0328-19 NY Times Crossword 28 Mar 19, Thursday

Constructed by: Damon Gulczynski
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Give Me Some Space

Themed clues require the insertion of a SPACE in order to make sense:

  • 64A Request needed to understand four clues in this puzzle : GIVE ME SOME SPACE
  • 17A Tome : FROM WHERE I STAND (To me)
  • 30A Often : DECIMAL (Of ten)
  • 37A Notable : POWERLESS (Not able)
  • 49A Goon : PERSIST (Go on)

Bill’s time: 11m 09s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 Fivers : ABES

The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Abraham Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

9 Nickname for Cleveland Browns fans : DAWGS

The Cleveland Browns football team was a charter member of the All-American Football Conference, formed in 1946. Cleveland is the only NFL city that has never hosted nor sent a team to the Super Bowl.

16 World Golf Hall-of-Famer Lorena : OCHOA

Lorena Ochoa is a retired professional golfer from Mexico who was ranked as the number one female golfer in the world from 2007 to 2010.

20 Like Guinness : IRISH

Guinness is the most popular beer sold in Ireland. The beer is a stout and has that famous creamy white head, a result of mixing the beer with nitrogen as it is poured. You can also buy Guinness that has no nitrogen, which is sold in bottles bearing the the name Guinness Export. This carbonated version of the beer has a very different taste, and is my personal favorite …

21 Dandies : FOPS

A dandy is a man who is overly fastidious with regard to his personal appearance. There’s a suggestion that the term originated in Scotland, where “Dandy” is a diminutive of the name “Andrew”. Back in the early 1800s, when the use of “dandy” was at its height, the female equivalent was a dandizette.

22 Editorial override : STET

“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

23 Down Under predator : DINGO

The dingo is a wild dog of Australia. It is thought to have originated from domesticated dogs that were brought to Australia with humans that settled the land centuries ago.

26 Court org. – or a former court org. : ABA

American Bar Association (ABA) – or American Basketball Association (ABA)

27 D.C. summer setting : EDT

Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)

41 Give a raw deal : SHAFT

“Shafted” isn’t a nice term at all. Someone who has been shafted has been given a raw deal. The term arose in the fifties, playing on the vulgar slang usage of shaft to represent the male organ (a usage that has been around since the early 1700s). The use of the verb “shaft” is a reference to sodomy. As I said, not nice …

45 Nashville landmark, familiarly : OPRY

The Grand Ole Opry started out as a radio show in 1925 originally called the WSM “Barn Dance”. In 1927, the “Barn Dance” radio show was broadcast in a slot after an NBC production called “Musical Appreciation Hour”, a collection of classical works including Grand Opera. In a December show, the host of “Barn Dance” announced, “For the past hour, we have been listening to music taken largely from Grand Opera. From now on we will present the ‘Grand Ole Opry'”. That name was used for the radio show from then on.

The Tennessee city of Nashville was founded in 1779 near a stockade in the Cumberland River valley called Fort Nashborough. Both the settlement and the fort were named for General Francis Nash, a war hero who died in combat during the American Revolution.

52 Goose egg : ZIP

The use of the phrase “goose egg” to mean “zero” is baseball slang that dates back to the 1860s. The etymology is as expected: the numeral zero and a goose egg are both large and round.

54 Issa of “Insecure” : RAE

Issa Rae is a Stanford University graduate who created a YouTube web series called “Awkward Black Girl”. Rae also plays the title role in the series, a young lady named “J”. “Awkward Black Girl” was adapted into an HBO comedy-drama called “Insecure”, in which Issa Rae stars.

55 Boston Garden legend Bobby : ORR

Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking. While still 31 years old, in 1979, Orr became the youngest person inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Boston Garden was an arena that opened in 1928, closed in 1995, and was demolished in 1995. “The Garden” hosted home games for the NBA’s Boston Celtics and the NHL’s Boston Bruins.

56 See 51-Down : SKOAL
(51D Says “56-Across!,” for example : TOASTS)

“Skoal” is a Swedish and Norwegian toast that has roots in the old Norse word “skaal” meaning “cup”.

The tradition of toasting someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

58 They can carry a tune : IPODS

The iPod is Apple’s signature line of portable media players. The iPod first hit the market in 2001 with a hard drive-based device, now known as the iPod Classic. Later models all use flash memory, allowing a smaller form factor. The smallest of the flash-based models is the iPod Shuffle, which was introduced in 2005.

60 Crime film genre : NOIR

The expression “film noir” has French origins, but only in that it was coined by a French critic in describing a style of Hollywood film. The term, meaning “black film” in French, was first used by Nino Frank in 1946. Film noir often applies to a movie with a melodramatic plot and a private eye or detective at its center. Good examples would be “The Big Sleep” and “D.O.A”.

62 Noah Webster’s alma mater : YALE

Not only is Noah Webster’s name inextricably linked with his series of dictionaries, but he is also renowned as an advocate for English spelling reform. He argued that “traditional” English is hard to learn, and that it should be simplified and standardized (instead of “standardised”). He published spelling books that were used in schools, and from edition to edition he changed the spelling of words in order to simplify the language. Examples are the use of “s” over “c” in words like “defense” (in Ireland we have defence and defense depending on usage), “-re” became “-er” as in center instead of centre (reversing the influence of French), and he dropped one of the Ls in words like traveler (I learned “traveller”). Mind you, he also spelled “tongue” as “tung”, but he didn’t get very far with that one.

68 One of Thanos’s foes in the Avengers movies : THOR

The Avengers are a team of superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. The original lineup, which dates back to 1963, consisted of Ant-Man, Hulk, Iron Man, Thor and the Wasp. Soon after their formation, the Avengers rescued Captain America trapped in ice, and thereafter he joined the team. There is a 2012 movie called “The Avengers” that features Iron Man, Captain America, Hulk and Thor.

69 Vet school subj. : ANAT

Anatomy (anat.)

70 It may have a big mouth : DELTA

A river delta is a triangular landform at the mouth of a river created by the deposition of sediment. The Nile Delta in Northern Egypt is one of the world’s largest river deltas, and covers 150 miles of coastline on the Mediterranean. The most famous “delta” in the United States isn’t actually a delta at all. The Mississippi Delta is an alluvial plain that lies 300 miles north of the river’s actual delta, yet it is known as the “Mississippi River Delta”. Very confusing …

71 ___ souci (carefree) : SANS

“Sans souci” is a French term that translates literally as “without worry”, so we use it to mean “carefree”.

Down

1 One who doesn’t believe : INFIDEL

“Infidel” is an English word that was coined by the Roman Catholic Church to describe someone who did not believe in the Catholic dogma. The word comes from Latin “infidelis” meaning “unfaithful”. During the time of the Crusades, the term “infidel” was used for any non-Christian, and particular the Saracens of North Africa.

2 Subject of Hemingway’s “Death in the Afternoon” : CORRIDA

Spanish bullfighting is known locally as “corrida de toros”, literally “race of bulls”.

“Death in the Afternoon” is a 1932 non-fiction book by Ernest Hemingway about bullfighting. He was a fan …

4 Label on some packages of jerky : NO MSG

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn’t be in our food …

Jerky is meat that has been trimmed of fat and dried. The term “jerky” comes into English via Spanish from the Incan Quechua “ch’arki” meaning “dried flesh”.

6 Sexy, muscular man : BEEFCAKE

It’s not really clear how the “cheesecake” came to be used for a provocative picture of a woman. It is known that the term arose in the 1930s, and originally applied to to the covers of pulp magazines that used the images of the attractive young females to attract a largely male audience. One theory is that during the depression years, the luscious cheesecake dessert was unattainable, as were the “luscious” models depicted on the magazine covers. The male equivalent of “cheesecake” is “beefcake”.

7 Gaffe : ERROR

Our word “gaffe”, meaning a social blunder, comes from the French “gaffe” meaning “clumsy remark”, although it originally was the word for a boat hook. The exact connection between a boat hook and a blunder seems to be unclear.

9 Bobs and bouffants : DOS

A bob cut is a short hairstyle in which the hair is cut straight around the head, at about the line of the jaw. Back in the 1570s, “bob” was the name given to a horse’s tail that was cut short, and about a century later it was being used to describe short hair on humans. The style became very popular with women in the early 1900s (as worn by actress Clara Bow, for example), with the fashion dying out in the thirties. The style reemerged in the sixties around the time the Beatles introduced their “mop tops”, with Vidal Sassoon leading the way in styling women’s hair in a bob cut again. Personally, I like it …

“Bouffant” is a French word meaning “puffed out” that we’ve imported into English. Apparently, the first use of “bouffant” with reference to a hairstyle dates back to 1955.

11 Common riddle ending : WHAT AM I?

Here are a few riddles:

  1. Imagine you are in a dark room. How do you get out?
  2. What can travel around the world while staying in a corner?
  3. There is a word and six letters it contains. Take one away and twelve is what remains. What word is it?
  4. Two girls were born to the same mother, on the same day, at the same time, in the same month and year and yet they’re not twins. How can this be?
  5. What is so delicate that even saying its name will break it?
  6. What word in the English Language is always spelled incorrectly?

And the answers:

  1. Stop imagining.
  2. A stamp
  3. Dozens
  4. They’re in a set of triplets
  5. Silence
  6. Incorrectly

25 Banned pollutants : PCBS

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were banned with good reason. Apart from their link to cancer and other disorders in humans and animals, they are extremely persistent in the environment once contamination has occurred. Among other things, PCBs were used as coolants and insulating fluids in electrical gear such as transformers and large capacitors, as well as a transfer agent in carbonless copy paper.

33 Nos. at the beach : SPFS

In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

35 Watergate-___ : ERA

The Watergate scandal is so named because it involved a break-in at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters in the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. The Watergate complex is made up of five units, three of which are apartment buildings, one an office building, and one a hotel-office building (which housed the DNC headquarters). Watergate led to the “-gate” suffix being used for many subsequent scandals, such as “Irangate”, “Bridgegate” and “Deflategate”.

38 ___ and Carla (1960s R&B duo) : OTIS

The 1960s duo Otis & Carla was made up of Otis Redding and Carla Thomas. The duo’s most celebrated album is 1967’s “King & Queen”.

39 Tina Fey’s role on “30 Rock” : LIZ LEMON

“30 Rock” is a sitcom on NBC that was created by the show’s star Tina Fey. Fey plays an ex-performer and writer from “Saturday Night Live” and uses her experiences on that show as a basis for the “30 Rock” storyline. Fey plays Liz Lemon, the head writer for the fictional sketch comedy series “TGS with Tracy Jordan”.

40 “The Book of ___” (2010 film) : ELI

2010’s “The Book of Eli” is one of those “end of the world” movies, with Denzel Washington playing a tough guy traveling across what is left of the United States after some apocryphal event.

41 Cadged : SPONGED

To cadge is to get something by begging.

42 Wonder Woman, for one : HEROINE

The superhero Wonder Woman first appeared in print in 1941, in a publication from DC Comics. As she was created during WWII, Wonder Woman’s first foes were the axis powers. In the less realistic world her biggest foe was and still is Ares, a “baddie” named for the Greek mythological figure. Wonder Woman had several signature expressions, including “Merciful Minerva!”, “Suffering Sappho!” and “Great Hera!”. She also has several devices that she uses in her quest for justice, e.g. the Lasso of Truth, a pair of indestructible bracelets and a tiara that can be used as a deadly projectile. Wonder Woman uses the name “Diana Prince” when “out of uniform”.

46 Barbecue griller’s purchase : PROPANE

Propane is a gas with the formula C3H8. It is an abundant byproduct of the refining of petroleum and is used as a fuel. The gas liquefies readily under pressure, and is usually transported in pressurized containers. However, the containers of “propane” that we purchase in stores is actually a mixture of propane and butane, usually in the ratio of about 50:50.

50 Terrier type : SKYE

The Skye terrier is a breed of dog that is actually under threat of extinction. A few years ago, there were only 30 Skye terriers born in the breed’s native land of the UK. The breed was named for the Isle of Skye in Scotland.

53 Card count : PIPS

A pip is a dot on a die or a domino, or a mark on a playing card.

59 Cocoon dwellers : PUPAE

A pupa is a stage in the life of some insects. All four stages are embryo, larva, pupa and imago. Pupae can look like little dolls, hence the name. “Pupa” is the Latin for “doll”.

61 Geom. figure : RECT

Rectangle (rect.)

65 N.Y.C. subway letters : MTA

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has public transportation responsibility in the state of New York (as well as part of Connecticut). “MTA” might also refer to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which is known as “the Metro” and sometimes “the MTA”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Volunteer’s offer : I CAN
5 Fivers : ABES
9 Nickname for Cleveland Browns fans : DAWGS
14 Talking in a movie theater, e.g. : NO-NO
15 Withered : SERE
16 World Golf Hall-of-Famer Lorena : OCHOA
17 Tome : FROM WHERE I STAND (To me)
20 Like Guinness : IRISH
21 Dandies : FOPS
22 Editorial override : STET
23 Down Under predator : DINGO
24 Unsavory sort : CREEP
26 Court org. – or a former court org. : ABA
27 D.C. summer setting : EDT
28 Palindromic girl’s name : ADA
30 Often : DECIMAL (Of ten)
32 Bonny miss : LASS
34 Barely manage, with “out” : EKE
36 It’s generally not played so much : B-SIDE
37 Notable : POWERLESS (Not able)
41 Give a raw deal : SHAFT
44 Have a bug : AIL
45 Nashville landmark, familiarly : OPRY
49 Goon : PERSIST (Go on)
52 Goose egg : ZIP
54 Issa of “Insecure” : RAE
55 Boston Garden legend Bobby : ORR
56 See 51-Down : SKOAL
58 They can carry a tune : IPODS
60 Crime film genre : NOIR
62 Noah Webster’s alma mater : YALE
63 Star ___ : PUPIL
64 Request needed to understand four clues in this puzzle : GIVE ME SOME SPACE
67 Pass : ENACT
68 One of Thanos’s foes in the Avengers movies : THOR
69 Vet school subj. : ANAT
70 It may have a big mouth : DELTA
71 ___ souci (carefree) : SANS
72 Popular bait for catching striped bass : EELS

Down

1 One who doesn’t believe : INFIDEL
2 Subject of Hemingway’s “Death in the Afternoon” : CORRIDA
3 Rubs oil on : ANOINTS
4 Label on some packages of jerky : NO MSG
5 Pale wood : ASH
6 Sexy, muscular man : BEEFCAKE
7 Gaffe : ERROR
8 Oozed : SEEPED
9 Bobs and bouffants : DOS
10 Doesn’t sit idly by : ACTS
11 Common riddle ending : WHAT AM I?
12 Spoiled : GONE BAD
13 Tear-jerker : SAD TALE
18 Cry of surprise : WHOA!
19 “Got it” : I SEE
25 Banned pollutants : PCBS
29 Frost relative : DEW
31 Childish retort : IS SO!
33 Nos. at the beach : SPFS
35 Watergate-___ : ERA
38 ___ and Carla (1960s R&B duo) : OTIS
39 Tina Fey’s role on “30 Rock” : LIZ LEMON
40 “The Book of ___” (2010 film) : ELI
41 Cadged : SPONGED
42 Wonder Woman, for one : HEROINE
43 Big news regarding extraterrestrials : ARRIVAL
46 Barbecue griller’s purchase : PROPANE
47 Moderate’s opposite : RADICAL
48 “We totally should!” : YES, LET’S!
50 Terrier type : SKYE
51 Says “56-Across!,” for example : TOASTS
53 Card count : PIPS
57 Kind of shirt : ALOHA
59 Cocoon dwellers : PUPAE
61 Geom. figure : RECT
65 N.Y.C. subway letters : MTA
66 Hems and haws : ERS

12 thoughts on “0328-19 NY Times Crossword 28 Mar 19, Thursday”

  1. 33:50. I got the theme early enough. There were a lot of LIZ LEMON type answers I didn’t know. I also didn’t know the word “cadged”. Good one.

    Best –

  2. 50:02 two errors…..64 across really only applies to 17A where to and me are separated….all of the off the wall clues are jammed into the middle bottom.
    IMO not an enjoyable puzzle

    1. I’m not sure what you mean. In 17A, the clue “Tome” has to be interpreted as “To me”. Similarly, in 30A, “Often” has to be interpreted as “Of ten”; in 30A, “Notable” has to be interpreted as “Not able; and, in 49A, “Goon” has to be interpreted as “Go on”. The answer for 64A applies to all of them.

  3. I always enjoy attacking the theme first so I went after 64A. Tough slog. Really stymied on Skoal/Toast cross but finally broke thru at 30 min.
    Big help to split the remaining theme clues into two words and finished up in another 17 min. Love Thursdays.
    Wish there was a Thursday only book.

  4. 17:26, 3 errors: LI(N) LEMON; (N)I(L); (L)IPS. Entered NIL first; never watched ’30 Rock’, so LIN looked ok. Probably should have caught LIPS, but didn’t proofread well enough.

  5. I had the puzzle all worked without any errors when I went back to figure out the theme. After a minute or two it dawned on me. I had to pick out the four answers that made no sense and then try to decipher what was unique about the clue. I really doubt that if I had had the theme early on that it would have helped. All in all, it took a pretty concentrated effort today to finish this one.

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