0312-19 NY Times Crossword 12 Mar 19, Tuesday

Constructed by: Jules Markey
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Button-Down

Themed answers are each in the DOWN-direction, and each starts with a type of BUTTON:

  • 30A Very conventional … or a hint to the starts of the answers to the four starred clues : BUTTON-DOWN
  • 3A *Bo-o-o-ring event : SNOOZEFEST (giving “snooze button”)
  • 6A *Go order a drink : BELLY UP TO THE BAR (giving “belly button”)
  • 9A *Flop sweat producer : PANIC ATTACK (giving “panic button”)
  • 24A *Scoffing remark to an ignoramus : LIKE YOU KNOW (giving “like button”)

Bill’s time: 7m 23s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

13 Some Dairy Queen orders : CONES

Soft serve ice cream was developed by John McCullough in 1938. McCullough was able to get his new dessert carried by a local ice cream store in Illinois. He and the store owner became so swamped with sales that they opened a store specifically built around the product in Joliet, Illinois, hence creating the first Dairy Queen outlet. There are now over 5,700 Dairy Queen franchises in 19 countries. We’ve even got one in Ireland …

14 Frequent Andrew Wyeth model : HELGA

Andrew Wyeth was known as a realist painter and “the painter of the people” in recognition of his popularity with the man in the street. His neighbor, Helga Testorf, posed for a total of 247 paintings over a 14 year period, a series known as “The Helga Pictures”. The remarkable thing is that neither Wyeth’s wife nor Testorf’s husband knew anything about the portrait sessions or the paintings.

19 Some Siouans : OTOS

The Otoe (also “Oto”) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestward, ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

21 Runaway best-selling Apple products of the 2000s : IPODS

The iPod is Apple’s signature line of portable media players. The iPod first hit the market in 2001 with a hard drive-based device, now known as the iPod Classic. Later models all use flash memory, allowing a smaller form factor. The smallest of the flash-based models is the iPod Shuffle, which was introduced in 2005.

23 Pince-___ (style of glasses) : NEZ

Pince-nez are eyeglasses clipped to the bridge of the nose. “Pince-nez” is French, and translates as “pinch the nose”.

24 ___ Godiva : LADY

In the legend of Lady Godiva, the noblewoman rode naked through the streets of Coventry in England, basically as a dare from her husband in return for relieving the taxes of his tenants. Lady Godiva issued instructions that all the town’s inhabitants should stay indoors while she made her journey. However, a tailor in the town named Tom disobeyed the instructions by boring holes in the shutters on his windows, and “peeped”. As a result, Peeping Tom was struck blind, and the term “peeping Tom” has been in our language ever since.

26 Utopian : EDENIC

The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More for his book “Utopia” published in 1516 describing an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More’s use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek “ou” meaning “not” and “topos” meaning “place”. By calling his perfect island “Not Place”, More was apparently making the point that he didn’t think that the ideal could actually exist.

34 Content of a bog : PEAT

When dead plant matter accumulates in marshy areas, it may not fully decay due to a lack of oxygen or acidic conditions. We are familiar with this in Ireland, because this decaying matter can form peat, and we have lots and lots of peat bogs around the country.

35 Western tribe member : UTE

The Ute are a group of Native American tribes who now reside in Utah and Colorado. The Ute were not a unified people as such, but rather a loose association of nomadic groups. The word “Ute” means “Land of the Sun”, and “Ute” also gave us the state name “Utah”.

36 Military operation that might last for months : SIEGE

Our word “siege” comes from a 13th century word for a “seat”. The military usage derives from the concept of a besieging force “sitting down” outside a fortress until it falls.

39 Largest moon of Saturn : TITAN

Titan is the largest moon of Saturn. Titan is unusual in many ways, including the fact that it is the only known satellite in the solar system that is has its own atmosphere (our own moon does not, for example). Titan is the second largest moon in the solar system, after Ganymede that orbits Jupiter. Titan is so large that it has a greater volume than Mercury, the solar system’s smallest planet.

41 Org. with a Form 1040 : IRS

Here in the US we can choose one of three main forms to file our tax returns. Form 1040 is known as the “long form”. Form 1040A is called the “short form”, and can be used by taxpayers with taxable income below $100,000 who don’t itemize deduction. Form 1040EZ is an even simpler version of the 1040, and can be used by those with taxable income less than $100,000 who take the standard deduction and who also have no dependents. Form 1040 was originally created just for tax returns from 1913, 1914 and 1915, but it’s a form that just keeps on giving, or should I say “taking” …?

42 Modern acronym for “seize the day” : YOLO

You only live once (YOLO)

“Carpe diem” is a quotation from Horace, one of Ancient Rome’s leading lyric poets. “Carpe diem” translates from Latin as “seize the day” or “enjoy the day”. The satirical motto of a procrastinator is “carpe mañana”, “translating” as “seize tomorrow”.

57 Website with crowdsourced reviews : YELP

yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

59 Bagel go-with : LOX

Lox is brine-cured salmon fillet that is finely sliced. The term “lox” comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

60 Bringer of rain : NIMBUS CLOUD

Nimbus clouds are rain clouds, with “nimbus” being the latin word for “cloud”. Some other types of cloud can take on the prefix nimbo- or suffix -nimbus, indicating that they are similar to that other cloud type but carry precipitation. So, a stratus cloud that has rain is called nimbostratus, and cumulus cloud with rain is called cumulonimbus.

63 The Cardinals, on scoreboards : ARI

The Arizona Cardinals were founded in 1898 as the Chicago Cardinals. That makes the Cardinals the oldest, continuously-run professional football team in the whole country.

64 Creator of a logical “razor” : OCCAM

Ockham’s Razor (also “Occam’s Razor”) is a principle in philosophy and science that basically states that the simplest explanation is usually the correct one. This explanation is a corollary to the more exact statement of the principle, that one shouldn’t needlessly use assumptions in explaining something. The principle is referred to as “lex parsimoniae” in Latin, or “the law of parsimony”. Parsimony is being thrifty with money or resources.

65 Bird in the flycatcher family : PEWEE

A pewee is a small bird, so called because of the “pee wee” sound that it makes.

Down

5 Happy ___ clam : AS A

Our phrase “happy as a clam” dates back to the mid-1600s. Back then it was a more lengthy expression: “happy as a clam in the mud at high tide”. The idea was that a clam would be happy in its muddy home at high tide, because no one from land could get to it and eat it.

6 *Go order a drink : BELLY UP TO THE BAR (giving “belly button”)

The navel is basically a scar left behind when the umbilical cord is removed from a newborn baby. One interesting use of the umbilicus (navel, belly button) is to differentiate between identical twins, especially when they are very young.

7 Fashion magazine with more than 40 international editions : ELLE

“Elle” magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. “Elle” is the French word for “she”. “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

8 Psyche part : EGO

Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the superego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The superego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

9 *Flop sweat producer : PANIC ATTACK (giving “panic button”)

The phrase “flop sweat” describes heavy perspiration caused by embarrassment. Originally from the world of theater, the term applied to perspiration caused the fear of a poor opening night, fear of a flop.

10 The “x” in Euler’s Identity – eiπ + 1 = x : ZERO

Leonhard Euler was a brilliant Swiss mathematician and physicist, and a pioneer in the fields of logarithms and graph theory. Euler’s eyesight deteriorated during his working life, and eventually became almost totally blind.

11 Gung-ho : AVID

“Kung ho” is a Chinese expression meaning “work together, cooperate”. The anglicized version “gung-ho” was adopted by a Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

17 Slight vestige : TRACE

We use the word “vestige” for a trace, mark or sign. The term comes from the Latin “vestigium” that also means trace, as well as footprint.

24 *Scoffing remark to an ignoramus : LIKE YOU KNOW (giving “like button”)

The insulting word “ignoramus”, describing an ignorant person, comes to us directly from Latin. The term translates from Latin as “we ignore”, the first person, plural tense of “ignorare”.

25 Old Turkish title : AGA

“Aga” (also “agha”) is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

30 Very conventional … or a hint to the starts of the answers to the four starred clues : BUTTON-DOWN

Something described figuratively as “button-down” is very conventional and unimaginative. The idea is that someone opting for a shirt with a button-down collar might be described as conventional.

31 H : ETA

Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

38 “Green Book” co-star Mahershala : ALI

Mahershala Ali is an actor and sometime rapper. Among the more memorable roles Ali has had are lobbyist Remy Danton in TV’s “House of Cards”, and Colonel Boggs in “The Hunger Games” series of movies. He also won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for playing Juan in the 2016 drama “Moonlight”.

44 Kvetches : CARPS

The word “carp” used to mean simply “talk” back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian “karpa” meaning “to brag”. A century later, the Latin word “carpere” meaning “to slander” influenced the use of “to carp” so that it came to mean “to find fault with”.

The word “kvetch” comes to us from Yiddish, with “kvetshn” meaning “to complain” or “squeeze”.

46 Jane ___, anonymous plaintiff : ROE

Though the English court system does not use the term today, “John Doe” first appeared as the “name of a person unknown” in England in 1659, along with the similar “Richard Roe”. An unknown female is referred to as “Jane Doe”. Variants of “John Doe” are “Joe Blow” and “John Q. Public”.

48 Transitioned : SEGUED

A segue is a transition from one topic to the next. “Segue” is an Italian word that literally means “now follows”. It was first used in musical scores directing the performer to play into the next movement without a break.

49 People who count to five by saying “ett, två, tre, fyra, fem” : SWEDES

The country of Sweden emerged during the Middle Ages, and became one of the great powers of Europe in the days of the Swedish Empire in 17th and early 18th century. Since then Sweden’s influence has waned. What was the eastern part of Sweden was lost to Russia in the early 1800s, and is now modern-day Finland. In the 20th century Sweden has adopted a very non-aggressive stance and was neutral in both World Wars. Sweden is not a member of NATO, but is a member of the European Union, although the country does not use the euro as its currency.

57 Village People hit with a spelled-out title : YMCA

“YMCA” was released in 1978 by Village People and has been adopted as an anthem by the gay community. The song was written by Victor Willis, a straight member of the mostly gay band, and he clarifies that the lyrics are extolling the virtues of the “YMCA” as a source of recreation for black urban youth. I think he might have been winking when he said that …

58 Philosopher Zeno of ___ : ELEA

Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his paradoxes, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as “Achilles and the Tortoise”, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival. Or can he …?

62 An NCO : CPL

A non-commissioned officer (NCO) might be a sergeant (sgt.) or a corporal (cpl.).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Clueless : AT SEA
6 After the ___ (when to leave a phone message) : BEEP
10 [Bzzt!] : ZAP!
13 Some Dairy Queen orders : CONES
14 Frequent Andrew Wyeth model : HELGA
15 Palindromic woman’s name : EVE
16 Affected adversely, physically or psychologically : TOOK A TOLL ON
18 Oil installation : RIG
19 Some Siouans : OTOS
20 Part to play : ROLE
21 Runaway best-selling Apple products of the 2000s : IPODS
23 Pince-___ (style of glasses) : NEZ
24 ___ Godiva : LADY
25 Part of the upper deck? : ACE
26 Utopian : EDENIC
28 Naked : UNGARBED
33 Like an orange tan, say : FAKE
34 Content of a bog : PEAT
35 Western tribe member : UTE
36 Military operation that might last for months : SIEGE
38 Got chicken, say : ATE
39 Largest moon of Saturn : TITAN
41 Org. with a Form 1040 : IRS
42 Modern acronym for “seize the day” : YOLO
44 Play mates? : CAST
45 Supply with updated parts : RETROFIT
47 A puzzling direction : ACROSS
50 Asleep : OUT
51 “Listen!,” quaintly : HARK!
53 Fresh : NEW
54 Aerodynamic : SLEEK
57 Website with crowdsourced reviews : YELP
58 Lip : EDGE
59 Bagel go-with : LOX
60 Bringer of rain : NIMBUS CLOUD
63 The Cardinals, on scoreboards : ARI
64 Creator of a logical “razor” : OCCAM
65 Bird in the flycatcher family : PEWEE
66 Favorite : PET
67 Sport, as a sport coat : WEAR
68 Touches down : LANDS

Down

1 When a play’s plot is set in motion : ACT ONE
2 Honked : TOOTED
3 *Bo-o-o-ring event : SNOOZEFEST (giving “snooze button”)
4 Comics exclamations : EEKS
5 Happy ___ clam : AS A
6 *Go order a drink : BELLY UP TO THE BAR (giving “belly button”)
7 Fashion magazine with more than 40 international editions : ELLE
8 Psyche part : EGO
9 *Flop sweat producer : PANIC ATTACK (giving “panic button”)
10 The “x” in Euler’s Identity – eiπ + 1 = x : ZERO
11 Gung-ho : AVID
12 Jumping pieces in a classic wooden puzzle : PEGS
14 Car part called a bonnet in England : HOOD
17 Slight vestige : TRACE
22 According to : PER
24 *Scoffing remark to an ignoramus : LIKE YOU KNOW (giving “like button”)
25 Old Turkish title : AGA
27 Ride, in two different senses : NAG
29 Born: Fr. : NEE
30 Very conventional … or a hint to the starts of the answers to the four starred clues : BUTTON-DOWN
31 H : ETA
32 Screening area? : DEN
36 Noble title : SIR
37 Rage : IRE
38 “Green Book” co-star Mahershala : ALI
40 Country on the Mediterranean: Abbr. : ISR
43 Many a time : OFT
44 Kvetches : CARPS
46 Jane ___, anonymous plaintiff : ROE
48 Transitioned : SEGUED
49 People who count to five by saying “ett, två, tre, fyra, fem” : SWEDES
52 Homecoming returnee, informally : ALUM
54 Nonverbal response to an insult : SLAP
55 Mythology : LORE
56 Way out : EXIT
57 Village People hit with a spelled-out title : YMCA
58 Philosopher Zeno of ___ : ELEA
61 What a “neat” drink is served without : ICE
62 An NCO : CPL

2 thoughts on “0312-19 NY Times Crossword 12 Mar 19, Tuesday”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.