1023-22 NY Times Crossword 23 Oct 22, Sunday

Constructed by: Daniel Bodily & Jeff Chen
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: To Be Continued

Twenty-three answers in the puzzle only make sense if we read BETWEEN THE LINES, combining several adjacent clues and combining the corresponding adjacent answers. I must admit, I spent 5-6 minutes after solving, just figuring out the theme:

  • 63A Read : BET (Read here to understand)
  • 64A Here : WEE
  • 65A To : NTH
  • 66A Understand : ELI
  • 67A 23 answers in today’s puzzle that don’t seem to match their clues : NES (BETWEEN THE LINES)
  • 1A Shops : ANTI (Shops peddling collectibles)
  • 5A Peddling : QUEST
  • 10A Collectibles : ORES (ANTIQUE STORES)
  • 35A Historic : MIRA (Historic hockey upset)
  • 36A Hockey : CLEO
  • 37A Upset : NICE (MIRACLE ON ICE)
  • 54A Waste : GARB (Waste disposal locations)
  • 55A Disposal : AGED
  • 56A Locations : UMPS (GARBAGE DUMPS)
  • 76A Dazzling : KALE (Dazzling pattern generator)
  • 77A Pattern : IDOS
  • 78A Generator : COPE (KALEIDOSCOPE)
  • 92A Classes : DRAM (Classes for actors)
  • 93A For : ALES
  • 94A Actors : SONS (DRAMA LESSONS)
  • 115A Home : MART (Home-decorating guru)
  • 116A Decorating : HASTE
  • 117A Guru : WART (MARTHA STEWART)

Bill’s time: 31m 49s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

19 Instrument for Arachne, in mythology : LOOM

In Greek and Roman mythology, Arachne was a mortal woman who was a great weaver. Arachne boasted that her weaving was greater than that of the goddess Athena (or Minerva in Roman myth), and this was proven true in a contest. As a result, Arachne was turned into a spider by Athena. “Arachne” is the Greek word for spider.

21 Word on the street, perhaps? : TAXI

We call cabs “taxis”, a word derived from “taximeter cabs” that were introduced in London in 1907. A taximeter was an automated meter designed to record distance traveled and fare to be charged. The term “taximeter” evolved from “taxameter”, with “taxa” being Latin for “tax, charge”.

22 Like Superman, but not Spider-Man : CAPED

Superman’s origins can be traced back to an illustrated short story titled “The Reign of the Superman” created by high school classmates Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in 1933. That first “Superman” wasn’t a very glamorous character. He was a vagrant who gained psychic powers and used them for nefarious purposes. By the time that Siegel and Shuster put together a comic strip called “The Superman”, the title character had evolved into a superhero. The pair sold all rights to “The Superman” character to Detective Comics in 1938 for the princely sum of $130.

Spider-Man is a creation of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, and first appeared in comics in 1962. He was a somewhat groundbreaking character in that his alter ego was a teenage high school student (Peter Parker), which marked the first time that a young person featured front and center as the superhero.

24 Nephew of Abel : ENOCH

According to the Bible’s Book of Genesis, Enoch was the son of Cain, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve. Enoch’s mother was Awan, who was also Enoch’s aunt (Cain’s sister).

25 One-eyed war god : ODIN

In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. He is usually depicted as having one eye, reflecting the story of how he gave one of his eyes in exchange for wisdom.

26 African animal that may be spotted or striped : HYENA

Hyenas have the reputation of being cowardly scavengers. That said, the spotted hyena that lives in Sub-Saharan Africa actually kills about 95% of its food and a pack of spotted hyenas are capable of driving off leopards or lionesses before they can consume their kill.

27 Armed force at sea? : OCTOPUS

The term “octopus” comes from the Greek for “eight-footed”. The most common plural used is “octopuses”, although the Greek plural form “octopodes” is also quite correct. The plural “octopi” isn’t really correct as the inference is that “octopus” is like a second-declension Latin noun, which it isn’t. That said, dictionaries are now citing “octopi” as an acceptable plural. Language does evolve, even though it drives me crazy …

29 “Person of the Year” magazine : TIME

“Time” magazine started naming a “Man of the Year” in 1927, only changing the concept to “Person of the Year” in 1999. Prior to 1999, the magazine did recognize four females as “Woman of the Year”: Wallis Simpson (1936), Soong May-ling a.k.a. Madame Chiang Kai-shek (1937), Queen Elizabeth II (1952) and Corazon Aquino (1986). “Time” named Albert Einstein as Person of the Century in 1999, with Franklin D. Roosevelt and Mahatma Gandhi as runners-up.

31 Big froyo franchiser : TCBY

TCBY is a chain of stores selling frozen yogurt that was founded in 1981 in Little Rock, Arkansas. The acronym TCBY originally stood for “This Can’t Be Yogurt”, but this had to be changed due to a lawsuit being pressed by a competitor called “I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt”. These days TCBY stands for “The Country’s Best Yogurt”.

34 White terrier, informally : WESTIE

The West Highland White Terrier is a cute-looking, little white dog from Scotland. The “Westie” looks very much like a related breed, the little black Scottish Terrier. The two breeds can be seen sitting side-by-side on the famous label of Black & White Scotch whisky.

35 Historic : MIRA (Historic hockey upset)
36 Hockey : CLEO
37 Upset : NICE (MIRACLE ON ICE)

Team USA won the gold medal in men’s hockey at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid. The victory was a surprising one given the decades-long dominance of the USSR team. The “big result” for the American team was the epic victory against the Soviets, a victory often referred to as the “Miracle on Ice”. The US went on to defeat Finland in the final and secured the gold medal. The moniker “miracle” comes from words uttered by sportscaster Al Michaels, who was calling the game for ABC. He declared, in the final seconds, “Do you believe in miracles?! Yes!”

38 ___ Toy Barn (where Emperor Zurg chases Buzz Lightyear) : AL’S

1995’s “Toy Story” was the world’s first feature-length computer-animated movie. “Toy Story” was also Pixar’s first production. The main roles in the film are Buzz Lightyear and Woody, who are voiced by Tim Allen and Tom Hanks respectively. Hanks was the first choice to voice Woody, but Allen was asked to voice Buzz after Billy Crystal turned down the role.

39 “I,” in the “Iliad” : IOTA

Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet, and one that gave rise to our letters I and J. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small, as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

“Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer that tells the story of the ten-year siege of “Ilium” (i.e. “Troy”) during the Trojan war. “The Odyssey”, also attributed to Homer, is sometimes described as a sequel to “Iliad”.

41 Low-scoring Yahtzee category : ONES

The dice game Yahtzee was introduced in 1956 and is a variant of earlier dice games, especially the game “Yacht” (which even has a similar name). Yahtzee is required entertainment in our house during holidays. The game involves the rolling of five dice, with the intent of getting certain combinations. A lot of those combinations resemble poker hands, such as a straight, three of a kind, four of a kind and a full house.

42 Lower back bones : SACRA

As children, we have five “extra” vertebrae at the base of our spine. Those vertebrae will have fused into one bone called the sacrum by the time we hit our late twenties.

47 Lionel Messi’s homeland: Abbr. : ARG

Lionel “Leo” Messi is a soccer player from Argentina. Messi was awarded FIFA’s Ballon d’Or (Golden Ball) award from 2009 to 2013. The Ballon d’Or is presented to the player who is considered the best in the world in the prior year.

48 Standoffish : ALOOF

I suppose one might guess from the “feel” of the word “aloof” that it has nautical roots. Originally “aloof” meant “to windward” and was the opposite of “alee”. A helmsman might be instructed to stay aloof, to steer the boat into the weather to keep a distance from a lee-shore. It is from this sense of maintaining a distance that aloof came to mean “distant” in terms of personality. Interesting, huh …?

51 Capital on the Arabian Peninsula : MUSCAT

Muscat is the capital of Oman. The city lies on the northeast coast of the state on the Gulf of Oman, a branch of the Persian Gulf.

57 Things believers believe : CREEDS

A creed or credo is a profession of faith, or a system of belief or principles. “Credo” is Latin for “I believe”.

58 The “A” in A.D. : ANNO

The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

60 Children’s book series akin to “Where’s Waldo?” : I SPY

The series of children’s illustrated books called “Where’s Waldo?” were originally titled “Where’s Wally?” in Britain, where the books originated. The book contains page after page of illustrations with crowds of people surrounding famous landmarks from around the world. The challenge is to find Waldo/Wally, who is hidden in the crowd.

62 N.I.H. standard : RDA

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) organization is made up of 27 different institutes that coordinate their research and services. Examples of member institutes are the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute on Aging.

68 The “P” of E.P.S. ratio, on Wall Street : PER

The ratio of a corporation’s net income to the total number of shares outstanding is known as “earnings per share” (EPS).

69 Adverb repeated in the “Star Wars” prologue : FAR

Every “Star Wars” film starts out with an opening crawl announcing “A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away….”

70 Calvin and Hobbes, e.g. : PALS

The comic strip “Calvin and Hobbes” is still widely syndicated, but hasn’t been written since 1995. The cartoonist Bill Watterson named the character Calvin after John Calvin, the 16th century theologian. Hobbes was named for Thomas Hobbes, a 17th century English political philosopher.

71 Head, in slang : NOB

The slang term “nob” has been used for “head” for over 300 years, and is a variant of “knob”.

72 Onetime radio host Don : IMUS

Don Imus’s syndicated radio show “Imus in the Morning” used to broadcast from New York City. Imus has been described as a “shock jock”, a disc jockey who deliberately uses provocative language and humor that many would find offensive . I’m not a big fan of shock jocks …

74 “Mad” figure of fiction : HATTER

In Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”, the Mad Hatter makes his first appearance in a chapter called “A Mad Tea-Party”. This event is usually described as “The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party”, even though the Mad Hatter was just a guest. The host was the March Hare. In fact, the phrase “Mad Hatter” doesn’t appear anywhere in Lewis Carroll’s novel, although the character, the Hatter (and sometimes “Hatta”), is described as “mad”.

81 1998 film “Waking ___ Devine” : NED

“Waking Ned Devine” is an entertaining comedy film from 1998 set in Ireland. It’s all about Ned Devine who wins a fortune from the National Lottery, but who dies before he can claim the prize. The whole village conspires to “keep him alive” so that the winnings will be delivered and the locals can share the loot. Worth a rental …

82 Al ___ (pasta specification) : DENTE

The Italian expression “al dente” literally means “to the tooth” or “to the bite” and is used to describe not only pasta, but also vegetables that are cooked so that they are tender and yet still crisp.

83 Initialism aptly found in “timetable” : ETA

Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

85 Xmas, for Justin Trudeau : B-DAY

Here are some famous people who were born on Christmas Day:

  • Isaac Newton (b.1642)
  • Humphrey Bogart (b.1899)
  • Cab Calloway (b.1907)
  • Anwar el-Sadat (b.1918)
  • Rod Serling (b.1924)
  • Jimmy Buffett (b.1946)
  • Sissy Spacek (b.1949)
  • Karl Rove (b.1950)
  • Annie Lennox (b.1954)
  • Justin Trudeau (b.1971)

Justin Trudeau ascended to the leadership of Canada’s Liberal Party in 2013, He led the Liberals to a decisive victory in the federal election of 2015, after which he assumed the office of Prime Minister of Canada. Justin is the eldest son of former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, who led Canada for 15 years starting in 1968.

86 Synthetic fiber : RAYON

Rayon is a little unusual in the textile industry in that it is not truly a synthetic fiber, but nor can it be called a natural fiber. Rayon is produced from naturally occurring cellulose that is dissolved and then reformed into fibers.

89 City east of Phoenix : MESA

The city of Mesa, Arizona is in effect a suburb of Phoenix. The original settlement of non-Native Americans was founded by Daniel Webster Jones who led a Mormon group from St. George, Utah. The settlement was first called Jonesville, then Fort Utah and eventually Lehi. A second group of Mormons arrived and formed a settlement on top of a nearby mesa. It was this use of a mesa that eventually gave the city its current name.

109 Put cargo on : LADE

The verb “to lade” meaning “to load” comes from an Old English word “hladan”. “Lade” also used to mean “draw water” and indeed gave us our word “ladle”. So “lade” and “ladle” are close cousins.

Cargo is freight carried by some vehicle. The term “cargo” comes into English via Spanish, ultimately deriving from the Latin “carricare” meaning “to load on a cart”.

110 She might cry “Uncle!” : NIECE

To say uncle is to submit or yield. This peculiarly American use of “uncle” dates back to the early 1900s, but nobody seems to know how “uncle!” came to mean “stop!”

111 Last “O” in YOLO : ONCE

You only live once (YOLO)

112 Rough rug fiber : SISAL

The sisal plant is an agave, the flesh of which is not generally used in making tequila. Sisal is grown instead for the fibers that run the length of its leaves. The fiber is used extensively for twine, rope, carpeting, wall coverings etc. My favorite application though, is in the construction of dartboards. Sisal takes its name from the port of Sisal in Yucatan, Mexico that was a major shipping point for sisal plants.

Down

4 Captcha confirmation : I’M NOT A ROBOT

A CAPTCHA is a challenge-and-response test that is used to determine if a user is a human or some automated program. The acronym “CAPTCHA” stands for “Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart”.

7 “I”, in the “Aeneid” : EGO

“Ego” is a Latin word meaning “I”.

Aeneas was a Trojan hero of myth who traveled to Italy and became the ancestor of all Romans. Aeneas’s story is told in Virgil’s epic poem “The Aeneid”.

10 Chiwere-speaking tribe : OTOE

Chiwere is a Siouan language spoken by the Otoe people, as well as by the Missouria and Iowa.

16 When the lighting of the Olympic cauldron happens : OPENING CEREMONY

A flame is used as the symbol for the Olympic Games in commemoration of the theft of fire for humanity by Prometheus from Zeus in Greek mythology. The symbolic flame was introduced to the Modern Olympics in the 1928 Summer Games in Amsterdam. The tradition of the Olympic torch relay started out as political theater devised and funded by Nazi Germany for the 1936 Summer Games in Berlin.

28 Rice dish : PILAF

“Pilaf” is a Persian word, one that we use to describe rice that is browned in oil and then cooked in a seasoned broth. It can also be called “pilau”.

30 Sound of shear terror? : MAA!

“Maa” is the call of a goat.

35 Epoch when the Mediterranean Sea nearly dried up : MIOCENE

The Mediterranean Sea is almost completely enclosed by land, and is connected to the Atlantic Ocean by the narrow Strait of Gibraltar. The sea takes its name from the Latin “mediterraneus”, which means “in the middle of land”.

43 Fourth man to walk on the moon : ALAN BEAN

Alan Bean is a former astronaut. He was the fourth man to walk on the moon, roaming the moon’s surface with Pete Conrad as part of the Apollo 12 mission. Bean resigned from NASA in 1981 and turned to painting. He is the only artist in the world to have incorporated real moon dust into his works.

46 Female nature deities : NYMPHS

In Greek and Roman mythology, nymphs were divine female spirits associated with a particular location or landform in nature.

51 Some BBQ-flavored fast-food sandwiches : MCRIBS

The McDonald’s McRib sandwich is based on a pork patty. There isn’t any pork rib in the patty though. It is primarily made up of pork shoulder meat reconstituted with tripe, heart and stomach tissue. Enjoy …

53 Letters near a conveyor belt : TSA

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the agency that employs the good folks who check passengers and baggage at airports.

55 Online pop-up generator : ADWARE

“Adware” is “advertising-supported software”, an application that includes ads in some form so that the developer can generate revenue. Sometimes deceptive practices can be used to entice a user to install such programs, so adware can sometimes be classed as malware (malicious software).

60 How perjurers might be caught : IN A LIE

An act of perjury is the willful giving of false testimony under oath. The term “perjury” ultimately comes from the Latin “per” meaning “away” and “iurare” meaning “to swear”.

61 ___ Mary : BLOODY

The Bloody Mary is one of my favorite cocktails, perhaps because it seems to taste so differently depending on who makes it. It has numerous ingredients above and beyond the requisite vodka and tomato juice, and has been described as “the world’s most complex cocktail”.

67 How Usher wants to take it in a 1998 #1 hit : NICE AND SLOW

“Usher” is the stage name of R&B singer Usher Terry Raymond IV.

68 The 76ers, on scoreboards : PHI

The Philadelphia 76ers basketball team is one of the oldest franchises in the NBA. The “Sixers” were formed in 1946 as the Syracuse Nationals. The team moved to Philadelphia in 1963, and the name 76er was chosen in a fan contest, a name that honors the men who fought for the country’s independence in 1776.

69 Disaster response org. : FEMA

Federal emergency management has been structured for over 200 years, but what we know today as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was created in 1979 in an Executive Order issued by President Jimmy Carter.

70 Arctic coats : PARKAS

A parka is a hooded jacket that is often lined with fur, and that is worn in cold weather. The original parka was a pullover design, but nowadays it is usually zipped at the front. “Parka” is the Russian name for the garment, and it was absorbed into English in the late 1700s via the Aleut language.

75 Headset? : TOTEM

“Totem” is a word used to describe any entity that watches over a group of people. As such, totems are usually the subjects of worship. Totem poles are really misnamed, as they are not intended to represent figures to be worshiped, but rather are heraldic in nature, and often celebrating the legends or notable events in the history of a tribe.

76 Popular Korean minivan : KIA SEDONA

The Kia Sedona is a minivan that is also sold as the Kia Carnival.

77 Country with more than 100 active volcanoes : INDONESIA

Indonesia is the fourth most populous country in the world, and is the country with the largest population of Muslims. And, Indonesia has an amazing 17,508 islands.

84 Verizon, for one : TELECOM

The telecommunications company that we know today as Verizon was founded in 1983 as Bell Atlantic, and was one of the “Baby Bells” that were formed after the breakup of AT&T. Bell Atlantic merged with fellow Baby Bell NYNEX in 1997, and then merged with GTE in 2000 to form Verizon. The new company name is a portmanteau of “veritas” (“truth” in Latin) and “horizon”.

85 Hardly genteel : BOORISH

Back in the early 1500s, a boor was a rustic person, a peasant farmer, someone associated with the countryside. The term “boor” ultimately comes from the Latin “bos” meaning “cow, ox”. By the mid-1500s, someone described as boorish was considered rude in manner, which is our usage today.

88 Brain cases : CRANIA

The human skull is made up of two parts: the cranium (which encloses the brain) and the mandible (or “jawbone”).

89 1600 for the SAT, informally : MAX

Today, the standardized test for admission to colleges is known as the SAT Reasoning Test, but it used to be called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, which led to the abbreviation “SAT”.

90 No. listed on the inside of car doors, often : PSI

Pounds per square inch (PSI) is a measure of pressure.

96 Actress Catherine who starred as Kevin’s mom in “Home Alone” : O’HARA

Catherine O’Hara is an actress and comedian from Toronto, Ontario. One of O’Hara’s more famous film roles is Kevin’s mother in the Christmas classic “Home Alone”. She also plays a lead character (Moira) in the excellent sitcom “Schitt’s Creek” alongside Eugen Levy.

“Home Alone” is a 1990 film starring Macaulay Culkin that has become a Christmas classic. Culkin was nominated for a Best Actor Golden Globe for his performance, becoming the youngest actor ever to be so honored.

97 “Red” or “white” wood : CEDAR

Cedar is used for the manufacture of some wardrobes and chests as it has long been believed that the fragrant oil in the wood is a moth-repellent. However, whether or not cedar oil is actually effective at keeping moths away seems to be in doubt.

102 Italian automaker : FIAT

Fiat is the largest car manufacturer in Italy, and is headquartered in Turin in the Piedmont region in the north of the country. Fiat was founded in 1899 by Giovanni Agnelli, when the company’s name was “Fabbrica Italiana di Automobili Torino” (FIAT). A few years ago, Fiat became the majority shareholder in Chrysler.

106 Tape player of a sort, in brief : VCR

Video Cassette Recorder (VCR)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Shops : ANTI (Shops peddling collectibles)
5 Peddling : QUEST
10 Collectibles : ORES (ANTIQUE STORES)
14 A kitchen might have a good one : AROMA
19 Instrument for Arachne, in mythology : LOOM
20 Natural instincts : URGES
21 Word on the street, perhaps? : TAXI
22 Like Superman, but not Spider-Man : CAPED
23 Symbol of bravery : LION
24 Nephew of Abel : ENOCH
25 One-eyed war god : ODIN
26 African animal that may be spotted or striped : HYENA
27 Armed force at sea? : OCTOPUS
29 “Person of the Year” magazine : TIME
31 Big froyo franchiser : TCBY
33 When said three times, “Get off my case!” : NAG
34 White terrier, informally : WESTIE
35 Historic : MIRA (Historic hockey upset)
36 Hockey : CLEO
37 Upset : NICE (MIRACLE ON ICE)
38 ___ Toy Barn (where Emperor Zurg chases Buzz Lightyear) : AL’S
39 “I,” in the “Iliad” : IOTA
40 You’ll have to pull some strings to play this : HARP
41 Low-scoring Yahtzee category : ONES
42 Lower back bones : SACRA
45 Downsides : CONS
46 How many U.N. members have names starting with “W” : NONE
47 Lionel Messi’s homeland: Abbr. : ARG
48 Standoffish : ALOOF
49 Whiz : ACE
50 Promotional overkill : HYPE
51 Capital on the Arabian Peninsula : MUSCAT
54 Waste : GARB (Waste disposal locations)
55 Disposal : AGED
56 Locations : UMPS (GARBAGE DUMPS)
57 Things believers believe : CREEDS
58 The “A” in A.D. : ANNO
59 Racket : DIN
60 Children’s book series akin to “Where’s Waldo?” : I SPY
61 Word with nursing or training : … BRA
62 N.I.H. standard : RDA
63 Read : BET (Read here to understand)
64 Here : WEE
65 To : NTH
66 Understand : ELI
67 23 answers in today’s puzzle that don’t seem to match their clues : NES (BETWEEN THE LINES)
68 The “P” of E.P.S. ratio, on Wall Street : PER
69 Adverb repeated in the “Star Wars” prologue : FAR
70 Calvin and Hobbes, e.g. : PALS
71 Head, in slang : NOB
72 Onetime radio host Don : IMUS
74 “Mad” figure of fiction : HATTER
76 Dazzling : KALE (Dazzling pattern generator)
77 Pattern : IDOS
78 Generator : COPE (KALEIDOSCOPE)
79 Like some care services : IN-HOME
80 Purplish blue : IRIS
81 1998 film “Waking ___ Devine” : NED
82 Al ___ (pasta specification) : DENTE
83 Initialism aptly found in “timetable” : ETA
84 Thief’s haul : TAKE
85 Xmas, for Justin Trudeau : B-DAY
86 Synthetic fiber : RAYON
87 Tiptop : ACME
89 City east of Phoenix : MESA
90 D-worthy : POOR
91 Sweetie pie : HON
92 Classes : DRAM (Classes for actors)
93 For : ALES
94 Actors : SONS (DRAMA LESSONS)
95 Get off berth control? : UNDOCK
99 Tarnish, e.g. : MAR
100 Crossed out : EXED
101 Apt rhyme for “pyre” : FIRE
102 Revitalize : FRESHEN
103 Finalized, as a contract : INKED
105 Safe harbor : COVE
107 “Let me repeat …” : I SAID …
109 Put cargo on : LADE
110 She might cry “Uncle!” : NIECE
111 Last “O” in YOLO : ONCE
112 Rough rug fiber : SISAL
113 Unwritten, say : ORAL
114 Didn’t make public for a while : SAT ON
115 Home : MART (Home-decorating guru)
116 Decorating : HASTE
117 Guru : WART (MARTHA STEWART)

Down

1 “I’ll ___ it” : ALLOW
2 “Hold the rocks,” at a bar : NO ICE
3 Blows one’s horn : TOOTS
4 Captcha confirmation : I’M NOT A ROBOT
5 Adds to a playlist, e.g. : QUEUES
6 Sights in a funeral home : URNS
7 “I”, in the “Aeneid” : EGO
8 Partitioned : SECTIONED
9 Product launches made during sporting events? : T-SHIRTS
10 Chiwere-speaking tribe : OTOE
11 “Stellar!” : RAD!
12 They can help you get out of jams : EXIT LANES
13 Real : SINCERE
14 Having overexercised, maybe : ACHY
15 ___ gun (alien zapper) : RAY
16 When the lighting of the Olympic cauldron happens : OPENING CEREMONY
17 Wolf, to a shepherd : MENACE
18 “A penny saved is a penny earned” and others : ADAGES
28 Rice dish : PILAF
30 Sound of shear terror? : MAA!
32 Go lightly, with “along” : BOP …
35 Epoch when the Mediterranean Sea nearly dried up : MIOCENE
36 Like difficult water for boating : CHOPPY
37 Like Thor : NORSE
42 It’s a long story : SAGA
43 Fourth man to walk on the moon : ALAN BEAN
44 Gain exclusive control, business-wise : CORNER THE MARKET
45 More wary : CAGIER
46 Female nature deities : NYMPHS
47 A charismatic person has one : AURA
50 Gets a move on : HUSTLES
51 Some BBQ-flavored fast-food sandwiches : MCRIBS
52 Totals : ADDS UP TO
53 Letters near a conveyor belt : TSA
55 Online pop-up generator : ADWARE
60 How perjurers might be caught : IN A LIE
61 ___ Mary : BLOODY
66 Makes beloved : ENDEARS
67 How Usher wants to take it in a 1998 #1 hit : NICE AND SLOW
68 The 76ers, on scoreboards : PHI
69 Disaster response org. : FEMA
70 Arctic coats : PARKAS
73 In the public eye : SEEN
75 Headset? : TOTEM
76 Popular Korean minivan : KIA SEDONA
77 Country with more than 100 active volcanoes : INDONESIA
82 Device providing oversight? : DRONE
84 Verizon, for one : TELECOM
85 Hardly genteel : BOORISH
87 Website overseers : ADMINS
88 Brain cases : CRANIA
89 1600 for the SAT, informally : MAX
90 No. listed on the inside of car doors, often : PSI
91 Get over it! : HURDLE
96 Actress Catherine who starred as Kevin’s mom in “Home Alone” : O’HARA
97 “Red” or “white” wood : CEDAR
98 Prepared to pray, say : KNELT
100 Idyllic spot : EDEN
101 Stocking stuffers : FEET
102 Italian automaker : FIAT
104 ___ mode (fuel-saving feature in newer cars) : ECO
106 Tape player of a sort, in brief : VCR
108 Dunderhead : ASS

19 thoughts on “1023-22 NY Times Crossword 23 Oct 22, Sunday”

  1. 17:44. Clever theme. It was the ICE part of 37A that did it for me, because I noticed the reference to hockey in the preceding clue. That, put together with the puzzle title, got me looking in the right direction.

    Also, a pretty aesthetically pleasing grid today.

  2. What Bill said, except that I spent considerably more time figuring out the theme after finishing the puzzle. At that point, I created a version on paper, with the answers, and began to highlight the odd ones. About halfway through the process, a light came on in my aging skull and I finally understood a theme that (for me, at least) was harder to see when working online.

    In any case, I enjoyed the process … 😜

  3. 59:13, 4 errors (all involving trying to fit naiad into 46D). Kudos to those who managed to figure this one out. To me, figuring out the theme was like renting an elephant to move a lawn chair.

  4. 35:59. Got the theme at KALE IDES COPE of all places, although I knew (N)ICE and hockey were related somehow before that like Tom R says.

    Up to that point I was hunting and gathering trying to fill in anything I could. After that, I leaned heavily on the theme to finish. Pretty amazing construction.

    Can’t wait to drop into a conversation the origin of ALOOF on someone. Wow.

    This puzzle at least deserves consideration for Dave K’s wall of fame IMO.

    Best –

  5. Thank goodness for this website. I finished the puzzle but couldn’t find the theme. Too “recherché,” i. e. mannered and convoluted. I vote for this being one of the worst puzzles ever.
    Sylvie

  6. 1:19:32 and somehow no errors but I too had no clue what was going on…about 10 minutes after finishing I finally got it.
    With Jeff Chen and partner (always a partner) anything goes👎👎
    I’m glad I’m not the only one who thinks this one stinks.
    Stay safe😀

  7. I deemed this puzzle not worth the time it was taking me. DNF after halfway through. Very clever though, I must admit.

  8. thanks to jeff chen for ruining another sunday puzzle for those of us who would just enjoy having something to do on a sunday afternoon. what dreck

  9. What a fun and entertaining puzzle. Easy theme to pick up on and cleverly constructed. Thanks Will, Jeff and Daniel. And thank you Bill for the great blog even if it is populated by some ungrateful curmudgeons.

  10. “You can please some of the people all of the time and you can please all of the people some of the time, but you can’t please all of the people all of the time.” … 😜.

  11. I finished the whole puzzle. I had some idea about what was going on with the ice clue -nice -ice -hockey -but as far as the theme went …you gotta be kidding me ! I wanna have fun on a Sunday not have my head explode. Very clever though I do have to admit.

  12. 37:05, no errors. Agreed with the others, for all the suck that Shortz and co. routinely turns out, this one is in on the very stiff competition for Worst of the Worst.

  13. Figured out the theme about halfway through. I knew something was a foot. I was all over the place trying to figure it out.

    Once I figured it out, it was pretty smooth running.

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