0308-20 NY Times Crossword 8 Mar 20, Sunday

Constructed by: Laura Taylor Kinnel
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: What’s Shaking?

We have a rebus puzzle today, with the letters NaCl (SALT) appearing in some squares. We use SALT in the intersecting across-answers, and NACL in the intersecting down-answers:

  • 20A Add insult to injury : RUB SALT IN THE WOUND
  • 41A How to take glib promises : WITH A GRAIN OF SALT
  • 65A Boardwalk buy : SALT WATER TAFFY
  • 87A 2002 Winter Olympics locale : SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
  • 112A You, according to Jesus in Matthew 5:13 : THE SALT OF THE EARTH
  • 2D Almost won : RAN A CLOSE SECOND
  • 28D Peak : PINNACLE
  • 35D Shows how it’s done : PUTS ON A CLINIC
  • 80D Clustered : IN A CLUMP
  • 101D Handcuffs : MANACLES

… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 17m 24s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6 Longtime anthropomorphic aardvark on PBS : ARTHUR

“Arthur” is an educational TV show that started airing on PBS in 1996. The title character is an aardvark who regularly introduces children to important social issues such as dyslexia, cancer and autism. “Arthur” is the longest-running children’s animated show on US television, and is the second-longest running of any animated show, behind Fox’s “The Simpsons”.

17 Sounds “everywhere,” in a children’s song : BAA BAA

There was an old American version of the English children’s song “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” (E-I-E-I-O) that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the older US version goes “Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o”.

22 “Whenever I want you, all I have to do” is this, in an Everly Brothers hit : DREAM

The Everly Brothers were noted for their steel guitar sound, and their great use of harmony. Their harmony onstage wasn’t reflected off the stage though. In 1973 the brothers decided to pursue separate careers and scheduled a farewell performance attended by many fans, family and stalwarts from the music industry. Don Everly came on stage too drunk to perform, and eventually brother Phil just stormed off into the wings, smashing his guitar as he left. The boys didn’t talk to each other for ten years after that incident. Phil Everly passed away in January 2014.

27 Jack Frost’s bite : NIP

The Christmas classic known as “The Christmas Song”, which starts out with the line “Chestnuts roasting on an open fire”, was written in 1944 by Bob Wells and singer Mel Tormé. According to Tormé, the song was actually written on a very hot summer day, with Wells providing the lyrics. Apparently without the intention of writing a song, Wells jotted down four “Christmassy” phrases in an effort to “stay cool by thinking cool”. Those phrases were:

  • Chestnuts roasting
  • Jack Frost nipping
  • Yuletide carols
  • Folks dressed up like Eskimos

“The Christmas Song” is now the most-performed Christmas song in the world.

29 Bits of terre in la mer : ILES

In French, an “île” (island) is “terre dans la mer” (land in the sea).

32 Author Harper : LEE

Nelle Harper Lee was an author from Monroeville, Alabama. For many years, Lee had only one published novel to her name, i.e. “To Kill a Mockingbird”. That contribution to the world of literature was enough to earn her the Presidential Medal of Freedom and a Pulitzer Prize. Harper Lee was a close friend of fellow author Truman Capote who was the inspiration for the character named “Dill” in her novel. Lee was all over the news in 2015 as she had published a second novel, titled “Go Set a Watchman”. The experts seem to be agreeing that “Go Set a Watchman” is actually a first draft of “To Kill a Mockingbird”. Lee passed away less than a year after “Go Set a Watchman” hit the stores.

33 He loved Lucy : DESI

Desi Arnaz was famous for his turbulent marriage to Lucille Ball. Arnaz was a native of Cuba, and was from a privileged family. His father was Mayor of Santiago and served in the Cuban House of Representatives. However, the family had to flee to Miami after the 1933 revolt led by Batista.

35 Tea type : PEKOE

A pekoe (or more commonly “orange pekoe”) is a medium-grade black tea. There is no orange flavor in an orange pekoe tea. The “orange” name most likely derived from the name of the trading company that brought the tea to Europe from Asia.

38 1940s vice president who went on to become president : PERON

Nowadays, President Juan Perón of Argentina is perhaps less well-known than his second wife, Eva Perón of “Evita” fame. Juan and Eva Perón were overthrown in a military coup in 1955, although Juan Perón was returned to power in 1973 after which he served for only nine months before he passed away. Juan was succeeded in office by his third wife, Isabel Perón.

39 “In Praise of Folly” writer : ERASMUS

Desiderius Erasmus was a Dutch priest and theologian. Erasmus was a very prolific and successful writer and in the 1530s his written works accounted for 10-20% of all book sales in the world. A famous quotation accredited to Erasmus is:

In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

45 Subject of many a negotiation : SALARY

It has been suggested that our term “salary” comes from the Latin “sal” meaning “salt”. The idea is that a Roman soldier’s “salarium” might have been an allowance to purchase salt.

46 Days ___ : INN

The Days Inn hotel chain was founded in 1970 by a real estate developer called Cecil B. Day. One of the features of a Days Inn hotel in those early days was an on-site gas pump, which dispensed gasoline at discount prices.

47 Jeanne d’Arc, e.g.: Abbr. : STE

Joan of Arc (also “Jeanne d’Arc”, her birth name) led the French Army successfully into battle a number of times during the Hundred Years War with England. When she was eventually captured, Joan was tried in Rouen, the seat of the occupying English government in France at that time. There she was burned at the stake having been found guilty of heresy. In fact, after the fire died down, the executioner raked the coals to display the charred body, proving Joan had died, and then burned the corpse again, twice, so that relics could not be collected. The remaining ashes were then cast into the Seine River. Joan of Arc was canonized some 600 years later, in 1920, and is now one of the patron saints of France.

54 City on the Brazos River : WACO

The Texas city of Waco is named for the Wichita people known as the “Waco”, who occupied the area for thousands of years.

The Brazos River is the longest river in the state of Texas. It was originally called “Rio de los Brazos de Dios” by the Spanish, which translates as “the River of the Arms of God”. So, the Brazos is literally “the arms” in English.

57 ___ Crunch : CAP’N

The first Cap’n Crunch commercials aired in 1963, at the time the product line was launched. The Cap’n’s full name is Captain Horatio Magellan Crunch, would you believe? Crunch’s voice was provided for many years by Daws Butler, the same voice actor who gave us Yogi Bear and Huckleberry Hound. Cap’n Crunch is commander of the S.S. Guppy.

59 Gobs : OODLES

The term “toodles” meaning “goodbye”, is a short form of “toodle-oo”, which in turn comes from the French “à tout à l’heure” which translates as “see you later”.

:

64 Item often numbered from 3 to 9 IRON

That would be golf.

65 Boardwalk buy : SALT WATER TAFFY

Salt water taffy was invented in Atlantic City and is now found all over the US, but primarily in coastal towns (for some reason) and not really outside of America. Taffy is made by stretching the solid mass made by boiling up sugar, butter, flavoring, and coloring until it achieves a fluffy texture. Despite the inference in the name, the recipe for salt water taffy does not include “seawater”, but does include both salt and water.

69 Time magazine’s Person of the Century runner-up, 1999 : GANDHI

Mohandas Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader in India in the first part of the 20th century, as the country sought independence from Britain. He was also referred to as “Mahatma”, meaning “great soul”. His remarkable philosophy of nonviolence and living a modest lifestyle was a great inspiration to the Indian people. India (and Pakistan) was granted independence in 1947. Tragically, Gandhi was assassinated the very next year.

“Time” magazine started naming a “Man of the Year” in 1927, only changing the concept to “Person of the Year” in 1999. Prior to 1999, the magazine did recognize four females as “Woman of the Year”: Wallis Simpson (1936), Soong May-ling a.k.a. Madame Chiang Kai-shek (1937), Queen Elizabeth II (1952) and Corazon Aquino (1986). “Time” named Albert Einstein as Person of the Century in 1999, with Franklin D. Roosevelt and Mahatma Gandhi as runners-up.

73 Big name in theaters : IMAX

The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo ’67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

74 Till compartment : ONES

What we usually call a cash register here in North America, we mostly call a “till” in Ireland and the UK. I haven’t heard the word “till” used much here in that sense …

76 “Silent Spring” subject, for short : DDT

DDT is dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (don’t forget now!). DDT was used with great success to control disease-carrying insects during WWII, and when made available for use after the war it became by far the most popular pesticide. And then Rachel Carson published her famous book “Silent Spring”, suggesting there was a link between DDT and diminishing populations of certain wildlife. It was the public outcry sparked by the book, and reports of links between DDT and cancer, that led to the ban on the use of the chemical in 1972. That ban is touted as the main reason that the bald eagle was rescued from near extinction.

80 Descartes’s conclusion : … I AM

The great French philosopher Rene Descartes made the famous statement in Latin, “Cogito ergo sum”. This translates into French as “Je pense, donc je suis” and into English as “I think, therefore I am”. Anything pertaining to the philosophy of Descartes can be described by the adjective “Cartesian”.

83 Energy : VIM

“Vim” and “pep” are both words that mean “energy, power”.

87 2002 Winter Olympics locale : SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

The last Olympic Games held in the US was in Salt Lake City in 2002, a winter games. That made Utah the fifth US state to host the Olympics.

94 Abdominal pain producer : ULCER

Until fairly recently, a peptic ulcer was believed to be caused by undue amounts of stress in one’s life. It is now known that 70-90% of all peptic ulcers are in fact associated with a particular bacterium.

95 Way of securing payment : LIEN

A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone’s property until a debt is paid. When an individual takes out a car loan, for example, the lending bank is usually a lien holder. The bank releases the lien on the car when the loan is paid in full.

98 Knitting stitch : PURL

As all of us knitters know, the purl stitch and knit stitch are very similar, one being sort of the inverse of the other. Yes, I’ve knitted a few sweaters in my day …

103 Org. with the slogan “Every child. One voice” : PTA

The National Parent Teacher Association (National PTA) was founded back in 1897 as the National Congress of Mothers. The PTA uses the slogan “everychild. onevoice” (sic).

104 Brand with the slogan “The Art of Childhood” : CRAYOLA

Crayola has made the decision to rename colors of crayons a few times, often with a nod to changing attitudes in society. Some examples are:

  • “Flesh” to “Peach” (1962 … not all flesh is peach-colored!)
  • “Prussian Blue” to “Midnight Blue” (1958 … as the Cold War was raging)
  • “Indian Red” to “Chestnut” (1999 … even though the name wasn’t a reference to “American Indian”)

107 What flies usually become : OUTS

That would be baseball.

112 You, according to Jesus in Matthew 5:13 : THE SALT OF THE EARTH

Jesus used the metaphors of salt and light in the Sermon on the Mount as recounted in the Gospel of Matthew:

Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost its savor, wherewith shall it be salted? it is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out and trodden under foot of men.

117 Fishes : ANGLES

We use the verb “to angle” to mean “to fish” because “angel” is an Old English word meaning “hook”.

118 Moved like Jagr? : DEKED

A deke, also known as a dangle, is a technique used to get past an opponent in ice hockey. “Deke” is a colloquial shortening of the word “decoy”.

Jaromír Jágr is an NHL hockey player from the Czech Republic. When Jágr made his debut in the NHL in 1990 at age 18, he was the youngest player in the league.

119 Shaded growths : MOSSES

There is a traditionally-held belief that in the northern hemisphere there is a heavier growth of moss on the north-facing side of trees. The assumption is that the sun creates a drier environment on the south side of the tree, an environment that is less conducive to the growth of moss.

120 Lil Nas X and Billie Eilish, to teens : IDOLS

“Lil Nas X” is the stage name of rapper Montero Lamar Hill. He was born and raised just outside of Atlanta. His first hit was “Old Town Road”, which is classified as country rap.

Billie Eilish is a singer-songwriter from Los Angeles. She has won several awards, and is the youngest person to have won all four major Grammy categories in the same year, i.e. Best New Artist, Record of the Year, Song of the Year and Album of the Year.

Down

3 Martial artist’s belt : OBI

The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied at the back in what is called a butterfly knot. The term “obi” is also used for the thick cotton belts that are an essential part of the outfits worn by practitioners of many martial arts. The color of the martial arts obi signifies the wearer’s skill level.

4 Appurtenance for a T.S.A. agent : WAND

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the agency that employs the good folks who check passengers and baggage at airports.

An appurtenance is an accessory, perhaps a piece of equipment for a specific task. It might also be an appendage; a suffix to a word, for example.

5 Many Dorothy Parker pieces : SATIRES

Dorothy Parker was a poet and satirist, and a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. After the famed meetings at the Algonquin Hotel ceased, Parker headed to Hollywood where she became a successful screenwriter, earning two Oscar nominations. However she ended up on the Hollywood blacklist for being involved in left-wing politics. When Parker passed away in 1967, her body was cremated. Her ashes remained unclaimed for over twenty years before the NAACP took charge of them and placed them in a specially-designed memorial garden outside their headquarters in Baltimore. The plaque reads:

Here lie the ashes of Dorothy Parker (1893–1967) humorist, writer, critic. Defender of human and civil rights. For her epitaph she suggested, ‘Excuse my dust’. This memorial garden is dedicated to her noble spirit which celebrated the oneness of humankind and to the bonds of everlasting friendship between black and Jewish people.

6 Big 12 college town : AMES, IOWA

Iowa State University of Science and Technology (ISU) is located in Ames, Iowa. Among many other notable milestones, ISU created the country’s first school of veterinary medicine, in 1879. The sports teams of ISU are known as the Cyclones.

10 Sch. with 50+ alums who went on to become astronauts : USNA

The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is located in Annapolis, Maryland. The USNA was founded in 1845 and educates officers for both the US Navy and the US Marine Corps. The motto of the USNA is “Ex Scientia Tridens”, which translates as “From Knowledge, Sea Power”.

13 Setting for a classic Georges Seurat painting, en français : PARC

Georges Seurat was a French Post-Impressionist. His most famous work is “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte – 1884”, a work in the pointillist style that can be viewed in the Art Institute of Chicago. If you’ve seen the movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”, it features quite prominently in a wonderful, wonderful scene shot at the gallery. The painting features ordinary people enjoying a day at a park, and is the inspiration for the 1984 musical by Stephen Sondheim called “Sunday in the Park with George”.

14 Fruity quaff : ADE

“Quaff” is both a verb and a noun. One “quaffs” (takes a hearty drink) of a “quaff” (a hearty drink).

15 South American cowboys : LLANEROS

A llanero is a herdsman from Venezuela or Colombia. “Llanero” comes from “Llanos”, the South American grasslands. “Llano” is the Spanish word for “plain”.

16 Like Havarti or Muenster : SEMISOFT

Havarti cheese was invented in the mid-1800s by farmer Hanne Nielson. He chose “Havarti” from the name of his farm, Havarthigaard, located in the neighborhood of Øverød, north of Copenhagen.

Muenster is an American cheese, not to be confused with Munster cheese which is from the department called Vosges in the northeast of France. The American cheese is named for the German city of Münster (also “Muenster”) in the northwest of the country, and a city that doesn’t actually have a local cheese named for it.

17 Reveille player : BUGLER

“Reveille” is a trumpet call that is used to wake everyone up at sunrise. The term comes from “réveillé”, the French for “wake up”.

26 Kind of wheel : FERRIS

The first Ferris Wheel was built for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. That wheel was designed and constructed by George Washington Gale Ferris, Jr. who lent his name to wheels built from then on.

31 Heroine of Bizet’s “The Pearl Fishers” : LEILA

“The Pearl Fishers” (“Les Pêcheurs de Perles”) is the second-most famous Georges Bizet opera, after “Carmen”. “The Pearl Fishers” is about two Ceylon fishermen, Nadir and Zurga, who are lifelong friends. Their friendship is threatened when the two fall in love with the same woman, a priestess named Leila.

38 Refried bean : PINTO

Pinto beans are so-called because their skins have a mottled (“pinto”) appearance.

40 Astronaut Jemison of the space shuttle Endeavour : MAE

Mae Jemison was a crew member on the Space Shuttle Endeavour on a 1992 mission. As such, Jemison became the first African-American woman to travel in space. Jemison is also a big fan of “Star Trek” and appeared on an episode of “Star Trek: The Next Generation”. That made her the first real astronaut to appear on any of the “Star Trek” shows.

45 Nursery rhyme couple : SPRATS

“Jack Sprat” was a nickname given in the 16th century to people of small stature. Jack featured in a proverb of the day:

Jack will eat not fat, and Jull doth love no leane. Yet betwixt them both they lick the dishes cleane.

Over time, this mutated into a nursery rhyme that is still recited in England:

Jack Sprat could eat no fat. His wife could eat no lean. And so between them both, you see, they licked the platter clean.

50 Princess Diana, for one : ICON

Charles, Prince of Wales married Lady Diana Spencer in 1981 at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. The wedding was a huge television event, with about 750 million people tuning in worldwide. Although the event was billed as a fairytale wedding, the couple separated in 1992 and divorced in 1996. Famously, Lady Diana died in a car crash in Paris the following year.

51 Negotiator with G.M. : UAW

The United Auto Workers (UAW) was founded to represent workers in auto plants in the Detroit area in 1935. Nowadays the UAW’s membership extends into the aerospace, agriculture and other industries.

56 Disco ___ (“The Simpsons” character) : STU

On “The Simpsons”, the character of Disco Stu is voiced by Hank Azaria, although the original intent was for him to be voiced by Phil Hartman. Disco Stu is described as “a black, wrinkly John Travolta”.

61 Fabric with sheen : LAME

Lamé is a fabric that has metallic yarns included in the weave. Lamé is a popular fabric for stylish evening wear, and also in the sport of fencing. The metallic threads are conductive and so help register a touch by an épée.

62 Actress ___ Rachel Wood : EVAN

Actress Evan Rachel Wood’s most famous role to date is playing one of the leads in the 2003 movie “Thirteen”. Wood’s private life draws a lot of attention, especially as she was romantically linked for some time with the “outrageous” musician Marilyn Manson.

63 Potential source of a political scandal : SEXT

Sexting (a portmanteau of “sex” and “texting”) is the sending of explicit dialog and images between cell phones. The term “sexting” was coined by the UK’s “Sunday Telegraph Magazine” in a 2005 article.

75 Attendant of Desdemona in “Othello” : EMILIA

Emilia and Iago are characters in William Shakespeare’s play “Othello”. Emilia and Iago are a married couple, although Iago kills Emilia late in the play.

Desdemona is one of the main characters in William Shakespeare’s play “Othello”. She is the daughter of a Venetian senator called Brabantio whom she vexes by eloping with Othello, a man not of her race and several years older.

79 Continental abbr. : EUR

The continent of Europe was named for Europa, a Phoenician princess of Greek mythology.

82 Best Actress Oscar winner between Streep and Field : MACLAINE

Actress Shirley MacLaine was born Shirley MacLean Beaty in Richmond, Virginia in 1934. Perhaps in an unknown nod to her future, she was named for child actress Shirley Temple. MacLaine’s younger brother is actor Warren Beatty, who also changed the spelling of his name for his acting career.

Meryl Streep has had more nominations for an Academy Award than any other actor, which is both a tribute to her talent and the respect she has earned in the industry. I am not a huge fan of her earlier works but some of her recent movies are now on my list of all-time favorites. I recommend “Mamma Mia!” (you’ll either love it or hate it!), “Julie & Julia”, “It’s Complicated” and ”Hope Springs”.

Actress Sally Field first came to the public’s attention in the sixties with title roles in the TV shows “Gidget” and “The Flying Nun”. She has two Best Actress Oscars: one for “Norma Rae” (1979) and one for “Places in the Heart” (1984).

89 Fictional exemplar of Christmas spirit : TINY TIM

“Tiny Tim” is the nickname of Timothy Cratchit, a character in the Charles Dickens novella “A Christmas Carol”. Tiny Tim is the son of Ebenezer Scrooge’s underpaid clerk Bob Cratchit, and is a sickly child. Famously, the child utters the words “God bless us, every one!” at Christmas dinner, which words are repeated by the author at the end of the story.

90 Stir-fried noodle dish : PAD THAI

The delicious dish called pad Thai is a meld of stir-fried rice noodles with tamarind juice, red chili pepper plus a mix of vegetables and possibly tofu, meat or fish. It is usually topped with crushed peanuts, coriander and lime. The name “pad Thai” translates as “fried Thai-style”.

92 Senator Joni and Dadaist Max : ERNSTS

Joni Ernst was elected as a US Senator for Iowa in 2014. Ernst is a Republican who had previously served as a lieutenant colonel in the Iowa National Guard. She is the first female veteran in the US Senate, and the first woman to represent Iowa in the US Congress.

Max Ernst was a painter and sculptor, and a pioneer in the Dada movement and Surrealism. Ernst was born near Cologne in Germany in 1891 and he was called up to fight in WWI, as were most young German men at that time. In his autobiography he writes “Max Ernst died the 1st of August, 1914”, which was a statement about his experiences in the war. In reality, Ernst died in 1976 having lived to the ripe old age of 85.

97 Source of the line “Man does not live by bread alone”: Abbr. : DEUT

Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible. The English title “Deuteronomy” comes from a Greek word that translates as “second law”.

100 Boxer, for example : BREED

The boxer breed of dog (one of my favorites!) originated in Germany. My first dog was a boxer/Labrador mix, a beautiful combination. Our current family dog is a boxer/pug mix, and is another gorgeous animal.

101 Handcuffs : MANACLES

A manacle is a device for constraining the hands, like handcuffs. The term comes from the Latin “manicula” which means “handle” or literally “little hand”.

105 “___ be in England” : OH TO

Robert Browning met fellow poet Elizabeth Barrett in 1845. Elizabeth was a sickly woman, confined to her parents’ house in Wimpole Street in London, largely due to the conservative and protective nature of her father. Robert and Elizabeth eventually eloped in 1846, and lived in self-inflicted exile in Italy. Away from the country of his birth, Browning was moved to write his now famous “Home Thoughts, From Abroad”, the first line of which is “Oh, to be in England …”

114 Super ending : -EGO

Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the superego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The superego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Boasts : CROWS
6 Longtime anthropomorphic aardvark on PBS : ARTHUR
12 Australia’s national women’s basketball team : OPALS
17 Sounds “everywhere,” in a children’s song : BAA BAA
18 Gloomy : MOROSE
19 Soup server : LADLE
20 Add insult to injury : RUB SALT IN THE WOUND
22 “Whenever I want you, all I have to do” is this, in an Everly Brothers hit : DREAM
23 Farming prefix : AGRO-
24 “Gracias a ___” : DIOS
25 Jam producer : TRAFFIC
27 Jack Frost’s bite : NIP
29 Bits of terre in la mer : ILES
30 Churns : ROILS
32 Author Harper : LEE
33 He loved Lucy : DESI
34 Dry : SERE
35 Tea type : PEKOE
36 “A Life for the ___” (Mikhail Glinka opera) : TSAR
38 1940s vice president who went on to become president : PERON
39 “In Praise of Folly” writer : ERASMUS
41 How to take glib promises : WITH A GRAIN OF SALT
44 Dog/dog separator : EAT
45 Subject of many a negotiation : SALARY
46 Days ___ : INN
47 Jeanne d’Arc, e.g.: Abbr. : STE
48 Enlivens : SPICES UP
52 Big feller? : AXE
53 Fails to be : ISN’T
54 City on the Brazos River : WACO
55 Propeller blades? : OARS
57 ___ Crunch : CAP’N
59 Gobs : OODLES
64 Item often numbered from 3 to 9 : IRON
65 Boardwalk buy : SALT WATER TAFFY
68 Gush : RAVE
69 Time magazine’s Person of the Century runner-up, 1999 : GANDHI
71 Strain : TUNE
72 ___ Westover, author of the 2018 best-selling memoir “Educated” : TARA
73 Big name in theaters : IMAX
74 Till compartment : ONES
76 “Silent Spring” subject, for short : DDT
78 Nothingburger : NONEVENT
80 Descartes’s conclusion : … I AM
83 Energy : VIM
84 Least interesting : DRIEST
86 It gets the ball rolling : CUE
87 2002 Winter Olympics locale : SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
90 Looks through : PERUSES
94 Abdominal pain producer : ULCER
95 Way of securing payment : LIEN
96 Fizzy drinks : SODAS
98 Knitting stitch : PURL
99 “Holy ___!” : MOLY
100 Word after bargain or overhead : BIN
101 Emulated a kitten : MEWED
102 ___ expense (free) : AT NO
103 Org. with the slogan “Every child. One voice” : PTA
104 Brand with the slogan “The Art of Childhood” : CRAYOLA
107 What flies usually become : OUTS
109 Get cold feet, with “out” : WUSS …
110 It’s held by a winner : TITLE
112 You, according to Jesus in Matthew 5:13 : THE SALT OF THE EARTH
115 Follow : ENSUE
116 Reflexive pronoun : ITSELF
117 Fishes : ANGLES
118 Moved like Jagr? : DEKED
119 Shaded growths : MOSSES
120 Lil Nas X and Billie Eilish, to teens : IDOLS

Down

1 Orlando ___, two-time Gold Glove Award winner : CABRERA
2 Almost won : RAN A CLOSE SECOND
3 Martial artist’s belt : OBI
4 Appurtenance for a T.S.A. agent : WAND
5 Many Dorothy Parker pieces : SATIRES
6 Big 12 college town : AMES, IOWA
7 Column crosser : ROW
8 Brings (out) : TROTS
9 Time of day : HOUR
10 Sch. with 50+ alums who went on to become astronauts : USNA
11 Warning sign : RED FLAG
12 Blast from the past : OLDIE
13 Setting for a classic Georges Seurat painting, en français : PARC
14 Fruity quaff : ADE
15 South American cowboys : LLANEROS
16 Like Havarti or Muenster : SEMISOFT
17 Reveille player : BUGLER
20 Jack up : RAISE
21 Repeated part of a pop song : HOOK
26 Kind of wheel : FERRIS
28 Peak : PINNACLE
31 Heroine of Bizet’s “The Pearl Fishers” : LEILA
33 Cozy spot : DEN
35 Shows how it’s done : PUTS ON A CLINIC
36 Climate change, notably : THREAT
37 State : SAY
38 Refried bean : PINTO
40 Astronaut Jemison of the space shuttle Endeavour : MAE
42 Reduction in what one owes : TAX CREDIT
43 Headaches : ANNOYANCES
45 Nursery rhyme couple : SPRATS
48 Gulp : SWIG
49 Prefix with medic or military : PARA-
50 Princess Diana, for one : ICON
51 Negotiator with G.M. : UAW
53 Suckling : INFANT
56 Disco ___ (“The Simpsons” character) : STU
58 Memorized : PAT
60 Exasperate : DRIVE UP A WALL
61 Fabric with sheen : LAME
62 Actress ___ Rachel Wood : EVAN
63 Potential source of a political scandal : SEXT
66 Evasive maneuver : END RUN
67 Opposite of “to” : FRO
70 Behave like a helicopter parent : HOVER
75 Attendant of Desdemona in “Othello” : EMILIA
77 Lightly roast : TEASE
79 Continental abbr. : EUR
80 Clustered : IN A CLUMP
81 Meted out : ALLOTTED
82 Best Actress Oscar winner between Streep and Field : MACLAINE
84 Agent of change : DYE
85 Attention seekers : SHOW-OFFS
88 Critical : KEY
89 Fictional exemplar of Christmas spirit : TINY TIM
90 Stir-fried noodle dish : PAD THAI
91 Sews up : SUTURES
92 Senator Joni and Dadaist Max : ERNSTS
93 What water in a bucket might do : SLOSH
97 Source of the line “Man does not live by bread alone”: Abbr. : DEUT
100 Boxer, for example : BREED
101 Handcuffs : MANACLES
104 This, for one : CLUE
105 “___ be in England” : OH TO
106 Not so much : LESS
108 Post : SEND
111 “Tut-tut” : TSK
113 Argentina’s leading daily sports newspaper : OLE
114 Super ending : -EGO

9 thoughts on “0308-20 NY Times Crossword 8 Mar 20, Sunday”

  1. 31:05, no errors. It took me awhile to understand the gimmick in this one, even though I’ve seen similar things many times before.

  2. 38:26. I got the SALT/across part of the theme early in the solve, but for whatever reason it took me a long time to realize what was going on with the NACL/down answers. It took put oN A CLinic for me to finally see it. Well done theme.

    Best –

  3. 57:35 It’s a typical Sunday for me, but I figured out the NACL theme early on, but some of the rest was obscure to me

  4. 37:40, no errors. One of those puzzles that feels good if you get it, and frustrated if you don’t. Happy for a clean fill.

  5. Had a good time with this one. No errors and found it to be “just right” for a Sunday offering. My compliments to Ms. Kinnel.

  6. No errors, but I don’t grok 44 across — why is EAT the answer to “Dog/dog separator”? Is it just that literal dogs require individual food bowls, or is there some sort of pun or other reference I’m missing?

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