0529-22 NY Times Crossword 29 May 22, Sunday

Constructed by: Daniel Bodily and Jeff Chen
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: A Monumental Centennial

Themed answers relate to the LINCOLN MEMORIAL, which was dedicated 100 years ago tomorrow. The black squares in the grid depict the MEMORIAL, and nine letters in the center-bottom spell out PRE-SID-ENT:

  • 27A Landmark dedicated on 5/30/1922 : LINCOLN MEMORIAL
  • 21A With 23-Across, what this puzzle’s subject promised in his most famous address : A NEW BIRTH …
  • 23A See 21-Across : … OF FREEDOM
  • 33A Raymond ___, Best Actor nominee for portraying this puzzle’s subject (1940) : MASSEY
  • 76A Feature first recommended to this puzzle’s subject by an 11-year-old girl : BEARD
  • 85A Nickname for this puzzle’s subject : HONEST ABE
  • 35D One epithet for this puzzle’s subject : SAVIOR OF THE UNION
  • 38D Another epithet for this puzzle’s subject : GREAT EMANCIPATOR
  • 59D Campaign nickname that reflected the rustic upbringing of this puzzle’s subject : RAIL SPLITTER
  • 63D Accessory in which this puzzle’s subject stashed important documents : STOVEPIPE HAT
  • 106D Lead-in to historic : PRE-
  • 107D ___ the Kid, rhyming N.H.L. nickname : SID
  • 108D Otolaryngologist, for short : ENT

Bill’s time: 20m 46s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 About 200 feet, for a Boeing 777 : SPAN

The Boeing 777 was introduced in 1995, when it was the company’s first fly-by-wire airliner. It has been tremendously successful, with Boeing receiving more orders for the 777 than any other model.

9 Artist Vincent van ___ : GOGH

Vincent van Gogh was a Dutch post-impressionist painter who seems to have had a very tortured existence. Van Gogh only painted for the last ten years of his life, and enjoyed very little celebrity while alive. Today many of his works are easily recognized, and fetch staggering sums in auction houses. Van Gogh suffered from severe depression for many of his final years. When he was only 37, he walked into a field with a revolver and shot himself in the chest. He managed to drag himself back to the inn where he was staying but died there two days later.

19 Slacks, say, in slang : TROU

The term “slacks” was introduced in the early 1800s with the meaning “loose trousers”. Those early slacks were part of a military uniform.

20 Apparel in many a Degas painting : TUTU

The word “tutu”, used for a ballet dancer’s skirt, is actually a somewhat “naughty” term. It came into English from French in the early 20th century. The French “tutu” is an alteration of the word “cucu”, a childish word meaning “bottom, backside”.

Edgar Degas was a French artist who was famous for both his paintings and his sculptures. Some of Degas’ most beautiful works feature female ballet dancers, and others depict women bathing.

21 With 23-Across, what this puzzle’s subject promised in his most famous address : A NEW BIRTH …

23 See 21-Across : … OF FREEDOM

I admit to having profound respect and admiration for great speeches delivered by great men and women. Forgive me as I reproduce here the full text of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address:

Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that “all men are created equal.”

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow, this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.

It is rather for us the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.

26 Piercing-free bijouterie : EAR CLIPS

The noun “bijou” (plural “bijoux”) is used for a small, expensive trinket. “Bijou” is French for “jewel”.

27 Landmark dedicated on 5/30/1922 : LINCOLN MEMORIAL

The Lincoln Memorial is my favorite place to visit in the whole of Washington D.C. The memorial itself was designed by Henry Bacon, and the sculptor of the magnificent statue of President Lincoln was Daniel Chester French. I spent a wonderful afternoon a few years ago touring the workshop and home of French, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. The workshop is stunning, with miniature studies for his magnum opus, the Lincoln Statue, as well as many other beautiful works.

33 Raymond ___, Best Actor nominee for portraying this puzzle’s subject (1940) : MASSEY

Raymond Massey was a Canadian-American actor. As well as having a very successful movie career, Massey was also well known for playing Dr. Gillespie in the TV show “Dr. Kildare” in the 1960s. Offscreen, he served his country in the military in both WWI and WWII.

In the 1940 biopic “Abe Lincoln in Illinois”, Abe was played by Raymond Massey. Massey also played the role in the original Broadway play of the same name, on which the movie was based. The film also starred Ruth Gordon, in her big screen debut, as Mary Todd Lincoln.

36 Hades’ collection : SOULS

Hades was the god of the underworld to the ancient Greeks. Over time, Hades gave his name to the underworld itself, the place where the dead reside. The term “Hades” was also adopted into the Christian tradition, as an alternative name for hell. But, the concept of hell in Christianity is more akin to the Greek “Tartarus”, which is a dark and gloomy dungeon located in Hades, a place of suffering and torment.

41 Actress Green of “Casino Royale” : EVA

Despite the English-sounding name, Eva Green is a French actress. Green played Bond girl Vesper Lynd in the 2006 movie “Casino Royale” opposite Daniel Craig.

42 They watch what you eat, for short : FDA

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has its roots in the Division of Chemistry (later “Bureau of Chemistry”) that was part of the US Department of Agriculture. President Theodore Roosevelt gave responsibility for examination of food and drugs to the Bureau of Chemistry with the signing of the Pure Food and Drug Act. The Bureau’s name was changed to the Food, Drug and Insecticide Organization in 1927, and to the Food and Drug Administration in 1930.

44 Order of doughnuts : DOZEN

Our word “dozen” is used for a group of twelve. We imported it into English from Old French. The modern French word for “twelve” is “douze”, and for “dozen” is “douzaine”.

46 “Norma ___” : RAE

“Norma Rae” is a 1979 movie starring Sally Field as Norma Rae Webster in a tale of union activities in a textile factory in Alabama. The film is based on the true story of Crystal Lee Sutton told in a 1975 book called “Crystal Lee, a Woman of Inheritance”.

51 He played Ferris Bueller’s droning economics teacher : BEN STEIN

Many of us know Ben Stein as a very smart and entertaining TV personality. Before focusing on his screen career, Stein was a speechwriter for Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.

54 Pay-___-click (advertising model) : PER

“Pay-per-click” is an advertising model commonly used on the Internet. The scheme allows advertisers to place ads for free, only paying every time that a reader clicks on an ad.

55 Place for an ace : SKY

A flying ace (also “air ace”) is an aviator who has shot down a number of enemy planes during combat. The qualifying number of kills seems to vary, but five is common. The first use of “ace” was during WWI, when the French newspapers dubbed pilot Adolphe Pegoud “l’as” (French for “the ace”) when he shot down his fifth German plane.

57 Composer Zimmer : HANS

Hans Zimmer is a film composer from Frankfurt in Germany. The long list of films that Zimmer has scored includes “Rain Man” (1998), “The Lion King” (1994), “Gladiator” (2000), “The Dark Knight” (2008), “Inception” (2010) and “12 Years a Slave” (2013).

58 N.H.L. great Bobby : ORR

Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking. While still 31 years old, in 1979, Orr became the youngest person inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Prior to that, in 1967, Orr became the youngest person named the NHL’s Rookie of the Year.

60 PDF alternative : DOC

Microsoft Word documents have the “.doc” file extension, at least those created prior to the introduction of Microsoft Office 2007. The extension used now is “.docx”.

Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications and platforms, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

67 Big moneymaker : CASH COW

On a farm, a dairy cow can produce a steady supply of milk, with relatively little maintenance. In the world of business, by analogy, a “cash cow” is an operation that delivers a steady stream of profits, with relatively little investment.

71 Italicize or underline : STRESS

Italic type leans to the right, and is often used to provide emphasis in text. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

76 Feature first recommended to this puzzle’s subject by an 11-year-old girl : BEARD

There is a story that just before Abraham Lincoln was elected president in 1860, he received a letter from a 12-year-old girl who criticized Lincoln’s appearance and his pockmarked, gaunt face. The little girl, Grace Bedell from New York, promised to get her brothers to vote for Lincoln if he would just grow a beard. However, Lincoln waited until after the election to grow his famous whiskers, a distinctive look that would forever be associated with his presidency.

78 Rivendell resident, in “The Lord of the Rings” : ELF

Rivendell is a location occupied by Elves in Middle-earth, the fictional realm created by novelist J. R. R. Tolkien.

82 Cable news anchor Cabrera : ANA

Ana Cabrera is a journalist from Denver who joined CNN in 2013. She took over as anchor of CNN’s weekend show “CNN Newsroom” in 2017.

85 Nickname for this puzzle’s subject : HONEST ABE

Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth President of the US. There are several stories told about how he earned the nickname “Honest Abe”. One story dates back to early in his career as a lawyer. Lincoln accidentally overcharged a client and then walked miles in order to right the wrong as soon as possible.

88 Eponymous physicist Mach : ERNST

The Mach number of a moving object (like say an airplane) is its speed relative to the speed of sound. A plane traveling at Mach 2, for example, is moving at twice the speed of sound. The term “Mach” takes its name from the Austrian physicist Ernst Mach who published a groundbreaking paper in 1877 that even predicted the “sonic boom”.

92 Ulysses S. Grant, e.g. : WAR HERO

US President Ulysses S. Grant was born Hiram Ulysses Grant. Ohio Congressman Thomas Hamer nominated a young Grant to attend West Point, and gave the candidate’s name as “Ulysses S. Grant” in error. Grant tried to fix the error while studying at the military academy, but bureaucracy won out and the future president eventually embraced the inaccurate name as his own.

93 Bit of “deets” : SPEC

“Deets” is slang for “details”.

96 Bikini’s place : PACIFIC

The name of Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands comes from the Marshallese name “Pikinni”, meaning “coconut place”. Famously, Bikini Atoll was the site of 23 nuclear detonations by the US from 1946 to 1958.

99 “Crazy Rich Asians” director Jon M. ___ : CHU

Jon M. Chu is a movie and television director who is perhaps known for directing 2018’s highly-acclaimed film “Crazy Rich Asians”. Chu’s firstborn child is named “Willow”, after the 1998 film “Willow”. His second-born child is named “Jonathan Heights”, after the 2021 movie “In the Heights”.

“Crazy Rich Asians” is a 2018 romcom based on a 2013 novel of the same name by Kevin Kwan. The film garnered a lot of attention and accolades, not only for the quality of the script and performances. It was the first major Hollywood movie to feature a principal cast of Asian descent since 1993’s “The Joy Luck Club”.

100 IV site, for short : ICU

An intravenous drip (IV) might be seen in an intensive care unit (ICU), operating room (OR) or emergency room (ER).

102 When repeated, cheer accessory : POM

The French call a ball made of tufted wool a “pompon”, a word that we imported into English directly as “pompon”. We use “pompon” to describe perhaps bobbles on some hats, or the tufted balls that are shaken by cheerleaders at sports events. Over time, the spelling “pompom” has become common in English, probably due to mishearing. To confuse matters a little, we also use the word “pom-pom”, which is a nickname for a British autocannon used mainly as an anti-aircraft weapon, particularly during WWII.

109 Trattoria staple : OREGANO

Oregano is a perennial herb that is in the mint family. Also known as wild marjoram, oregano is very much associated with the cuisine of southern Italy. Oregano’s popularity surged in the US when soldiers returning from WWII in Europe brought with them an affinity for what they called “the pizza herb”.

112 Sanskrit for “great soul” : MAHATMA

Mohandas Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader in India in the first part of the 20th century, as the country sought independence from Britain. He was also referred to as “Mahatma”, meaning “great soul”. His remarkable philosophy of nonviolence and living a modest lifestyle was a great inspiration to the Indian people. India (and Pakistan) was granted independence in 1947. Tragically, Gandhi was assassinated the very next year.

114 Govt. aid for a mom-and-pop store : SBA LOAN

The Small Business Administration (SBA) is a government agency with the mission of assisting small businesses. The SBA doesn’t give loans itself, but it does act as a guarantor under the right circumstances. The SBA was set up in 1953, and isn’t a favorite with fiscal conservatives.

115 Some titles with tildes : SENORS

The tilde diacritical mark (~) is very much associated with the Spanish language. We use the name “tilde” in English, taking that name from Spanish. Confusingly, the word “tilde” in Spanish is used more generally to mean “accent mark, diacritic”, of which a “~” is just one. What we call a “tilde” in English is usually referred to as a “virgulilla” or “tilde de la eñe” in Spanish.

Down

2 Skiing star Lindsey : VONN

Lindsey Vonn is a World Champion alpine ski racer from Saint Paul, Minnesota. She is one of the few women to have won World Cup races in all five alpine racing disciplines: downhill, super-G, giant slalom, slalom and super combined. In fact, Vonn is the most successful US ski racer in history.

3 Partner of aid : ABET

The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (literally “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

4 Pieces included with Ikea furniture : DOWELS

A dowel is a rod made from plastic, wood or metal. In its complete form, it is referred to as a “dowel rod”. We are perhaps more used to the rod cut into short lengths known as “dowel pins”.

9 Classic Pontiac : GTO

The Pontiac GTO was produced by GM from 1964 to 1974, and again by a GM subsidiary in Australia from 2004 to 2006. The original GTO’s design is credited to Pontiac chief engineer at the time John DeLorean, who later founded the DeLorean Motor Company.

10 Title role in a Monteverdi opera : ORFEO

The Italian composer Claudio Monteverdi was a true pioneer. His opera “L’Orfeo” was one of the first operas ever composed, and is the earliest surviving opera that is still regularly performed. The debut performance of “L’Orfeo” was in 1607.

12 One-eyed giant? : HURRICANE

A severe tropical storm is called a hurricane when it occurs in the Atlantic and Northeast Pacific, a typhoon in the Northwest Pacific, and a cyclone in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean. Tropical storms form over warm water, picking up energy from the evaporation from the ocean surface.

13 McCartney of fashion : STELLA

Stella McCartney is an English fashion designer. She is the daughter of musician Paul McCartney (of Beatles fame) and photographer Linda McCartney nee Eastman.

14 Maker of the Q7 and Q8 : AUDI

The Audi name has an interesting history. The Horch company was founded by August Horch in 1909. Early in the life of the new company, Horch was forced out of his own business. He set up a new enterprise and continued to use his own name as a brand. The old company sued him for using the Horch name so a meeting was held to choose something new. Horch’s young son was studying Latin in the room where the meeting was taking place. He pointed out that “horch” was German for “hear” and he suggested “Audi” as a replacement, the Latin for “listen”.

28 Tab inits. : LSD

The drug LSD is often sold impregnated into blotting paper. The paper blotter is usually divided into squares with ¼-inch sides, with each square referred to as a “tab”.

29 Unlikely winners in Fortnite, say : NOOBS

“Noob” (sometimes “newb”) is a not-so-nice slang term for a “newbie”, and often refers to someone who is new to an online community.

30 Earful in an elevator : MUZAK

“Muzak” is a proprietary name for piped music, and is apparently a blend of the words “music” and “Kodak”. The Muzak system was developed way back in 1922 and was first used in workplaces.

31 Dead lines? : ELEGY

Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, which he completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:

  • Celestial fire
  • Far from the Madding Crowd
  • Kindred spirit

32 I.S.P. alternative to 84-Down : MSN

The Microsoft Network (MSN) used to be an Internet service provider (ISP). These days, MSN is mainly a Web portal.

35 One epithet for this puzzle’s subject : SAVIOR OF THE UNION

An epithet is a word or phrase used in a name to describe the quality of the person or thing bearing that name. For example, King Richard I was also known as Richard the Lionheart. The term “epithet” can also describe a word that is disparaging or abusive.

38 Another epithet for this puzzle’s subject : GREAT EMANCIPATOR

President Lincoln’s actions that resulted in the freeing of slaves led to him earning the nickname “the Great Emancipator”.

48 Cousin of a bittern : EGRET

Egrets are a group of several species of white herons. Many egret species were faced with extinction in the 1800s and early 1900s due to plume hunting, a practice driven by the demand for egret plumes that could be incorporated into hats.

Bitterns are wading birds in the heron family. Unlike most of their heron cousins, bitterns tend to have short necks.

49 Ray of McDonald’s fame : KROC

The original McDonald’s restaurant was opened in 1940 by Richard and Maurice McDonald as a barbecue restaurant. The brothers then moved into fast food hamburgers, eventually selling out to one of their franchise agents, Ray Kroc. It was Ray Kroc who really led the company to its worldwide success. He was played by Michael Keaton in the movie about Ray Kroc’s business life called “The Founder”.

52 Utility bill unit : THERM

A therm is a unit of heat energy. One therm is equivalent to 100,000 British thermal units (BTUs).

59 Campaign nickname that reflected the rustic upbringing of this puzzle’s subject : RAILSPLITTER

Before Abraham Lincoln was elected president, his political campaign used the nickname “Railsplitter” to emphasize the candidate’s humble upbringing. Lincoln had worked at splitting fence rails in his youth.

61 Beachside locale : CABANA

Our word “cabana” comes from the Spanish “cabaña”, the word for a small hut or a cabin. We often use the term to describe a tent-like structure beside a pool.

63 Accessory in which this puzzle’s subject stashed important documents : STOVEPIPE HAT

A stovepipe hat is also known as a top hat.

65 Wrinkly fruit : UGLI

The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine that was first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruit’s unsightly wrinkled rind.

66 Home to about 75% of the world’s tornadoes : USA

Tornado Alley has no precisely defined boundaries, but it generally lies between the Rockies and the Appalachians. It is so named because it is the area in the US where tornadoes occur most frequently.

68 Rocker Bob : SEGER

Bob Seger struggled as a performing artist right through the sixties and early seventies before becoming a commercial success in 1976 with the release of his album “Night Moves”. Since then, Seger has recorded songs that have become classics like “We’ve Got Tonight”, “Like a Rock” and “Old Time Rock & Roll”.

70 Island whose capital and largest city is Iraklion : CRETE

Crete is the largest of the Greek Islands. Crete figures heavily in Greek mythology. Zeus was born in a cave at Mount Ida, the highest peak on the island. Crete was also home to the Labyrinth where the Minotaur was slain by Theseus. Icarus and Daedalus, after having crafted the Labyrinth, escaped from the island using wings that they crafted.

72 Subject of the seven-letter mnemonic PALE GAS : SINS

The cardinal sins of Christian ethics are also known as the seven deadly sins. The seven sins are:

  • Wrath
  • Greed
  • Sloth
  • Pride
  • Lust
  • Envy
  • Gluttony

73 “Zip-a-dee-doo-dah,” e.g. : SCAT

Scat singing is a vocal improvisation found in the world of jazz. There aren’t any words as such in scat singing, just random nonsense syllables made up on the spot.

77 Hon : BAE

“Bae” is a contemporary term of endearment. It is a pet name that is an abbreviation of “babe, baby”, although I’ve also read that it is an acronym standing for “before anyone else”.

84 I.S.P. alternative to 32-Down : AOL

AOL was a leading Internet Service Provider (ISP) in the 1980s and 1990s. The company does still provide dial-up access to the Internet for some subscribers, but most users now access AOL using faster, non-AOL ISPs.

89 Court figure, informally : REF

Back in the early 17th century, a referee was someone who examined patent applications. We started using the same term for a person presiding over a sporting event in the 1820s. “Referee” is a derivative of the verb “to refer”, and literally describes someone who has the authority to make a decision by “referring” to a book, archive etc.

91 Perfumed pouches : SACHETS

A sachet is a small packet of perfumed powder left in perhaps a closet or trunk to scent clothes. The word “sachet” is a diminutive of the French word “sac” meaning “bag”.

93 Symbols of rebirth in ancient Egypt : SCARABS

Scarabs were amulets in ancient Egypt. Scarabs were modeled on the dung beetle, as it was viewed as a symbol of the cycle of life.

94 Goat’s milk cheese : CHEVRE

Chèvre is goat cheese. It takes its name from “chèvre”, the French word for “goat”.

95 Anthony or Joe who directed “Avengers: Endgame” : RUSSO

“Avengers: Endgame” is a 2019 superhero movie. It is the 22nd film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe that features several superheroes made famous in Marvel Comics. “Avengers: Endgame” closes out the story arcs for several superheroes from prior films in the series.

99 Some arcade machine mechanisms : CLAWS

Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

106 Lead-in to historic : PRE-

We define “prehistory” as that span of time before humans started keeping written records or had writing systems.

107 ___ the Kid, rhyming N.H.L. nickname : SID

Sidney Crosby is a professional ice hockey player from Canada, currently captain of the Pittsburgh Penguins. Crosby has the nicknames “The Next One” and “Sid the Kid”.

108 Otolaryngologist, for short : ENT

The ear, nose and throat (ENT) branch of medicine is more correctly called “otolaryngology”.

110 This really blows : GALE

A gale is a very strong wind, one defined by the Beaufort scale as having wind speeds from 50 to just over 100 kilometers per hour.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Part of a big media campaign : TV AD
5 About 200 feet, for a Boeing 777 : SPAN
9 Artist Vincent van ___ : GOGH
13 Tiara go-with : SASH
17 Kind of spider commonly found near train tracks : HOBO
18 Held on to : KEPT
19 Slacks, say, in slang : TROU
20 Apparel in many a Degas painting : TUTU
21 With 23-Across, what this puzzle’s subject promised in his most famous address : A NEW BIRTH …
23 See 21-Across : … OF FREEDOM
25 Premium flight amenity : INTERNET
26 Piercing-free bijouterie : EAR CLIPS
27 Landmark dedicated on 5/30/1922 : LINCOLN MEMORIAL
33 Raymond ___, Best Actor nominee for portraying this puzzle’s subject (1940) : MASSEY
36 Hades’ collection : SOULS
37 Rough and uneven : CRAGGY
41 Actress Green of “Casino Royale” : EVA
42 They watch what you eat, for short : FDA
44 Order of doughnuts : DOZEN
45 It’s in, then it’s out : FAD
46 “Norma ___” : RAE
47 Pining away : LOVESICK
50 Suitcase : BAG
51 He played Ferris Bueller’s droning economics teacher : BEN STEIN
53 Something easily snapped : TWIG
54 Pay-___-click (advertising model) : PER
55 Place for an ace : SKY
56 Wish to take back : RUE
57 Composer Zimmer : HANS
58 N.H.L. great Bobby : ORR
60 PDF alternative : DOC
62 Get the ___ : NOD
63 Situated : SET
64 Office : BUREAU
67 Big moneymaker : CASH COW
71 Italicize or underline : STRESS
74 It’s all about me : EGOTISM
76 Feature first recommended to this puzzle’s subject by an 11-year-old girl : BEARD
77 Extendable recording device : BOOM MIC
78 Rivendell resident, in “The Lord of the Rings” : ELF
79 Drink (up) : LAP
80 “You with me?” : AGREE?
81 ___ Offroad Fury (2000s video game series) : ATV
82 Cable news anchor Cabrera : ANA
83 Stuffed pockets : PITAS
85 Nickname for this puzzle’s subject : HONEST ABE
88 Eponymous physicist Mach : ERNST
90 Have ___ (be able to jump high, in slang) : HOPS
92 Ulysses S. Grant, e.g. : WAR HERO
93 Bit of “deets” : SPEC
94 Locales in a winery tour, perhaps : CELLARS
96 Bikini’s place : PACIFIC
99 “Crazy Rich Asians” director Jon M. ___ : CHU
100 IV site, for short : ICU
101 Choose : TAP
102 When repeated, cheer accessory : POM
104 Stretches : LENGTHS
109 Trattoria staple : OREGANO
111 Takes part in a pilot program? : AVIATES
112 Sanskrit for “great soul” : MAHATMA
113 Sent a letter : WROTE TO
114 Govt. aid for a mom-and-pop store : SBA LOAN
115 Some titles with tildes : SENORS
116 Backs : STERNS

Down

1 Some Asian cuisine : THAI
2 Skiing star Lindsey : VONN
3 Partner of aid : ABET
4 Pieces included with Ikea furniture : DOWELS
5 Barely get wet? : SKINNY-DIP
6 Writer Georges whose 300-page novel “A Void” completely avoided the letter E : PEREC
7 Is ___ (probably will) : APT TO
8 Utmost : NTH
9 Classic Pontiac : GTO
10 Title role in a Monteverdi opera : ORFEO
11 Win at life : GO FAR
12 One-eyed giant? : HURRICANE
13 McCartney of fashion : STELLA
14 Maker of the Q7 and Q8 : AUDI
15 Cry from one being tickled, maybe : STOP!
16 Runs well : HUMS
22 Snug-fitting underwear : BRIEFS
24 Greetings sent with a click : E-CARDS
28 Tab inits. : LSD
29 Unlikely winners in Fortnite, say : NOOBS
30 Earful in an elevator : MUZAK
31 Dead lines? : ELEGY
32 I.S.P. alternative to 84-Down : MSN
33 Diner order : MELT
34 Say outright : AVOW
35 One epithet for this puzzle’s subject : SAVIOR OF THE UNION
38 Another epithet for this puzzle’s subject : GREAT EMANCIPATOR
39 “Buy low, sell high” outcome : GAIN
40 Aches (for) : YENS
43 Nailed : ACED
45 Ongoing quarrel : FEUD
48 Cousin of a bittern : EGRET
49 Ray of McDonald’s fame : KROC
51 Arched body part : BROW
52 Utility bill unit : THERM
59 Campaign nickname that reflected the rustic upbringing of this puzzle’s subject : RAILSPLITTER
61 Beachside locale : CABANA
62 Loving turndown : NO, DEAR
63 Accessory in which this puzzle’s subject stashed important documents : STOVEPIPE HAT
64 [Outta my way, slowpoke!] : [BEEP!]
65 Wrinkly fruit : UGLI
66 Home to about 75% of the world’s tornadoes : USA
68 Rocker Bob : SEGER
69 More than unpleasant : HARSH
70 Island whose capital and largest city is Iraklion : CRETE
71 Habitual drinker : SOT
72 Subject of the seven-letter mnemonic PALE GAS : SINS
73 “Zip-a-dee-doo-dah,” e.g. : SCAT
75 Fastball stat : MPH
77 Hon : BAE
84 I.S.P. alternative to 32-Down : AOL
86 Biting remarks? : OWS
87 ___ on over (go somewhere, in slang) : BOP
89 Court figure, informally : REF
91 Perfumed pouches : SACHETS
93 Symbols of rebirth in ancient Egypt : SCARABS
94 Goat’s milk cheese : CHEVRE
95 Anthony or Joe who directed “Avengers: Endgame” : RUSSO
97 Makeup set? : ATOMS
98 One making a racket? : CON MAN
99 Some arcade machine mechanisms : CLAWS
103 Spooky sounds : MOANS
105 One chased by un perro : GATO
106 Lead-in to historic : PRE-
107 ___ the Kid, rhyming N.H.L. nickname : SID
108 Otolaryngologist, for short : ENT
110 This really blows : GALE

10 thoughts on “0529-22 NY Times Crossword 29 May 22, Sunday”

  1. I was surprised to not find the individual elements spelled out in your description of 72D as something like that appears to be both interesting and useful. For those similarly curious (and baffled!), I offer the following.

    PALE GAS:

    Pride
    Avarice (greed)
    Lust
    Envy

    Gluttony
    Anger (wrath)
    Sloth

  2. 30:23, no errors (but, for some reason, I bogged down for quite a while in the lower right).

    And I appreciate Michael’s list … I was going to research that and … forgot … 🤓.

  3. 41:31, 2 errors M(A)LT/(A)VA. Impressive construction with the black squares also depicting Abe’s STOVEPIPE HAT and BEARD.

  4. 33:13. Indeed the theme answers were relatively easy. It was a lot of the small stuff that made this puzzle challenging.

    Took a couple of minutes to find an error. I spelled MoHATMA wrong which I didn’t notice, but I did notice SCARoBS.

    Entire midsection of ELEGY, LSD, MUZAK and SOULS took me forever to get.

    Best –

  5. Took me 13-something to fill the grid, but I had “AVA” and “MALT” for 41A/33D (both of which seemed reasonable to me). When I didn’t get the jingle, I looked around for an error and couldn’t find one, and I moved on with my day.

    So DNF.

  6. 52:11 figured out the theme reasonably quickly(for me!)without reading anything regarding the puzzle title. Have spent many 7/4’s staking out a seat on the wall in front of the Memorial with my wife and daughter guaranteeing an unobstructed view of the fireworks👍👍

  7. 1:07:36 no errors.
    For a Jeff Chen and partner (always a partner) puzzle…I’ll take it😀
    Stay safe😀

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