0712-20 NY Times Crossword 12 Jul 20, Sunday

Constructed by: Samuel A. Donaldson
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Chores Galore

Themed answers are household CHORES reinterpreted as CHORES for a professional specified in the clue:

  • 23A Chore for a censor? : TAKE OUT THE TRASH
  • 28A Chore for a satellite TV technician? : DO THE DISHES
  • 42A Chore for a security guard? : SWEEP THE FLOOR
  • 67A Chore for a rower? : GO TO THE BANK
  • 73A Chore for a knight? : SORT THE MAIL
  • 97A Chore for a dog-walker? : PICK UP THE TOYS
  • 114A Chore for an N.F.L. owner? : PAY THE BILLS
  • 121A Chore for a bowling alley employee? : CLEAN THE GUTTERS

… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 19m 49s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 “The King of Latin Pop” : IGLESIAS

Spanish singer Julio Iglesias’ real name is Julio José Iglesias de la Cueva. He took up playing the guitar as a young man while recovering from a devastating car accident that injured his spinal cord. “Immediate” recovery took three years, but he still receives therapy for his weakened legs.

9 “The Tale of ___ Puddle-Duck” (Beatrix Potter children’s book) : JEMIMA

Beatrix Potter was an English author famous for the children’s books she wrote and illustrated. The most famous character in her stories was Peter Rabbit, whose sisters were Flopsy, Mopsy and Cottontail. Potter put her talent as an artist to good use in the scientific world as well. She recorded many images of lichens and fungi as seen through her microscope. As a result of her work, she was respected as an expert mycologist.

21 Ruler of the afterlife, in Egyptian mythology : OSIRIS

Osiris was the Egyptian god of the underworld. Osiris was the son of Geb the Earth god, and Nut the sky goddess. His wife Isis was also his sister. Osiris was killed and mutilated by Set, his own brother. Isis reassembled Osiris and revived him, just long enough that they could conceive their son Horus.

23 Chore for a censor? : TAKE OUT THE TRASH

The original “censor” was an officer in ancient Rome who had responsibility for taking the “census”, as well as supervising public morality.

25 LaBelle or LuPone : PATTI

Patti LaBelle is the stage name of singer Patricia Holt-Edwards from Philadelphia. She started her career in the sixties as the lead singer of the vocal group Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles, later changing its name to simply “LaBelle”. When the group disbanded in 1976, Patti launched a remarkably successful solo career.

Singer Patti LuPone won Tonys for playing Eva Peron in “Evita ” and Rose in “Gypsy”.

26 With, at a café : AVEC

In French, “avec” (with) and “sans” (without) are opposites.

27 The Cards, on scoreboards : ARI

The Arizona Cardinals were founded in 1898 as the Chicago Cardinals. That makes the Cardinals the oldest, continuously-run professional football team in the whole country.

28 Chore for a satellite TV technician? : DO THE DISHES

Dish Network was the brand name used by satellite communication company EchoStar for its consumer-oriented service. EchoStar spun off Dish Network as a separate entity in 2008, although the two independent companies continue to work closely together.

30 Wayne’s sidekick in old “S.N.L.” skits : GARTH

“Wayne’s World” was originally a “Saturday Night Live” sketch starring Mike Myers (as Wayne Campbell) and Dana Carvey as Garth Algar. The sketch was so successful that it was parlayed into two hit movies, released in 1992 and 1993. Not my cup of tea though …

36 Scientist who said “I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious” : EINSTEIN

After Albert Einstein moved to the US in 1933, he became quite a celebrity and his face was readily recognizable. Einstein was frequently stopped in the street by people who would naively ask him if he could explain what “that theory” (i.e. the theory of relativity) was all about. Growing tired of this, he finally learned to tell people that he was sorry, but folks were constantly mistaking him for Albert Einstein!

40 Wet weather wear : PONCHO

A poncho is a typical South American outer garment that has been used by Native American peoples since pre-Hispanic times. One of the iconic uses of a poncho was by Clint Eastwood in spaghetti westerns.

50 Wildcatter’s target : OIL

“Wildcatter” is a familiar term for someone who drills what are called “wildcat wells”, speculative wells in areas that are not previously known to yield oil.

51 ___ Na Na : SHA

Do you remember the band “Johnny Casino & The Gamblers” in the movie “Grease”? That was actually the real-world group named Sha Na Na. Johnny Casino & the Gamblers sang “Those Magic Changes” at the high school dance, in between “Rock’N Roll Is Here to Stay” and “Hound Dog”. Sha Na Na got together in the sixties, hosted the variety show “Sha Na Na” from 1977 to 1981, and are still performing today.

52 “Othello” setting : VENICE

The most famous Moor in literature has to be Othello, the title character in William Shakespeare’s tragedy “Othello, the Moor of Venice”. The word “Moor” describes various peoples of North Africa, usually of the Muslim faith. At the height of their geographic influence the Moors occupied much of the Iberian peninsula, calling it Al Andalus (from which modern Andalusia gets its name).

54 Like a list of lists of lists : META

In recent decades the prefix “meta-” has been used as a standalone adjective. In this sense “meta” means “self-referential”, describing something that refers to itself. For example, “This sentence starts with the word ‘this’ and ends with the word ‘this’” might be called a meta sentence. A movie that is about the making of the very same movie could also be described as meta.

55 Kristen of “Bridesmaids” : WIIG

Kristen Wiig is a comic actress who appears on “Saturday Night Live”. She also made an appearance on the first season of Spike TV’s quirky “The Joe Schmo Show”, playing “Dr. Pat”. More recently, she co-wrote and starred in the 2011 hit film “Bridesmaids”, and co-starred in the 2016 reboot of “Ghostbusters”.

“Bridesmaids” is a 2011 comedy movie co-written by and starring Kristen Wiig. I wasn’t crazy about this film until Chris O’Dowd turned up as a traffic cop. Wiig and O’Dowd were great together, I thought. Pity about the rest of the movie …

57 ___ Verde National Park : MESA

Mesa Verde National Park is in Colorado. Mesa Verde is home to ancient cliff dwellings built by the Puebloan people, also known as the Anasazi. The most spectacular of these dwellings is Cliff Palace, which is the largest cliff dwelling in North America.

69 “Chandelier” singer, 2014 : SIA

“Sia” is the stage name of Australian singer Sia Furler from Adelaide. Sia is a cousin of Australian Christian Rock musician Peter Furler.

72 Hoppy medium? : ALE

The foodstuff that we call “hops” are actually the female flowers of the hop plant. The main use of hops is to add flavor to beer. The town in which I live here in California used to be home to the largest hop farm in the whole world. Most of the harvested hops were exported all the way to the breweries of London, where they could fetch the best price.

82 Japanese vegetable : UDO

Udo is a perennial plant native to Japan known taxonomically as Aralia cordata. The stems of udo are sometimes boiled up and served in miso soup.

83 Icy moon of Jupiter : EUROPA

As are many celestial bodies, the moon of Jupiter called Europa was named after a figure in Greek mythology. Europa was a Phoenician woman who was abducted by Zeus. Europa also gave her name to the continent of Europe.

84 Author James : AGEE

James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

85 Air Force 1 maker : NIKE

Nike was founded in 1964 in Eugene, Oregon by entrepreneur Phil Knight and track-and-field coach Bill Bowerman as Blue Ribbon Sports (BRS). BRS started out by distributing athletic shoes made in Japan. The company started making its own shoes in 1971 and changed its name to Nike, after the Greek goddess of victory.

94 Zen principle : ONENESS

Zen is a Buddhist school that developed its own tradition in China back in the 7th century AD. Zen is a Japanese spelling of the Chinese word “chan”, which in turn derives from the Sanskrit word “dhyana” meaning “meditation”.

97 Chore for a dog-walker? : PICK UP THE TOYS

The toy group of dogs is made up of the smallest breeds. The smallest of the small breeds are sometimes called teacup breeds.

104 Children’s author Richard : SCARRY

Richard Scarry was an author and illustrator of children’s books. His most famous series of books was set in the fictional Busytown, a locale inhabited by anthropomorphic animals.

106 Insurance giant : AIG

“AIG” is an initialism used by the American International Group, a giant insurance corporation. After repeated bailouts by American taxpayers starting in 2008, the company made some serious PR blunders by spending large amounts of money on executive entertainment and middle management rewards. These included a $444,000 California retreat, an $86,000 hunting trip in England, and a $343,000 getaway to a luxury resort in Phoenix. Poor judgment, I’d say …

109 It’s spotted at the craps table : DIE

If one considers earlier versions of craps, then the game has been around for a very long time and probably dates back to the Crusades. It may have been derived from an old English game called “hazard” also played with two dice, which was mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” from the 1300s. The American version of the game came here courtesy of the French and first set root in New Orleans where it was given the name “crapaud”, a French word meaning “toad”.

110 Fool, in Canadian slang : HOSER

The derogatory word “hoser”, meaning “foolish or uncultivated person”, is apparently attributed to Canadians. That said, I just read that the term is in fact rarely used north of the border.

114 Chore for an N.F.L. owner? : PAY THE BILLS

The Buffalo Bills, founded in 1959, were named after an earlier team with the same name that had merged with the Cleveland Browns back in 1950. The Bills name was obviously popular with fans, as the name was chosen in a public contest. The older team had been named for “Buffalo Bill” Cody. The team mascot is Billy Buffalo, and the cheerleaders are known as the Buffalo Jills.

117 Pro at deductions : CPA

Certified public accountant (CPA)

119 Daughter of Katie Holmes and Tom Cruise : SURI

Tom Cruise’s third wife was actress Katie Holmes The high-profile couple were dubbed “TomKat” by the entertainment media. Cruise and Holmes had one child together, a daughter Suri, who was born in 2006. TomKat divorced in 2012.

120 “The Princess Bride” character ___ Montoya : INIGO

In the William Goldsmith novel “The Princess Bride”, the title character is kidnapped by a trio of outlaws that includes fencing master Inigo Montoya. In the 1987 film adaptation, Montoya is played by Mandy Patinkin.

127 Goes wild : RUNS AMOK

The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had a good reason for that frenzy …

129 Double-black diamond section of a ski mountain, with “the” : STEEPS

In North America, ski runs are given a standardized rating in terms of skiing difficulty. The ratings are:

  • Green circles: easy to ski, often termed “bunny slopes”.
  • Blue squares: medium difficulty
  • Black diamond: steep and challenging terrain
  • Double black diamond: experts only (I’ve never braved one!)

Down

3 Magic, once : LAKER

Magic Johnson’s real name is Earvin Johnson. Johnson was born and grew up in Lansing, Michigan. Earvin earned the nickname “Magic” when playing basketball in high school, after one particularly great performance on the court.

5 B’way posting : SRO

Standing room only (SRO)

6 Kitty paper : IOU

The pot in a card game has been referred to as “the kitty” since the 1880s. It’s not certain how the name “kitty” evolved but possibly it comes from “kit”, the necessary equipment for the game.

7 Utah resort town : ALTA

Alta ski resort actually lies within the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area. The first ski lift in the resort was opened way back in 1939. Today, Alta is one of only three ski resorts in the country that prohibits snowboarding (along with Deer Valley, Utah and Mad River Glen, Vermont. The ski resort of Snowbird, located next to Alta, has been in operation since 1971.

11 Certain Spanish Surrealist paintings : MIROS

Joan Miró was a Spanish artist. Miro immersed himself in Surrealism, so much so that Andre Breton, the founder of the movement, said that Miró was “the most Surrealist of us all”. There are two museums dedicated to Miró’s work. The Fundació Joan Miró is in his native Barcelona, and the Fundació Miró Mallorca is in Palma de Mallorca, where the artist spent much of his life.

14 World’s largest tennis stadium, familiarly : ASHE

Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens, New York opened in 1997 and for years was the largest outdoor, tennis-only venue in the world. The stadium was often criticized for not having a retractable dome to protect the playing surface from inclement weather. Well, that changed in 2016 when the stadium debuted its new retractable roof, a $150 million investment in the facility.

17 Where Groucho, Chico and Harpo spent a night : AT THE OPERA

“A Night at the Opera” is a 1935 Marx Brothers film that was the first movie in which Chico, Harpo and Groucho appeared without their brother Zeppo. “A Night at the Opera” is really great entertainment!

29 Judo levels : DANS

The “dan” ranking system is used in several Japanese and Korean martial arts. The dan ranking indicates a level of proficiency, and often only applies to practitioners who have already earned a black belt.

Judo is a martial art from Japan that was developed relatively recently, in 1882. The name “judo” translates as “gentle way”. Practitioners of judo proceed through a series of proficiency grades known as the kyu-dan system. At each progression, a different colored belt is awarded.

38 Former SeaWorld attraction : SHAMU

Shamu was the name of the third orca (aka “killer whale”) ever to be featured in a public exhibition. Shamu starred in a popular SeaWorld show in San Diego in the sixties. After she died in 1971, her name lived on as the “stage name” of orca shows in different SeaWorld parks. That original Shamu was retired after she grabbed and refused to let go of the leg of one of her trainers.

39 San Francisco’s ___ Valley : NOE

Noe Valley is a neighborhood in San Francisco. The area is named after José de Jesús Noé who was the last Mexican mayor of Yerba Buena, which is what San Francisco was called when it was part of Mexico.

43 Nintendo gaming console with a pileup of vowels : WII U

The Wii U video game console is the successor to Nintendo’s Wii. I’m wondering if “Wii U” is some sort of play on the pronouns “we” and “you”? Maybe I just think too much …

45 Baked : ON POT

“Potiguaya” is the Mexican-Spanish word for “marijuana leaves”. The slang name “pot” comes from “potiguaya”.

53 “Germ” that’s passed from one child to another : COOTIE

“Cooties” is WWI British slang for “body lice”. Ugh …

56 Heroic exploit : GEST

Our word “gest”, describing a great deed or exploit, has been around since about 1300. The term comes from the Old French word “geste” meaning the same thing. These days “geste” can also mean “gesture”.

61 Captain with a whalebone leg : AHAB

Here are the final words uttered by Captain Ahab, just before Moby Dick destroys his vessel, the Pequod:

Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell’s heart I stab at thee; for hate’s sake I spit my last breath at thee. Sink all coffins and all hearses to one common pool! and since neither can be mine, let me then tow to pieces, while still chasing thee, though tied to thee, thou damned whale! Thus, I give up the spear!

67 Poet ___ Scott-Heron : GIL

Gil Scott-Heron was a jazz poet and musician who is best remembered as a spoken word performer from the seventies and eighties. Scott-Heron’s most famous work is the poem and song “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”, the title of which became a popular slogan for the Black Power movements in the sixties.

71 It’s due south of Hollywood : MIAMI

Hollywood is a coastal city in Florida that was founded in 1925. It was named after Hollywood, California as the founder’s dream was to build a motion picture colony on the East Coast.

73 Shoving match, in a way : SUMO

Sumo is a sport that is practiced professionally only in Japan, the country of its origin. There is an international federation of sumo wrestling now, and one of the organization’s aims is to have the sport accepted as an Olympic event.

74 Thor’s father : ODIN

In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin’s wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term “Friday” (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin’s son was Thor, whose name gave us the term “Thursday”. Odin himself gave us our word “Wednesday” from “Wodin”, the English form of his name.

75 Motel 6 alternative : RODEWAY INN

The chain of economy motels called Rodeway Inn started in Phoenix, Arizona in 1962. Rodeway Inn was the fastest growing chain in the hotel industry in 2007.

87 Noble thing : INERT GAS

An inert gas can be different from a noble gas. Both are relatively non-reactive, but a noble gas is an element. An inert gas might be a compound, i.e. made up of more than one element.

92 Michelle of “Crazy Rich Asians” : YEOH

Michelle Yeoh is an actress from Malaysia who appeared in several Hong Kong action films in which she did her own stunts and martial arts scenes. Her most famous action performance was in the 2000 movie “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, although I best know her for playing opposite Pierce Brosnan in the Bond film “Tomorrow Never Dies”.

96 Scottish terrier type : SKYE

The Skye terrier is a breed of dog that is actually under threat of extinction. A few years ago, there were only 30 Skye terriers born in the breed’s native land of the UK. The breed was named for the Isle of Skye in Scotland.

98 Actor Robert of “Spenser: For Hire” : URICH

Robert Urich was an actor famous for starring in television’s “Vega$” and “Spenser: For Hire”. Urich appeared in many television shows, starring in fifteen, which is a record for any actor.

105 Vessel whose name anagrams to where it might be used : CANOE

“Canoe” is an anagram of “ocean”.

107 Woods who voiced Cinderella : ILENE

Ilene Woods was an actress and singer who is best remembered for voicing the title character in Walt Disney’s 1950 classic “Cinderella”. For many years, Woods’ husband was Ed Shaughnessy, the drummer with Doc Severinsen’s “The Tonight Show Band”.

111 Snarky challenge : SUE ME!

“Snark” is a term that was coined by Lewis Carroll in his fabulous 1876 nonsense poem “The Hunting of the Snark”. Somehow, the term “snarky” came to mean “irritable, short-tempered” in the early 1900s, and from there “snark” became “sarcastic rhetoric” at the beginning of the 21st century.

112 Swashbuckling Flynn : ERROL

Errol Flynn plays the archetypal swashbuckler in the 1935 film “Captain Blood“. The movie is the second of three adaptations of the novel of the same name by Rafael Sabatini. Captain Blood happens to be an Irishman …

A swashbuckler is a flashy swordsman. The term “swashbuckler” probably derives somehow from “swash” meaning “fall of a blow”, and “buckler” meaning “small round shield”.

115 Loops in, in a way : BCCS

A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

118 Bad fit : AGUE

An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

122 Six-pt. plays : TDS

Touchdown (TD)

123 Chapel Hill sch. : UNC

The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill started enrolling students way back in 1795, making it the oldest public university in the country, i.e. the first to enrol students.

124 Houston sch. : TSU

Texas Southern University (TSU) is a school in Houston. TSU was founded as the Houston Colored Junior College in 1927.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 “The King of Latin Pop” : IGLESIAS
9 “The Tale of ___ Puddle-Duck” (Beatrix Potter children’s book) : JEMIMA
15 Give an address : ORATE
20 Onscreen twins, often : DUAL ROLE
21 Ruler of the afterlife, in Egyptian mythology : OSIRIS
22 Benefit of some online purchases : NO TAX
23 Chore for a censor? : TAKE OUT THE TRASH
25 LaBelle or LuPone : PATTI
26 With, at a café : AVEC
27 The Cards, on scoreboards : ARI
28 Chore for a satellite TV technician? : DO THE DISHES
30 Wayne’s sidekick in old “S.N.L.” skits : GARTH
32 What a digital subscription might end : ADS
34 Current location : SEA
35 Certify formally, with “to” : ATTEST …
36 Scientist who said “I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious” : EINSTEIN
40 Wet weather wear : PONCHO
42 Chore for a security guard? : SWEEP THE FLOOR
47 Notch-like : V-SHAPED
50 Wildcatter’s target : OIL
51 ___ Na Na : SHA
52 “Othello” setting : VENICE
54 Like a list of lists of lists : META
55 Kristen of “Bridesmaids” : WIIG
57 ___ Verde National Park : MESA
60 Having zero talent for : POOR AT
63 Wisconsin senator Johnson : RON
64 Person to look out for : NUMERO UNO
67 Chore for a rower? : GO TO THE BANK
69 “Chandelier” singer, 2014 : SIA
70 “Be honest!” : ADMIT IT!
72 Hoppy medium? : ALE
73 Chore for a knight? : SORT THE MAIL
77 Eats daintily : NIBBLES ON
82 Japanese vegetable : UDO
83 Icy moon of Jupiter : EUROPA
84 Author James : AGEE
85 Air Force 1 maker : NIKE
86 Calf-length skirt : MIDI
88 Bakery enticements : AROMAS
90 “Come to think of it …” : SAY …
93 Proven postulate : LAW
94 Zen principle : ONENESS
97 Chore for a dog-walker? : PICK UP THE TOYS
101 More watered down : WEAKER
103 Statement before a demonstration : HERE’S HOW …
104 Children’s author Richard : SCARRY
106 Insurance giant : AIG
109 It’s spotted at the craps table : DIE
110 Fool, in Canadian slang : HOSER
114 Chore for an N.F.L. owner? : PAY THE BILLS
117 Pro at deductions : CPA
119 Daughter of Katie Holmes and Tom Cruise : SURI
120 “The Princess Bride” character ___ Montoya : INIGO
121 Chore for a bowling alley employee? : CLEAN THE GUTTERS
125 Carrying a key? : TONAL
126 Forthcoming : CANDID
127 Goes wild : RUNS AMOK
128 Horse ___ : SENSE
129 Double-black diamond section of a ski mountain, with “the” : STEEPS
130 With a firm grip : SECURELY

Down

1 Conference attendee’s clip-on : ID TAG
2 Tropical sorbet flavor : GUAVA
3 Magic, once : LAKER
4 The people’s choice : ELECTEE
5 B’way posting : SRO
6 Kitty paper : IOU
7 Utah resort town : ALTA
8 Fixed charge : SET RATE
9 Average guy : JOE
10 Abbr. on a city limits sign : ESTD
11 Certain Spanish Surrealist paintings : MIROS
12 Ticked off : IRATE
13 Cause of a small setback : MISHAP
14 World’s largest tennis stadium, familiarly : ASHE
15 Hitting the right note : ON PITCH
16 Common Christmas entree : ROAST HAM
17 Where Groucho, Chico and Harpo spent a night : AT THE OPERA
18 Crispy cookie brand : TATE’S
19 Live : EXIST
24 Like most modern TVs, informally : HI-DEF
29 Judo levels : DANS
31 Coxae, familiarly : HIPS
33 Most common surname in Brazil : SILVA
37 Math degree : NTH
38 Former SeaWorld attraction : SHAMU
39 San Francisco’s ___ Valley : NOE
41 Patent : OVERT
42 Scattered about : SOWN
43 Nintendo gaming console with a pileup of vowels : WII U
44 Tourney format, for short : ELIM
45 Baked : ON POT
46 Potential result of social unrest : RIOTING
48 ___ mess (traditional English dessert) : ETON
49 Cold and humid : DANK
53 “Germ” that’s passed from one child to another : COOTIE
56 Heroic exploit : GEST
58 Bewitch : ENAMOR
59 Redundant name for a drink : SODA POP
61 Captain with a whalebone leg : AHAB
62 Bad thing for a bluffer : TELL
65 Ceremony : RITE
66 Home to the landmark Koko Crater : OAHU
67 Poet ___ Scott-Heron : GIL
68 Served as : BEEN
71 It’s due south of Hollywood : MIAMI
73 Shoving match, in a way : SUMO
74 Thor’s father : ODIN
75 Motel 6 alternative : RODEWAY INN
76 Strike : ERASE
78 Tops : BESTS
79 Isolated team of workers, in business-speak : SILO
80 “I guess” : OKAY
81 6:00 broadcast : NEWS
84 Didn’t just assume : ASKED
87 Noble thing : INERT GAS
89 German exclamation : ACH!
91 “That hits the spot” : AHH!
92 Michelle of “Crazy Rich Asians” : YEOH
95 Helmet opening : EARHOLE
96 Scottish terrier type : SKYE
98 Actor Robert of “Spenser: For Hire” : URICH
99 Eyes, informally : PEEPERS
100 Like the rank of major general : TWO-STAR
102 Lambaste : RAIL AT
104 Barbecue rods : SPITS
105 Vessel whose name anagrams to where it might be used : CANOE
107 Woods who voiced Cinderella : ILENE
108 Open space in a forest : GLADE
111 Snarky challenge : SUE ME!
112 Swashbuckling Flynn : ERROL
113 Like investing in a start-up : RISKY
115 Loops in, in a way : BCCS
116 Small cut : SNIP
118 Bad fit : AGUE
122 Six-pt. plays : TDS
123 Chapel Hill sch. : UNC
124 Houston sch. : TSU

7 thoughts on “0712-20 NY Times Crossword 12 Jul 20, Sunday”

  1. 36:03 after finding and fixing an error: I had somehow put SERI for 119-Across, so I had SEE ME for 111-Down (which really didn’t seem all that snarky, but, nevertheless, distracted me for awhile). Maybe my crossword lizard brain will finally remember SURI after this (no more dead flies for it until it shapes up!) … 😜.

  2. 44:10. I also had to search for an error…but not a brain error. A fat finger error. Pretty average time for a Sunday for me. I don’t try to rush through so much as savor these Sunday delights. I enjoyed the punny clues.

  3. 58:01 with a few assists. Sooooo many false starts and miscues – too numerous to mention. Just on a different wavelength with this one. Thus ends my streak of 6 consecutive days with less than 2X Bill’s times.

  4. 44:36, after a DNF on Saturday. I was never able to solve the NE corner on Saturday’s, Sunday’s made for a pleasant recovery….

  5. Bringing up the rear (as usual) 1:26:23 and I had mega for 54A and not knowing British desserts the cross didn’t help me.
    Never heard of Rodeway inn …good luck with a canoe in the ocean.
    Stay safe😇.

  6. 40:03, no errors. Most significant erasure 75D RED ROOF IN before RODEWAY INN. 46D clue and entry are very apropos for what is happening across America today.

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