0829-21 NY Times Crossword 29 Aug 21, Sunday

Constructed by: Dory Mintz
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme Uh? Oh …

Themed answers are common phrases with an “uh” or “oh” sound inserted:
22A Beams of one’s dreams? : FANTASY SUPPORTS (from “fantasy sports”)
33A Visit a museum to see a Rembrandt exhibit? : GO FOR BAROQUE (from “go for broke”)
49A Bird of prey that’s gently petted? : FALCON CARESSED (from “Falcon Crest”)
67A Actor Justin sitting poolside? : THEROUX IN THE TOWEL (from “threw in the towel”)
86A Make fun of small orange fruits? : DERIDE APRICOTS (from “dried apricots”)
102A Mashed potatoes, on a Thanksgiving plate? : GRAVY TERRAIN (from “gravy train”)
116A Fourth-quarter meltdown at an N.B.A. game in Oklahoma City? : THUNDER COLLAPSE (from “thunderclaps”)

Bill’s time: 32m 22s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

4 Politician with the campaign slogan 30-Across : OBAMA
(30A See 4-Across : YES WE CAN )

The 2008 campaign that resulted in the election of President Barack Obama used the slogan “Change we can believe in”, along with the associated chant “Yes We Can”. The words “Yes We Can” were perhaps borrowed from the United Farm Workers, which organization uses the motto “Sí, se puede”. “Sí, se puede” translates as “Yes, it is possible” and is a phrase very much associated with labor leader Cesar Chavez.

19 Wrestling star John : CENA

John Cena is a professional wrestler turned rapper and actor. Although wrestling, rapping and “Cena-style” movies wouldn’t be my cup of tea, I have to admire Cena’s philanthropic record. He holds the title for the most wishes granted by a single individual for the Make-A-Wish Foundation that benefits children with life-threatening medical conditions.

27 Moonfish : OPAH

“Opah” is the more correct name for the fish also known as the sunfish, moonfish or Jerusalem haddock. I’ve seen one in the Monterey Aquarium. It is one huge fish …

28 Swimmers in kelp forests : SEA OTTERS

Sea otters actually hold hands while sleeping on their backs so that they don’t drift apart. When sea otter pups are too small to lock hands, they clamber up onto their mother’s belly and nap there.

Kelps are large seaweeds that grow in kelp forests underwater. Kelps can grow to over 250 feet in length, and do so very quickly. Some kelps can grow at the rate of 1-2 feet per day.

33 Visit a museum to see a Rembrandt exhibit? : GO FOR BAROQUE (from “go for broke”)

Something described as baroque is extremely ornate and convoluted. The term comes from the Baroque Period of the early 17th to mid-18th century. Many of the arts focused on great detail and elaborate design during that time.

The celebrated Dutch painter’s full name was Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (sometimes “Ryn”). Rembrandt is perhaps most appreciated for his portraits, and left the world a remarkable collection of self-portraits.

35 One prone to looking down : SNOB

Back in the 1780s, a snob was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word “snob” was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn’t a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

36 His tomb is in Red Square : LENIN

Lenin’s Tomb is a mausoleum in which lie the embalmed remains of Vladimir Lenin. The tomb lies just outside the walls of the Kremlin in Red Square. Lenin died in 1924, after which his body was housed in a wooden structure in Red Square for viewing by mourners. The current marble and granite structure was completed in 1930. The body has rested there on display ever since, except for the years of WWII when there was a perceived danger of Moscow falling to the Germans. The body was evacuated to Tyumen in Siberia for the war years.

37 Diamondbacks, on scoreboards : ARI

The Arizona Diamondbacks (also “D-backs”) joined Major League Baseball’s National League in 1998. By winning the World Series in 2001, the Diamondbacks became the fastest expansion team to do so in Major League history.

38 Face cards? : IDS

Identity document (ID)

41 Destination for oenophiles : NAPA

In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oeno-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

43 Sicily’s Parco dell’___ : ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcanoes in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts. It is sometimes referred to as “Mongibello” in Italian, and as “Mungibeddu” (sometimes “Muncibeddu”) in Sicilian. The English name “Etna” comes from the Greek “aitho” meaning “I eat”.

45 Bug spray ingredient : DEET

“DEET” is short for “N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide”, an active ingredient in insect repellents. DEET is most often used to repel mosquitoes by applying it to the skin and/or clothing. It is also used to protect against tick bites.

49 Bird of prey that’s gently petted? : FALCON CARESSED (from “Falcon Crest”)

There are about 40 species of the birds of prey classed as falcons, with examples being several species of kestrel. Falcons differ from hawks and eagles in that they kill their prey with their beaks, as opposed to their talons. Famously, falcons swoop down on their prey at great speed. Peregrine falcons have been clocked at well over 200 miles per hour, making them the fastest-moving creatures on the planet.

53 Popular pops : PEPSIS

Pepsi has used many, many slogans over the years. The slogans range from “The Choice of a New Generation” featuring Michael Jackson in the eighties and nineties, to the original “Twice as Much for a Nickel” that ran from 1939 to 1950.

56 Longtime hockey star Kovalchuk : ILYA

Ilya Kovalchuk is a Russian-born hockey player who turned out for the Atlanta Thrashers and New Jersey Devils of the National Hockey League. Kovalchuk returned to his homeland in 2013, and signed a contract with SKA Saint Petersburg of the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) that covers Europe and Asia.

73 Santa-tracking org. : NORAD

The North American Defense Command (NORAD) isn’t just a US operation but is a cooperative arrangement between Canada and the United States. The two countries entered into an agreement to establish NORAD in 1958, mainly due to the concern that there would be little or no warning of a missile attack from the Soviet Union that came over the North Pole. NORAD also tracks Santa Claus coming from the North Pole every Christmas, and these days publishes Santa’s location on Christmas Eve on its website. The tracking of Santa started into 1955 when a local Sears store placed an advertisement in a Colorado Springs newspaper with a phone number that could be used to call Santa Claus. The newspaper accidentally printed the number for the Continental Air Defense Command (a precursor to NORAD). The officer on duty instructed his staff to give all children who called a “current location” for Santa. Today, NORAD gets about 120,000 phone queries about Santa’s location every year, and the website gets about 20 million visitors.

81 Award-winning film set in Tehran : ARGO

“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I highly recommend “Argo”, although I found the scenes of religious fervor to be very frightening …

83 Bishop’s headgear : MITER

A miter (also “mitre”) is a traditional headdress worn by bishops in some Christian traditions. The term “miter” comes from a Greek word for “headband, turban”.

92 TV character who said “Time to hit the hay … oh, I forgot, I ate it!” : MR ED

The sitcom “Mister Ed” first aired in 1961 and ran for almost five years. It was a very successful show (and even made it to Ireland!). Mister Ed, the talking horse, was a palomino that had the real name of Bamboo Harvester. Mister Ed’s “voice” was that of actor Allan “Rocky” Lane, a star of a lot of B-movie westerns from the forties and fifties. In the show, Mister Ed would only talk to the lead (human) character Wilbur, played by Alan Young, leading to some hilarious situations. Mister Ed had a stunt double and stand-in for the show, another horse called Pumpkin. Pumpkin later made frequent appearances on the show “Green Acres”.

93 Old auto with its founder’s monogram : REO

Ransom Eli Olds was a pioneer in the automotive industry, and the founder of the Oldsmobile and REO brands. Olds introduced the first modern “stationary” assembly line (Henry Ford’s famous innovation was the “moving” assembly line). As a result, it can be argued that the Oldsmobile Curved Dash was the first mass-produced, low-priced automobile, rather than Ford’s Model T.

97 Opposite of “avant” : APRES

In French, “avant” (before) comes ahead of “après” (after).

102 Mashed potatoes, on a Thanksgiving plate? : GRAVY TERRAIN (from “gravy train”)

The original “riders of the gravy train” were railroad men in the 1920s who were assigned a run that had good pay and little work. Since then, the phrase “gravy train” has come to mean any job that is easy and pays well. The term “gravy” had been slang for easy money since about 1900.

107 Instrument heard in Spanish folk music : CASTANET

Castanets are hand-held percussion instruments associated most notably with Spanish music. We tend to think of castanets being used in the flamenco style of dance, but in fact this is rarely the case. The name “castanets” comes from “castaña”, the Spanish word for “chestnut”, which they resemble.

112 Food brand whose sales boomed after the premiere of “Stranger Things” : EGGO

“Stranger Things” is a sci-fi horror TV show made for Netflix that aired its first season in 2016. I don’t do horror, and so haven’t seen it …

114 “When We Were Young” singer : ADELE

“Adele” is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older. Her third studio album “25”, released in 2015, broke the first-week sales records in both the UK and the US.

116 Fourth-quarter meltdown at an N.B.A. game in Oklahoma City? : THUNDER COLLAPSE (from “thunderclaps”)

The Oklahoma City Thunder NBA team arrived in 2008 after relocating from Seattle, where they were named the SuperSonics. The “Thunder” name was chosen as a reference to Oklahoma City’s exposure to the storms of Tornado Alley, and to the 45th Infantry Division “Thunderbirds” who were headquartered there until 1968.

The word “thunder” precedes the word “lightning” in the phrase “thunder and lightning”. However, thunder comes after lighting in reality, at least to the observer. The observer sees the flash of lightning and then seconds later hears the crash of thunder. That’s because light travels faster than sound.

122 Lather gatherer : LOOFA

The loofah (also “loofa”, “lufah” and “luffa”, all Arabic words) is a vine, with fruit that’s very popular in Asia and Africa. If the fruit is allowed to mature, it can be processed to remove everything but the more rigid xylem structure (remember your high school botany class?) leaving a soft, sponge-like mass that is used as a skin polisher.

123 Remained in bed, e.g. : LAIN

There is often confusion between the verbs “to lie” and “to lay”. The latter is a transitive verb, and so needs an object. So we can’t “lay down”, we must “lie down”. But, we can “lay out” a plan.

125 “… sting like ___” : A BEE

Muhammad Ali first used his famous catchphrase “float like a butterfly and sting like a bee” before his world title fight against Sonny Liston in 1964. Back then Ali still went by his birth name of Cassius Clay.

Down

1 Boardwalk treat : TAFFY

Salt water taffy was invented in Atlantic City and is now found all over the US, but primarily in coastal towns (for some reason) and not really outside of America. Taffy is made by stretching the solid mass made by boiling up sugar, butter, flavoring, and coloring until it achieves a fluffy texture. Despite the inference in the name, the recipe for salt water taffy does not include “seawater”, but does include both salt and water.

3 Actor Leary : DENIS

Actor Denis Leary started his career as a standup comedian working in Boston. One of his more famous roles on the big screen was Detective Michael McCann in the 1999 version of “The Thomas Crown Affair”. On the small screen, Leary was co-creator and star of “Rescue Me”, a comedy drama about New York City firefighters that ran from 2004 till 2011.

5 ___ State, nickname for Massachusetts : BAY

“The Bay State” is one of the nicknames of Massachusetts. Other nicknames for Massachusetts are “The Old Colony State” and “The Codfish State”.

12 Wrinkly-skinned fruit : CASABA

A casaba is a type of honeydew melon. The casaba takes its name from the Turkish city of Kasaba, from where the fruit was imported into America in the late 1800s.

13 Largest object in the Kuiper belt : PLUTO

Pluto was discovered in 1930, and was welcomed as the ninth planet in our solar system. Pluto is relatively small in size, just one fifth of the mass of our own moon. In the seventies, astronomers began to discover more large objects in the solar system, including Eris, a “scattered disc object” at the outer reaches. Given that Eris is actually bigger than Pluto, and other objects really aren’t that much smaller, Pluto’s status as a planet was drawn into question. In 2006 there was a scientific definition for a “planet” agreed for the first time, resulting in Pluto being relegated to the status of “dwarf planet”, along with Eris.

14 And the following, in footnotes : ET SEQ

The Latin phrase “et sequens” or “et sequentia” is used in English to mean “and following”, and is abbreviated to “et seq.”

15 His birthday is celebrated as “Children’s Day” in India : NEHRU

Jawaharlal Nehru was the first prime minister of India, serving from 1947-64. Nehru was basically the heir to his mentor Mahatma Gandhi. Nehru’s only daughter Indira, also became prime minister (known as Indira Gandhi through marriage, though she was not related to Mahatma).

23 Main port of Yemen : ADEN

Aden is a seaport in Yemen that is located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967. A native of Aden is known as an Adeni. Some believe that Cain and Abel are buried in the city.

31 N.Y. neighbor : CONN

The official nickname of Connecticut (CT) is the “Constitution State”, but can also be referred to as the Nutmeg State, the Provisions State, and the Land of Steady Habits.

32 Calculators of old : ABACI

The abacus (plural “abaci”) was used as a counting frame long before man had invented a numbering system. It is a remarkable invention, particularly when one notes that abaci are still widely used today across Africa and Asia.

36 Speaking part? : LARYNX

The voice box or larynx is where pitch and volume of sound are manipulated when we talk. The structure called the Adam’s apple that protrudes from the human neck is formed by the thyroid cartilage that surrounds the larynx. The Adam’s apple of males tends to increase in size during puberty, so the feature tended to be associated more with males in days gone by, perhaps leading to the name “Adam’s” apple. A doctor specializing in treating the larynx is a laryngologist.

39 Paul of “Little Miss Sunshine” : DANO

Paul Dano is an actor and musician from New York City. I best know him for playing Brian Wilson in “Love & Mercy”, a fascinating film about the Beach Boys.

“Little Miss Sunshine” is a much-respected 2006 comedy film about a family’s road trip in a VW bus. I tried watching this one a couple of times and just couldn’t take it at all despite a great cast that includes Greg Kinnear, Steve Carell, Toni Collette and Alan Arkin.

42 Where fruit bat soup is eaten as a delicacy : PALAU

Palau is a tiny island nation lying 500 miles east of the Philippines, and 2,000 miles south of Japan. Palau was once a Spanish possession and was sold by Spain to Germany in the late 19th century. During WWI, Japan invaded the islands (Japan had declared war on Germany) and was awarded the islands as a territory by the League of Nations at the end of hostilities. In WWII the US took Palau from the Japanese in a bloody battle in 1944. Palau emerged from American administration in 1994 and is now a sovereign state.

The genus of bats known as fruit bats are also commonly referred to as flying foxes. Their natural habits are found mainly in South Asia, Australia and East Africa.

46 Widespread : EPIDEMIC

Something described as epidemic affects an unusually large proportion of a population. The term “epidemic” comes from the Greek “epi” meaning “among” and “demos” meaning “people”.

47 Nonstop flight? : ESCALATOR

Escalators have an advantage over elevators in that they can move larger numbers of people in the same time frame. They can also be placed in just about the same physical space that would be needed for a regular staircase. Patents for escalator-type devices were first filed in 1859, but the first working model wasn’t built until 1892 by one Jesse Reno. It was erected alongside a pier in Coney Island, New York, with the second escalator being placed at an entrance to the Brooklyn Bridge. Soon after, the Otis elevator company purchased the necessary patents and went into the business.

48 Maori for “image” : TIKI

A tiki is a large carving of wood or stone resembling a human form that is found in Polynesian cultures. The carvings often mark out boundaries surrounding sites that are sacred to the locals.

50 Redeems at a casino : CASHES IN

The term “casino” originated in the 1700s, then describing a public room for music or dancing. “Casino” is a diminutive of “casa” meaning “house”.

51 Sooners, by another name : OKIES

“Okies” is a derogatory term used during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s for farming families who migrated from Oklahoma (hence the name), Arkansas, Kansas and Texas in search of agricultural jobs in California. The road used by many of these migrant families was Route 66, which is also called “Mother Road”.

The 1889 Indian Appropriations Act officially opened up the so-called Unassigned Lands, land in Oklahoma on which no Native American tribes had settled. Once the Act was signed, those lands became available for settlement. Those people who settled the same lands illegally, prior to the date specified, were termed “Sooners” as their situation was defined in the “sooner clause” of the Act. “Sooner State” is now a nickname for Oklahoma.

54 Dict. listing : SYN

Synonym (syn.)

58 Setting for Mets games: Abbr. : EDT

Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)

63 Residential suffix with Angel : -ENO

An Angeleno is someone who lives in Los Angeles.

64 High-priced violin, informally : STRAD

Generations of the Stradivari family produced violins and other stringed instruments, the most famous of which were constructed by Antonio Stradivari.

66 All-knowing sort : SWAMI

A swami is a religious teacher in the Hindu tradition. The word “swami” can also mean “husband” in the Bengali and Malay languages.

68 It’s represented by a dot in the top-left corner, in Braille : ONE

The Braille system of reading and writing was devised in 1825 by Louis Braille, who was himself afflicted with blindness. Braille characters are composed of six positions or dots, each arranged in two columns of three dots each. Every dot can be raised or not raised, given a total of 64 possible characters.

69 Mideast palace parts : HAREMS

“Harem” is a Turkish word derived from the Arabic for “forbidden place”. Traditionally, a harem was the female quarters in a household in which a man had more than one wife. Not only wives (and concubines) would use the harem, but also young children and other female relatives. The main point was that no men were allowed in the area. The term “harem” is also applied to the women, children and staff occupying the quarters.

70 Son of Gloucester in “King Lear” : EDGAR

Edgar is a key figure in William Shakespeare’s tragedy “King Lear”. Edgar is the legitimate son of the Earl of Gloucester, a powerful man in england. Edgar is tricked by his brother, which leads to his exile. Edgar returns in disguise as a mad beggar, and in his disguise is able to help both his father and King Lear himself.

75 ___ Alonso, Mets slugger with the most home runs by a rookie in M.L.B. history (53) : PETE

Pete Alonso is a professional first baseman who made his Major League debut in 2019 with the New York Mets. Alonso’s nickname is “Polar Bear”.

79 People people, for short : EDS

There used to be a “People” page in each issue of “Time” magazine. This page was spun-off in 1974 as a publication of its own, which we now call “People” magazine. “People” is noted for its annual special editions with features such as “Best & Worst Dressed” and “Sexiest Man Alive”. The “Sexiest Man Alive” edition now appears at the end of November each year. The first choice for “Sexiest Man” was Mel Gibson, in 1985.

82 “What’s ___, Doc?” (old Bugs Bunny short) : OPERA

“What’s Opera, Doc?” is one of my favorite cartoons of all time. It’s all about Elmer Fudd chasing Bugs Bunny to musical extracts from Wagnerian operas. The most famous line from the cartoon is “Kill the Wabbit”, which Elmer sings to the main theme from “Ride of the Valkyries”. “What’s Opera, Doc?” cost Warner Bros. about six times as much as any other cartoon the studio had produced up to that time.

85 Grapefruit descriptor : RUBY RED

The somewhat bitter fruit that we know as “grapefruit” originated in the island nation of Barbados in the Caribbean. It developed as a hybrid (possibly accidentally) of the Jamaican sweet orange and the Indonesian pomelo. Back in the mid-1700s, the new hybrid was referred to as “the forbidden fruit”, and later as the shaddock. Some believe that a “Captain Shaddock” brought Indonesian pomelo seeds to Barbados and was responsible for developing the hybrid. The contemporary name is perhaps an allusion to the fact that grapefruit grow in clusters like grapes.

87 Kelly of “Live” : RIPA

When Kelly Ripa secured the co-host spot on morning television with Regis Philbin, she was still acting in “All My Children” in a role she had been playing for over ten years. After a year of holding down two jobs, she eventually gave up the acting gig. Ripa has acted as spokeswoman for several brands over the years, including Electrolux and Rykä.

89 Nutritional figs. : RDAS

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

96 Snapple competitor : NESTEA

Nestea is a brand of iced tea made by Nestlé. The name is a portmanteau of “Nestlé” and “tea”.

Originally, “Snapple” was the name of just one type of juice made by a company called Unadulterated Food Products. The drink’s name was a contraction of “snappy apple”. The company’s name was changed to the Snapple Beverage Corporation in the early 1980s. Snapple was sold in 1994, and is now a brand name owned by Dr Pepper Snapple Group.

98 “Socialism: Utopian and Scientific” writer, 1880 : ENGELS

Friedrich Engels was a German political theorist who worked closely with Karl Marx to develop what became known as Marxist Theory. Along with Marx, he also co-authored the “Communist Manifesto” in 1848, and later he supported Marx as he worked to publish “Das Kapital”.

100 Leaning right: Abbr. : ITAL

Italic type leans to the right, and is often used to provide emphasis in text. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

101 Four-time U.S. Open champ : NADAL

Rafael “Rafa” Nadal is a Spanish tennis player. He is noted for his expertise on clay courts, which earned him the nickname “The King of Clay”.

102 Four-time Australian Open champ : GRAF

Steffi Graf is a former World No. 1 professional tennis player from Germany. Graf won 22 Grand Slam singles titles, which was more than any other man or woman until Serena Williams came along.. Graf is married to another former World No. 1, namely Andre Agassi.

104 Maker of the MDX, NSX and TLX : ACURA

Acura is the luxury brand of the Honda Motor Company. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

108 Home of many Sherpas : NEPAL

Nepal lies to the northeast of India. Today, the state is known as the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. In 2008, the Communist Party of Nepal won the country’s general election. Soon after, the Assembly voted to change the form of government, moving away from a monarchy and creating a secular republic.

In the Tibetan language, “Sherpa” means “eastern people” (sher = east, pa = people). Sherpas are an ethnic group from Nepal, but the name is also used for the local guides who assist mountaineers in the Himalayas, and particularly on Mount Everest.

109 ___ Hughes, name of main roles in “Westworld” and “Downton Abbey” : ELSIE

“Westworld” is an HBO series that is based on a 1973 movie of the same name, which was written and directed by novelist Michael Crichton. Westworld is a high-tech theme park populated by androids that interact with the guests.

In the incredibly successful period drama “Downton Abbey”, the patriarch of the family living at Downton is Robert Crawley, the Earl of Grantham or Lord Grantham. The character is played by Hugh Bonneville. Lord Grantham married American Cora Levinson (played by Elizabeth McGovern). Lord and Lady Grantham had three daughters, and no sons. The lack of a male heir implied that the Grantham estate would pass to a male cousin, and out of the immediate family. The Grantham daughters are Lady Mary (played by Michelle Dockery), Lady Edith (played by Laura Carmichael) and Lady Sybil (played by Jessica Brown Findlay). Lady Sybil had the audacity to marry the family chauffeur, who was an Irish nationalist. The shame of it all …

117 Taipei-to-Seoul dir. : NNE

Taipei (officially “Taipei City”) is the capital of Taiwan (officially “the Republic of China”). “Taipei” translates from Chinese as “Northern Taiwan City” and indeed, the capital is situated at the northern tip of Taiwan. The city is nicknamed “City of Azaleas” as flowers are said to bloom better in Taipei than in any other city on the island.

Seoul is the capital city of South Korea. The Seoul National Capital Area is home to over 25 million people and is the second largest metropolitan area in the world, second only to Tokyo, Japan.

119 ___ Palmas : LAS

The Spanish province of Las Palmas comprises about half of the islands of Gran Canaria, and several other small islands, located off the northwest coast of Africa. Gran Canaria is perhaps better known as the “Canary Islands” in English. The province takes its name from Las Palmas, the capital city of Gran Canaria island.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Sliver : TAD
4 Politician with the campaign slogan 30-Across : OBAMA
9 Word with poetry or proportions : EPIC …
13 Something you might click to open : PEN
16 Elicits a “Whoa” from, say : AWES
18 Trimmed (down) : PARED
19 Wrestling star John : CENA
20 Tailor : ALTER
22 Beams of one’s dreams? : FANTASY SUPPORTS (from “fantasy sports”)
25 Food served in an omakase meal : SUSHI
26 Having very little mental energy left : FRIED
27 Moonfish : OPAH
28 Swimmers in kelp forests : SEA OTTERS
30 See 4-Across : YES WE CAN
33 Visit a museum to see a Rembrandt exhibit? : GO FOR BAROQUE (from “go for broke”)
35 One prone to looking down : SNOB
36 His tomb is in Red Square : LENIN
37 Diamondbacks, on scoreboards : ARI
38 Face cards? : IDS
41 Destination for oenophiles : NAPA
43 Sicily’s Parco dell’___ : ETNA
45 Bug spray ingredient : DEET
49 Bird of prey that’s gently petted? : FALCON CARESSED (from “Falcon Crest”)
53 Popular pops : PEPSIS
55 Kind of attack : SNEAK
56 Longtime hockey star Kovalchuk : ILYA
57 To read: Sp. : LEER
59 Gross : ICKY
60 Error, in totspeak : OOPSIE
62 Buys in : ANTES
65 Look down on : DISDAIN
67 Actor Justin sitting poolside? : THEROUX IN THE TOWEL (from “threw in the towel”)
71 Adds insult to injury : PILES ON
73 Santa-tracking org. : NORAD
74 River across the New York/New Jersey border : RAMAPO
77 Some rideshare info : ETAS
78 Exploit : DEED
81 Award-winning film set in Tehran : ARGO
83 Bishop’s headgear : MITER
84 Hang up the cleats, so to speak : RETIRE
86 Make fun of small orange fruits? : DERIDE APRICOTS (from “dried apricots”)
90 Something rectangular that might have more than four sides : MENU
91 Two-player card game : SPIT
92 TV character who said “Time to hit the hay … oh, I forgot, I ate it!” : MR ED
93 Old auto with its founder’s monogram : REO
94 Storage spot : BIN
97 Opposite of “avant” : APRES
99 Reason to reschedule : RAIN
102 Mashed potatoes, on a Thanksgiving plate? : GRAVY TERRAIN (from “gravy train”)
107 Instrument heard in Spanish folk music : CASTANET
111 Vinyl collection : RECORD SET
112 Food brand whose sales boomed after the premiere of “Stranger Things” : EGGO
114 “When We Were Young” singer : ADELE
115 Sharp : ACUTE
116 Fourth-quarter meltdown at an N.B.A. game in Oklahoma City? : THUNDER COLLAPSE (from “thunderclaps”)
120 Made out : FARED
121 Take home : EARN
122 Lather gatherer : LOOFA
123 Remained in bed, e.g. : LAIN
124 Something to shoot for : PAR
125 “… sting like ___” : A BEE
126 Clubs : SWATS
127 ___ Bleus, nickname for France’s soccer team : LES

Down

1 Boardwalk treat : TAFFY
2 Plugged in, so to speak : AWARE
3 Actor Leary : DENIS
4 Missions, for short : OPS
5 ___ State, nickname for Massachusetts : BAY
6 Basis for an insurance investigation : ARSON
7 “Build ___ Buttercup” (1968 hit by the Foundations) : ME UP
8 Spot for a perfume sample in a magazine, maybe : AD PAGE
9 Green prefix : ECO-
10 Staff : PERSONNEL
11 Lead-in to com or net, but not org : INTER-
12 Wrinkly-skinned fruit : CASABA
13 Largest object in the Kuiper belt : PLUTO
14 And the following, in footnotes : ET SEQ
15 His birthday is celebrated as “Children’s Day” in India : NEHRU
17 Worries anxiously : STEWS
20 Mounted on : ASTRIDE
21 Angry reaction : RISE
23 Main port of Yemen : ADEN
24 They’re banned in many classrooms nowadays : PHONES
29 Thing seen in the foreground of “Washington Crossing the Delaware” : OAR
31 N.Y. neighbor : CONN
32 Calculators of old : ABACI
34 Partner of starts : FITS
36 Speaking part? : LARYNX
38 “In that case …” : IF SO …
39 Paul of “Little Miss Sunshine” : DANO
40 Didn’t hear the alarm, say : SLEPT LATE
42 Where fruit bat soup is eaten as a delicacy : PALAU
44 Orange follower : -ADE
46 Widespread : EPIDEMIC
47 Nonstop flight? : ESCALATOR
48 Maori for “image” : TIKI
50 Redeems at a casino : CASHES IN
51 Sooners, by another name : OKIES
52 Have a home-cooked meal : EAT IN
53 Like some obligations : PRIOR
54 Dict. listing : SYN
58 Setting for Mets games: Abbr. : EDT
61 Gradually diminish : ERODE
63 Residential suffix with Angel : -ENO
64 High-priced violin, informally : STRAD
66 All-knowing sort : SWAMI
68 It’s represented by a dot in the top-left corner, in Braille : ONE
69 Mideast palace parts : HAREMS
70 Son of Gloucester in “King Lear” : EDGAR
71 With 72-Down, a pop : PER …
72 See 71-Down : … ITEM
75 ___ Alonso, Mets slugger with the most home runs by a rookie in M.L.B. history (53) : PETE
76 “… ish” : … OR SO
79 People people, for short : EDS
80 Exit : DEPARTURE
82 “What’s ___, Doc?” (old Bugs Bunny short) : OPERA
85 Grapefruit descriptor : RUBY RED
87 Kelly of “Live” : RIPA
88 Remark after losing : I TRIED
89 Nutritional figs. : RDAS
95 “___ be an honor!” : IT’D
96 Snapple competitor : NESTEA
98 “Socialism: Utopian and Scientific” writer, 1880 : ENGELS
100 Leaning right: Abbr. : ITAL
101 Four-time U.S. Open champ : NADAL
102 Four-time Australian Open champ : GRAF
103 It has its highlights : RECAP
104 Maker of the MDX, NSX and TLX : ACURA
105 Bloc party? : VOTER
106 Fix up again : REHAB
107 Brown hue : COCOA
108 Home of many Sherpas : NEPAL
109 ___ Hughes, name of main roles in “Westworld” and “Downton Abbey” : ELSIE
110 Decade after the aughts : TEENS
113 Blossom : GROW
117 Taipei-to-Seoul dir. : NNE
118 Frequently : OFT
119 ___ Palmas : LAS

6 thoughts on “0829-21 NY Times Crossword 29 Aug 21, Sunday”

  1. 40:05, a great relief after yesterday’s DNF. Denis Leary recorded an album that had one particular musical piece that when CFNY out of Toronto played it, I was laughing so hard, I had to pull over before I ended up in a ditch. I won’t mention the title here, it’s a family webpage….

  2. 41:18. Hard one for me. I’m doing this after a redeye flight in an airport lounge so I’ve had to deal with a few distractions. Excuse of the day anyway.

    Remind me not to stop in PALAU for any fruit bat soup…

    Best –

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