0906-22 NY Times Crossword 6 Sep 22, Tuesday

Constructed by: Trenton Charlson
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Dot Dot Dot

Themed answers each include the letter string “iji”, three letters that feature DOTS in lowercase:

  • 37A Indication of more to come … or a hint to a feature of three consecutive letters in 18-, 20-, 59- and 61-Across : DOT DOT DOT
  • 18A Longtime conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra : SEIJI OZAWA
  • 20A Shenanigans : HIJINKS
  • 59A Host city of the 2008 Olympics : BEIJING
  • 61A South Pacific currency : FIJI DOLLAR

Bill’s time: 7m 26s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

9 “Jeepers!” : GOSH!

“Jeepers” is slang dating back at least to 1929, and a euphemism for “Jesus”.

14 N.F.L. player-turned-broadcaster ___ Rashad : AHMAD

Ahmad Rashad is a former football player who launched a career as a sportscaster after he retired from the game. Rashad proposed marriage to actress Phylicia Ayers-Allen on national television in 1985. Ayers-Allen, who played Bill Cosby’s wife on “The Cosby Show”, accepted the proposal and became Rashad’s third wife.

16 Brand whose logo’s letters are covered in snow : ICEE

Icee and Slurpee are brand names of slushy drinks. Ugh …

17 Clark of the Daily Planet : KENT

Superman’s comic book creators gave their title character’s alter-ego the name “Clark Kent” by melding the names of Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, two leading men of the cinema at the time Superman was created. However, they modeled Clark’s character more on the silent film actor Harold Lloyd.

The “Daily Planet” is the fictional newspaper for which Clark Kent and Lois Lane work in the “Superman” universe. Clark and Lois’ editor-in-chief is Perry White.

18 Longtime conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra : SEIJI OZAWA

Seiji Ozawa is most famous for his work as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, although he is also the principal conductor of the Vienna State Opera. Ozawa is renowned for wearing a white turtleneck under his dress suit when he conducts, rather than the traditional starched shirt and white tie.

The Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) is one of the Big Five in the US (along with the New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and Cleveland Orchestras). The BSO was founded in 1881, and has been calling Boston’s Symphony Hall its home since the building was purpose-built for the orchestra in 1900. The BSO’s first conductor was German-born British baritone and conductor George Henschel, who was a close friend of composer Johannes Brahms.

20 Shenanigans : HIJINKS

I suppose one might be forgiven for thinking that “shenanigan” is an Irish term, as it certainly sounds Irish. Usually written in the plural, shenanigans are acts of mischief, pranks. Apparently the word is of uncertain derivation, but was coined in San Francisco or Sacramento, California in the mid-1800s.

24 Yokohama-based automaker : ISUZU

Isuzu is a Japanese manufacturer of commercial vehicles and diesel engines. The company was named for the Isuzu River, with “isuzu” translating into English as “fifty bells”.

Yokohama is the second-most populous city in Japan. It lies on Tokyo Bay, and is just a 40-minute drive from the nation’s capital.

27 They all lead to Rome, it’s said : ROADS

The expression “all roads lead to Rome” is used to mean “whatever way we do this, we’ll get the same result”. The phrase has been used since the 1100s and probably even earlier than that. The expression arises because the ancient Roman road system had all major roads radiating from Rome like spokes on a wheel.

32 Anonymous John or Jane : DOE

Though the English court system does not use the term today, “John Doe” first appeared as the “name of a person unknown” in England in 1659, along with the similar “Richard Roe”. An unknown female is referred to as “Jane Doe ”, and the equivalent to Richard Roe is Jane Roe (as in Roe v. Wade, for example). Variants of “John Doe” used outside of the courts are “Joe Blow” and “John Q. Public”.

33 Feudal residences : MANORS

Feudalism was a legal and military system that flourished in medieval Europe. Central to the system were the concepts of lords, vassals and fiefs. Lords would grant fiefs (land or rights) to vassals in exchange for allegiance and service.

35 Narrow waterway : RIA

A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, and both are formed as sea levels rise. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

44 Italian tourist town near Naples : AMALFI

Amalfi, Italy is a coastal town on the Gulf of Salerno located about 30 miles southeast of Naples. The town gives its name to the popular tourist destination known as the Amalfi Coast.

49 World-weariness : ENNUI

“Ennui” is the French word for “boredom”, and a term that we now use in English. It’s one of the few French words we’ve imported and haven’t anglicized, and actually pronounce “correctly”.

51 Like some elephants and all tigers : ASIAN

There are only three species of elephant living today, with all others being extinct. These are the African bush elephant, the African forest elephant, and the Asian elephant (or “Indian elephant”). As is well known, the African elephant is distinguished from the Asian/Indian elephant by its much larger ears. The African bush elephant is the largest living land animal.

Tigers are the largest of all the cat species. They are referred to as “apex predators” (as are lions and humans, for example), meaning that tigers are at the top of the food chain and aren’t the prey of any other animal.

52 Alan ___, folklorist who discovered legends like Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger : LOMAX

Woody Guthrie was a singer-songwriter. He was best known for his recording of the folk song “This Land is Your Land”, the lyrics of which were written by Guthrie himself.

American folk singer Pete Seeger wrote and co-wrote a lot of classic songs. The list includes “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?”, “If I had a Hammer”, and “Turn, Turn, Turn!”

54 Capital of Jordan : AMMAN

Amman is the capital city of Jordan, and one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in the world. Amman has been occupied by a number of different civilizations over the centuries, including the Greeks who called it “Philadelphia”, a name retained by the Romans when they occupied the city just after 100 AD.

56 Emma Stone’s role in “La La Land” : MIA

“La La Land” is a 2016 romantic musical film starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone as a musician and actress who fall in love in “La La Land” (Los Angeles, i.e. “LA”). The film was written and directed by Damien Chazelle, who had found success two years earlier with the musical drama “Whiplash”. “La La Land” won a record-breaking seven Golden Globes and tied the record number of Oscar nominations at fourteen, winning six.

Actress Emma Stone is from Scottsdale, Arizona. Stone really came to prominence with her performance in the 2010 high school movie called “Easy A”. She won the Best Actress Oscar for her performance in the 2016 movie “La La Land”. Now one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood, Stone values her privacy and works hard to maintain a low profile. Good for her, I say …

57 Galas, e.g. : APPLES

Gala is the second-most popular apple cultivar in the US, after red delicious. The gala apple tree originated in New Zealand in 1930, and is a cross between a golden delicious and a Kidd’s orange red.

59 Host city of the 2008 Olympics : BEIJING

The city of Beijing in China was given its name in 1403, with “Beijing” chosen as it translates as “Northern Capital”. The name distinguishes it from the city of Nanjing, whose name translates as “Southern Capital”. “Beijing” was written in English as “Peking” for centuries.

61 South Pacific currency : FIJI DOLLAR

The island nation of Fiji is an archipelago in the South Pacific made up of over 330 islands, 110 of which are inhabited. Fiji was occupied by the British for over a century and finally gained its independence in 1970.

65 Grandson of Adam and Eve : ENOS

Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve, and nephew of Cain and Abel. According to the ancient Jewish work called the Book of Jubilees, Enos married his own sister Noam.

68 Letters associated with a rainbow flag : LGBT

The best-known rainbow flag is the one representing gay pride. Such usage of the rainbow flag was popularized in 1978 by artist Gilbert Baker. The varying colors of the flag represent the diversity of the gay community.

Down

1 Religion founded in Punjab : SIKHISM

Sikhism is a religion that was founded in the Punjab region, which straddles the India-Pakistan border. Even though Sikhism was established relatively recently, it is now the fifth-largest organized religion in the world. Sikhism was founded in the 15th century by Guru Nanak.

Punjab is the most populous province in Pakistan and is home to over half of the country’s citizens. “Punjab” (also “Panjab”) translates as “Five Waters”, a reference to five rivers that form tributaries to the Indus River: Chenab, Jhelum, Ravi, Beas and Sutlej.

2 The tiniest amount : ONE IOTA

Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet, and one that gave rise to our letters I and J. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small, as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

3 Casanova : DON JUAN

Don Juan is a flighty character who has been featured by a number of authors, poets and composers, including Molière, Byron, and Mozart. In the underlying legend, Don Juan ends up talking to the statue of the dead father of one of his conquests. Don Juan dines with the ghost of the dead man and when shaking the hand of the ghost he is dragged away to hell. We now use the term “Don Juan” to describe any womanizer or ladies’ man.

Giacomo Casanova was an 18th-century adventurer from Venice. We know so much about him, and his reputation as a womanizer, because he left us his autobiography “Histoire de ma vie” (Story of My Life). A guy recounting stories of his love life and conquests? All true, I am sure …

4 Prefix with matter or gravity : ANTI-

In the world of particle physics, antimatter is made up of particles that have the same mass as particles of ordinary matter, but with the opposite charge and quantum spin. Mixing matter and antimatter causes the annihilation of both, with a release of energy equal to the mass of the particles according to Einstein’s equation E=mc².

5 Soaks up the sun : BASKS

Our verb “to bask”, meaning “to expose one to pleasant warmth”, is derived from the gruesome, 14th-century term “basken”, meaning “to wallow in blood”. The contemporary usage apparently originated with Shakespeare, who employed “bask” with reference to sunshine in “As You Like It”.

6 Kind of monkey used in medical research : RHESUS

The rhesus macaque is also known as the rhesus monkey. As it is widely available and is close to humans anatomically and physically, the rhesus macaque has been used in scientific research for decades. The rhesus monkey was used in the development of rabies, smallpox and polio vaccines, and it also gave its name to the rhesus factor that is used in blood-typing. It was also rhesus monkeys that were launched into space by the US and Soviet space programs. Humans and macaques share about 93% of their DNA and had a common ancestor about 25 million years ago.

8 ___ Mahal : TAJ

“Mahal” is the Urdu word for “palace”, as in “Taj Mahal” meaning “crown of palaces”. The Taj Mahal is a mausoleum holding the body of Mumtaz Mahal, the third wife of Mughal emperor Shah Jahan. The name “Mumtaz Mahal” translates as “the chosen one of the palace”.

9 Thingamajig : GIZMO

The word “gizmo” (also “gismo”), meaning something the name of which is unknown or forgotten, was originally slang used by both the US Navy and the Marine Corps. The exact origin seems unknown.

10 Anthem with both English and French lyrics : O CANADA

Canada’s national anthem “O Canada” was commissioned in 1880 by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec, so the original words are in French. The first English translation was made in 1906. The current English lyrics have been revised a few times, but the French version remains the same as it did back in 1880.

O Canada!
Our home and native land!
True patriot love in all of us command.
With glowing hearts we see thee rise,
The True North strong and free!
From far and wide,
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.
God keep our land glorious and free!
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

19 Rest on one’s ___ (take it easy) : OARS

To rest on one’s oars is to relax, especially after having made an effort.

21 Explosive compound, informally : NITRO

Nitroglycerin (also known as “nitro”) is a very unstable, oily, colorless liquid. It is usually used as the explosive ingredient in a stabilized product like dynamite or cordite. Nitroglycerin is also used medically, as a vasodilator. Right after it hits the bloodstream, nitroglycerin causes the blood vessels to dilate so that the heart has less work to do. I had occasion to take it a couple of times, and boy, what a speedy and fundamental effect it has …

25 Like a balanced “game,” in economics : ZERO-SUM

A zero-sum game is one in which the gains of the winner are exactly offset by the losses of the loser. There is no net gain. So by definition, a win-win situation cannot be arrived at in a zero-sum game.

26 Fathom or furlong : UNIT

Our word “fathom” comes from the Old English word used to describe the length of the outstretched arms. Today, a fathom is equal to six feet.

There are eight furlongs in a mile. The name “furlong” comes from the Old English “furh” (meaning “furrow”) and “lang” (meaning “long”). In Anglo-Saxon times, a furlong was the length of a furrow in a “ploughed” field that was one acre in area. The width of said one-acre field was defined as one chain.

34 Lee who co-created the X-Men : STAN

The X-Men are a team of superheroes created by Stan Lee for Marvel Comics. Nowadays, the X-Men are perhaps best known as the subject of a series of movies, with Hugh Jackman playing Wolverine and Patrick Stewart playing Professor Xavier (or simply “Professor X”). Some very respected actors have also played the villains whom the X-Men have to battle. For example, the enemy called Magneto is portrayed by veteran Shakespearean actor Sir Ian McKellen.

36 Grps. that often sponsor book fairs : PTAS

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

38 Actress Delany : DANA

Actress Dana Delany came to the public’s attention playing the lead in the TV show “China Beach” from 1988 to 1991. More recently, she played the lead in the drama series “Body of Proof” from 2011 to 2013.

39 Neighbor of a Saudi : OMANI

Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

40 Fried Mideast fare : FALAFEL

Falafel is a ball of ground chickpeas or fava beans that has been deep fried and served in pita bread. I love chickpeas, but falafel is often too dry for me …

62 Tupperware topper : LID

Back in the 1930s, Earl Tupper was working at the DuPont Chemical Company, and from DuPont obtained inflexible pieces of polyethylene slag. Tupper purified the slag and shaped it into unbreakable containers. He added airtight lids with a “burping seal” that provided tight seals similar to that provided by the lids on paint cans. He called his new product Tupperware.

63 Sch. whose mascot is Mike the Tiger : LSU

The Tigers are the sports teams of Louisiana State University (LSU). They are officially known as the Fightin’ Tigers, and the school mascot is “Mike the Tiger”. The name comes from the days of the Civil War, when two Louisiana brigades earned the nickname the “Louisiana Tigers”. Given the French/Cajun history of Louisiana, the LSU fans use the cheer “Geaux Tigers” instead of “Go Tigers”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Part of a fast-food combo : SODA
5 Impudent sort : BRAT
9 “Jeepers!” : GOSH!
13 Privy to : IN ON
14 N.F.L. player-turned-broadcaster ___ Rashad : AHMAD
16 Brand whose logo’s letters are covered in snow : ICEE
17 Clark of the Daily Planet : KENT
18 Longtime conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra : SEIJI OZAWA
20 Shenanigans : HIJINKS
22 Accursed : DAMNED
23 Promise of payment : IOU
24 Yokohama-based automaker : ISUZU
27 They all lead to Rome, it’s said : ROADS
28 “Don’t ___ with me!” : START
30 Ships out : SENDS
32 Anonymous John or Jane : DOE
33 Feudal residences : MANORS
35 Narrow waterway : RIA
36 What dogs often do after a few rounds of “Go fetch” : PANT
37 Indication of more to come … or a hint to a feature of three consecutive letters in 18-, 20-, 59- and 61-Across : DOT DOT DOT
40 Big gala : FETE
43 Some small batteries : AAS
44 Italian tourist town near Naples : AMALFI
48 American ___ (beverage) : ALE
49 World-weariness : ENNUI
51 Like some elephants and all tigers : ASIAN
52 Alan ___, folklorist who discovered legends like Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger : LOMAX
54 Capital of Jordan : AMMAN
56 Emma Stone’s role in “La La Land” : MIA
57 Galas, e.g. : APPLES
59 Host city of the 2008 Olympics : BEIJING
61 South Pacific currency : FIJI DOLLAR
64 Eight, in Italian : OTTO
65 Grandson of Adam and Eve : ENOS
66 Some Olympics projectiles : DISCI
67 Astute : KEEN
68 Letters associated with a rainbow flag : LGBT
69 Royal family title : DUKE
70 Small vortex : EDDY

Down

1 Religion founded in Punjab : SIKHISM
2 The tiniest amount : ONE IOTA
3 Casanova : DON JUAN
4 Prefix with matter or gravity : ANTI-
5 Soaks up the sun : BASKS
6 Kind of monkey used in medical research : RHESUS
7 “Is that true about me?” : AM I?
8 ___ Mahal : TAJ
9 Thingamajig : GIZMO
10 Anthem with both English and French lyrics : O CANADA
11 Attached, as a patch : SEWED ON
12 Accessory for a pilot or telemarketer : HEADSET
15 Performed : DID
19 Rest on one’s ___ (take it easy) : OARS
21 Explosive compound, informally : NITRO
25 Like a balanced “game,” in economics : ZERO-SUM
26 Fathom or furlong : UNIT
29 Teased relentlessly : RODE
31 Pop, to a tot : DADA
34 Lee who co-created the X-Men : STAN
36 Grps. that often sponsor book fairs : PTAS
38 Actress Delany : DANA
39 Neighbor of a Saudi : OMANI
40 Fried Mideast fare : FALAFEL
41 Not doing things the rite way? : ELOPING
42 It may lead to a full-time position : TEMP JOB
45 Like some editions and partnerships : LIMITED
46 Lost consciousness, in a way : FAINTED
47 Hurting badly : IN AGONY
49 Crossed (out) : EXED
50 “It’s me again!” : I’M BACK!
53 Star-studded group : A-LIST
55 High home for a hawk : AERIE
58 Turf : SOD
60 “Is this some kind of twisted ___?” : JOKE
62 Tupperware topper : LID
63 Sch. whose mascot is Mike the Tiger : LSU

3 thoughts on “0906-22 NY Times Crossword 6 Sep 22, Tuesday”

  1. 11:23. A bit of an ugly Tuesday effort. All kinds of issues all over the grid. Is it tomorrow yet?

    I’ve seen SEIJI OZAWA in puzzles several times, but I never can remember the name outright. I need a lot of crosses….still.

    A friend of mine who has been just about everywhere in the world once told me that he thought the AMALFI coast in Italy is the most beautiful place on earth. I’ve been all over Europe but never there. It’s on my todo list.

    Best –

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