0322-20 NY Times Crossword 22 Mar 20, Sunday

Constructed by: Brendan Emmett Quigley
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Bring Your ‘A’ Game

Themed answers comprise a word starting with ‘A’ alongside a phrase starting with A that sounds exactly like the original word:

  • 23A What the church’s music director wanted to do? : ACQUIRE A CHOIR
  • 32A Truism about unwanted sound? : A NOISE ANNOYS
  • 50A Greatly dismay one of the Beatles? : APPALL A PAUL
  • 65A Times when your archenemy shows up? : A RIVAL’S ARRIVALS
  • 81A What the antigovernment activist does? : ATTACKS A TAX
  • 96A “Aye” or “Oui”? : A VOWEL AVOWAL
  • 111A Geronimo, when his beard was just coming in? : A PATCHY APACHE

… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 19m 15s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Half of a 1960s folk-rock group : PAPAS

The folk group called the Magic Circle renamed itself to the Mamas and the Papas in the early sixties. Sadly, the Mamas and the Papas weren’t a happy bunch, always fighting over who was getting credit for songs and whose voice was getting mixed out of recordings, so they split up, twice. While they were together though, they wrote and recorded some great songs, songs which really do epitomize the sound of the sixties. “Monday, Monday” was written by John Phillips, one of “the Papas”, and it was to become the only number one hit for the group. Here’s a shocker … when it hit number one in 1966, it was the first time that a group made up of both sexes topped the American charts!

12 Car thief’s tool : SLIM JIM

A slim jim is a thin strip of spring steel that is used to open car doors without using a key and without picking the lock. Instead, the slim jim bypasses the lock and manipulates the levers and rods that operate the door.

19 Govt.-backed investment : T-BILL

A Treasury note (T-note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A Treasury bill (T-bill) is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-bond matures in 20-30 years.

27 “I’m With ___” (2016 campaign slogan) : HER

“I’m With Her” was a slogan used by the 2016 campaign to elect Hillary Clinton as US president.

28 Broadband overseer, for short : FCC

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been around since 1934, when it replaced the Federal Radio Commission.

39 Indian term of address : SRI

“Sri” is a title of respect for a male in India.

41 Sch. on the Mississippi River : LSU

LSU’s full name is Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, and is located in Baton Rouge. LSU was founded in 1860 as a military academy, with then-Colonel William Tecumseh Sherman as superintendent.

50 Greatly dismay one of the Beatles? : APPALL A PAUL

The ex-Beatles bass player’s full name is Sir James Paul McCartney. “Paul” was knighted for his services to music in 1997.

55 Picture cards : IDS

Identity document (ID)

57 Staple in Creole cooking : RED BEANS

In the US, the term “Creole” is usually a reference to the people descended from the colonial French and colonial Spanish people who settled in the Louisiana region before it became part of the United States with the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

58 West Indies city that’s home to Lynden Pindling International Airport : NASSAU

Nassau is the capital of the Bahamas, and used to be called Charles Town. Located on the island of New Providence, the original settlement was burnt to the ground by the Spanish in 1684. It was rebuilt and named Nassau in honor of King William III of England (“William of Orange”), a Dutchman from the House of Orange-Nassau. Nassau is a favored location for the James Bond series of movies. The city and surroundings feature in “Thunderball”, “Never Say Never Again”, “Casino Royale” and “For Your Eyes Only”. Bond portrayer Sean Connery has lived for many years at Lyford Cay, which is just a 30-min drive from the center of Nassau.

61 Classic Halloween costume : DEVIL

All Saints’ Day is November 1st each year. The day before All Saints’ Day is All Hallows’ Eve, better known by the Scottish term “Halloween”.

63 Literary character whose house is uprooted by a tornado : AUNT EM

In the children’s novel “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum, Dorothy Gale lives with her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry.

64 Shade similar to claret : CERISE

The name for the red color that we know as “cerise” is the French word for “cherry”.

68 Decorative throw : AFGHAN

An afghan is a blanket or a wrap that is knitted or crocheted from very colorful yarns.

77 One of the Ramones : DEE DEE

The Ramones were an American punk rock band. The group formed in Forest Hills, New York in the mid-seventies. The band members took on the stage names Dee Dee, Joey, and Johnny Ramone, even though they were not related. Arguably, the Ramones were the first punk rock group, defining the genre. Something else that’s not my cup of tea …

83 Acct. holdings : CDS

A certificate of deposit (CD) is like a less-flexible and higher-paying savings account. Instead of depositing money into a savings account and earning interest periodically, one can open a CD. With a CD one deposits a minimum amount of money but must leave it there for a specified length of time. In return for committing the funds for a fixed period, one is given a higher interest rate than a savings account and can redeem that interest and the initial deposit when the term has expired. CDs are relatively low-risk investments as they are FDIC insured, just like savings accounts.

84 Setting of a 1903 Victor Herbert operetta : TOYLAND

“Babes in Toyland” is an operetta by Victor Herbert that was first performed in 1903 in Chicago. The musical play “The Wizard of Oz” had appeared on Broadway the prior year and was a resounding hit, so the creators of “Babes in Toyland” wanted to cash in on that success by producing something in the same genre. While not as big a hit as “Oz”, the show did very well. It played for 192 performances, and is still produced today. The basic storyline makes use of various characters from the Mother Goose nursery rhymes, wound into a Christmas entertainment.

87 Spanish letter with a tilde : ENE

The tilde diacritical mark (~) is very much associated with the Spanish language. We use the name “tilde” in English, taking that name from Spanish. Confusingly, the word “tilde” in Spanish is used more generally to mean “accent mark, diacritic”, of which a “~” is just one. What we call a “tilde” in English is usually referred to as a “virgulilla” or “tilde de la eñe” in Spanish.

89 ___ doble (dance) : PASO

The lively and dramatic dance called the paso doble (Spanish for “double-step”) is very much associated with the Spanish bullfight, but in fact it originated in southern France, where bullfighting is also legal. The dance is based on music that is played at bullfights when the bullfighters enter the arena, and when they close in for the kill. Not a big fan of bullfighting …

100 Anne of fashion : KLEIN

Anne Klein was a fashion designer from Brooklyn, New York. Anna was born Hannah Golofski, and founded her first clothing company in the 1940s along with her first husband Ben Klein.

104 Rep.’s opponent : DEM

The modern-day Democratic Party was founded in 1828 when supporters of Andrew Jackson broke away from the former Democratic-Republican Party during the presidency of John Quincy Adams. That date makes the Democratic Party the oldest voter-based political party in the world. Andrew Jackson became the first Democratic US president, in 1829.

105 One of the N.H.L.’s original six teams: Abbr. : BOS

The “Original Six” are the group of teams that made up the National Hockey League (NHL) from the opening 1942-43 season until the NHL expansion of 1967. Those teams are still in the league, and are:

  • Boston Bruins
  • Chicago Blackhawks
  • Detroit Red Wings
  • Montreal Canadiens
  • New York Rangers
  • Toronto Maple Leafs

111 Geronimo, when his beard was just coming in? : A PATCHY APACHE

Cochise and Geronimo were perhaps the two most famous Apache leaders to resist intrusions by the European Americans in the 1800s. Both lived lives full of conflict, but both also lived relatively long lives. Cochise eventually entered into a treaty putting an end to the fighting, and retired onto a new reservation. Cochise died of natural causes in 1874, at the age of 69. Geronimo surrendered, and spent years as a prisoner of war. He spent his last years as a celebrity, and even rode in the inaugural parade for President Theodore Roosevelt. Geronimo died of pneumonia in 1909 at the age of 79.

114 Former Indianapolis arena : RCA DOME

The RCA Dome was probably better known as the Hoosier dome, home to the Indianapolis Colts from 1984-2007. It was torn down in 2008, but the inflated roof was put to good use afterwards. The material was re-purposed by local artisans, creating wallets, messenger bags etc. These can still be purchased, with proceeds going to charity.

117 Noted satellite of 1962 : TELSTAR

Telstar 1 was a communications satellite launched by AT&T in 1962. Telstar 1 acted as a relay for the first phone calls to be sent through space, as well as the first television pictures. Telstar 1 didn’t stay in service very long though. The transistors on board were fried when the US exploded a high-altitude nuclear bomb in a test later that year.

118 Some green sauces : PESTOS

The Italian term “pesto” applies to anything made by pounding. What we tend to know as pesto sauce is more properly called “pesto alla genovese”, i.e. pesto from Genoa in northern Italy. I love, love pesto sauce …

Down

1 Some book fair organizers, for short : PTAS

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

3 Arouse : PIQUE

The words “whet” and “pique” can both be used in the sense of sharpening or awaking one’s interest or desire.

4 Class Notes subjects : ALUMNI

An alumnus (plural “alumni”) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural “alumnae”). The term comes into English from Latin, in which an alumnus is a foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or alumnus.

6 One who asks “Got your ears on?” : CB’ER

A CB’er is someone who operates a Citizens Band (CB) radio. In 1945, the FCC set aside certain radio frequencies for the personal use of citizens. The use of the Citizens Band increased throughout the seventies as advances in electronics brought down the size of transceivers and their cost. There aren’t many CB radios sold these days though, as they have largely been replaced by cell phones.

7 Rio hello : OLA

Rio de Janeiro is the second largest city in Brazil (after São Paulo). “Rio de Janeiro” translates as “January River”. The name reflects the discovery of the bay on which Rio sits, on New Year’s Day in 1502.

11 ___ chi ch’uan (martial art) : TAI

More correctly called “t‘ai chi ch‘uan”, tai chi is a martial art that is mostly practiced to improve overall health and increase longevity.

13 Billionaire Blavatnik : LEN

Len Blavatnik is an American businessman who was born in Odessa, Ukraine but who now lives in London. In 1986, Blavatnik founded Access Industries, a US-based industrial group that is headquartered in New York. One of Access’s subsidiaries is the Warner Music Group. Blavatnik was listed as the fourth-richest person in the UK in 2014.

15 Sight from Catania, in brief : MT ETNA

The Metropolitan City of Catania (“Province of Catania” prior to 2015) is not only home to the city of Catania, but is also home to Mount Etna, Europe’s largest volcano. It is the second largest city on the island of Sicily (after Palermo), and has a long and rich cultural history. Today, Catania is known as a center for technology industries, earning it the nickname “European Silicon Valley”.

16 Frontman whom People magazine once named “sexiest rock star” : JON BON JOVI

Jon Bon Jovi was born John Francis Bongiovi, Jr. He is the frontman of the band that took his name, i.e. Bon Jovi.

21 Co. that might hire influencers : PR FIRM

Public relations (PR)

24 Radiation units : REMS

The contemporary standard radiation dosage unit is the “roentgen equivalent in man”, abbreviated to “rem”.

29 TV show with the theme song “Won’t Get Fooled Again” : CSI: MIAMI

The “CSI” TV show franchise uses hits from the Who as theme music:

  • “Who Are You” … “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”
  • “Baba O’Riley” … “CSI: New York”
  • “Won’t Get Fooled Again” … “CSI: Miami”
  • “I Can See for Miles” … “CSI: Cyber”

33 Sch. whose mascot is Brutus Buckeye : OSU

Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus was founded back in 1870 as the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College. The athletic teams of OSU are called the Buckeyes, named after the state tree of Ohio. In turn the buckeye tree gets its name from the appearance of its fruit, a dark nut with a light patch thought to resemble a “buck’s eye”.

36 1887 Chekhov play : IVANOV

Anton Chekhov was a Russian writer of short stories and a playwright, as well as a physician. He wrote four classic plays that are often performed all around the world, namely “The Seagull”, “Uncle Vanya”, “Three Sisters” and “The Cherry Orchard”. All the time Chekhov was writing, he continued to practice medicine. He is quoted as saying “Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.”

37 Spots at the card table : PIPS

A pip is a dot on a die or a domino, or a mark on a playing card.

38 “___ bit confused” : I’M A

So am I …

41 Director von Trier : LARS

Lars von Trier is a film director and screenwriter from Denmark. Even though there is a lot of demand for von Trier to work all over the world, the vast majority of his films are shot in Denmark or Sweden, even movies set in the US. That’s because von Trier has an intense fear of flying.

48 Black birds : ANIS

The tropical bird called the ani is related to the cuckoo. Cuckoos go around robbing other birds’ best, but anis don’t.

49 Actor Noah of “ER” : WYLE

Noah Wyle is an actor noted for playing Dr. John Truman Carter III on television’s “ER”. He was highly valued by the show’s producers, earning about $400,000 per episode in 2005, a world record for an actor in a TV drama at that time.

53 Foreign language seen on U.S. money : LATIN

From 1776, “E pluribus unum” was the unofficial motto of the United States. The phrase translates from Latin as “Out of many, one”. It was pushed aside in 1956 when an Act of Congress designated “In God We Trust” as the country’s official motto. “In God We Trust” had appeared on US coins since 1864, but was only introduced on paper currency in 1957.

56 Avatar : PERSONA

The Sanskrit word “avatar” describes the concept of a deity descending into earthly life and taking on a persona. It’s easy to see how in the world of online presences one might use the word avatar to describe one’s online identity.

59 Park place? : STREET

Park the car in the street.

61 Symbols of change, in math : DELTAS

Delta is the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet. We are most familiar with an upper-case delta and its distinctive triangular shape. The letter’s shape has influenced terms such as “deltoid muscle” and “river delta”. The upper-case delta is also used in mathematics and science to indicate a change in value. The lower-case delta looks a bit like our lower-case D, and indeed the Greek letter delta gave us our Latin letter D.

63 Protected on a boat : ALEE

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

64 Bathroom sealant : CAULK

The term “caulk” comes from old Norman French “cauquer”, and described the action of filling gaps with lime. “Caulk” has the same root as our word “chalk”.

66 Ravaged, as mosquitoes might : ATE ALIVE

“Mosquito” is the Spanish for “little fly”. The female mosquito actually has to have a “blood meal” before she is able to lay her eggs. Mosquitoes are sometimes referred to as “skeeters”.

68 Rock band whose lead guitarist notably dresses in a schoolboy uniform : AC/DC

The Heavy Metal band known as AC/DC was formed by two brothers Malcolm and Angus Young in Australia. The group is usually called “Acca Dacca” down under.

70 Flies into a violent rage : GOES POSTAL

“Going postal” is a slang term meaning to get uncontrollably angry and perhaps violent, especially in the workplace. The term arose out of a spate of killings that took place at postal facilities in the late eighties and early nineties.

73 Sci-fi bounty hunter Boba ___ : FETT

Boba Fett is one of the principal bad guys in the “Star Wars” universe. Boba Fett appears in Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back” and in “Episode VI: Return of the Jedi”. A young version of Boba Fett also appears in “Episode II: Attack of the Clones”.

74 Golfer Aoki : ISAO

Isao Aoki is one of Japan’s greatest golfers. Aoki’s best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

77 Susan of “L.A. Law” : DEY

Actress Susan Dey first appeared on “The Partridge Family” when she was 17-years-old when she had no acting experience. Years later, Dey won a Golden Globe for playing the leading role of Grace Van Owen in “L.A. Law”.

“L.A. Law” ran on NBC from 1986 to 1994, and was one of the network’s most successful drama series. It took over from the equally successful “Hill Street Blues” in the Thursday night 10 p.m. slot until, after a six-year run, it was itself replaced by yet another respected drama, “E.R.” The opening credits showed that famous California licence plate. The plate was on a Jaguar XJ for most of the series, but moved onto a Bentley towards the end of the run. For each series the registration sticker was updated, so no laws were being broken.

78 Abolitionist Horace : MANN

Horace Mann was Massachusetts politician, and the first Secretary of the Massachusetts State Board of Education. Mann made sweeping educational reforms in the state, with other states around the country adopting many of the policies he developed. Such was his influence that he is known by historians as the “Father of the Common School Movement”. And as an aside, Mann was brother-in-law to author Nathaniel Hawthorne.

84 Who wrote “This is the way the world ends / Not with a bang but a whimper” : TS ELIOT

The last two lines of T.S. Eliot’s 1925 poem “The Hollow Men” are oft-quoted:

This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.

93 Flatpack retailer : IKEA

The IKEA furniture chain was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943, when he was just 17-years-old. IKEA is an acronym standing for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don’t forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

95 Mexican wrap : SERAPE

“Serape” is the English pronunciation and spelling of the Spanish word “zarape”. A zarape is like a Mexican poncho, a soft woolen blanket with a hole in the middle for the head. Most serapes have colorful designs that use traditional Mayan motifs.

98 Psychotherapist Alfred : ADLER

Alfred Adler was one of the group of medical professionals that founded the psychoanalytic movement. Today, Adler is less famous than his colleague Sigmund Freud.

101 Like Machu Picchu : INCAN

Machu Picchu is known as “The Lost City of the Incas”, and it can be visited on a mountain ridge in Peru, 50 miles northwest of the city of Cuzco in the southeast of the country. The name Machu Picchu means “old peak”. The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu originates about 50 miles from Cusco on the Urubamba River in Peru. It can take travelers about 5 days to trek the full length of the trail, passing through many Incan ruins before reaching the Sun Gate on Machu Picchu mountain. The trail was becoming greatly overused, forcing the Peruvian government to limit the number of people on the trail each day to 500. Book early …

102 Some fruit-flavored sodas : NEHIS

The Nehi cola brand has a name that sounds like “knee-high”, a measure of a small stature. Back in the mid-1900’s the Chero-Cola company, which owned the brand, went for a slightly different twist on “knee-high” in advertising. The logo for Nehi was an image of a seated woman’s stockinged legs, with her skirt pulled up to her knees to hint at “knee-high”.

106 ___-free : SCOT

The phrase “scot-free” means “free from punishment, restraint or obligation”. The term derives from the Old English “scotfreo” meaning “exempt from royal tax”, with “scot” being a royal tax.

107 Caustic cleaners : LYES

What we call “lye” is usually sodium hydroxide, although historically the term “lye” was used for potassium hydroxide. Lye has many uses, including to cure several foodstuffs. Lye can make olives less bitter, for example. The chemical is also found in canned mandarin oranges, pretzels and Japanese ramen noodles. More concentrated grades of lye are used to clear drains and clean ovens. Scary …

110 Residency org. : AMA

American Medical Association (AMA)

112 Trivial content : PAP

One use of the term “pap” is to describe soft or semi-liquid food for babies and small children. “Pap” comes into English, via French, from the Latin word used by children for “food”. In the 1500s, “pap” also came to mean “an oversimplified” idea. This gives us a usage that’s common today, describing literature or perhaps TV programming that lacks real value or substance. Hands up those who think there’s a lot of pap out there, especially on television …

113 Benefits plan, maybe : HMO

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Half of a 1960s folk-rock group : PAPAS
6 Action : COMBAT
12 Car thief’s tool : SLIM JIM
19 Govt.-backed investment : T-BILL
20 Another name for the cornflower : BLUECAP
22 Vacuum tube with five active components : PENTODE
23 What the church’s music director wanted to do? : ACQUIRE A CHOIR
25 Stick in a church : INCENSE
26 Difficult problem : STUMPER
27 “I’m With ___” (2016 campaign slogan) : HER
28 Broadband overseer, for short : FCC
30 Up : AT BAT
31 Nasty words : VENOM
32 Truism about unwanted sound? : A NOISE ANNOYS
35 Dull : INSIPID
39 Indian term of address : SRI
40 Call ___ early night : IT AN
41 Sch. on the Mississippi River : LSU
44 Robustness : VIM
45 Pounds : PUMMELS
47 Chatter : JAW
50 Greatly dismay one of the Beatles? : APPALL A PAUL
55 Picture cards : IDS
56 Carousel figure : PONY
57 Staple in Creole cooking : RED BEANS
58 West Indies city that’s home to Lynden Pindling International Airport : NASSAU
61 Classic Halloween costume : DEVIL
62 Affirmed under oath : SWORE TO
63 Literary character whose house is uprooted by a tornado : AUNT EM
64 Shade similar to claret : CERISE
65 Times when your archenemy shows up? : A RIVAL’S ARRIVALS
68 Decorative throw : AFGHAN
71 Quaint giggle : TEE-HEE
72 In a daze : OUT OF IT
76 Native of Hrvatska, e.g. : CROAT
77 One of the Ramones : DEE DEE
78 Dipped in egg and bread crumbs, then fried : MILANESE
79 Consider : DEEM
80 Unimpressive brain size : PEA
81 What the antigovernment activist does? : ATTACKS A TAX
83 Acct. holdings : CDS
84 Setting of a 1903 Victor Herbert operetta : TOYLAND
87 Spanish letter with a tilde : ENE
88 Little kid : TOT
89 ___ doble (dance) : PASO
91 What’s not a good fit? : IRE
92 Halloween haul : CANDIES
96 “Aye” or “Oui”? : A VOWEL AVOWAL
100 Anne of fashion : KLEIN
103 Pertaining to the lowest possible level : BASAL
104 Rep.’s opponent : DEM
105 One of the N.H.L.’s original six teams: Abbr. : BOS
107 Scholarly : LEARNED
109 Facing a judge : ON TRIAL
111 Geronimo, when his beard was just coming in? : A PATCHY APACHE
114 Former Indianapolis arena : RCA DOME
115 Didn’t go out : SAT HOME
116 America’s foe in an 1898 war : SPAIN
117 Noted satellite of 1962 : TELSTAR
118 Some green sauces : PESTOS
119 Very small : EENSY

Down

1 Some book fair organizers, for short : PTAS
2 “The Good Doctor” airer : ABC TV
3 Arouse : PIQUE
4 Class Notes subjects : ALUMNI
5 Get into with little effort : SLIP ON
6 One who asks “Got your ears on?” : CB’ER
7 Rio hello : OLA
8 Significantly : MUCH
9 Take from the top? : BEHEAD
10 Nut seen on the back of a dime : ACORN
11 ___ chi ch’uan (martial art) : TAI
12 Liven (up) : SPICE
13 Billionaire Blavatnik : LEN
14 Recites, as a spell : INCANTS
15 Sight from Catania, in brief : MT ETNA
16 Frontman whom People magazine once named “sexiest rock star” : JON BON JOVI
17 “Methinks …” : I’D SAY …
18 Matches : MEETS
21 Co. that might hire influencers : PR FIRM
24 Radiation units : REMS
29 TV show with the theme song “Won’t Get Fooled Again” : CSI: MIAMI
33 Sch. whose mascot is Brutus Buckeye : OSU
34 Suffers (from) : AILS
36 1887 Chekhov play : IVANOV
37 Spots at the card table : PIPS
38 “___ bit confused” : I’M A
41 Director von Trier : LARS
42 Gush : SPEW
43 Hairstyle that calls for a lot of spray : UPDO
45 Do some prescheduling : PLAN AHEAD
46 Ending with “umich.” : EDU
48 Black birds : ANIS
49 Actor Noah of “ER” : WYLE
51 Prophet believed to be buried in the Cave of the Patriarchs : ABRAHAM
52 Eye luridly : LEER AT
53 Foreign language seen on U.S. money : LATIN
54 In mint condition : UNUSED
56 Avatar : PERSONA
59 Park place? : STREET
60 Extremely dry : SERE
61 Symbols of change, in math : DELTAS
63 Protected on a boat : ALEE
64 Bathroom sealant : CAULK
66 Ravaged, as mosquitoes might : ATE ALIVE
67 Spoke aloud : VOICED
68 Rock band whose lead guitarist notably dresses in a schoolboy uniform : AC/DC
69 Actor Armisen : FRED
70 Flies into a violent rage : GOES POSTAL
73 Sci-fi bounty hunter Boba ___ : FETT
74 Golfer Aoki : ISAO
75 Reach out with one’s hands? : TEXT
77 Susan of “L.A. Law” : DEY
78 Abolitionist Horace : MANN
80 Spot for cannonballs : POOL
82 Part of a Victorian social schedule : TEA
84 Who wrote “This is the way the world ends / Not with a bang but a whimper” : TS ELIOT
85 Enticing smells : AROMAS
86 In mint condition : NEW
90 Some honors : AWARDS
92 Polishing aids : CLOTHS
93 Flatpack retailer : IKEA
94 Go by : ELAPSE
95 Mexican wrap : SERAPE
96 Cancel early : ABORT
97 Former secretary of state Cyrus : VANCE
98 Psychotherapist Alfred : ADLER
99 Diminish : ABATE
101 Like Machu Picchu : INCAN
102 Some fruit-flavored sodas : NEHIS
106 ___-free : SCOT
107 Caustic cleaners : LYES
108 Not allow : DENY
110 Residency org. : AMA
112 Trivial content : PAP
113 Benefits plan, maybe : HMO

4 thoughts on “0322-20 NY Times Crossword 22 Mar 20, Sunday”

  1. 25:58, no errors. Theme a big help. Upper right corner complicated by never having heard of a “PENTODE” (though I guess it was the “obvious” answer), drawing a blank for awhile on “SLIM JIM”, and not immediately remembering “LEN” Blavatnik. Still, it all eventually worked out … 😜.

  2. 43:44. Took a while, but I made it. Entertaining theme. I drew a blank on SLIM JIM as well, but all I needed was the S to remember it. Haven’t heard the expression to GO POSTAL in years. I guess it’s still used.

    Best –

  3. 45:15 Had “Leo” instead of “Len”, “mates” for “meets”….amazingly for me, got the theme early, but a lot of smaller answers had me puzzled for while

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