1208-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 8 Dec 15, Tuesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Neville Fogarty
THEME: Break Fast … each of today’s themed answers starts with FA- and ends with -ST, so we are BREAKING FA-ST:

61A. Free motel offering nowadays … or what 18-, 26-, 40- and 52-Across do? : BREAKFAST (BREAK FAST)
18A. Sprinkle from Tinker Bell : FAIRY DUST
26A. The one for the Kennedys has three knights’ helmets on it : FAMILY CREST
40A. Classic sitcom with kids called Princess, Bud and Kitten : FATHER KNOWS BEST
52A. Potential charge against a bounty hunter : FALSE ARREST

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Yom Kippur service leader : RABBI
Yom Kippur is the holiest day of the year for the Jewish people and is also known as the Day of Atonement.

6. Dutch cheese : EDAM
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

10. Talkative half of a magic duo : PENN
Penn Jillette is one half of the duo of magicians known as Penn & Teller (Penn is the one who talks). Penn teamed up with Teller on stage in 1981, having met him through a friend back in 1974. As well as being talkative onstage, Penn is very vocal offstage when it comes his causes and beliefs. He is a devout atheist, a libertarian and a supporter of free-market capitalism.

14. Blanched : PALED
In cooking, “to blanch” a food substance is to plunge it into boiling water for a short time and then plunge it into iced water to stop the cooking process. The literal meaning of “blanch” is “whiten” (from French), but the procedure does not necessarily result in a color change. The desired outcome is usually a softening of texture or a reduction in a strong taste.

15. Former Italian currency : LIRA
The word “lira” is used in a number of countries for currency. “Lira” comes from the Latin for “pound” and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro in 2002.

18. Sprinkle from Tinker Bell : FAIRY DUST
Tinker Bell is a fairy in the “Peter Pan” story by J. M. Barrie. “Tink” is a minor character in the original play and novel, but evolved into a major character in the many, many film and television adaptation of the tale.

23. Mountain ___ : DEW
If you check the can, you’ll see that “Mountain Dew” is now marketed as “Mtn Dew”.

24. Car rental add-on : GPS
Global Positioning System (GPS)

26. The one for the Kennedys has three knights’ helmets on it : FAMILY CREST
Helmets on coat of arms or family crest signify wisdom and security in defense.

31. Classic Camaro : IROC
The IROC-Z is a model of Camaro, introduced in 1978. The IROC-Z takes its name from a famous stock car race, the International Race of Champions.

32. 1990s Indian P.M. : RAO
P. V. Narasimha Rao was Prime Minister of India from 1991 to 1996. Rao is seen by most as the leader who transformed his country’s economy into the market-driven engine that it is today.

33. Chicken ___ king : A LA
A dish prepared “a la king” (usually chicken or turkey), is food prepared in a cream sauce, with mushrooms, pimentos, green peppers and sherry.

34. Headlight gas : XENON
Metal halide lamps that are called xenons don’t actually rely on the incorporated xenon gas to generate light. The xenon gas is added so that the lamp comes on “instantly”. Without the xenon, the lamp would start up rather like a street lamp, flickering and sputtering for a while before staying alight.

40. Classic sitcom with kids called Princess, Bud and Kitten : FATHER KNOWS BEST
“Father Knows Best” is a radio and television sitcom that ran in the 1940s and 1950s. The title character was played by Robert Young, the actor who later played the title role on “Marcus Welby, M.D.”

46. ___ es Salaam : DAR
Dar es Salaam is the largest city in Tanzania, and sits right on the east coast of Africa. The city’s name is usually translated from Arabic as “Haven of Peace”.

47. Cardinal cap letters : STL
The St. Louis Cardinals were originally called the “Brown Stockings”, changing their name to the “Perfectos” in 1899. That obviously didn’t go down well with the locals, as the owners changed it one year later to the Cardinals.

50. Operating system used since the 1970s : UNIX
Unix is a computer operating system that was developed at Bell Labs in 1969.

51. Precursor to reggae : SKA
Ska originated in Jamaica in the late fifties and was the precursor to reggae music. No one has a really definitive etymology of the term “ska”, but it is likely to be imitative of some sound.

57. Magnate Onassis : ARI
Aristotle Onassis was born to a successful Greek shipping entrepreneur in Smyrna in modern-day Turkey. However, his family lost its fortune during WWI and so Aristotle worked with his father to build up a new business empire centered on the importation of tobacco. In 1957, Aristotle founded the Greek national airline, what is today called Olympic Air, and he also got into the business of shipping oil around the world. He married Athina Livanos in 1946, the daughter of a wealthy shipping magnate. They couple had two children together, with one being the famous Christina Onassis. Livanos divorced Onassis on discovering him in bed with the opera singer Maria Callas. Onassis ended his affair with Callas in order to marry Jackie Kennedy in 1968.

58. 2000s Japanese P.M. : ABE
Shinzo Abe first became Prime Minister of Japan in 2006, at which time he was the youngest person to hold the post since WWII and was the first PM born after the war. Abe was in office for less than a year, but was voted in again in 2012. Abe is usually characterized as a right-wing nationalist.

68. Journals : LOGS
The word “logbook” dates back to the days when the captain of a ship kept a daily record of the vessel’s speed, progress etc. using a “log”. A log was a wooden float on a knotted line that was dropped overboard to measure speed through the water.

69. Qatari bigwig : EMIR
In English, emir can also be written as emeer, amir and ameer (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry. Qatar is scheduled to who the 2022 FIFA World Cup, although the nation’s eligibility to do so is under question after a far-reaching bribery scandal was uncovered at the sport’s governing body.

70. Lagniappe : EXTRA
A “langniappe” is something extra, a tip. It is an informal term used mainly in Louisiana and Texas, coming from New Orleans Creole.

72. Award won by Tiger Woods 23 times : ESPY
The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

By now, everyone must know everything there is to know about Tiger Woods. But did you know that Tiger’s real name is Eldrick Tont Woods? “Tont” is a traditional Thai name.

Down
1. Record stat : RPM
The first vinyl records designed to play at 33 1/3 rpm (revolutions per minute) were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first Long Play (LP) 33 1/3 rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm “single” the following year, in 1949.

3. Democratic stronghold : BLUE STATE
On political maps, red states are Republican and blue states Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple.

4. Group of quails : BEVY
“Bevy” is a collective noun used for a number of types of bird, including quail and swans. “Bevy” is also sometimes used as a collective noun for ladies.

“Quail” is a name used for several chicken-like wild birds. Quail are common prey for hunters.

5. Obsession : IDEE FIXE
An “idée fixe” (a French term) is basically a fixed idea, an obsession.

6. 2010 hit Broadway musical with the song “Sparklejollytwinklejingley” : ELF
“Elf” is a comedy movie released for the 2003 Christmas season. “Elf” was directed by Jon Favreau and stars Will Ferrell in the title role with James Caan supporting. It’s all about one of Santa’s elves who finds out he is human and goes to meet his father in New York City. The film was adapted for the stage as a musical that premiered in 2010.

7. Sábado, por ejemplo : DIA
In Spanish (Span.), the days of the week are all masculine (masc.) nouns. Unlike in English, the days of the week in Spanish are not capitalized when used in the middle of a sentence:

lunes – Monday
martes – Tuesday
miércoles – Wednesday
jueves – Thursday
viernes – Friday
sábado – Saturday
domingo – Sunday

9. Thomas Becket, e.g. : MARTYR
Thomas Becket was the Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until 1170, and came into conflict with King Henry II of England, claiming that the crown was seeking to exert undue pressure over the Church. That conflict led to Becket being murdered in Canterbury Cathedral by followers of the king. Only two years after his death, Becket was canonised by Pope Alexander III.

10. Bachelor ___ : PAD
Back in the 16th century a “pad” was a bundle of straw to lie on, and came to mean a “sleeping place” in the early 1700s. The term was revitalized in the hippie era.

19. “Spirit, mind and body” org. : YMCA
The YMCA is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of “a healthy spirit, mind and body”. The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

29. L.B.J. in-law Charles : ROBB
Chuck Robb is a former Governor of Virginia and former US Senator. Robb is married to Lynda Bird Johnson Robb, the daughter of former President Lyndon B. Johnson. The couple were married in the White House in December 1967.

35. Who “knows what it’s like to be the bad man,” according to a 1971 hit by the Who : NO ONE
“No one knows what it’s like to be the bad man” is a line from the 1971 song “Behind Blue Eyes” recorded by the Who.

You might be aware that the theme songs used by the three “CSI” television shows are numbers written and performed by The Who. The first choice for the “CSI: NY” theme was “Behind Blue Eyes”, but this was changed at the last minute to “Baba O’Riley”.

37. Holds aside for a year, in college sports : REDSHIRTS
To redshirt a college athlete is to hold him or her aside for a year in order to extend the players period of eligibility. The term dates back to the mid-fifties, when red shirts were worn by the scrimmage squad during practice.

38. Where Sharp and Panasonic are headquartered : OSAKA
Sharp Corporation is a Japanese manufacturer of electronic goods, headquartered in Osaka. The company takes its name from one of the first inventions of one of its founders: the Ever-Ready Sharp Pencil.

Not so long ago, Panasonic was called Matsushita Electronics, the name it took from its founder when the company started in 1918. The products manufactured back then were lamp sockets, and in 1927 the company introduced a bicycle lamp. Even after the company became famous for producing electrical and electronic goods, Matsushita had a very successful line of Panasonic bicycles, as the founder was raised in a family with a bicycle shop and he was passionate about cycling.

41. Big name in oil : HESS
The Hess Corporation is an oil company based in New York City. In 1964, the company started selling toy trucks with the Hess logo on them, in Hess gas stations. The company has been selling them every since, bringing out new models just before Christmas. Hess toy trucks have become quite collectible and the old ones can fetch a pretty penny.

48. Durable furniture wood : TEAK
Teak is a hardwood tree in the mint family, commonly found in monsoon forests of Asia.

52. Offering from Aesop : FABLE
Aesop is remembered today for his famous fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

53. Classic shirt brand : ARROW
The Arrow brand of shirts and collars was produced by Cluett Peabody & Company of Troy, New York. Cluett Peabody had a long-running ad campaign that featured “Arrow men”, i.e. men who wore Arrow collars and shirts.

54. Feudal lord : LIEGE
A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. “Liege” was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Very confusing …

55. Large quantities of paper : REAMS
A ream is 500 sheets of paper. As there were 24 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires made up a ream, there used to be 480 sheets in a ream. Ever since the standard was changed to 500, a 480-sheet packet of paper has been called a “short ream”.

60. Love letter letters : XOXO
In the sequence XOX, the X represents a kiss and the O a hug. Hugs and kisses …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Yom Kippur service leader : RABBI
6. Dutch cheese : EDAM
10. Talkative half of a magic duo : PENN
14. Blanched : PALED
15. Former Italian currency : LIRA
16. Salve ingredient : ALOE
17. Light violet : MAUVE
18. Sprinkle from Tinker Bell : FAIRY DUST
20. Checked out : EYED
22. 20s dispenser : ATM
23. Mountain ___ : DEW
24. Car rental add-on : GPS
26. The one for the Kennedys has three knights’ helmets on it : FAMILY CREST
30. Go bad : ROT
31. Classic Camaro : IROC
32. 1990s Indian P.M. : RAO
33. Chicken ___ king : A LA
34. Headlight gas : XENON
36. Surfer dudes, e.g. : BROS
40. Classic sitcom with kids called Princess, Bud and Kitten : FATHER KNOWS BEST
44. Genealogical drawing : TREE
45. 20 : SCORE
46. ___ es Salaam : DAR
47. Cardinal cap letters : STL
50. Operating system used since the 1970s : UNIX
51. Precursor to reggae : SKA
52. Potential charge against a bounty hunter : FALSE ARREST
56. It’s pitched with a pitchfork : HAY
57. Magnate Onassis : ARI
58. 2000s Japanese P.M. : ABE
59. Cry in place of a whistle, maybe : TAXI!
61. Free motel offering nowadays … or what 18-, 26-, 40- and 52-Across do? : BREAKFAST
65. Read carefully (over) : PORED
68. Journals : LOGS
69. Qatari bigwig : EMIR
70. Lagniappe : EXTRA
71. Lamb nursers : EWES
72. Award won by Tiger Woods 23 times : ESPY
73. “Oh, that’s a shame” : SO SAD

Down
1. Record stat : RPM
2. Small battery : AAA
3. Democratic stronghold : BLUE STATE
4. Group of quails : BEVY
5. Obsession : IDEE FIXE
6. 2010 hit Broadway musical with the song “Sparklejollytwinklejingley” : ELF
7. Sábado, por ejemplo : DIA
8. Popular computer typeface : ARIAL
9. Thomas Becket, e.g. : MARTYR
10. Bachelor ___ : PAD
11. Give the slip : ELUDE
12. Pokes (around) : NOSES
13. Fig. on a cereal box : NET WT
19. “Spirit, mind and body” org. : YMCA
21. Challenger : DARER
24. Bribery and such : GRAFT
25. Like some opposites : POLAR
27. Some frock wearers : MONKS
28. “Agreed” : I CONCUR
29. L.B.J. in-law Charles : ROBB
35. Who “knows what it’s like to be the bad man,” according to a 1971 hit by the Who : NO ONE
37. Holds aside for a year, in college sports : REDSHIRTS
38. Where Sharp and Panasonic are headquartered : OSAKA
39. Back-alley cat, e.g. : STRAY
41. Big name in oil : HESS
42. Place for a watch : WRIST
43. Celebrity scandal fodder : SEX TAPES
48. Durable furniture wood : TEAK
49. Add-on cost for a science course : LAB FEE
52. Offering from Aesop : FABLE
53. Classic shirt brand : ARROW
54. Feudal lord : LIEGE
55. Large quantities of paper : REAMS
60. Love letter letters : XOXO
62. Real blockhead : ASS
63. Drink with a straw : SIP
64. Make an effort : TRY
66. Notable time period : ERA
67. Mom’s partner : DAD

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4 thoughts on “1208-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 8 Dec 15, Tuesday”

  1. 9:45, with two errors. I wrote in ABO instead of ABE, giving me ROAMS instead of REAMS, and then neglected to check the clue for 55D, which would have alerted me to the error. I recognized IROC, but never knew what it stood for, and HESS as the name of an oil company is completely new to me. But … a good Tuesday puzzle … and I'll be more careful tomorrow … 🙂

  2. Bill—The term "pad" goes back to pre-hippie days. As one old enough to remember remember, the beatniks used the word "pad" prolifically. Of course, some social historians say there was no difference between beatniks and hippies.

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