1030-21 NY Times Crossword 30 Oct 21, Saturday

Constructed by: Michael Hawkins
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme None

Bill’s time: 20m 01s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

14 Academia, it’s said : IVORY TOWER

In modern usage, an ivory tower is an environment focused on education and intellectual pursuits while isolated from the practicalities of everyday life. The term is often used to describe academia. “Ivory tower” originated in the Song of Solomon in the Bible with the line “Your neck is like an ivory tower”.

16 TV host who was the subject of the documentary “You Laugh but It’s True” : NOAH

Trevor Noah is a comedian from Johannesburg, South Africa. Noah took over as host of the Comedy Channel’s “The Daily Show” after Jon Stewart retired. Noah can speak several languages, including English, Xhosa, Zulu, Sotho, Afrikaans, and German.

25 “Olympus ___ Fallen” (2013 film) : HAS

“Olympus Has Fallen” is an entertaining action movie from 2013 starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart and Morgan Freeman. It’s all about a Secret Service agent attempting the rescue of the president after a North-Korean guerrilla assault on the White House. There’s a 2016 sequel called “London Has Fallen”.

32 What Real Madrid and F.C. Barcelona play in : LA LIGA

The premier division of Spanish club soccer is the “Campeonato Nacional de Liga de Primera División”, or more usual “La Liga” (The League).

Real Madrid is a professional soccer team based in Madrid, Spain. The team name translates as “Royal Madrid”. Real Madrid is often ranked as the world’s most valuable soccer team, and is one of the most widely supported sports teams on the planet.

“Barça” is the nickname of the soccer club FC Barcelona (Futbol Club Barcelona). Barcelona is one of the most financially successful football clubs in the world in terms of revenue, along with the likes of Manchester United, Real Madrid and Bayern Munich.

33 Clerical garment : ALB

An alb is a white, neck-to-toe vestment worn by priests, usually with a rope cord around the waist. The term alb comes from “albus”, the Latin word for “white”.

34 Many take notes using one : ATM

Automatic Teller Machine (ATM)

35 Milk purchase: Abbr. : GAL

The name of our fluid measure called a “gallon” ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin term “galleta” meaning “bucket, pail”.

41 City name on both the East and West Coast : SALEM

Salem is a seaport on the Massachusetts coast. It is noted as the location of the Salem witch trials of 1692, an event that the city commemorates during the run-up to Halloween every year in October.

Salem is the state capital of Oregon. It is thought that the city takes its name from the older city of Salem, Massachusetts.

42 Elwes of “The Princess Bride” : CARY

Cary Elwes is an English actor who is perhaps most noted for appearing in the 1987 film “The Princess Bride”. He also played the title role in 1993’s “Cary Elwes”. Cary is the son of a celebrated English portrait painter, Dominick Elwes.

“The Princess Bride” is a novel by William Goldman written in 1973. Famously, the book was adapted into a 1987 film of the same name directed by Rob Reiner that has become a cult classic.

43 Letters that further extend letters : PPS

One adds a PS (post scriptum, or simply “postscript”) at the end of a letter (ltr.). A second postscript is a post post scriptum, a PPS.

53 Mystery prize : EDGAR AWARD

The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (“Edgars”) are presented annually by the Mystery Writers of America. There are several categories of awards. For example, the Ellery Queen Award honors “writing teams and outstanding people in the mystery-publishing industry”. The Raven Award is presented to non-writers, who contribute to the mystery genre.

59 Something that may be broken in a kitchen : YOLK

The yolk is the yellow part of a chicken’s egg. The term “yolk” comes from the Old English “geolu” meaning “yellow”.

Down

1 Checked item for some travelers : VISA

A visa is usually a stamp in one’s passport, an indication that one is authorized to enter (and less often, to exit) a particular country. The word “visa” comes into English, via French, from the Latin expression “charta visa” meaning “paper that has been seen”, or “verified paper”.

4 Linocuts and such : ART

The printmaking technique of “linocut” is similar to woodcut, but with a sheet of linoleum used instead of bare wood for the relief design. Linoleum was introduced as a floor covering in the 1860s, but the use of linoleum for printing only dates back to the early 1900s.

Lino (short for “linoleum”) was originally made by coating canvas with solidified linseed oil. The product’s inventor, Englishman Frederick Walton, gave it the name “linoleum” from “linum” and “oleum”, the Latin for “linen” and “oil”.

7 ___ Together (punny name for a hardware store) : AWL

An awl is a pointed tool used for marking a surface or for piercing small holes. The earliest awls were used to pierce ears, apparently. The tool then became very much associated with shoemakers.

23 One of 768 in a 35-Across: Abbr. : TSP
(35A Milk purchase: Abbr. : GAL)

Teaspoon (tsp.)

24 Overseas rate: Abbr. : KPH

Kilometres per hour (kph)

25 Commotion : HULLABALOO

Our word “hullabaloo”, meaning “commotion”, is a derivative of an older term “hollo-ballo”. “Hollo-ballo” was a word used for an uproar in the north of England and Scotland.

30 Screening sites : LABS

Our term “laboratory”, often shortened to “lab”, comes from the Medieval Latin word “laboratorium” meaning “place for labor, work”. This in turn comes from the Latin verb “laborare” meaning “to work”.

32 Loser to “The Shape of Water” for Best Picture : LADY BIRD

“Lady Bird” is a 2017 coming-of-age movie starring Saoirse Ronan in the title role, a high school senior who has a strained relationship with her mother (played by Laurie Metcalf). Roman and Metcalf earned themselves Oscar nominations for their performances.

“The Shape of Water” is a 2017 movie that is described as a “romantic monster” film, and so is in a pretty unique genre, I’d say. It was directed by Guillermo del Toro, who also co-wrote the script. It’s all about a mute young lady working in a government laboratory and falling in love with a humanoid amphibian who is held captive there. Not my cup of tea …

38 Caulks, e.g. : RESEALS

The term “caulk” comes from old Norman French “cauquer”, and described the action of filling gaps with lime. “Caulk” has the same root as our word “chalk”.

39 A.I. on Discovery One : HAL

In the movie “2001: A Space Odyssey”, Dr. David Bowman (“Dave”) goes up against the spacecraft computer known as “HAL”.

42 Vigorous exercise : CARDIO

Aerobic exercise is moderate activity designed to be at a low enough intensity that very little anaerobic activity takes place. In other words, the exercise is at a level where oxygen is taken in to burn fat and carbohydrate and to create energy. Anaerobic exercise is more intense and uses carbohydrate (glycogen) in the muscle to provide energy, without the need for oxygen. Aerobics are also called “cardio” as the exercises strengthen the cardiovascular system.

46 Titular Menotti opera character : AMAHL

Composer Gian Carlo Menotti’s “Amahl and the Night Visitors” has a special place in the repertoire, in that it is the first opera specifically composed for American television. “Amahl and the Night Visitors” was commissioned by NBC and had its debut at the NBC studios in Rockefeller Center on Christmas Eve, 1951. In today’s world of commercially-driven television, I can’t imagine a network commissioning a classical work …

47 Singer Peniston with the 1991 top 5 hit “Finally” : CECE

CeCe Peniston is a recording artist noted for the prevalence of her music in dance clubs. Her most successful song is “Finally”, released in 1991. Supposedly Peniston wrote the lyrics for “Finally” while she was still at school, and during a chemistry class!

51 ___ Prairie, suburb of Minneapolis : EDEN

The city of Eden Prairie lies just outside downtown Minneapolis. If you live there, congratulations! Eden Prairie was ranked by “Money Magazine” in 2010 as the best place to live in America.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Words on some flashcards, informally : VOCAB
6 Stuff : SATE
10 “___ are …” : ODDS
14 Academia, it’s said : IVORY TOWER
16 TV host who was the subject of the documentary “You Laugh but It’s True” : NOAH
17 One paid to be in an audience : SEAT-FILLER
18 Pot price : ANTE
19 Its larva is eaten as a delicacy in the Mexican dish escamoles : ANT
20 Suffix with carboxyl : -ASE
21 Loved, on social media : HEARTED
23 Found through searching : TRACKED DOWN
25 “Olympus ___ Fallen” (2013 film) : HAS
27 Quiet (down) : PIPE
28 Defeated, in a way : SLAIN
30 Source of cheap caviar : LUMPFISH
32 What Real Madrid and F.C. Barcelona play in : LA LIGA
33 Clerical garment : ALB
34 Many take notes using one : ATM
35 Milk purchase: Abbr. : GAL
36 “___ love is better than high birth to me”: Shak. : THY
37 Lacking focus : BLURRY
39 Low-lying areas? : HIDEOUTS
41 City name on both the East and West Coast : SALEM
42 Elwes of “The Princess Bride” : CARY
43 Letters that further extend letters : PPS
44 You can’t leave home with it : BASEBALL BAT
47 One who likes to dish? : CATERER
48 Ohio congressman Ryan : TIM
49 Corn’s place : TOE
52 Princess ___ Martell on “Game of Thrones” : ELIA
53 Mystery prize : EDGAR AWARD
56 Refrigerate : COOL
57 Locale for athletic competition : FIELD HOUSE
58 A long, long time : EONS
59 Something that may be broken in a kitchen : YOLK
60 Reveal : LET ON

Down

1 Checked item for some travelers : VISA
2 ___-ready : OVEN
3 Outer layer : COAT
4 Linocuts and such : ART
5 Without a doubt : BY FAR
6 Grammatical mistake : SOLECISM
7 ___ Together (punny name for a hardware store) : AWL
8 Snickers piece? : TEE-HEE
9 Didn’t do the right thing : ERRED
10 Hot : ON A ROLL
11 “I might be out late. See you in the morning” : DON’T WAIT UP
12 Occasions for hiring a sitter : DATE NIGHTS
13 Get rid of : SHED
15 “Alas!” : ‘TIS A PITY!
22 Commercial success : AD SALE
23 One of 768 in a 35-Across: Abbr. : TSP
24 Overseas rate: Abbr. : KPH
25 Commotion : HULLABALOO
26 Walking : AMBULATION
29 Count against? : NAYS
30 Screening sites : LABS
31 One whose work is always cropping up? : FARMER
32 Loser to “The Shape of Water” for Best Picture : LADY BIRD
35 Some slumber party activity : GIRL TALK
38 Caulks, e.g. : RESEALS
39 A.I. on Discovery One : HAL
40 Go (for) : OPT
42 Vigorous exercise : CARDIO
45 Substantial : BEEFY
46 Titular Menotti opera character : AMAHL
47 Singer Peniston with the 1991 top 5 hit “Finally” : CECE
49 Opposite of relaxed : TAUT
50 Thereabouts : OR SO
51 ___ Prairie, suburb of Minneapolis : EDEN
54 It’s hair-raising : GEL
55 Wretchedness : WOE

14 thoughts on “1030-21 NY Times Crossword 30 Oct 21, Saturday”

  1. 16:56, no errors. Excitement of the day: spotting Mercury rising (a little ahead of the sun) during this morning’s trip around Barr Lake!

  2. 39:41 Like @Tom R, I also struggled with the SE, but I also added the SW, NW, NE, and center to all my struggles. That just about covers it.

    But even with that long time, I still have a swelled head because once I figured out all my betes noire, I smacked myself in the forehead a lot, finally realizing the answers.

  3. 28:25. Complete guess at CECE/ELIA, but the E made more sense than other vowels. Also had SEAT FIndER (whatever that is) before FILLER and itS A PITY before TIS A PITY. NW was my toughest part.

    Agree with the above regarding all the movie references. Just had to sweat through them.

    Some oblique cluing in this one, but I finished so I guess it was adequate.

    Best –

  4. tough time today.. SOLECISM LALIGA AMAHL…
    then i had several variations of TIS A PITY.. ITS A PITY…

    so technically a DNF with 2 lookups..

    OLE !… guess i need to get into the spanish soccer league now!

    …. or improve my “SOLECISM”..

  5. Had SEATRINGER for a while until I got the pun for 7-D which opened the way for a clean finish. I thought the grid was “Saturday worthy.” Crosses, as usual, played a big part.

  6. 24:58, no errors. Tough puzzle. I think the clue for 44A belongs in the Hall of Infamy for poor clues. There is no rule in baseball preventing a player from carrying the bat away from home plate. A player, after hitting a home run, can carry the bat around the bases if they want.

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