0113-19 NY Times Crossword 13 Jan 19, Sunday

Constructed by: Andy Kravis
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Parlor Tricks

Themed answers are common two-word phrases. The first word is referred to directly in the clue, and the second word is something one might order in an ice cream PARLOR:

  • 23A. At the ice cream parlor, the grand marshal ordered a … : PARADE FLOAT
  • 39A. The confirmed bachelor ordered a … : SINGLE MALT
  • 42A. The crossing guard ordered a … : TRAFFIC CONE
  • 67A. The amateur singer ordered a … : KARAOKE BAR
  • 70A. The dental hygienist ordered a … : SUCTION CUP
  • 92A. The Apollo Theater usher ordered a … : HARLEM SHAKE
  • 97A. The pastry chef ordered a … : BAKING SODA
  • 115A. And the homebody ordered an … : INSIDE SCOOP

Bill’s time: 16m 46s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

11. Total nerdburger : DWEEB

“Dweeb” is relatively recent American slang that came out of college life in the late sixties. Dweeb, squarepants, nerd; they’re all not-nice terms that mean the same thing, i.e. someone excessively studious and socially inept.

16. The Mormon Church, for short : LDS

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) is known colloquially as the Mormon Church.

20. Company with a Roman centurion logo, informally : AMEX

“Amex” is short for “American Express”, the name of the financial services company that is best known for its credit card, charge card and traveler’s check businesses. The company name is indicative of its original business. American Express was founded in 1850 in Buffalo, New York as an express mail service.

21. Name shouted at the end of the “Flintstones” closing theme song : WILMA!

Wilma is the wife of cartoon character Fred Flintstone. On the TV show, Wilma was voiced by Jean Vander Pyl. Vander Pyl was also provided the voice for Rosie the Robot on “The Jetsons”.

22. I.S.P. option : AOL

AOL was a leading Internet Service Provider (ISP) in the 1980s and 1990s. The company does still provide dial-up access to the Internet for some subscribers, but most users now access AOL using faster, non-AOL ISPs.

25. R&B’s ___ Brothers : ISLEY

The Isley Brothers are an R&B group from Cincinnati, Ohio. The original lineup was a vocal trio consisting of three brothers: O’Kelly, Jr., Rudolph and Ronald Isley. The three brothers wrote the fabulous 1959 hit “Shout”, the song which brought the group its first success.

28. Weak-minded type : DOTARD

A dotard is a person who is in his or her dotage, someone who has become senile.

30. Something lost in old literature : PARADISE

“Paradise Lost” is an epic poem written by Englishman John Milton. It is indeed an epic work, published originally in ten volumes with over ten thousand lines of verse. The “paradise” that is “lost” is the Garden of Eden, from which Adam and Eve were expelled by God in the “Fall of Man”.

32. Airline to Ben Gurion Airport : EL AL

Ben Gurion International (TLV) is Israel’s main airport, and is located in the city of Lod just a few miles southeast of Tel Aviv. The airport is named for David Ben-Gurion, Israel’s first prime minister.

38. Govt. org. under Homeland Security : ICE

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is a federal agency that was founded within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in 2003. ICE was effectively formed from a merger of sections of the US Customs Service and the Immigration and Naturalization Service.

39. The confirmed bachelor ordered a … : SINGLE MALT

In order to be labelled as “single malt” scotch, the whisky must come from a single distillery (hence “single”), and from a mash of malted grain (hence “malt”) that has been processed in a pot still.

47. Accident investigation org. : NTSB

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is responsible for the investigation of major accidents involving transportation. Included in this broad definition is the transportation of fluids in pipelines. The organization is independent in that it has no ties to other government agencies or departments so that its investigations can be viewed as “impartial”. The NTSB also earns a little money for the US as it hires out its investigation teams to countries who don’t have the necessary resources available on their own soil.

49. Navigational aid, for short : GPS

Global positioning system (GPS)

50. Actress Aniston, in the tabloids : JEN

Jennifer Aniston won a 2002 Emmy for playing Rachel on the great sitcom “Friends”. Jennifer’s parents are both actors, and her godfather was the actor Telly Savalas.

52. God, in Rastafarianism : JAH

“Jah” is a shortened form of “Jehovah”, and is a name often associated with the Rastafari movement.

I must admit that I don’t really know much about Rastafarianism. I do know that a “Rasta”, such as Bob Marley, is a follower of the movement. Some say that Rastafarianism is a religion, some not. I also know that it involves the worship of Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia.

59. Frequent co-star of Mastroianni : LOREN

Sophia Loren certainly has earned her exalted position in the world of movies. In 1962 Loren won an Oscar for Best Actress for her role in the Italian film “Two Women”, the first actress to win an Academy Award for a non-English speaking performance. She received a second nomination for Best Actress for her role in “Marriage Italian-Style”, another Italian-language movie, released in 1964.

Marcello Mastroianni was an actor from Italy who was noted for his collaborations with fellow-Italian actress Sophia Loren. One of Mastroianni’s more famous performances is in Federico Fellini’s 1960 classic “La Dolce Vita”. I’d guess that his most celebrated appearance with Sophia Loren was in “Marriage Italian Style” released in 1964.

61. “Frozen” snowman : OLAF

In the 2013 animated film “Frozen”, Olaf is a happy-go-lucky snowman who provides a lot of comic relief in the movie. Olaf is voiced by actor and comedian Josh Gad.

65. How many verbs in Esperanto are irregular : NONE

Esperanto is an international language specially constructed to create some level of harmony between people from different parts of the world. It was created in the late 1800s by an opthamologist from modern-day Poland. Tens of thousands, and maybe even millions of people speak Esperanto, with some being taught it as a native language from birth.

66. Premium Cuban cigar brand : COHIBA

Cuban leader Fidel Castro smoked the Cohiba brand of cigar, which comes from his native land. The cigars made for Castro and his top officials were produced under conditions of tight security. Apparently, back in the early sixties, the CIA actually worked on the development of exploding cigars as a means of assassination.

67. The amateur singer ordered a … : KARAOKE BAR

“Karate” is a Japanese word meaning “empty hand”, and the related word “karaoke” translates as “empty orchestra”.

72. Radicchio relative : ENDIVE

Endive is a leaf vegetable belonging to the chicory genus, and is in the daisy family. Endive is also known as “escarole”.

75. Amtrak stops: Abbr. : STNS

Amtrak is the name used commercially by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation. “Amtrak” comes from a melding of the words “America” and “track”.

76. What an auctioneer’s gavel indicates : SALE

The small hammer that one raps on a table or desk to call a meeting to order, or perhaps to signify a sale at an auction, that’s called a gavel. The term “gavel” is actually American English, a word that emerged in the early 19th century.

78. Home planet of TV’s ALF : MELMAC

“ALF” is a sitcom that aired in the late eighties. The title character is a hand-puppet, and supposedly an alien named Gordon Shumway from the planet Melmac. The alien crash-landed into the house of amateur radio enthusiast Willie Tanner. Tanner renamed the intruder “ALF”, standing for “alien life form”.

82. Rapper who founded the record label Mass Appeal : NAS

Rapper Nas used to go by an earlier stage name “Nasty Nas”, and before that by his real name “Nasir bin Olu Dara Jones”. Nas released his first album “Illmatic” in 1994, and inventively titled his fifth studio album “Stillmatic”, released in 2001. Not my cup of tea, I would say …

83. Japanese drama : NOH

Noh is a form of musical drama in Japan that has been around since the 14th century. Many of the Noh performers are masked, allowing all the roles to be played by men, including the female parts.

85. ___-free : SCOT

The phrase “scot-free” means “free from punishment, restraint or obligation”. The term derives from the Old English “scotfreo” meaning “exempt from royal tax”, with “scot” being a royal tax.

89. Wine from central Tuscany : CHIANTI

Chianti is a red wine from the Chianti region of central Tuscany in Italy. Historically, Chianti was stored in a characteristically bulbous bottle wrapped in a straw basket. However, the pragmatists have won the day and regular wine bottles tend to be used nowadays.

92. The Apollo Theater usher ordered a … : HARLEM SHAKE

The Harlem Shake is a dance that was introduced in the early eighties in the Harlem neighborhood of New York. The Harlem Shake was based on an Ethiopian dance called Eskista.

The Apollo Theater in the Harlem district of Manhattan, New York opened in 1914 as Hurtig and Seamon’s New Burlesque Theater. The original facility was a whites-only venue. When it was opened to African Americans in 1934, the name was changed to the Apollo.

97. The pastry chef ordered a … : BAKING SODA

“Bicarb” is a familiar term for sodium bicarbonate. Another name for the same compound is “baking soda”. When sodium carbonate is added to a batter, it reacts with acids and releases carbon dioxide which gives baked goods texture, all those “holes”.

100. Eastern philosophy : TAO

The name of the Chinese character “tao” translates as “path”, but the concept of Taoism signifies the true nature of the world.

102. Simpson with the 2004 hit “Pieces of Me” : ASHLEE

Ashlee Simpson is the younger sister of Jessica Simpson. They are both reality show stars. I know no more …

103. Arthur who composed “The Yeomen of the Guard” : SULLIVAN

“The Yeomen of the Guard” is an operetta by Gilbert & Sullivan, first performed in 1888. The work was immediately a big hit, and ran for 423 performances. Many regard the score to “The Yeomen of the Guard” as Arthur Sullivan’s finest.

113. Places for cheap drinks : DIVES

We’ve been using the word “dive” in American English for a run-down bar since the latter half of the 19th century. The term comes from the fact that disreputable taverns were usually located in basements, so one had to literally and figuratively dive into them.

118. “We’ll teach you to drink deep ___ you depart”: Hamlet : ERE

“We’ll teach you to drink deep ere you depart.” is a line from William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, and is spoken by Hamlet to his friend Horatio. Although we don’t know from where Horatio actually hails, he is not a regular at the Danish court. Here, Hamlet is telling his friend that by the time he heads home, Hamlet and his courtiers will have taught him how to hold his booze …

119. Stores with Småland play areas : IKEAS

The furniture chain IKEA was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943, when he was just 17-years-old. IKEA is an acronym standing for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don’t forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

122. Director Guillermo ___ Toro : DEL

Guillermo del Toro is a film director from Guadalajara in Mexico who has had a of success directing and producing American films. His best-known works are probably action movies like “Blade II” (2002) and “Hellboy” (2004).

124. Beaux-___ : ARTS

In French, one might view “beaux-arts” (fine arts) at a “musée” (museum).

Down

1. Elided greeting : ‘SUP?

I think that “sup?” is slang for “what’s up?”

3. Supermodel Lima : ADRIANA

Adriana Lima is fashion model from Brazil. Lima is perhaps best known as one of the Victoria’s Secret Angels. Her modelling career started when she won a “Supermodel of Brazil” competition in 1996, at 15 years of age.

6. It can symbolize an open mouth in an 8-Down : DEE
(8D. See 6-Down : EMOTICON)

An emoticon is a glyph created using text characters to represent facial features, and usually oriented sideways. The emoticon is designed to indicate emotion or attitude. The classic example is the smiley face: 🙂

7. Kind of intake, to a nutritionist : CALORIC

I wish we’d stop using the term “calorie”, because it is so confusing. In terms of physics, a calorie is amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree celsius (at one atmosphere of pressure). The so called “food calorie” is one thousand times as large, as it is defined in terms of kilograms instead of grams. In attempts to differentiate between these two definitions, the former is sometimes referred to as the “small calorie” and is given the symbol “cal”. The latter is referred to as the “large calorie” and given the symbol “Cal”, with a capital C. If only we’d use the SI system of units, we’d be think in just joules, instead of large and small and food calories.

9. Some narcs : DEA AGENTS

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

11. Bad thing on a motorist’s record, for short : DWI

In some states, there is no longer a legal difference between a DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) and a DUI (Driving Under the Influence). Other states retain that difference, so that by definition a DUI is a lesser offence than a DWI.

13. First name of the First Lady of Song : ELLA

Ella Fitzgerald, the “First Lady of Song”, had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Her mother died while Ella was still a schoolgirl, and around that time the young girl became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow Fitzgerald managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

14. Some sights in Oz : EMERALDS

According to L. Frank Baum’s series of “Oz” novels, there are two Yellow Brick Roads that lead to the Emerald City from Munchkin Country, and it turns out that Dorothy chose the harder of the two. In addition to the yellow roads, there is also a Red Brick Road, which leads from Munchkin County to the Country of the Quadlings.

15. Where many Golden State Warriors fans live : BAY AREA

The Golden State Warriors are our local NBA franchise out here in the San Francisco Bay Area and are based in Oakland, California. The team was founded in 1946 as the Philadelphia Warriors, becoming the San Francisco Warriors when they moved to City by the Bay in 1962. They changed named again (to Golden State) when they relocated to Oakland in 1971. The statewide name reflected the fact that the team played some of their 1971-72 season games in San Diego, and as such were “California’s” team.

16. Like much of the Western Hemisphere : LATIN AMERICAN

The Western Hemisphere is that half of the Earth’s surface lying to the west of the prime meridian (which runs through Greenwich). The opposing half of the planet is the Eastern Hemisphere.

29. Rehab affliction, for short : DTS

The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called delirium tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is “trembling madness”.

31. Bulbous, narrow-necked bottles : DEMIJOHNS

A carboy (also “demijohn”) is a large container for liquids, one usually with a capacity of 5 to 15 gallons. Glass and plastic carboys are often used at home for the fermentation of beer and wine.

32. Lifesaver, for short : EMT

Emergency medical technician (EMT)

33. Successful presidential slogan of old : I LIKE IKE

“I Like Ike” was a political slogan that originated with the grassroots movement to get Dwight D. Eisenhower (Ike) to run for president in the 1952 presidential election.

34. ___ al-Fitr (holiday marking the close of Ramadan) : EID

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and is traditionally a period of fasting. The faithful who observe Ramadan refrain from eating, drinking and sexual relations from dawn to dusk everyday, a lesson in patience, humility and spirituality.

44. Channel with highlights : ESPN

The initialism “ESPN” stands for Entertainment Sports Programming Network. ESPN is a cable network that broadcasts sports programming 24 hours a day, and was launched back in 1979. ESPN has a lot of ardent fans. Several parents have named children Espn (usually pronounced “Espen”) on honor of the network.

51. Annual science fiction award : NEBULA

The best works of science fiction and fantasy published each year are recognized annually by the Nebula Awards. The first Nebulas were awarded in 1966.

53. Family support group : AL-ANON

Al-Anon and Alateen are fellowships for relatives and friends of alcoholics. Alateen specifically supports teens who are affected by another’s drinking, whereas Al-Anon focuses on people of all ages.

56. Writing of W. S. Gilbert : LIBRETTO

A libretto can be the book that contains the text of a dramatic musical work, with the text itself also being called the libretto.

59. English facilities : LOO

It has been suggested that the British term “loo” comes from “Waterloo” (water closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo”, in which the pot was called the loo!

62. Country singer with the #1 albums “Breathe” and “Cry” : FAITH HILL

Faith Hill is a country singer from Ridgeland, Mississippi. Hill is married to fellow country singer Tim McGraw.

66. Females whose gender identities match their gender assignments at birth : CISWOMEN

The term “cisgender” is now used as the opposite of “transgender”. Cisgender people have a gender identity that matches the sex they were assigned at birth.

68. Some gametes : OVA

A gamete is a reproductive cell that has half the full complement of genes needed to make a normal cell. In sexual reproduction, it takes two gametes, one from each parent, to fuse into one cell which then develops into a new organism. The female gamete is the ovum, and the male the sperm.

69. Tach readings : RPMS

The tachometer takes its name from the Greek word “tachos” meaning “speed”. A tachometer in a car measures engine revolutions per minute (rpm).

71. Savings vehicle, in brief : T-NOTE

A Treasury note (T-note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-bond matures in 20-30 years.

78. ___ rea (intent to commit a crime) : MENS

“Mens rea” is Latin for “guilty mind” and is a central concept in criminal law. The concept is expanded to “actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea” meaning “the act does not make a person guilty unless the mind be also guilty”. In other words, a someone should not be deemed guilty of an act, unless he or she had a “guilty mind”, intended to do wrong.

88. What “goes to” a movie star : THE OSCAR

Legend has it that actor Emilio Fernández was the model for the Oscar statuette. Cedric Gibbons, art director at MGM, created the design and supposedly convinced a reluctant Fernández to pose nude for “Oscar”.

91. T.S.A. requirements : IDS

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the agency that employs the good folks who check passengers and baggage at airports.

93. Some counterculture gatherings : LOVE-INS

A “love-in” is a peaceful protest that is most associated with the late sixties. The gatherings themselves often involved meditation, music and the use of psychedelic drugs. The term “love-in” was apparently coined by LA comedian Peter Bergman who had a radio show at that time.

94. Theoretical : A PRIORI

In the world of philosophy, one can have “a priori” knowledge or “a posteriori” knowledge. A priori (“from the earlier”) knowledge is independent of experience, it is just known or assumed. For example, one might say that “all boys are males” is a priori knowledge. A posteriori knowledge relies on experience or some empirical evidence. For example, one might say that “boys are more likely to be diagnosed with ADD” is a posteriori knowledge.

96. W.W. II arena : ETO

General Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE) was in command of the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during WWII.

99. 8: Abbr. : AUG

As the first Emperor of Rome, Octavian was given the name Caesar Augustus. The month of August, originally called “Sextilis” in Latin, was renamed in honor of Augustus.

104. Soviet space dog of 1957 : LAIKA

The Soviet Union launched the Sputnik satellite towards the end of 1957. The first in a series of space missions, that first satellite was just a 23-inch diameter “ball” trailing four antennas. Sputnik 2 was launched just a month later, and carried the first living passenger into orbit, namely a dog named Laika. The word “sputnik” means “co-traveller” in Russian.

111. Eponym of the Courage Award given at the ESPYs : ASHE

The Arthur Ashe Courage Award has been presented annually since 1993 as part of the ESPY Awards. Named for tennis great Arthur Ashe, the Courage Award is presented to individuals whose contributions “transcend sports”. The list of recipients includes Howard Cosell (1995), Muhammad Ali (1997), Billie Jean King (1999), Nelson Mandela (2009), Caitlyn Jenner (2015) and Eunice Kennedy Shriver (2017).

114. Fed. agcy. founded by 24-Down : SSA
(24D. Pres. who signed the Glass-Steagall Act : FDR)

The Social Security Administration (SSA) was set up as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. The first person to receive a monthly retirement benefit was Ida May Fuller of Vermont who received her first check for the sum of $22.54 after having contributed for three years through payroll taxes. The New Deal turned out to be a good deal for Ms. Fuller, as she lived to 100 years of age and received a total benefit of almost $23,000, whereas her three years of contributions added up to just $24.75.

116. ___ Beach, Hawaii : ‘EWA

‘Ewa Beach is on the coast of Oahu in Hawai’i. One of ‘Ewa Beach’s claim to fame is that it hosted and won the Little League World Series in 2005, by beating a team from the island nation of Curaçao in extra innings.

117. “Gangnam Style” rapper : PSY

“PSY” is the stage name of South Korean rapper Park Jae-sang. PSY became an international star when his 2102 music video “Gangnam Style” went viral on YouTube. That video had over 1 billion views on YouTube in about six months, making it the most viewed YouTube video clip of all time. I am not one of that billion …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Locale for a bottom feeder : SEABED
7. Relinquish : CEDE
11. Total nerdburger : DWEEB
16. The Mormon Church, for short : LDS
19. Having come apart : UNDONE
20. Company with a Roman centurion logo, informally : AMEX
21. Name shouted at the end of the “Flintstones” closing theme song : WILMA!
22. I.S.P. option : AOL
23. At the ice cream parlor, the grand marshal ordered a … : PARADE FLOAT
25. R&B’s ___ Brothers : ISLEY
26. Effort : TRY
27. Atoms : BITS
28. Weak-minded type : DOTARD
30. Something lost in old literature : PARADISE
32. Airline to Ben Gurion Airport : EL AL
33. Water : IRRIGATE
35. Sites with corporate names, often : ARENAS
36. Low-status, as work : MENIAL
38. Govt. org. under Homeland Security : ICE
39. The confirmed bachelor ordered a … : SINGLE MALT
42. The crossing guard ordered a … : TRAFFIC CONE
45. See 46-Across : … DEAD AIM
46. With 45-Across, focus directly on hitting someone : TAKE …
47. Accident investigation org. : NTSB
49. Navigational aid, for short : GPS
50. Actress Aniston, in the tabloids : JEN
52. God, in Rastafarianism : JAH
55. “Get ___!” : REAL
57. Winds, as videotape : SPOOLS
59. Frequent co-star of Mastroianni : LOREN
61. “Frozen” snowman : OLAF
63. Question of doubt : IS IT?
65. How many verbs in Esperanto are irregular : NONE
66. Premium Cuban cigar brand : COHIBA
67. The amateur singer ordered a … : KARAOKE BAR
70. The dental hygienist ordered a … : SUCTION CUP
72. Radicchio relative : ENDIVE
73. Smelly : RIPE
75. Amtrak stops: Abbr. : STNS
76. What an auctioneer’s gavel indicates : SALE
77. In a way : SORTA
78. Home planet of TV’s ALF : MELMAC
80. Planted : SOWN
82. Rapper who founded the record label Mass Appeal : NAS
83. Japanese drama : NOH
84. Slippery, say : WET
85. ___-free : SCOT
87. Friendly greeting on the highway : TOOT
89. Wine from central Tuscany : CHIANTI
92. The Apollo Theater usher ordered a … : HARLEM SHAKE
97. The pastry chef ordered a … : BAKING SODA
100. Eastern philosophy : TAO
101. Ocular socket : EYEPIT
102. Simpson with the 2004 hit “Pieces of Me” : ASHLEE
103. Arthur who composed “The Yeomen of the Guard” : SULLIVAN
106. Approximately : OR SO
107. All out : WHOLE HOG
110. Won : GAINED
111. Without alteration : AS IS
112. Filming locale : LOT
113. Places for cheap drinks : DIVES
115. And the homebody ordered an … : INSIDE SCOOP
118. “We’ll teach you to drink deep ___ you depart”: Hamlet : ERE
119. Stores with Småland play areas : IKEAS
120. Perspicacious : KEEN
121. Fishing sites : WHARFS
122. Director Guillermo ___ Toro : DEL
123. Earth : TERRA
124. Beaux-___ : ARTS
125. Vaporize : AERIFY

Down

1. Elided greeting : ‘SUP?
2. One who facilitates self-destructive behavior : ENABLER
3. Supermodel Lima : ADRIANA
4. Marina apparatus : BOAT LIFT
5. Stops : ENDS
6. It can symbolize an open mouth in an 8-Down : DEE
7. Kind of intake, to a nutritionist : CALORIC
8. See 6-Down : EMOTICON
9. Some narcs : DEA AGENTS
10. What “X” may stand for : EXTRA
11. Bad thing on a motorist’s record, for short : DWI
12. Pufflet : WISP
13. First name of the First Lady of Song : ELLA
14. Some sights in Oz : EMERALDS
15. Where many Golden State Warriors fans live : BAY AREA
16. Like much of the Western Hemisphere : LATIN AMERICAN
17. Along the back : DORSAL
18. Most foxy : SLYEST
24. Pres. who signed the Glass-Steagall Act : FDR
29. Rehab affliction, for short : DTS
31. Bulbous, narrow-necked bottles : DEMIJOHNS
32. Lifesaver, for short : EMT
33. Successful presidential slogan of old : I LIKE IKE
34. ___ al-Fitr (holiday marking the close of Ramadan) : EID
37. Miles away : AFAR
40. Fails (to) : NEGLECTS
41. Problems of amnesia : GAPS
43. Stop : CEASE
44. Channel with highlights : ESPN
48. Angry chorus : BOOS
51. Annual science fiction award : NEBULA
52. Isn’t serious : JOKES
53. Family support group : AL-ANON
54. Vegas establishment with a giant guitar sign : HARD ROCK HOTEL
56. Writing of W. S. Gilbert : LIBRETTO
58. Weight : ONUS
59. English facilities : LOO
60. Scruffs : NAPES
62. Country singer with the #1 albums “Breathe” and “Cry” : FAITH HILL
64. Follow closely : TAIL
66. Females whose gender identities match their gender assignments at birth : CISWOMEN
68. Some gametes : OVA
69. Tach readings : RPMS
71. Savings vehicle, in brief : T-NOTE
74. A pop : EACH
78. ___ rea (intent to commit a crime) : MENS
79. Winter garment insert : COAT LINER
81. Likely to butt in : NOSY
84. Pay up? : WAGE HIKE
86. Toy to keep track of? : TRAIN SET
88. What “goes to” a movie star : THE OSCAR
90. “That’s really important to me” : I NEED IT
91. T.S.A. requirements : IDS
93. Some counterculture gatherings : LOVE-INS
94. Theoretical : A PRIORI
95. Dismissal, slangily : KISS-OFF
96. W.W. II arena : ETO
97. Had a good cry : BAWLED
98. Like sailors on leave : ASHORE
99. 8: Abbr. : AUG
104. Soviet space dog of 1957 : LAIKA
105. Contribute : ADD
108. No longer bothered by : OVER
109. Manual selection : GEAR
111. Eponym of the Courage Award given at the ESPYs : ASHE
114. Fed. agcy. founded by 24-Down : SSA
116. ___ Beach, Hawaii : ‘EWA
117. “Gangnam Style” rapper : PSY

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