abbr. : IRR

Irregular (“irr.” or “irreg.”)

75 Purchase for a celebration : CHAMPAGNE

Champagne is made primarily using Pinot noir and Pinot Meunier grapes (both of which are mainly used to make red wine), as well as white Chardonnay grapes. Rosé Champagne is made from a blend of all three grapes, Blanc de noir Champagne from solely Pinot noir and Pinot Meunier, and Blanc de blanc from 100% Chardonnay.

76 Stable period from Augustus to Marcus Aurelius : PAX ROMANA

Marcus Aurelius was Emperor of Rome from 161 until his passing in 180. His death in 180 is generally regarded as the end of the “Pax Romana”, the long period of relative peace in the Roman Empire that started in 27 BCE. So, the death of Marcus Aurelius also marked the beginning of what came to be known as the Fall of the Roman Empire.

80 Pulitzer-winning W.W. II journalist : ERNIE PYLE

Ernie Pyle was a journalist, truly a roving reporter, never happy unless he was filing stories from some remote part of the country or some far-flung corner of the globe. Pyle was noted for his intimate style of reporting, emphasizing the human element of the story. His reports written during WWII in Europe, stressing the experiences of soldiers in the front lines, won him a Pulitzer Prize in 1944. After Germany surrendered he decided to follow the war in the Pacific. One day towards the end of the war, Pyle was traveling in a jeep on the island of le Shima in the Okinawa Islands when he was hit by enemy machine gun fire and was killed. Pyle was one of very few civilians killed during WWII who was awarded the Purple Heart.

81 Russian rulers of old : TSARINAS

A tsarina was the wife of a tsar, and so was a Russian empress.

82 Discovery of penicillin, e.g. : ACCIDENT

The antibiotic called penicillin was discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928. He noted that a blue-green mold growing in a Petri dish produced a substance that inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus bacteria, which was growing on the same substrate. The mold was Penicillium notatum, and Fleming named the antibiotic penicillin after the mold.

86 It’s skipped in the Gregorian calendar : YEAR ZERO

Our contemporary western calendar was introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, giving it the name “Gregorian” calendar. The Gregorian calendar superseded the Julian calendar, and both were aligned with movement of the sun across the sky. At issue was that the Julian calendar was misaligned with the solar year by about 11 minutes, creating an error that accumulated over time. Pope Gregory corrected the length of the year by introducing a more accurate rule for calculating leap years. He also wiped out the cumulated “misalignment”, in order to bring together the Christian celebration of Easter and the spring equinox. That correction involved the “loss” of 11 days. The last day of the Julian calendar (Thursday, 4 October 1582) was immediately followed by the first day of the Gregorian calendar (Friday, 15 October 1582).

93 Lead role in “Chicago” : ROXIE

The wonderful 1975 musical “Chicago” is based on a 1926 play of the same name written by a news reporter called Maurine Dallas Watkins. Watkins had been assigned to cover the murder trials of Beulah Annan and Belva Gaertner for the “Chicago Tribune”, and used the story that unfolded as the basis for her play. Annan became the character Roxie Hart, and Gaertner became Velma Kelly. I’ve only ever seen the movie version of “Chicago” and never a live performance …

94 November 13, e.g. : IDES

There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually “fixed” by law. “Kalendae” were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. “Nonae” were originally the days of the half moon. And “idus” (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

97 “Days of Grace” memoirist Arthur : ASHE

The great American tennis player Arthur Ashe spent the last years of his life writing his memoir called “Days of Grace”. He finished the manuscript just a few days before he passed away, dying from AIDS caused by a tainted blood transfusion.

98 Corvette roof options : T-TOPS

A T-top is a car roof that has removable panels on either side of a rigid bar that runs down the center of the vehicle above the driver.

105 Women’s rights pioneer Lucretia : MOTT

Lucretia Coffin Mott (what a name!) was an American Quaker, and an advocate for women’s rights. Mott has been called the first American “feminist”. Her first job was teaching in the Quaker school in which she was educated. There she learned that her salary was to be one third of that paid to the males with the same job (she married one of the male teachers!). That injustice initiated her interest in women’s rights.

107 Chapeau site : TETE

In French, one wears a “chapeau” (hat), a beret perhaps, on one’s “tête” (head).

111 Kylo of the “Star Wars” films : REN

Kylo Ren is the son of Han Solo and Princess Leia Organa in the “Star Wars” universe. The character’s birth name was Ben Solo. He was trained as a Jedi knight by his uncle, Luke Skywalker. However, Ben came to embrace the Dark Side, and changed his name to Kylo Ren. Ren is played by actor Adam Driver.

114 Charlemagne’s domain, for short : HRE

Charlemagne was the first king to use the title “Holy Roman Emperor”, even though the Holy Roman Empire (HRE) was not actually founded until over a century later when Otto I was crowned Emperor. Otto was the first of an unbroken line of Holy Roman Emperors who ruled Central Europe from 962 until 1806.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Moth attractors : LAMPS
6 Rescue site for a polar bear : BERG
10 “Hold it right there!” : STOP!
14 Word with grand or identity : … THEFT
19 Netflix crime drama set in a small town in Missouri : OZARK
20 “Hahahahahaha!” : LMAO!
21 Blacken on the barbecue : CHAR
22 Sun: Prefix : HELIO-
23 Change, as a hotel lock : REKEY
24 Aura : ATMOSPHERE
27 Weasley family owl in the Harry Potter books : ERROL
28 “You wish” : DREAM ON
30 It’s SW of the Pyrenees : IBERIA
31 “Give me an example!” : NAME ONE!
33 Designates for a specific purpose : EARMARKS
35 Big things in D.C. and Hollywood : EGOS
36 Source of the line “A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread – and Thou” : RUBAIYAT
37 Real nostalgia trip : BLAST FROM THE PAST
40 Mobile : CELL
42 Mao-___ (Chinese liquor) : TAI
43 L.G.B.T. History Mo. : OCT
44 Bite-size chocolate candy : KISS
47 Home for doves and pigeons : COTE
48 Home for herons and egrets : MARSH
50 “In case you didn’t hear me …” : I SAID …
52 Group on the dark side of the Force : SITH
54 “Alas!,” in Austria : ACH!
55 Generally speaking : FOR THE MOST PART
59 Not only that but also : NAY
60 Pompous pronoun : ROYAL WE
62 Vicuña product : WOOL
63 Eye-catching print pattern : LEOPARD
65 Creature slain in the Mines of Moria by Gandalf : BALROG
66 “A Little Night Music” composer : SONDHEIM
70 Award for technological development since 1995 : X PRIZE
71 Shed, as feathers : MOLTED
73 Individually : APIECE
75 Sometime collaborator with William Shakespeare, per the Oxford University Press : CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE
81 Deepest lake in the U.S. after Crater Lake : TAHOE
83 Place where musical talent may be wasted? : KARAOKE BAR
84 Assembly : ARRAY
87 Burns, in a way : SCALDS
89 Comics debut of 1963 : X-MEN
90 Important topic in golf instruction : STANCE
91 It’s all downhill from here : ACME
92 Easy way that might lead to error : PRIMROSE PATH
99 Printing measurement : PICA
100 Dead letters? : RIP
101 “It’s bulls and blood, it’s dust and mud,” per a Garth Brooks hit : RODEO
102 Enthusiastic enjoyment : GUSTO
103 Miss, say : ERR
104 Girl’s name that’s also a state abbreviation : IDA
105 Some laughable language mistakes – as found literally (in consecutive letters) in 24-, 37-, 55-, 75- and 92-Across : MIXED METAPHORS
109 Small, rectangular candy : PEZ
110 Cocktails with gin, vermouth and Campari : NEGRONIS
112 Gave the pink slip : AXED
113 Organism that grows on another plant nonparasitically : EPIPHYTE
115 Bening with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : ANNETTE
116 Statistician Silver : NATE
117 Dog to beware of : SNARLER
118 Angioplasty inserts : STENTS
119 Big 12 college town : AMES
120 Bounty hunter shot by Han Solo in “Star Wars: A New Hope” : GREEDO

Down

1 One-named singer with the 2017 #1 album “Melodrama” : LORDE
2 Longtime Hyundai model : AZERA
3 God, with “the” : MAKER
4 First words : PREAMBLE
5 Business with perpetually high sales? : SKYMALL
6 Glassy-eyed look : BLANK STARE
7 CPR administrator : EMT
8 Malek who won a Best Actor Oscar for “Bohemian Rhapsody” : RAMI
9 Dimwit : GOOBER
10 Easily split rock : SCHIST
11 Which train goes to Harlem, in song : THE “A”
12 Something to dip in the water : OAR
13 Wedding agreement : PRENUPTIAL
14 Title movie role for Jim Carrey : THE MASK
15 “I found what you’re looking for!” : HERE IT IS!
16 Jane Jetson’s son : ELROY
17 Shrek’s love : FIONA
18 “For rent” sign : TO LET
25 Beehive State bloomer : SEGO
26 Occasion for a high school after-party : PROM
29 “… ___ mouse?” : OR A
32 Org. in a 1976 sports merger : ABA
34 Be on the court for tipoff, say : START
36 Précis : RECAP
38 Bouillabaisse base : FISH
39 Myriad : HOST
40 Drink stirred with a spoon : COCOA
41 Kind of alcohol used as biofuel : ETHYL
45 It borders the Suez Canal : SINAI
46 Premium movie channel : STARZ
47 Keto diet no-no : CARB
48 “The Jungle Book” boy : MOWGLI
49 Chopped down : HEWN
50 Place reached by boat : ISLE
51 University in downtown Philadelphia : DREXEL
53 ___ Amendment, controversial 1976 Congressional measure : HYDE
55 Stunned … just stunned : FLOORED
56 Alteration of a video game, in gamer lingo : MOD
57 “I like that!” : OOH!
58 Chesterfield or reefer : TOPCOAT
61 Sleeve opening : ARMHOLE
64 What keeps athletic tape from sticking to the skin : PREWRAP
66 “Go ___ Watchman” (Harper Lee novel) : SET A
67 Target of a spray : ODOR
68 One of two in “The Grapes of Wrath” : IAMB
69 Film-rating org. : MPAA
72 “For shame!” : TSK!
74 Like the verb “to be”: Abbr. : IRR
75 Purchase for a celebration : CHAMPAGNE
76 Stable period from Augustus to Marcus Aurelius : PAX ROMANA
77 Man, to Marcus Aurelius : HOMO
78 Barely scratches (out) : EKES
79 Traitors : RENEGADES
80 Pulitzer-winning W.W. II journalist : ERNIE PYLE
81 Russian rulers of old : TSARINAS
82 Discovery of penicillin, e.g. : ACCIDENT
85 Built up gradually : ACCRETED
86 It’s skipped in the Gregorian calendar : YEAR ZERO
88 Some track-and-field training : SPRINTS
90 Propping (up) : SHORING
93 Lead role in “Chicago” : ROXIE
94 November 13, e.g. : IDES
95 ___ school : MED
96 Baby shark : PUP
97 “Days of Grace” memoirist Arthur : ASHE
98 Corvette roof options : T-TOPS
105 Women’s rights pioneer Lucretia : MOTT
106 End-of-semester stressor : EXAM
107 Chapeau site : TETE
108 Bicker (with) : SPAR
111 Kylo of the “Star Wars” films : REN
114 Charlemagne’s domain, for short : HRE

11 thoughts on “0728-19 NY Times Crossword 28 Jul 19, Sunday”

  1. 37:43. I read the title and knew the theme would be anagram related so I just solved it like a themeless. The reveal made the theme pretty obvious.

    I got caught up wanting to put “Temple” instead of DREXEL for 51D. Once nothing else fit, it took a while to undo all my damage.

    Didn’t realize until I read Wordplay that this grid was 22 squares wide – i.e. one extra column wide.

    Best –

  2. 1 hr and 49 min with two errors….I finished 90% of this puzzle rather quickly but spent the bulk of my time on the last 10% trying to figure out all the foreign words and obscure clues that some of us mere morals have a tough time with…..not an enjoyable puzzle by a long shot

  3. 28:59, no errors. I’m sure the theme was a challenge to the setter, but it is irrelevant to the solver. Didn’t get the theme until I saw Bill’s explanation. Spent a lot of time trying to put EGYPT in 45D and YET in 59A.

  4. No errors. The SE corner was a bear to figure out, but once I saw ERNIE I was able to fill his last name in and it finally came together.

  5. The SE corner was a bear to figure out, but once I saw ERNIE I was able to fill his last name in and it finally came together. No errors.

  6. Having a foggy brain day. I still don’t get it. Even with the bold letters showing me what the mixed metaphor is.

    ???????????

    1. An anagram is defined as: “a word, phrase, or name formed by rearranging the letters of another, such as cinema, formed from iceman.” All the theme entries contain the letters of the word METAPHOR, but the letters are in different orders. Technically, I believe, none of the theme answers are true anagrams, since they require additional letters to form the word or phrase.

  7. Late to the dance; worked this Monday afternoon. One square error with GRAEDO/HRA not being familiar with either. Solved without benefit of the theme which probably would have confused me more than helped.

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