0122-19 NY Times Crossword 22 Jan 19, Tuesday

Constructed by: John E. Bennett and Jeff Chen
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Watch Your Step!

Circled letters in today’s grid snake throughout the grid in four groups. Those letters spell out types of snake. Those snakes are:

  • KING COBRA
  • SIDEWINDER
  • COPPERHEAD
  • PUFF ADDER

  • 35A. “Look out!” … and warning when encountering the circled things in this puzzle : WATCH YOUR STEP!

Bill’s time: 9m 34s!

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Jan. honoree : MLK, JR

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a US Federal holiday taking place on the third Monday of each year. It celebrates the birthday of Dr. King, and was signed into law by President Reagan in 1983, and first observed in 1986. However, some states resisted naming the holiday MLK Day, and gave it alternative names (like “Civil Rights Day”). It was officially celebrated as MLK Day in all 50 states from the year 2000 onwards.

14. “Old MacDonald” refrain : E-I-E-I-O

There was an American version of the English children’s song “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” (E-I-E-I-O), that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the US version goes “Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o”.

15. State said to be “high in the middle” : OHIO

If we take a look at the word “Ohio” we might use the phrase “rounds on the ends and high in the middle”.

16. “Thus with a kiss ___” (Romeo’s last words) : I DIE

In Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, the last words uttered by Romeo are:

O true apothecary!
They drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

Juliet’s last words are:

Yea, noise? then I’ll be brief. O happy dagger! This is thy sheath; there rust, and let me die.

21. Certain close-knit social media group : TWIBE

That would be a Twitter “Twibe”.

22. “Brigadoon” co-star Charisse : CYD

Actress Cyd Charisse was famous for her dancing ability and the many roles she played opposite Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly. Charisse carved out a career based on dance despite the fact that she suffered from polio as a child. In fact, she took up ballet at the age of twelve to help build up her strength as she recovered from the disease.

“Brigadoon” is a Lerner and Loewe stage musical about a Scottish village that only appears for one day every one hundred years. “Brigadoon” was made into a movie in 1954, starring Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse.

25. Actor Wilson who has appeared with Ben Stiller in 12 films : OWEN

Actor Owen Wilson was nominated for an Oscar, but not for his acting. He was nominated for co-writing the screenplay for “The Royal Tenenbaums” along with Wes Anderson.

Ben Stiller is the son of comic actors Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara. Ben is perhaps as well-known as a director as he is an actor. He made his debut as a director in the film “Reality Bites” in 1994.

27. Grilled order with corned beef : REUBEN

There are conflicting stories about the origin of the Reuben sandwich. One such story is that it was invented around 1914 by Arnold Reuben, an immigrant from Germany who owned Reuben’s Deli in New York.

31. Long past time? : YORE

We use the word “yore” to mean “time long past” as in “the days of yore”. “Yore” comes from the Old English words for “of years”.

32. Guinness record holder for the U.S. city with the most consecutive days of sun (768), informally : ST PETE

Saint Petersburg, Florida is often referred to as “St. Pete” by locals and visitors alike. Located on a peninsula lying between Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, St. Pete was founded in 1888 and named for Saint Petersburg in Russia. The co-founders were Russian immigrant Peter Demens and Detroit native John C. Williams. The pair tossed a coin for the privilege of naming the new city, and Demens won. Williams lost, but did get to name the city’s first hostelry “The Detroit Hotel”.

41. Baseball’s Matty, Felipe or Moises : ALOU

Moisés Alou played Major League Baseball, as did his father Felipe and his uncles Matty and Jesús.

43. Some people have a gift for it : GAB

Blarney is a town in County Cork in the south of Ireland. Blarney is home to Blarney Castle, and inside the castle is the legendary Blarney Stone. “Kissing the Blarney Stone” is a ritual engaged in by many, many tourists (indeed, I’ve done it myself!), but it’s not a simple process. The stone is embedded in the wall of the castle, and in order to kiss it you have to sit on the edge of the parapet and lean way backwards so that your head is some two feet below your body. There is a staff member there to help you and make sure you don’t fall. The Blarney Stone has been labelled as the world’s most unhygienic tourist attraction! But once you’ve kissed it, supposedly you are endowed with the “gift of the gab”, the ability to talk eloquently and perhaps deceptively without offending. The term “blarney” has come to mean flattering and deceptive talk.

46. Wall St. starter : IPO

An initial public offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

51. Auto company since 1899 : FIAT

Fiat is the largest car manufacturer in Italy, and is headquartered in Turin in the Piedmont region in the north of the country. Fiat was founded in 1899 by Giovanni Agnelli, when the company’s name was “Fabbrica Italiana di Automobili Torino” (FIAT). A few years ago, Fiat became the majority shareholder in Chrysler.

53. Org. for Jaguars, but not Panthers : AFC

The Jacksonville Jaguars have been in the NFL since 1995, and play in the American Football Conference (AFC).

The Carolina Panthers are the NFL team based in Charlotte, North Carolina.

55. Idiot : NIMROD

“Nimrod” is a slang term used to describe a foolish person.

57. French military hat : KEPI

A kepi is a circular cap with a visor, one that’s particularly associated with the French military.

62. The “E” of Q.E.D. : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

63. Biblical twin : ESAU

Esau, was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born to Isaac and Rebekah, the event was described “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother Jacob, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

65. M&M’s that were discontinued from 1976 to 1987 over fears about their dye : REDS

Forrest Mars, Sr. was the founder of the Mars Company. Forrest invented the Mars Bar while living over in England and then developed M&M’s when he returned to the US. Mars came up with the idea for M&M’s when he saw soldiers in the Spanish Civil War eating chocolate pellets. Those pellets had a hard shell of tempered chocolate on the outside to prevent them from melting. Mars got some of the funding to develop the M&M from William Murrie, the son of the president of Hershey’s Chocolate. It is the “M” and “M” from “Mars” and “Murrie” that gives the name to the candy.

66. Chip’s cartoon partner : DALE

Chip ‘n’ Dale are two chipmunk characters created by Disney in 1943. The characters’ names are a pun on “Chippendale”, the family name of noted English furniture designer Thomas Chippendale.

67. Rear admiral’s rear : STERN

The rank of rear admiral is usually the lowest of the “admiral” ranks. The term originated with the Royal Navy. In days gone by, an admiral would head up the activities of a naval squadron from the central vessel. He would be assisted by a “vice admiral” who acted from the lead vessel. There would also be a lower-ranking admiral to command the ships at the rear of the squadron, and this was the “rear admiral”.

Down

2. Super Bowl of 2018 : LII

Super Bowl LII was played at the end of the 2017 season, with the Philadelphia Eagles defeating the defending champions, the New England Patriots. That result marked the first ever Super Bowl victory for the Eagles.

3. Burns in film : KEN

Ken Burns directs and produces epic documentary films that usually make inventive use of archive footage. Recent works are the sensational “The War” (about the US in WWII) and the magnificent “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea”, as well as 2014’s “The Roosevelts: An Intimate History”. Burns’ latest offering is 2017’s “The Vietnam War” that he co-directed with Lynn Novick.

4. Lively dances : JIGS

The dance known as a “jig” is most associated with Ireland and Scotland. In traditional Irish dancing, the jig is second in popularity only to the reel. The most famous Irish jig is probably “The Irish Washerwoman”. I may not dance a jig, but I sure do know the tune of “The Irish Washerwoman” …

6. Yankee Joe whose #6 was retired : TORRE

As a manager, Joe Torre was part of four World Series wins, all of them with the New York Yankees baseball team. Torre is an Italian American who was born in Brooklyn, New York. During the run up (pun intended!) to the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Torre carried the Olympic flame part of the way through Florence in Italy, handing it over to the next runner at the famous Ponte Vecchio. I’d guess that was quite a thrill for him …

8. Hyundai alternatives : KIAS

Kia Motors is the second largest manufacturer of cars in South Korea, behind Hyundai (and Hyundai is a part owner in Kia now). Kia was founded in 1944 as a manufacturer of bicycle parts, and did indeed produce Korea’s first domestic bicycle. The company’s original name was Kyungsung Precision Industry, with the Kia name introduced in 1952.

10. YouTube popularity metric : VIEWS

YouTube is a video-sharing website that was launched in 2005 by three ex-PayPal employees. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion. Yep, $1.65 billion, less than two years after it was founded …

12. Accessory for a cravat : TIE BAR

The cravat originated in Croatia and was an accessory used with a military uniform. Cravats were introduced to the fashion-conscious French by Croatian mercenaries enlisted into a regiment of the French army. The English placed a lot of emphasis on the knot used for the cravat, and in the period after the Battle of Waterloo the cravat came to be known as a “tie”. What we now call a tie in English is still called a “cravate” in French.

18. Places where goods are sometimes fenced : PAWNSHOPS

I remember the bad old days growing up in Dublin, Ireland, when my mother had to go to the pawnshop (I hope she doesn’t read this!). I’d wait outside with my brother, looking up at the pawnbroker’s sign, three gold balls hanging down from a metal bar. This traditional sign used by pawnbrokers is said to date back to the Medici family as the sign had symbolic meaning in the province of Lombardy where the Medici family reigned supreme. Because of this connection, pawnshop banking was originally called Lombard banking.

24. ___ mater (brain membrane) : DURA

The three membranes that envelop the brain and spinal cord are referred to as the meninges. From the inside to the outside, these membranes are known as:

  • the pia mater (“tender mother” in Latin)
  • the arachnoid mater (“spider-like mother”)
  • the dura mater (“tough mother”)

29. ___ ex machina : DEUS

“Deus ex machina” is a Latin phrase that translates as “god out of the machine”. “Deus ex machina” is a plot device used in some works whereby some apparently inextricable problem is suddenly resolved by an unexpected intervention. The term was first used in Horace’s “Ars Poetica”.

33. Ore, for one? : TYPO

The word “ore” might be written as “one” if there’s a typo.

34. “The Cask of Amontillado” writer : POE

“The Cask of Amontillado” is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe that was first published in 1846. The story tells of a vengeful man who lures his enemy into the catacombs, locks him in chains and then traps him in a niche by sealing it with a brick wall. Nice man …

38. Zeno of ___ (philosopher) : ELEA

Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his paradoxes, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as “Achilles and the Tortoise”, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival. Or can he …?

42. Mixed martial arts org. : UFC

The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is the largest promoter in the world of mixed martial arts competitions. I think the idea is that competitors fight each other in various disciplines to see who is the “best of the best” …

48. Ring-shaped islands : ATOLLS

An atoll is a coral island that is shaped in a ring and enclosing a lagoon. There is still some debate as to how an atoll forms, but a theory proposed by Charles Darwin while on his famous voyage aboard HMS Beagle still holds sway. Basically an atoll was once a volcanic island that had subsided and fallen into the sea. The coastline of the island is home to coral growth which persists even as the island continues to subside internal to the circling coral reef.

55. Org. behind the New Horizons probe : NASA

NASA’s New Horizons space probe was launched in 2006 with the primary mission of flying by and studying Pluto. As New Horizons launched, Pluto was officially classified as a planet, but a few months later it was downgraded to a dwarf planet. New Horizons achieved its primary mission in 2015, and is now headed towards a large object in the Kuiper Belt, scheduled to arrive there in 2019.

59. Ruby of the silver screen : DEE

Ruby Dee was an actress and civil rights activist. On the big screen, she is perhaps best remembered for co-starring in “A Raisin in the Sun” alongside Sidney Poitier, in “Do the Right Thing” alongside her husband Ossie Davis, and in “American Gangster” in which she played Denzel Washington’s mother.

61. Nine-digit ID : SSN

A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot. Since 2011 SSNs are assigned randomly. However, some random numbers have been excluded from use, i.e. Area Numbers 000, 666 (!) and 900-999.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Jan. honoree : MLK, JR
6. Mild reprimands : TSKS
10. Industrial vessels : VATS
14. “Old MacDonald” refrain : E-I-E-I-O
15. State said to be “high in the middle” : OHIO
16. “Thus with a kiss ___” (Romeo’s last words) : I DIE
17. Glider measurement : WINGSPREAD
19. “Have you ___ wondered …?” : EVER
20. Close calls : SCARES
21. Certain close-knit social media group : TWIBE
22. “Brigadoon” co-star Charisse : CYD
25. Actor Wilson who has appeared with Ben Stiller in 12 films : OWEN
26. Maker of the Pathfinder and Rogue : NISSAN
27. Grilled order with corned beef : REUBEN
29. Accomplished : DID
30. Before, in poetry : ERE
31. Long past time? : YORE
32. Guinness record holder for the U.S. city with the most consecutive days of sun (768), informally : ST PETE
35. “Look out!” … and warning when encountering the circled things in this puzzle : WATCH YOUR STEP!
40. “Fingers crossed!” : HOPE SO!
41. Baseball’s Matty, Felipe or Moises : ALOU
43. Some people have a gift for it : GAB
46. Wall St. starter : IPO
47. Addressee modifier on an envelope : CARE OF
49. Media sales team, informally : AD REPS
51. Auto company since 1899 : FIAT
53. Org. for Jaguars, but not Panthers : AFC
54. Big blows : WHAMS
55. Idiot : NIMROD
57. French military hat : KEPI
58. Massive electoral victories : LANDSLIDES
62. The “E” of Q.E.D. : ERAT
63. Biblical twin : ESAU
64. Creepy looks : LEERS
65. M&M’s that were discontinued from 1976 to 1987 over fears about their dye : REDS
66. Chip’s cartoon partner : DALE
67. Rear admiral’s rear : STERN

Down

1. Kitten’s call : MEW
2. Super Bowl of 2018 : LII
3. Burns in film : KEN
4. Lively dances : JIGS
5. ___ Lee Browne, actor/director in the Theater Hall of Fame : ROSCOE
6. Yankee Joe whose #6 was retired : TORRE
7. Glossy look : SHEEN
8. Hyundai alternatives : KIAS
9. Lawn order : SOD
10. YouTube popularity metric : VIEWS
11. Counsel : ADVISE
12. Accessory for a cravat : TIE BAR
13. Peaceful : SERENE
18. Places where goods are sometimes fenced : PAWNSHOPS
21. Listings in a nautical table : TIDES
22. Shout : CRY
23. “Dang, that hurts!” : YEOW!
24. ___ mater (brain membrane) : DURA
26. Hobbyists’ racers controlled remotely : NITRO CARS
28. Transaction with a bookie : BET
29. ___ ex machina : DEUS
33. Ore, for one? : TYPO
34. “The Cask of Amontillado” writer : POE
36. Contents of a poker pot : CHIPS
37. Damage, as a reputation : TAR
38. Zeno of ___ (philosopher) : ELEA
39. [And it’s gone!] : POOF!
42. Mixed martial arts org. : UFC
43. Rubbernecker : GAWKER
44. Stick (to) : ADHERE
45. Bikini insert : BRA PAD
48. Ring-shaped islands : ATOLLS
50. Sends out : EMITS
51. What follows the semis : FINAL
52. “It should be my turn soon” : I’M DUE
55. Org. behind the New Horizons probe : NASA
56. Nutritionist’s plan : DIET
58. Was in front : LED
59. Ruby of the silver screen : DEE
60. Blunder : ERR
61. Nine-digit ID : SSN

11 thoughts on “0122-19 NY Times Crossword 22 Jan 19, Tuesday”

  1. 16:45minutes. 4 look ups. Missed the theme. “Twibe”? C’mon… Also not sports savvy, so football and martial arts orgs were a bust.

  2. Hooray I finally managed to get this blog back.
    17:48 no errors but I was very tempted to put tribe in 21 ac.
    What the heck is twibe?

  3. No errors. I also pondered over TWIBE for a long time. I just could not believe that I had it correctly but I finally settled since nothing else would work.

    Bill, thanks for the blurb on JIG. I went right to YouTube to listen to The Irish Washerwoman. I first got turned on to Irish music and dance when I saw the original video of Michael Flatley and Riverdance. I was amazed by this great Irish contribution to the world. I am of Scot descent but I must say that when it comes to JIGs, the Irish beat the Scots hands down.

  4. Did not finish. Mostly pretty easy again, but the mid-east did me in even though I had TAR POOF ALOU. I just couldn’t see the CAREOF. Darn. Not that vague.

    Also didn’t fill in BRAPAD KEPI even though I was pretty sure it was not BRAWAD KEWI.

    After yesterday, ATOLLS was no problem. I kind of liked TYPO seeing it right away. I’m getting better at those. But, I live in OHIO, and thought it really was High, did not see HI.

    I live in Summit County. Akron is Greek for Summit (loosely). The word Acropolis comes from the Greek word Akron.

    Also did not know about EIEIO and OHIO.

    All in all, had fun with this one.

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