0223-20 NY Times Crossword 23 Feb 20, Sunday

Constructed by: Sophia & David Maymudes
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Resolved

Themed answers are common phrases preceded by the prefix “RE-”:

  • 27A “Stop rolling sevens!”? : REPRESS YOUR LUCK
  • 45A Build rapport like a presidential candidate? : RELATE TO THE PARTY
  • 70A Hate getting ready to move? : RESENT PACKING
  • 97A Makes friends while working retail? : RESTOCKS AND BONDS
  • 115A Event planner’s post-banquet task? : RETURN THE TABLES
  • 16D Young woman to call when your data gets deleted? : RECOVER GIRL
  • 69D Places to swim during school? : RECESS POOLS

… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 16m 10s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8 Julius Erving, to fans : DR J

Julius Erving is a retired professional basketball player who was known as “Dr. J”, a nickname he picked up in high school. Dr. J was a trailblazer in many ways, being the first player associated with slam dunking and other moves above the rim.

11 Calendar abbr. that’s also a French number : SEPT

In French, there are “sept” (seven) days in “la semaine” (the week).

The month of September is the ninth month in our year, although the name “September” comes from the Latin word “septum” meaning “seventh”. September was the seventh month in the Roman calendar until the year 46 BC when Julius Caesar introduced the Julian calendar. The Julian system moved the start of the year from March 1st to January 1st, and shifted September to the ninth month. The Gregorian calendar that we use today was introduced in 1582.

19 Early online encyclopedia : ENCARTA

Microsoft badly wanted to get into the online encyclopedia business in the eighties, and approached the biggest and the best, “Encyclopaedia Britannica”. “Britannica” declined, fearing that an online version would damage their print sales. “Britannica” had to sell eventually, but not to Microsoft, as the inevitable decline in print sales happened anyway. So Microsoft made a deal with “Funk & Wagnalls” and started publishing “Encarta” in disk form in the early nineties. Usage of Encarta grew until along came Wikipedia. Encarta was discontinued at the end of 2009.

21 The Powerpuff Girls, e.g. : TRIO

“The Powerpuff Girls” is a children’s animated television show that airs on the Cartoon Network.

22 Fantasy author Gaiman : NEIL

Neil Gaiman is an English author whose works include novels, comic books and graphic novels.

25 Wagner opus : RING CYCLE

Richard Wagner’s “Ring Cycle” is more properly called “Der Ring des Nibelungen” (The Ring of Nibelung), and comprises four very, very long operas. The individual operas are:

  1. “Das Rheingold”
  2. “Die Walkure”
  3. “Siegfried”
  4. “Gotterdammerung”

30 Southeast Asian ethnic group : HMONG

The Hmong people are an ethnic group from the mountains of China, Vietnam, Laos and Thailand.

31 Princess in a galaxy far, far away : LEIA

Every “Star Wars” film starts out with an opening crawl announcing “A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away….”

33 Org. in charge of Tokyo 2020 : IOC

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894, and has its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

36 “Oy ___!” : VEY

“Oy vey” is a Yiddish expression of dismay that translates literally as “oh, pain”. The more usual translation is “woe is me”.

37 Bay window : ORIEL

An oriel window is a bay window that projects from a wall, but does not reach all the way to the ground.

39 Home of Mount Rushmore: Abbr. : SDAK

The four presidents whose faces are carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore are (from left to right) George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. Each of the presidents is about 60 feet in height, although they might have been larger. The original intent was for each president to be depicted from head to waist, but the project lost funding.

40 Bobby of the Black Panthers : SEALE

Bobby Seale is the civil rights activist who co-founded the Black Panther Party with Huey Newton. Seale was one of the Chicago Eight, eight people charged as a result of anti-Vietnam war protests that took place during the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago. The judge ordered Seale severed from the case, reducing the group of defendants to the Chicago Seven. However, Seale’s vehement protests during the trial led to the judge ordering him bound, gagged and chained to his chair, and eventually sentenced him to four years in jail for contempt of court. That conviction was quickly overturned on appeal.

50 “Livin’ la ___ Loca” : VIDA

“Livin’ La Vida Loca” is a 1999 single recorded by Ricky Martin, the title of which translates as “living the crazy life”.

51 Celery unit : STALK

Apparently, we have quite a few “food months” in the US. Here are some examples:

  • January: National Soup Month
  • March: National Celery Month
  • April: National Pecan Month
  • October: National Pizza Month
  • December: National Egg Nog Month

53 Dance craze of the early 2010s : DOUGIE

The Dougie is a hip-hop dance that originated in Dallas. The dance took its name from the rapper Doug E. Fresh, who made similar moves during his performances. And no, I don’t Dougie …

56 Spot for a laundromat? : STAIN

If you go looking for a laundromat in the UK or Ireland, folks will likely know what you’re talking about. However, the local name for such a facility is “launderette” or sometimes “laundrette”.

61 Word with pop or crop : TOP

The term “pop top” refers to a whole family of designs for opening the top of a soda can. The oldest method is the “pull tab” or “ring pull”, invented in Canada in 1956. The design was long-lived, but it had its problems, so the world heaved a sigh of relief with the invention of the stay-on-tab in 1975. The new design led to less injuries and eliminated all those used pull tabs that littered the streets.

63 Subject of gossip : ITEM

An unmarried couple known to be involved with each other might appear in the gossip columns. This appearance as “an item” in the papers, led to the use of “item” to refer to such a couple, but only since the very early seventies.

65 Dance class garments : UNITARDS

A unitard is like a leotard, except that it has long legs and perhaps long sleeves. It wouldn’t be a good look for me …

75 Children’s book made into a 2012 3-D animated film : THE LORAX

“The Lorax” is a children’s book written by Dr. Seuss. It is an allegorical work questioning the problems created by industrialization, and in particular its impact on the environment. At one point in the story, the Lorax “speaks for the trees, for the trees have no tongues”. “The Lorax” was adapted into an animated film that was released in 2012, with Danny DeVito voicing the title character.

77 Singer Bareilles : SARA

Sara Bareilles achieved success with her 2007 “Love Song” with the help of the iTunes online store. In one week in June of that year, iTunes offered the song as “free single of the week” and it quickly became the most downloaded song in the store, and from there climbed to the number spot in the charts.

78 Grunts : GIS

The initialism “GI” stands for “Government Issue”, and not “General Infantry” as is widely believed. “GI” was first used in the military to denote equipment made from Galvanized Iron and during WWI, incoming German shells were nicknamed “GI cans”. Soon after, the term GI came to be associated with “Government Issue” and eventually became an adjective to describe anything associated with the Army.

83 Fancy rides : LIMOS

The word “limousine” derives from the name of the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a “limousine”. Well, that’s how the story goes …

96 Dunce cap, basically : CONE

John Duns Scotus was a theologian and scholar in the Middle Ages, responsible for many writings that were used as textbooks in British universities of the day. New ideas developed during the English Renaissance, but Duns Scotus and his followers resisted the changes. The word “dunse” came into use as a way of ridiculing those refusing to learn anything new. “Dunse”was a precursor to our modern usage of “dunce”.

102 Model and TV host Banks : TYRA

Tyra Banks is a tremendously successful model and businesswoman. Banks created and hosted the hit show “America’s Next Top Model “, and also had her own talk show. She was also the first African-American woman to make the cover of the “Sports Illustrated” swimsuit issue.

103 Billionaire Carl : ICAHN

Carl Icahn has many business interests, and is probably best known in recent years for his dealings with Yahoo! Icahn has a reputation as a corporate raider, a reputation that dates back to his hostile takeover of TWA in 1985. He made a lot of money out of that deal, before being ousted in 1993 after the company filed for bankruptcy protection.

109 Train schedule abbr. : STA

A station (“stn.” or “sta.”) is a railroad (RR) or bus stop.

110 Dutch cheese town : EDAM

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

115 Event planner’s post-banquet task? : RETURN THE TABLES

A banquet is an elaborate feast. “Banquet” is a term that seems to have reversed in meaning over time. Coming into English via French from Old Italian, “banquet” is derived from “banco” meaning “bench”. The original “banco” meal was simply a snack eaten on a bench, rather than at a table. I guess we eat more these days …

122 Turnabout : UIE

Hang a “uey” or “uie”, make a u-turn, make a 180.

124 Wrinkled fruit : UGLI

The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine that was first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

125 “To Live and Die ___” : IN LA

“To Live and Die in L.A.” is a novel written by Gerald Petievich, a former Secret Service agent. The book was made into a pretty successful 1985 film starring William L. Petersen, the former lead from TV’s “CSI”. Petersen plays the good guy, and Willem Dafoe the bad guy. The plot is all about a pair of Secret Service agents tracking down a counterfeiter. I haven’t seen the film, but it’s on my list …

126 Wichita-to-Omaha dir. : NNE

Wichita, Kansas started out as a trading post established by Jesse Chisholm in the 1860s, a stopover on the famous Chisholm Trail. Wichita became one of the railheads on the Chisholm Trail, the end point of many cattle drives from Texas. As such, Wichita earned the nickname “Cowtown”.

Omaha is the largest city in the state of Nebraska. It is located on the Missouri River, about 10 miles north of the mouth of the Platte River. When Nebraska was still a territory Omaha was its capital, but when Nebraska achieved statehood the capital was moved to the city of Lincoln.

127 Christie’s event : ART SALE

Christie’s is an auction house based in London, the largest auction house in the world. The business was founded in 1766 by James Christie.

128 Start of a Guinness record : MOST …

“The Guinness Book of World Records” holds some records of its own. It is the best-selling, copyrighted series of books of all time and is one of the books most often stolen from public libraries! The book was first published in 1954 by two twins, Norris and Ross McWhirter. The McWhirter twins found themselves with a smash hit, and eventually became very famous in Britain hosting a TV show based on world records.

130 Our sun : SOL

Sol was the Roman god personifying the sun.

Down

1 Pullers of Artemis’s chariot : DEER

Artemis was an ancient Greek goddess, and the equivalent of the Roman goddess Diana. Artemis was also a daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo. Among other things, she was the goddess of the hunt, and so often is depicted carrying a bow and arrows.

2 Georgia of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” : ENGEL

Georgia Engel was a very funny comedy actress who is best known for playing Georgette Baxter, wife of Ted Baxter, on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. Engel’s father was a vice admiral in the Coast Guard, and her sister was Miss Hawaii for 1967.

4 Antiterrorism law : PATRIOT ACT

The USA PATRIOT Act was signed into law in 2001 soon after the September 11th terrorist attacks. The name of the act is actually an acronym, standing for “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism”.

7 Bad records to have : RAP SHEETS

A rap sheet is a criminal record. “Rap” is a slang term dating back to the 1700s that means “blame, responsibility” as in “to take the rap”, “bad rap” and “to beat the rap”. This usage morphed into “rap sheet” in the early 1900s.

8 Company that makes products that suck : DYSON

Dyson vacuum cleaners do not use a bag to collect dust. James Dyson invented the first vacuum cleaner to use cyclonic separation in 1979, frustrated at the poor performance of his regular vacuum cleaner. As Dyson cleaners do not use bags, they don’t have to deal with collection bags that are blocked with fine dust particles, even after emptying. Cyclonic separation uses high speed spinning of the dust-containing air so that the dust particles are thrown out of the airflow into a collection bin. We have a Dyson now, and should have bought it years ago …

9 Streaming media device : ROKU

Roku is a manufacturer of digital media players that allow access to audio and video programming over the Internet that is shown on television. Roku was founded in Los Gatos, California in 2002 by Anthony Wood. Wood chose the company name “Roku” as it is the Japanese word for “six”, and Roku is the sixth company that Wood founded.

12 Prince in “The Little Mermaid” : ERIC

“The Little Mermaid” is a 1989 animated feature from Disney that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale of the same name. It tells the story of a mermaid princess named Ariel who falls in love with the human Prince Eric. Ariel’s father is chief merman King Triton. Her best friend is Flounder, who despite his name is not a flounder at all and is actually a tropical fish. Ariel is also friends with Sebastian, a red Jamaican crab whose full name is Horatio Thelonious Ignacious Crustaceous Sebastian.

14 Dress (up) : TOG

The verb “to tog up”, meaning “to dress up”, comes from the Latin “toga” describing the garment worn in ancient Rome. “Tog” can also be used as an informal word for a coat or a cloak. Back in Ireland, togs are what we call swimming shorts.

17 Pooh creator : MILNE

Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author who is best known for his delightful “Winnie-the-Pooh” series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin’s real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

18 Formal lament : ELEGY

Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, which he completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:

  • Celestial fire
  • Far from the Madding Crowd
  • Kindred spirit

38 Letters before “.gov” : IRS

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was set up during the Civil War to raise money to cover war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, the government was funded by levies on trade and property.

39 Island neighbor of Guadeloupe : ST KITTS

Saint Kitts is the more familiar name for Saint Christopher Island in the West Indies. Saint Kitts, along with the neighboring island of Nevis, is part of the country known as the Federation of Saint Kitts and Nevis. Saint Kitts has had a troubled history, with the Spanish, British and French all vying for control of the island. Most of the population today is descended from slaves brought onto Saint Kitts to farm tobacco and then sugar cane. Most of the slaves were from Africa, although Irish and Scottish slaves were also used.

Guadeloupe is an island in the Caribbean, and is one of the Leeward Islands. It is an overseas department of France, and as such is part of the European Union.

41 ___ Ingalls Wilder, author of “Little House on the Prairie” : LAURA

Laura Ingalls Wilder was an author from Pepin, Wisconsin who is best remembered for her “Little House” series of children’s novels. The series was based on her own childhood in a pioneer family that moved from Wisconsin to Kansas and back again.

42 Second person? : EVE

According to the Bible, Eve was created as Adam’s companion by God, creating her from Adam’s rib.

44 State in both the Mountain and Pacific time zones: Abbr. : IDA

The US state of Idaho has a panhandle that extends northwards between Washington and Montana, right up to the border with Canada. Across that border is the Canadian province of British Columbia. Most of Idaho is in the Mountain Time Zone, but Northern Idaho (the Panhandle) is in the Pacific Time Zone.

46 Locke who was called “The Father of the Harlem Renaissance” : ALAIN

“Harlem Renaissance” is the term used to describe a cultural movement in the 1920s that was known at the time as the “New Negro Movement”. The movement involved new cultural expression by African Americans that was centered mainly in urban areas in the northeast and midwest, and that was especially vibrant in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood.

47 Brexit exiter : THE UK

The UK held a referendum in June 2016 in which 52% of voters chose to leave the European Union (EU). The term “Brexit” was used for the vote, a portmanteau of “Britain” and “exit”. The vote led to some debate about the future of the UK. The Scottish electorate voted for the UK to stay in the EU, and so that revived speculation about Scotland leaving the UK. There is also some discussion about Northern Ireland’s future in the UK, as the Northern Irish electorate also voted to stay in the EU.

48 Actress Swinton : TILDA

Tilda Swinton is an English actress, and someone quite famous in her native land. Swinton made a big name for herself outside the UK when she played the “baddie” in the 2007 movie “Michael Clayton”, opposite the “goodie” played by George Clooney.

55 Runner in Pamplona : TORO

Pamplona, Spain is famous for its San Fermin festival held in July every year, the highlight of which is the Running of the Bulls. Every year, 200-300 people are injured in the bull run, and 15 people have been killed since 1910. If you get to Pamplona two days before the Running of the Bulls, you can see the animal-rights protest event known as the Running of the Nudes. The protesters are as naked as the bulls …

57 One side of Mount Everest : NEPAL

Nepal lies to the northeast of India. Today, the state is known as the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. In 2008, the Communist Party of Nepal won the country’s general election. Soon after, the Assembly voted to change the form of government, moving away from a monarchy and creating a secular republic.

Mount Everest was named by the Royal Geographical Society in 1865. The peak is named for Welsh surveyor George Everest, who had served as Surveyor General of India from 1830 through 1843. Everest actually objected initially to the use of his name, given that he had nothing to do with the peak’s discovery, and given that he believed “Everest” was difficult to write and to pronounce in Hindi.

64 Relative of a xylophone : MARIMBA

A marimba is a musical instrument that is somewhat like a large xylophone. The marimba originated in Mexico.

The glockenspiel and xylophone are similar instruments, the main difference being the material from which the keys are made. Xylophone keys are made from wood, and glockenspiel keys are made from metal.

66 End-of-the-week expression : TGIF

“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

68 Whitney Houston hit “___ Nothing” : I HAVE

Whitney Houston was the only singer to have a run of seven consecutive Billboard number-one hits. Houston’s recording of the wonderful Dolly Parton song “I Will Always Love You”, from the soundtrack of 1992’s “The Bodyguard”, is the best-selling single for a female artist in the history of recorded music. Houston died at the age of 48 in 2012, drowning in her bathtub.

71 ___ soda : SAL

Sodium carbonate is a well known as a water softener sold for use in laundry, and is variously described as Sal Soda, Washing Soda and Soda Crystals.

73 Brief glimpse of a star : CAMEO

Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to play himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning it’s easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

76 Slow, musically : LENTO

A lento passage is a piece of music that has a slow tempo. “Lento” is Italian for “slow”.

85 Star of “Your Show of Shows” of 1950s TV : SID CAESAR

Sid Caesar achieved fame in the fifties on TV’s “Your Show of Shows”. To be honest, I know Sid Caesar mainly from the very entertaining film version of the musical “Grease”, in which he played Coach Calhoun.

95 Screening org. : TSA

Transportation Security Administration (TSA)

98 Subject of the 2006 documentary “When the Levees Broke” : KATRINA

“When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts” is a documentary by Spike Lee that was released in 2006. The film explores the devastation of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.

106 Home planet of Ming the Merciless : MONGO

In the “Flash Gordon” comic strip, the main bad guy is Ming the Merciless, the evil emperor who rules the planet Mongo. Ming has been around quite a while, first appearing in print way back in 1934.

109 Gird (oneself) : STEEL

The phrase “gird your loins” dates back to ancient Rome. The expression describes the action of lifting “one’s skirts” and tying them between the legs to allow more freedom of movement before going into battle. Nowadays, “gird your loins” (or sometimes just “gird yourself”) is a metaphor for “prepare yourself for the worst”.

112 ___ Park, home of Facebook : MENLO

Menlo Park is a town in the San Francisco Bay Area. The town was built around land previously owned by two Irish immigrants. The pair called their property “Menlo Park”, naming it for Menlo in County Galway, which is where the Irishmen came from.

If you’ve seen the movie “The Social Network”, you might remember that Facebook started off as “Facemash”, a site created by Mark Zuckerberg while he was attending Harvard. Facemash became “Thefacebook” and membership was opened to students beyond Harvard, initially including Ivy League schools and then most colleges across North America.

114 “M*A*S*H” actress Loretta : SWIT

Loretta Swit started playing Major “Hot Lips” Houlihan on “M*A*S*H” in 1972. She and Alan Alda were the only actors who appeared in both the pilot and the series finale. Swit has written a book on needlepoint, would you believe? It’s called “A Needlepoint Scrapbook”.

117 Spanish youngster : NINO

In Spanish a boy is a “niño” or a “muchacho”. One can also call an adult male a “muchacho”, as in “one of the boys”. Calling an adult male a “niño” would be an insult.

118 Neophyte: Var. : TIRO

A tyro (also “tiro”) is a beginner or a novice. “Tyro” comes into English from Latin, in which language “tiro” means “recruit”.

A neophyte is a recent convert to a particular doctrine or practice.

121 Cassis cocktail : KIR

Kir is a French cocktail made by adding a teaspoon or so of crème de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to a glass, and then topping it off with white wine. The drink is named after Felix Kir, the Mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who used to offer the drink to his guests. My wife is particularly fond of a variant called a Kir Royale, in which the white wine is replaced with champagne.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Feeling of hopelessness : DESPAIR
8 Julius Erving, to fans : DR J
11 Calendar abbr. that’s also a French number : SEPT
15 “Your choice – him ___” : OR ME
19 Early online encyclopedia : ENCARTA
20 “___-hoo!” : YOO
21 The Powerpuff Girls, e.g. : TRIO
22 Fantasy author Gaiman : NEIL
23 Going MY way? : EGO TRIP
24 What’s up? : SKY
25 Wagner opus : RING CYCLE
27 “Stop rolling sevens!”? : REPRESS YOUR LUCK
30 Southeast Asian ethnic group : HMONG
31 Princess in a galaxy far, far away : LEIA
32 Lady bird : HEN
33 Org. in charge of Tokyo 2020 : IOC
34 Suffix with expert : -ISE
36 “Oy ___!” : VEY
37 Bay window : ORIEL
39 Home of Mount Rushmore: Abbr. : SDAK
40 Bobby of the Black Panthers : SEALE
42 Spew out : EMIT
45 Build rapport like a presidential candidate? : RELATE TO THE PARTY
50 “Livin’ la ___ Loca” : VIDA
51 Celery unit : STALK
52 “Hmm, that’s odd!” : HUH!
53 Dance craze of the early 2010s : DOUGIE
54 Right on : EXACT
56 Spot for a laundromat? : STAIN
58 Color akin to cyan : TEAL
60 Anger : RILE
61 Word with pop or crop : TOP
63 Subject of gossip : ITEM
65 Dance class garments : UNITARDS
67 Matter of survival : AIR
70 Hate getting ready to move? : RESENT PACKING
74 ___-di-dah : LAH
75 Children’s book made into a 2012 3-D animated film : THE LORAX
77 Singer Bareilles : SARA
78 Grunts : GIS
80 Tempo : PACE
81 Ran : FLED
83 Fancy rides : LIMOS
86 Cy Young Award winner Hernandez : FELIX
90 Requite : AVENGE
92 Board pick : CEO
94 Kind of scholarship : MERIT
96 Dunce cap, basically : CONE
97 Makes friends while working retail? : RESTOCKS AND BONDS
100 Accepts responsibility for : OWNS
101 “More or less” : SORTA
102 Model and TV host Banks : TYRA
103 Billionaire Carl : ICAHN
105 Trickster : IMP
107 Understood : GOT
108 Today, to José : HOY
109 Train schedule abbr. : STA
110 Dutch cheese town : EDAM
113 This may be at the end of one’s rope : NOOSE
115 Event planner’s post-banquet task? : RETURN THE TABLES
120 Winter athlete, not a summer one : SNOW SKIER
122 Turnabout : UIE
123 Where first tracks are found : SIDE ONE
124 Wrinkled fruit : UGLI
125 “To Live and Die ___” : IN LA
126 Wichita-to-Omaha dir. : NNE
127 Christie’s event : ART SALE
128 Start of a Guinness record : MOST …
129 Rough talk? : RASP
130 Our sun : SOL
131 Cheer on : ROOT FOR

Down

1 Pullers of Artemis’s chariot : DEER
2 Georgia of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” : ENGEL
3 Extent : SCOPE
4 Antiterrorism law : PATRIOT ACT
5 Unpaid debt : ARREAR
6 “Indeed” : IT IS
7 Bad records to have : RAP SHEETS
8 Company that makes products that suck : DYSON
9 Streaming media device : ROKU
10 Thrill-seeker’s action : JOYRIDE
11 Utterly failed : STRUCK OUT
12 Prince in “The Little Mermaid” : ERIC
13 Like medium-rare steak : PINKISH
14 Dress (up) : TOG
15 Ending with pseud- or syn- : -ONYM
16 Young woman to call when your data gets deleted? : RECOVER GIRL
17 Pooh creator : MILNE
18 Formal lament : ELEGY
26 Miser, colloquially : CHEAPO
28 Berate : YELL AT
29 Reluctant (to) : LOATH
35 Baby plant : SEEDLING
38 Letters before “.gov” : IRS
39 Island neighbor of Guadeloupe : ST KITTS
41 ___ Ingalls Wilder, author of “Little House on the Prairie” : LAURA
42 Second person? : EVE
43 Be sociable : MIX
44 State in both the Mountain and Pacific time zones: Abbr. : IDA
46 Locke who was called “The Father of the Harlem Renaissance” : ALAIN
47 Brexit exiter : THE UK
48 Actress Swinton : TILDA
49 “Ooh, that’s bad!” : YEESH!
55 Runner in Pamplona : TORO
57 One side of Mount Everest : NEPAL
59 What many Latin plurals end in : -ANI
62 “Bull’s-eye!” : PERFECTO!
64 Relative of a xylophone : MARIMBA
66 End-of-the-week expression : TGIF
67 For face value : AT PAR
68 Whitney Houston hit “___ Nothing” : I HAVE
69 Places to swim during school? : RECESS POOLS
71 ___ soda : SAL
72 Suits : EXECS
73 Brief glimpse of a star : CAMEO
76 Slow, musically : LENTO
79 Runner-up : SECOND BEST
82 Car with faulty brakes, e.g. : DEATH TRAP
84 Study of birds: Abbr. : ORNITH
85 Star of “Your Show of Shows” of 1950s TV : SID CAESAR
87 Way down : LOW
88 Travel stop : INN
89 Deletes, with “out” : XES
91 Canyons : GORGES
93 “The joke’s ___!” : ON YOU
95 Screening org. : TSA
98 Subject of the 2006 documentary “When the Levees Broke” : KATRINA
99 Rehearsals : DRY RUNS
104 Move in the direction of : HEAD TO
105 “Overall …” : IN SUM …
106 Home planet of Ming the Merciless : MONGO
109 Gird (oneself) : STEEL
111 “Half ___ is better …” : A LOAF
112 ___ Park, home of Facebook : MENLO
114 “M*A*S*H” actress Loretta : SWIT
116 Wrigglers : EELS
117 Spanish youngster : NINO
118 Neophyte: Var. : TIRO
119 Visionary : SEER
121 Cassis cocktail : KIR

7 thoughts on “0223-20 NY Times Crossword 23 Feb 20, Sunday”

  1. 1:12:54 no errors….I was moving along pretty well until the NE corner really slowed me down….How many knew 30A or 53A ?
    There were several clues that IMO should have stated abbr. but that’s just me

  2. 32:19, no errors. Have heard of HMONG, but the entry only came to mind after ONYM, MILNE & ELEGY were filled. DOUGIE was a complete unknown, filled by crosses but only SEEDLING and LAURA were sure things at that point. 48D started out as Helga, until UNITARDS gave me the ‘D’. Then switched to either Hilda or Gilda. PARTY finally gave me the ‘T’.

  3. Fairly straight forward, so no errors. Fortunately, I had no no
    one-letter curve balls that usually stunt a complete effort. Nice, though, after my O-fer- two Friday and Saturday.

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