0409-22 NY Times Crossword 9 Apr 22, Saturday

Constructed by: Sam Buchbinder
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 20m 57s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

11 Some radio announcements, in brief : APBS

An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

16 Schmooze : CHAT

To schmooze is to chat intimately. “Schmooze” is a word that comes from the Yiddish “schmusen” meaning “to chat” .

17 Where the entirety of the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy was filmed : NEW ZEALAND

The first European to sight the nation that we know today as New Zealand was the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman. He labeled the land “Staten Landt”, believing it to be part of South America. Dutch cartographers changed the name to “Nova Zelandia”, after the Dutch province of Zeeland. That Latin name evolved into the Dutch “Nieuw Zeeland”, which Captain James Cook anglicized to “New Zealand”.

“The Lord of the Rings” is a series of three epic fantasy films adapted from the novels of J. R. R. Tolkien. The films were produced and directed by Peter Jackson in a project that lasted a full eight years. All three movies were shot simultaneously, and entirely In New Zealand, which is Jackson’s homeland. “The Lord of the Rings” series is his the highest-grossing film series of all time. The third of the three movies in the series is “The Return of the King”, which won 11 Oscars. That ties the record for the most Academy Awards won by a movie, alongside “Ben-Hur” and “Titanic”.

18 Folderol : TO-DO

“Falderal” (also “folderal”) is a nonsense word that originated in the 18th century. Aptly enough, “folderol” means “nonsense”. Lovely term …

21 Amoeba feature : SILENT “O”

An ameba (also “amoeba”) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

23 Michael of “Superbad” : CERA

Michael Cera is a Canadian actor who played great characters on the TV show “Arrested Development”, and in the 2007 comedy-drama “Juno”. Cera is also quite the musician. He released an indie folk album titled “True That” in 2014.

“Superbad” is a comedy movie released in 2007. The script for the film was written by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg. Rogen and Goldberg started work on the script when they were just thirteen years old, with the first draft being completed by the time they were fifteen.

30 People of Burundi : TUTSI

The Tutsi are the second-largest population in Rwanda, with the Hutu being the largest. The bloody conflict that has existed between the Tutsi and Hutu peoples dates back to about 1880 when Catholic missionaries arrived in the region. The missionaries found that they had more success converting the Hutus than the Tutsi, and when the Germans occupied the area during WWI they confiscated Tutsi land and gave it to Hutu tribes in order to reward religious conversion. This injustice fuels fighting to this very day.

31 Huffing and puffing, e.g. : GERUNDS

A gerund is a form of a verb that can be used as a noun. For example, the gerund of the verb “to solve” is “solving”, as in the phrase “we really enjoyed the solving experience”.

33 Spread out at a party : PATE

Pâté is a rich spreadable paste made from a mixture of ground meat and fat to which various vegetables, herbs and spices may be added. The most famous version of the paste is pâté de foie gras, which is made from the fattened livers of geese (“foie gras” means “fat liver” in French).

37 Bishop’s group : RAT PACK

The original Rat Pack from the fifties was a group of actors that centered on Humphrey Bogart, and included a young Frank Sinatra. Supposedly, Bogart’s wife, Lauren Bacall, christened them the Rat Pack after seeing them all return from one of their nights on the town in Las Vegas. The sixties Rat Pack was a reincarnation of the fifties version, with the core group of actors being Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin (Dino), Sammy Davis Jr., Joey Bishop and Peter Lawford.

“Joey Bishop” was the stage name of entertainer Joseph Gottlieb from the Bronx, New York. Bishop was mainly a comedian, and was perhaps better known as a member of the famous Rat Pack, alongside Frank Sinatra, Peter Lawford, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Dean Martin. Bishop died in 2007, the last surviving member and the longest-lived “Rat”.

39 Some fridges : GES

The General Electric Company is usually referred to simply as “GE”. One of the precursor companies to GE was Edison General Electric, founded in 1890 by the inventor Thomas Edison. What we know today as GE was formed two years later when Edison merged his company with Charles Coffin’s Thomson-Houston Electric Company. In 1896, GE was selected as one of the 12 companies listed on the newly formed Dow Jones Industrial Average. GE was the last of the original 12 to survive on that list, being replaced by Walgreens in 2018. I spent over ten years with GE at the beginning of my working career, and in fact it was GE that asked me to transfer to the US from Ireland back in the 1980s …

40 Deadlines? : OBIT

Our word “obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”. The Latin term was used for “record of the death of a person”, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

42 It might be captured on a safari : FOOTAGE

“Safari” is a Swahili word meaning “journey” or “expedition”.

44 Who famously said “I really didn’t say everything I said” : BERRA

Yogi Berra is regarded by many as the greatest catcher ever to play in Major League Baseball, and has to be America’s most celebrated “author” of malapropisms. Here are some greats:

  • It ain’t over till it’s over.
  • 90% of the game is half mental.
  • Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.
  • When you come to a fork in the road, take it.
  • It’s déjà vu all over again.
  • Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they won’t go to yours.
  • A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.

52 Rear guard? : TALC

Talc is a mineral, hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

53 Drink that comes with a wide straw : BOBA TEA

Bubble tea, sometimes called “boba tea”, is a tea-based drink from Taiwan. The “bubbles” are chewy tapioca balls that are usually added to the drink.

57 Approval inits. : FDA

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has its roots in the Division of Chemistry (later “Bureau of Chemistry”) that was part of the US Department of Agriculture. President Theodore Roosevelt gave responsibility for examination of food and drugs to the Bureau of Chemistry with the signing of the Pure Food and Drug Act. The Bureau’s name was changed to the Food, Drug and Insecticide Organization in 1927, and to the Food and Drug Administration in 1930.

58 Like much of Sudan : ARID

Sudan was the largest country in Africa until 2011, when the Southern Sudan region opted by referendum to become independent. “North Sudan” retained the name of Sudan, and the new state is called South Sudan. Sudan is now the third largest country in the continent, after Algeria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

62 Musical Case : NEKO

Neko Case is an American singer-songwriter who is best known as a solo artist as well as a member of the indie rock group from Canada called the New Pornographers.

Down

2 Went for a ride, in a way : UBERED

Uber is a ridesharing service that was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. The service is somewhat controversial and has been described as an illegal taxicab operation. Central to Uber’s service is the company’s mobile app, which can use the client’s GPS location to help find the nearest available ride. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft.

3 Carpenters, at times : SAWERS

A carpenter is someone who shapes and assembles structural woodwork. The term “carpenter” comes from the Late Latin “carpentarius” meaning “wagon or carriage maker”. Both “carpenter” and “car” probably derive ultimately from the Gaulish word “karros” meaning “chariot”. Quite interesting …

4 Website with a “Got a Tip?” page : TMZ

TMZ.com is a celebrity gossip website launched in 2005 by producer Harvey Levin. “TMZ” stands for “thirty-mile zone”, a reference to the “studio zone” in Los Angeles. The studio zone is circular in shape with a 30-mile radius centered on the intersection of West Beverly Boulevard and North La Cienega Boulevard.

5 Boxing champ Max : BAER

Max Baer was an American Heavyweight Champion of the World in the thirties. Baer held the title for 364 days, and then went into the ring after hardly any training at all against the well-prepared James J. Braddock. Braddock was a huge underdog, and yet emerged victorious after 15 rounds (Braddock is the subject of the 2005 movie “Cinderella Man”). By the way, Baer’s son is Max Baer, Jr., the actor who played Jethro on “The Beverly Hillbillies”.

6 Site for a snipe : EBAY

Auction sniping is a relatively new phenomenon, a phenomenon that is associated with online auctions. A sniper waits until the final seconds of an auction and drops in a slightly higher bid, winning the auction as other bidders have no time to respond. Auction sniping is often executed with the help of a software application, or by using an online service.

7 It turns red in Exodus : NILE

According to the biblical Book of Exodus, God inflicted ten plagues on Egypt to persuade the Pharaoh to release the Israelites from bondage. For example, the first was the changing of water in the Nile to blood, the eighth was a plague of locusts that consumed all the Egyptian crops, and the tenth was the death of firstborn sons.

8 B.C. neighbor: Abbr. : IDA

Idaho borders six states, and one Canadian province:

  • Montana
  • Wyoming
  • Nevada
  • Utah
  • Washington
  • Oregon
  • British Columbia

The Canadian province of British Columbia (BC) is in the Pacific Northwest. The British referred to the territory drained by the Columbia River as the “Columbia District”. Queen Victoria chose the name “British Columbia” for that section of the Columbia District that fell under British control. The remainder of the Columbia District was referred to as “American Columbia” or “Southern Columbia”, which became the Oregon Territory in 1848.

9 Gathering that occurs once per decade : CENSUS DATA

The original census was taken during the days of the Roman Republic, and was a reckoning of all adult males who were fit for military service. The first US Census was taken in 1790, and was conducted by federal marshals.

11 Caused a ruckus : ACTED UP

The word “ruckus” is used to mean “commotion”, and has been around since the late 1800s. “Ruckus” is possibly a melding of the words “ruction” and “rumpus”.

13 What you find kitsch in : BAD TASTE

“Kitsch” is a German word, an adjective that means “gaudy, trash”.

14 Sources of some tips : STOOLIES

Stoolies, also called “canaries”, will sing to the cops given the right incentive. “Stoolie” is short for “stool pigeon”. A stool pigeon was a decoy bird tied to a stool so as to lure other pigeons. Originally a stoolie was a decoy for the police, rather than an informer, hence the name.

22 Line on a map: Abbr. : LAT

Lines of latitude are imaginary horizontal lines surrounding the planet. The most “important” lines of latitude are, from north to south:

  • Arctic Circle
  • Tropic of Cancer
  • Equator
  • Tropic of Capricorn
  • Antarctic Circle

24 Land on the Med. : ALG

Algeria is a huge country, the largest in Africa, and the largest on the Mediterranean. The capital of Algeria is Algiers, and the country takes its name from the city.

25 Alternative to a Gallup survey : CNN POLL

CNN (Cable News Network) was launched in 1980 by the Turner Broadcasting System, and was the first television channel in the world to provide news coverage 24 hours a day. CNN headquarters is located in Atlanta.

The Gallup company is best known for its public opinion polls. The company was founded by George Gallup in 1935 as the American Institute of Public Opinion.

27 “Utter your gravity ___ a gossip’s bowl”: “Romeo and Juliet” : O’ER

William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” doesn’t end well for the title characters. Juliet takes a potion as a ruse to fool her parents, to trick them into thinking she is dead. The potion puts her in a death-like coma for 24 hours, after which Juliet plans to awaken and run off with Romeo. Juliet sends a message to Romeo apprising him of the plan, but the message fails to arrive. Romeo hears of Juliet’s “death”, and grief-stricken he takes his own life by drinking poison. Juliet awakens from the coma, only to find her lover dead beside her. She picks up a dagger and commits suicide. Nobody lives happily ever after …

28 Tennis great with the most consecutive weeks ranked #1 in the world (377) : GRAF

Steffi Graf is a former World No. 1 professional tennis player from Germany. Graf won 22 Grand Slam singles titles, which was more than any other man or woman until Serena Williams came along. Graf is married to another former World No. 1, namely Andre Agassi.

35 Rule that’s often broken : “I” BEFORE “E”

“I before E, except after C”. With so many exceptions, I think this is one rule that’s not taught in schools anymore …

36 Kawasaki offering : DIRT BIKE

The Kawasaki company of Japan was founded in 1896 by Shozo Kawasaki. We tend to think of it as a manufacturer of motorcycles and perhaps all-terrain vehicles, but it started out as a shipbuilder, and indeed still makes ships today.

38 Cold War inits. : KGB

The “Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti” (KGB) was the national security agency of the Soviet Union until 1991. The KGB was dissolved after the agency’s chairman led a failed attempt at a coup d’état designed to depose President Mikhail Gorbachev.

The term “Cold War” was coined by novelist George Orwell in a 1945 essay about the atomic bomb. Orwell described a world under threat of nuclear war as having a “peace that is no peace”, in a permanent state of “cold war”. The specific use of “cold war” to describe the tension between the Eastern bloc and the Western allies is attributed to a 1947 speech by Bernard Baruch, adviser to Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

47 Garment of the Middle East : KAFTAN

A kaftan (also “caftan”) is a long robe that has been associated for centuries with Islamic cultures.

48 Like Meg among the March sisters : ELDEST

“Little Women” is a novel written by American author Louisa May Alcott. The quartet of “little women” comprises Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March. Jo is a tomboy, the main character in the story, and is based on Alcott herself.

51 CVS Health acquisition of 2018 : AETNA

When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mount Etna, the Italian volcano.

54 Subject of numerous hoaxes : YETI

The yeti, also known as the abominable snowman, is a beast of legend. “Yeti” is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology, and a cryptid is a creature or plant that isn’t recognized by the scientific community, but the existence of which has been suggested.

60 Doctor’s orders, for short : RXS

There seems to be some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol “Rx” that’s used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter’s blessing to help a patient recover.

61 Mens ___ : REA

Aisha Tyler is an actor and comedian who was a co-host on “The Talk” for several years starting in 2011. She began hosting the reboot of “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” in 2013.
“Archer” is an animated sitcom that first hit the screens in 2009. Haven’t seen this one …
“Mens rea” is Latin for “guilty mind” and is a central concept in criminal law. The concept is expanded to “actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea” meaning “the act does not make a person guilty unless the mind be also guilty”. In other words, someone should not be deemed guilty of an act, unless he or she had a “guilty mind”, intended to do wrong.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 “Wish I could live like that …” : MUST BE NICE …
11 Some radio announcements, in brief : APBS
15 First winning presidential ticket to alternate vowels and consonants : OBAMA-BIDEN
16 Schmooze : CHAT
17 Where the entirety of the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy was filmed : NEW ZEALAND
18 Folderol : TO-DO
19 Common Italian verb ending : -IRE
20 Brewery supply : RYE
21 Amoeba feature : SILENT “O”
23 Michael of “Superbad” : CERA
25 Shake hands, perhaps : CUT A DEAL
26 Many jingles : AD SLOGANS
30 People of Burundi : TUTSI
31 Huffing and puffing, e.g. : GERUNDS
33 Spread out at a party : PATE
34 Free : RID
37 Bishop’s group : RAT PACK
39 Some fridges : GES
40 Deadlines? : OBIT
42 It might be captured on a safari : FOOTAGE
44 Who famously said “I really didn’t say everything I said” : BERRA
46 Some seaside gatherings : CLAMBAKES
50 “In the end …” : AFTER ALL …
52 Rear guard? : TALC
53 Drink that comes with a wide straw : BOBA TEA
54 Chinese ___, food also called nagaimo : YAM
57 Approval inits. : FDA
58 Like much of Sudan : ARID
59 One with news to share, often : TV REPORTER
62 Musical Case : NEKO
63 Counter request : NEXT PLEASE
64 Sharp : KEEN
65 People might have personal ones for what they do : ASSISTANTS

Down

1 R&B artist with the 3x platinum 1995 debut album “Miss Thang” : MONICA
2 Went for a ride, in a way : UBERED
3 Carpenters, at times : SAWERS
4 Website with a “Got a Tip?” page : TMZ
5 Boxing champ Max : BAER
6 Site for a snipe : EBAY
7 It turns red in Exodus : NILE
8 B.C. neighbor: Abbr. : IDA
9 Gathering that occurs once per decade : CENSUS DATA
10 Call everything off : END IT
11 Caused a ruckus : ACTED UP
12 Poor cell connection? : PHONE TAG
13 What you find kitsch in : BAD TASTE
14 Sources of some tips : STOOLIES
22 Line on a map: Abbr. : LAT
24 Land on the Med. : ALG
25 Alternative to a Gallup survey : CNN POLL
27 “Utter your gravity ___ a gossip’s bowl”: “Romeo and Juliet” : O’ER
28 Tennis great with the most consecutive weeks ranked #1 in the world (377) : GRAF
29 Devices used to sterilize medical equipment : AUTOCLAVES
32 Racket : SCAM
34 Take the money and run, say : ROB A BANK
35 Rule that’s often broken : “I” BEFORE “E”
36 Kawasaki offering : DIRT BIKE
38 Cold War inits. : KGB
41 Walk all over : TREAD ON
43 Put down : EAT
45 Word with fair or film : ART …
47 Garment of the Middle East : KAFTAN
48 Like Meg among the March sisters : ELDEST
49 Close calls : SCARES
51 CVS Health acquisition of 2018 : AETNA
54 Subject of numerous hoaxes : YETI
55 Tablet collection : APPS
56 Grow out of something, say : MOLT
60 Doctor’s orders, for short : RXS
61 Mens ___ : REA

10 thoughts on “0409-22 NY Times Crossword 9 Apr 22, Saturday”

  1. 14:44. Had the grid filled in 12-something but had to fix “bolt” to MOLT. Having a couple of autoclaves in my lab helped with the fill…

  2. 30:13 after fixing a minor glitch. (I struggled all the way through it and then forgot to go back and review an entry I wasn’t sure of.)

    Is it just me or have the puzzles been a little harder than usual this week? … 🤨

  3. 1:00:30. Not sure if the puzzles are harder, or that I’m focusing on my struggles with the app. My solving times are certainly longer.
    For some odd reason the word ASTROLABES came to mind before AUTOCLAVES. 6 out of 10 letters coincided, which actually helped in entering the crosses.

  4. 35:47,DNF. I got all but the upper right corner. Needed to peek at a few answers to complete thevgrid. Grrr… Anyway, that’s how we learn.

  5. 58:49/DNF Exact same quadrant as Alaska Steve, with the same result only 20 minutes more of frustration. I’m gonna finish a “Saturday” yet, by golly!!!

  6. 27:13. Forgot to post yesterday.

    Surprising how every puzzle seems to be different for everyone. I didn’t find this one all that difficult and I used the upper right to begin the puzzle. Go figure.

    Best –

  7. This wasn’t as difficult for me as Fridays. I felt I did pretty well but I had to look up the name of the medical device AUTOCLAVE. I was using CLAMPS as the end of the word and bottom section wasn’t completing the words. When I got CLAVE, everything fell together.

    I used SUNNI on 30A for awhile but that didn’t last. TUTSI wasn’t my first or second pick.

    I actually messed up on 54D. I used SETI instead of YETI. That gave me SIM for 54A. I missed 55D also. Had IPPS instead of APPS. hmm. Not sure what I was thinking there.

    1. Completed after a really really long time with one wrong letter: Monika / Kera . Never heard of either (e before i ) of them .

      In school we learned, ” i before e except after c, or when sounded like a as in neighbor and weigh”. And this sentence made of exceptions: “Neither leisured foreigner seized weird heights.”

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