1123-20 NY Times Crossword 23 Nov 20, Monday

Constructed by: Stanley Newman
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: IDs

Themed answers each include TWO FORMS OF ID hidden within:

  • 62D Two forms of them are found in 18-, 38- and 60-Across : IDS
  • 18A Australian wind instrument : DIDGERIDOO
  • 38A System of underwater mountains : MID-OCEAN RIDGE
  • 60A Wedding attendant : BRIDESMAID

Bill’s time: 5m 28

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Talon : CLAW

A talon is a claw of a bird of prey. The term “talon” ultimately derives from “talus”, the Latin word for “ankle”.

14 Smog, e.g. : HAZE

“Smog” is a portmanteau formed by melding “smoke” and “fog”. The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s. Several cities around the world have a reputation of being particularly smoggy. For example, the most smog-plagued city in Latin America is Mexico City, which is located in a highland “bowl” that traps industrial and vehicle pollution.

16 White gemstone : PEARL

Pearls form in oysters because of a reaction that is similar to an immune system response in higher animals. The pearl is formed as the oysters lay down successive layers of calcium carbonate around some microscopic foreign body that has penetrated the shell.

17 White gemstone : OPAL

97% of the world’s opals come from Australia, so it’s no surprise perhaps that the opal is the national gemstone of the country. The state of South Australia provides the bulk of the world’s production, i.e. about 80%.

18 Australian wind instrument : DIDGERIDOO

The didgeridoo is a wind instrument that was developed in northern Australia over a thousand years ago by the indigenous people. Despite the instrument’s origins, the name “didgeridoo” is not aboriginal, and is thought perhaps to be onomatopoetic and imitative of the sound made.

25 Caller of balls and strikes : UMP

Back in the 15th century, “an umpire” was referred to as “a noumpere”, which was misheard and hence causing the dropping of the initial letter N. The term “noumpere” came from Old French “nonper” meaning “not even, odd number”. The idea was that the original umpire was a third person called on to arbitrate between two, providing that “odd number” needed to decide the dispute.

27 Kind of pudding : TAPIOCA

The cassava plant is a woody shrub native to South America grown largely for its carbohydrate-rich tubers. In fact, the cassava is the third largest food source of carbohydrates (for humans) in the world. Ordinarily, that carbohydrate is extracted from the plant and dried as flour, and is known as tapioca.

31 U.S. president who was once president of the Harvard Law Review : OBAMA

Not only did President Barack Obama attend Harvard University, so did his birth father, Barack Obama, Sr. President Obama’s parents separated when Barack Obama, Sr. went off to Harvard, leaving his wife and child back in Hawaii.

33 Fleming who created 007 : IAN

The character James Bond was the creation of writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number “007” was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th-century English spy named John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized “007” to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”. There’s an entertaining miniseries that aired on BBC America called “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond” that details Ian Fleming’s military career, and draws some nice parallels between Fleming’s experiences and aspirations and those of his hero James Bond. Recommended …

34 Third-largest city in Japan : OSAKA

The Japanese city of Osaka used to be called Naniwa, with the name changing to Osaka sometime before 1500. “Osaka” can be translated either as “large hill” or “large slope”. Osaka is sometimes referred to as “the Chicago of Japan” as it is a major center of commerce and industry. The city has also been named the “nation’s kitchen”, and was a center for Japan’s rice trade for centuries.

42 Artist’s stand : EASEL

The word “easel” comes from an old Dutch word meaning “donkey”, would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

43 Two auto-racing Unsers : ALS

The Unser family seems to have auto racing in their blood. Al Unser, Sr. won the Indy 500 on four occasions. Al’s brother Jerry was the first of the Unsers to compete at Indianapolis. Al’s other brother Bobby, won the Indy three times. Al’s son, Al Junior, won the Indy twice. Al Junior’s son is also a racing driver who competes at the Indy Speedway.

46 City between Phoenix and Mesa : TEMPE

Tempe is a city in the metropolitan area of Phoenix. The city is named for the Vale of Tempe in Greece.

52 Reggae relative : SKA

Ska originated in Jamaica in the late fifties and was the precursor to reggae music. No one has a really definitive etymology of the term “ska”, but it is likely to be imitative of a sound.

55 Fraternity party costume made from a bedsheet : TOGA

In ancient Rome, the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae” or “togas”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a “stola”.

56 Forlorn : SAD

Someone described as forlorn appears sad and lonely because he or she has been deserted or abandoned.

58 Belfast’s province : ULSTER

Ireland is divided into four provinces: Leinster, Munster, Connacht and Ulster. “Ulster” is sometimes used as a synonym for “Northern Ireland”, but in fact Ulster comprises the six counties of Northern Ireland and three more, namely Donegal, Cavan and Monaghan.

Belfast is the capital of Northern Ireland, and an important port city. That said, much of Belfast’s success as a port is in the past. In the early 1900s, the Harland and Wolff shipyard was the world’s largest. The most famous vessel built by Harland & Wolff was the RMS Titanic. Belfast was also the largest linen producing center in the world, resulting in the city being nicknamed “Linenopolis”. More recently, Belfast is noted as home to the film studios where “Game of Thrones” was produced.

63 Book after II Chronicles : EZRA

In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Ezra was originally combined with the Book of Nehemiah, with the two being separated in the early days of the Christian Era.

65 ___-European languages : INDO

The Indo-European languages are a large group that includes most of the major languages of Europe, the Iranian plateau and South Asia. The Indo-European is the largest grouping of languages in the world.

67 Sch. in New Haven, Conn. : YALE U

The city of New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1638 by Puritan immigrants from England. New Haven is home to Yale University. The city also initiated the first public tree planting program in the country. The large elms included in the program led to New Haven being called “the Elm City”.

Down

3 Pink-flowering shrub : AZALEA

Azaleas are very toxic to most animals. If you go to Korea, you might come across “Tug Yonju”, which is azalea wine made from the plant’s blossoms. Azaleas are usually grown as shrubs, but are also seen as small trees, and often indoors.

5 Wicked city in Genesis : SODOM

The cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, as well as Admah and Zeboim, were destroyed by God for the sins of their inhabitants, according to the Bible. The name Sodom has become a metaphor for vice and homosexuality, and gives us our word “sodomy”.

6 Ho ___ Minh City : CHI

Hanoi (“Hà Nội” in Vietnamese) was the capital of North Vietnam, and Saigon the capital of South Vietnam. After the Vietnam War, Hanoi was made capital of the reunified state. Saigon, the larger metropolis, was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City. Hanoi is located in the delta of the Red River, and is just over 50 miles from the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea.

7 Tennis’s Murray or Roddick : ANDY

Andy Murray is a tennis player from Scotland who became British number-one in 2006, rising to world number-one in 2016. Much to the delight of the locals, Murray won the Wimbledon Championship in 2013, making him the first British male player to win in 77 years. Murray also won Olympic gold in the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, and again in the Rio Games in 2016. Sir Andy Murray was knighted in 2017.

Andy Roddick is a former World No. 1 tennis player from the US. Roddick retired in 2012, although he has been playing in what’s referred to as World Team Tennis.

8 Capital of Colombia : BOGOTA

Bogotá is the capital city of Colombia. Noted for having many libraries and universities, Bogotá is sometimes referred to as “The Athens of South America”.

9 Lifesaving subj. taught by the Red Cross : CPR

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

Back in 1859, a Swiss businessman called Henri Dunant went to meet French emperor Napoleon III, to discuss making it easier to conduct commerce in French-occupied Algeria. The Emperor was billeted at Solferino, where France and Austria were engaged in a major battle. In one day, Dunant witnessed 40,000 soldiers die in battle and countless wounded suffering on the battlefield without any organized medical care. Dunant abandoned his business agenda and instead spent a week caring for the sick and wounded. Within a few years he had founded the precursor to the Red Cross, and in 1901 he was awarded the first ever Nobel Peace Prize.

10 Longtime “Project Runway” host Klum : HEIDI

German-born Heidi Klum was married to the successful English singer, Seal. Klum is a talented lady and has built a multi-faceted career based on her early success as a model. She is the force behind the Bravo reality show called “Project Runway” that has been on the air since 2004. Klum has been nominated 4-5 times for an Emmy for her association with the show. Klum was also signed up as the official ambassador for Barbie in 2009, the 50th anniversary of the Barbie Doll, and for her service that year a Heidi Klum Barbie was produced. She has been adding a touch of class to the judging panel on the show “America’s Got Talent” from 2013 through 2020.

“Project Runway” is a reality show that is hosted by model Heidi Klum. On the show, contestants compete by presenting clothes designs having been given limited time and materials. “Project Runway” is now a worldwide franchise. North of the border, the show is called “Project Runway Canada” and is hosted by supermodel Iman. The show in the UK is known as “Project Catwalk” and has had several hosts, including Elizabeth Hurley and Kelly Osbourne.

28 ___ lobe (part of the brain) : PARIETAL

The parietal lobe is one of the four main lobes of the brain, the others being the frontal lobe, occipital lobe and the temporal lobe.

30 “Dumb” bird : DODO

The dodo was a direct relative of the pigeon and dove, although the fully-grown dodo was usually three feet tall. One of the reasons the dodo comes to mind when we think of extinction of a species, is that it disappeared not too long ago (last recorded alive in 1681) and humans were the reason for its demise. The dodo lived exclusively on the island of Mauritius and when man arrived, we cut back the forests that were its home. We also introduced domestic animals, such as dogs and pigs, that ransacked the dodo’s nests. The dodo was deemed to be an awkward flightless bird and so the term “dodo” has come to mean a dull-witted person.

35 Tyne Daly or Keira Knightley : ACTRESS

Actress Tyne Daly really came into the public eye playing Detective Lacey in “Cagney and Lacey”. From 1999 to 2005, Daly played the mother of the title character in the TV show “Judging Amy”.

English actress Keira Knightley had her big break in the movies when she co-starred in 2002’s “Bend It Like Beckham”. Knightley played one of my favorite movie roles, Elizabeth Bennett in 2005’s “Pride and Prejudice”. Knightley won a Golden Globe for that performance, although that 2005 film isn’t the best adaptation of Austen’s novel in my humble opinion …

38 Spanish resort island, to locals : MALLORCA

The Island of Majorca (“Isla Mallorca” in Spanish) is Spain’s largest island, and is located in the Mediterranean Sea. The population of the island ballooned over the past few decades as Majorca became a mecca for tourists from all over Europe.

41 Locale of Oakland and Alameda : EAST BAY

The city of Oakland, located in the San Francisco Bay Area, was settled by the Spanish in 1772. The area now known as Oakland was called “Encinal” by those early settlers, which translates as “oak grove”, giving the city its name.

“Alameda” is Spanish for “a place full of poplars”. There are a number of locations in the US and elsewhere with the name “Alameda”, including the county of Alameda, California where I lived for decades. Alameda County is home to the city of Alameda, located on Alameda Island.

45 One of the Three Musketeers : ARAMIS

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is the trio’s young protégé D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

47 Unleavened bread for Passover : MATZOH

Matzo is an unleavened bread that is very brittle. The bread is crushed, creating a Matzo meal that is then formed into balls using eggs and oil as a binder. The balls are usually served in a chicken stock.

48 Justin Trudeau’s father : PIERRE

Justin Trudeau ascended to the leadership of Canada’s Liberal Party in 2013, He led the Liberals to a decisive victory in the federal election of 2015, after which he assumed the office of Prime Minister of Canada. Justin is the eldest son of former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, who led Canada for 15 years starting in 1968.

51 “Sexy ___” (Beatles song) : SADIE

“Sexy Sadie” is a song written by John Lennon and released by the Beatles in 1968. Lennon wrote the song in India, and its original title was “Maharishi”.

53 Words of praise : KUDOS

Our word “kudos” means “acclaim given for an exceptional achievement”. “Kudos” is both a singular and plural noun, and comes from the Greek “kyddos” meaning “glory, fame”.

57 Comic Carvey once of “S.N.L.” : DANA

Dana Carvey, along with the likes of Phil Hartman and Kevin Nealon, was part of the new breed of “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) comedians credited with resurrecting the show in the late eighties. One of Carvey’s most popular characters was the Church Lady, and he became so associated with her that among fellow cast members Carvey was often referred to simply as “the Lady”. Another favorite Carvey character was Garth Algar who went to feature in the “Wayne’s World” movies. Carvey had open-heart surgery in 1997 to clear a blocked artery, but the surgical team operated on the wrong blood vessel. To recover, he had to have five more procedures. He ended up suing for medical malpractice and donated his $7.5 million compensation payment to charity.

61 End of a school’s email address : EDU

The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

62 Two forms of them are found in 18-, 38- and 60-Across : IDS

Identity document (ID)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Talon : CLAW
5 Sign of a wound’s healing : SCAB
9 Wallace of Fox News : CHRIS
14 Smog, e.g. : HAZE
15 “This is terrible!” : OH NO!
16 White gemstone : PEARL
17 White gemstone : OPAL
18 Australian wind instrument : DIDGERIDOO
20 “Hmm, good enough” : IT’LL DO
22 Way over there, quaintly : YON
23 Minor fender damage : DING
24 Fish eggs : ROE
25 Caller of balls and strikes : UMP
27 Kind of pudding : TAPIOCA
29 Hole-digging tool : SPADE
31 U.S. president who was once president of the Harvard Law Review : OBAMA
33 Fleming who created 007 : IAN
34 Third-largest city in Japan : OSAKA
36 Rubber gaskets : O-RINGS
38 System of underwater mountains : MID-OCEAN RIDGE
41 Dine at a restaurant : EAT OUT
42 Artist’s stand : EASEL
43 Two auto-racing Unsers : ALS
44 Exchange : TRADE
46 City between Phoenix and Mesa : TEMPE
50 Horror film villain with a knife : SLASHER
52 Reggae relative : SKA
54 Atmosphere : AIR
55 Fraternity party costume made from a bedsheet : TOGA
56 Forlorn : SAD
58 Belfast’s province : ULSTER
60 Wedding attendant : BRIDESMAID
63 Book after II Chronicles : EZRA
64 Like the smell of burning rubber : ACRID
65 ___-European languages : INDO
66 Threadbare : WORN
67 Sch. in New Haven, Conn. : YALE U
68 Insolent talk : SASS
69 Place to store garden tools : SHED

Down

1 Church groups in robes : CHOIRS
2 Take-it-with-you computer : LAPTOP
3 Pink-flowering shrub : AZALEA
4 In good health : WELL
5 Wicked city in Genesis : SODOM
6 Ho ___ Minh City : CHI
7 Tennis’s Murray or Roddick : ANDY
8 Capital of Colombia : BOGOTA
9 Lifesaving subj. taught by the Red Cross : CPR
10 Longtime “Project Runway” host Klum : HEIDI
11 Communicating by wireless : RADIOING
12 Severe place of confinement : IRON CAGE
13 “Think” for IBM and “Think outside the bun” for Taco Bell : SLOGANS
19 Fills with love : ENAMORS
21 Exactly below, on a map : DUE SOUTH
26 Jab : POKE
28 ___ lobe (part of the brain) : PARIETAL
30 “Dumb” bird : DODO
32 Sounded like sheep : BAAED
35 Tyne Daly or Keira Knightley : ACTRESS
37 Not busy : IDLE
38 Spanish resort island, to locals : MALLORCA
39 Delivery room announcement : IT’S A GIRL
40 Scottish refusals : NAES
41 Locale of Oakland and Alameda : EAST BAY
45 One of the Three Musketeers : ARAMIS
47 Unleavened bread for Passover : MATZOH
48 Justin Trudeau’s father : PIERRE
49 Quick trip to a store and back, e.g. : ERRAND
51 “Sexy ___” (Beatles song) : SADIE
53 Words of praise : KUDOS
57 Comic Carvey once of “S.N.L.” : DANA
59 Stitches : SEWS
61 End of a school’s email address : EDU
62 Two forms of them are found in 18-, 38- and 60-Across : IDS

9 thoughts on “1123-20 NY Times Crossword 23 Nov 20, Monday”

  1. 5:47 Only issue was how to spell DIDGERIDOO, which came from a few crosses. Any connection that the very next across answer was It’ll do??

  2. 6:12, no errors, no complaints. Winged it on the spelling of DIDGERIDOO and got it right! (But I carefully checked all the crosses to make sure … 😜.)

    @DuncanR … Thank you for your comments yesterday. I have other evidence of cataracts in my future, in the form of halos around bright lights at night. What’s odd about the blurry vision from hiking in the cold is that it’s temporary; at worst, it clears up overnight. I’m thinking of digging out the goggles I used to use while skiing (if I can find them) and wearing them while hiking; given the current coronavirus situation, that might be a good idea, anyway. And I’m still thinking about a visit to an ophthalmologist. (Of course, I’ve been doing that for a year or two now … 😜.)

  3. 7:39. Forgot to even look for a theme. Couldn’t remember DIDGERIDOO and had to get via crosses…again. Second time in a week or so. I’ll try remembering it by using it in a sentence: Once you DIDGERIDOO with your wife, you were trapped forever…

    Best –

  4. 14:41 no errors…I too knew didgeridoo but not now to spell it…thank you crosses.
    Stay safe and enjoy the new year…it’s got to get better RIGHT?
    One more to go Ravens🙏🙏🙏

  5. 8:43, no errors. Couple of initial ‘write-o-graphical’ errors; TAPIOCO and ARAMOS (seemed to have an O hang up today).
    Go Seahawks! 🏈

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