0226-19 NY Times Crossword 26 Feb 19, Tuesday

Constructed by: Alex Vratsanos
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Joint

Today’s grid includes eight sets of JOINTED words shown using circled letters. Each of those words is the name of a JOINT in the body:

  • ELBOW
  • ANKLE
  • HIP
  • KNUCKLE
  • SHOULDER
  • KNEE
  • WRIST
  • NECK
  • 40A What each set of shaded letters in this puzzle represents : JOINT

Bill’s time: 6m 35s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 River that formed part of the border between East and West Germany : ELBE

The River Elbe rises in the Czech Republic and travels over a thousand kilometers before emptying into the North Sea near the port of Hamburg in Germany.

9 Brewery in the Nikkei 225 : ASAHI

Asahi is a beer, and the name of the brewery that produces it. “Asahi” is Japanese for “morning sun”. Asahi introduced a “dry beer” in 1987, igniting a craze that rocketed the brewery to the number one spot in terms of beer production in Japan, with Sapporo close behind.

The Nikkei is a stock market index for the Tokyo Stock Exchange that has been published by the “Nihon Keizai Shimbun” newspaper since 1950. The “Nihon Keizai Shimbun” has the largest circulation of any financial newspaper in the world, and is read by over 3 million people daily.

14 MGM symbol : LION

There has been a lion in the logo of the MGM studio since 1924. The original was an Irishman (!), a lion named Slats who was born in Dublin Zoo in 1919. However, it wasn’t until Jackie took over from Slats in 1928 that the roar was heard, as the era of silent movies was coming to an end. The current lion is called Leo, and he has been around since 1957.

15 Jannings who won the first Best Actor Oscar (1928) : EMIL

Emil Jannings was an actor from Switzerland who also held German and Austrian citizenship. Jannings was the first person to receive an Oscar, as the star of the 1928 silent movie called “The Last Command”. He also starred opposite Marlene Dietrich in the 1930 classic “The Blue Angel”.

17 British term for a row of houses converted from stables : MEWS

Back in the late 14th century, the king’s hawks were housed at a specific location in London known as the King’s Mews, with a “mew” being a cage for hawks. That location was converted to the Royal Stables in 1534, with the name Royal Mews persisting, even when the stables were relocated to the grounds of Buckingham Palace. The use of the term “mews” to describe stable blocks spread to outside of London, and indeed internationally. Early in the 20th century, stables/mews became obsolete with the growth of motorized transportation, and so many were converted into housing.

18 Chess ending : MATE

In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be “in check”. If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in “checkmate” and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce “check!”) so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn’t occur.

19 Ω : OMEGA

Omega is the last letter of the Greek alphabet and is the one that looks like a horseshoe when in uppercase. The lowercase omega looks like a Latin W. The word “omega” literally means “great O” (O-mega). Compare this with the Greek letter Omicron, meaning “little O” (O-micron).

20 What’s gained or lost with daylight saving time : ONE HOUR

On the other side of the Atlantic, daylight saving time (DST) is known as “summer time”. The idea behind summer/daylight-savings is to move clocks forward an hour in spring (“spring forward”), and backwards in the fall (“fall back”) so that afternoons have more daylight. Here in the US, DST starts on the second Sunday of March, and ends on the the first Sunday of November.

24 Dublin’s land : EIRE

The city of Dublin, the capital of Ireland, is known as “Baile Átha Cliath” in Irish (“town of the hurdled ford”). The English name “Dublin” is an anglicized form of the older Irish name for the city “Dubh Linn”, meaning “black pool”.

25 Italian port on the Adriatic Sea : TRIESTE

Trieste is a city-port on the northeastern coast of Italy that is almost completely surrounded by the country of Slovenia. Trieste was home for many years to Irish author James Joyce.

29 Rope fiber : SISAL

The sisal plant is an agave, and as far as I can tell, its flesh is not used in making tequila. Sisal is grown instead for the fibers that run the length of its leaves. The fiber is used extensively for twine, rope, carpeting, wall coverings etc. My favorite application though, is in the construction of dartboards. Sisal takes its name from the port of Sisal in Yucatan, Mexico that was a major shipping point for sisal plants.

32 Deux + un : TROIS

In French “deux + un” (two + one) is “trois” (three).

35 Bronze coin in the Harry Potter books : KNUT

The author of the amazingly successful “Harry Potter” series of books is J. K. Rowling. Rowling wrote the first book when she was living on welfare in Edinburgh in Scotland, and in longhand. She would often write in local cafes, largely because she needed to get her baby daughter out of the house (she was a single mom), and the youngster would tend to fall asleep on walks. Within five years, the single mom on welfare became a very rich woman, and is now worth about $1 billion!

36 Flight board posting, for short : ETA

Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

39 1/12 of a foot : INCH

Our term “ounce” (abbreviated to “oz.”) comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a “libra”, the Roman “pound”. “Uncia” is also the derivation of our word “inch”, 1/12 of a foot.

42 Entr’___ : ACTE

The term “entr’acte” comes to us from French, and is the interval “entre deux actes” (between two acts) of a theatrical performance. The term often describes some entertainment provided during that interval.

45 Confucian philosophy : TAO

The sayings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius (anglicized from “K’ung Fu-Tse”) are collected in a work called “The Analects” or “Linyu”. It wasn’t Confucius who wrote down his thoughts though, but rather his pupils, some 40 or so years after his death in 479 BC.

46 Classic Chrysler product : K-CAR

Chrysler introduced K-cars in the early 1980s at a time when demand for large cars with V8 engines was plummeting. Post-oil crisis consumers were seeking low-cost, fuel-efficient vehicles, which brought Chrysler to the brink of bankruptcy. It was the economical 4-cylinder, front-wheel drive platform that singlehandedly delivered the company into the profitability within a couple of years. K-cars were designed to carry 6 passengers, on two bench seats. Remember taking a corner a little too fast on those seats, in the days when no one wore seat belts?

47 “The ___ Club” (1970s-’80s televangelist show) : PTL

“The PTL Club” was a daily television show hosted by televangelists Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker. PTL is short for both “Praise the Lord” and “People that Love”. The show ended its run of over ten years in 1987 when it was revealed that Jim Bakker was involvement in financial and sexual scandals. Bakker served 5 years in jail, part of an 18-year sentence.

48 Bygone Apple messenger : ICHAT

iChat was introduced in 2002, and was Apple’s “instant messaging” application that integrated with the Mac Operating System. iChat was replaced by Messages.

53 ___ Reader : UTNE

The “Utne Reader” is known for aggregation and republishing of articles on politics, culture and the environment from other sources in the media. The “Utne Reader” was founded in 1984 by Eric Utne, with management taken over by Eric’s wife Nina Rothschild Utne in 1990.

56 Not pay for each drink individually, say : RUN A TAB

When we run a tab at a bar say, we are running a “tabulation”, a listing of what we owe. Such a use of “tab” is American slang that originated in the 1880s.

60 Sorrowful bell sound : KNELL

The word “knell” is used for a solemn ring from a bell, often associated with death or a funeral. “Knell” comes the Old English “cnell” and is probably imitative in origin, sounding like a peal from a large bell.

63 Legal order : WRIT

A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in “written” form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

67 Religious setback? : APSE

The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally, apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

68 Emergency operation, for short : EVAC

Evacuation (evac.)

69 Raft-making wood : BALSA

Balsa is a very fast growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes. Amazingly, in WWII a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it “The Wooden Wonder” and “The Timber Terror”.

71 Smooth sheet material : SILK

The textile known as silk is made from a natural protein fiber produced from the cocoons of the larvae of the the mulberry silkworm. Ethical vegans tend to avoid silk as many, many silkworms die in order to produce a relatively small amount of fabric. Raw silk is obtained by boiling alive the silkworms inside the cocoons that yield the fibers.

Down

1 “Tickle me” doll : ELMO

The toy called Tickle Me Elmo was a sensational fad in the late nineties, with stores raising prices dramatically above the recommended retail price to take advantage of demand. Reportedly, prices as high as $1500 were paid at the height of the craze. The toy’s manufacturer, Tyco, originally planned to market the “tickle” toy as Tickle Me Tasmanian Devil (after the “Looney Tunes” character), but then went with “Elmo” after they bought the rights to use “Sesame Street” names.

2 Protection for a lender : LIEN

A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone’s property until a debt is paid. When an individual takes out a car loan, for example, the lending bank is usually a lien holder. The bank releases the lien on the car when the loan is paid in full.

3 Ring champ Riddick : BOWE

Riddick Bowe is a former professional boxer from Brooklyn, New York. Bowe was Undisputed Heavyweight Champion of the World in 1992. A few years later Bowe retired from boxing to join the US Marines. However, after just 11 days of basic training Bowe asked to quit, and the Marine Corps came into a lot of criticism for acceding to his request.

5 Take exception to something : DEMUR

To demur is to voice opposition, to object. It can also mean to delay and has it roots in the Latin word “demorare”, meaning “to delay”.

6 Liqueur whose name is Italian for “a little bitter” : AMARETTO

Amaretto is an Italian liqueur with a sweet almond flavor. Even though the drink is sweet, it has a bitterness lent to it by the bitter almonds that are often used as a flavoring. The name “amaretto” is a diminutive of the Italian word “amaro” meaning “bitter”.

8 Prefix with -mania : KLEPTO-

Kleptomania is the compulsion to steal, whether or not one is need of what is stolen. The term derives from the Greek word for “to steal”, “kleptein”, with the suffix “-mania”.

10 French river in fierce W.W. I fighting : SOMME

WWI’s Battle of the Somme took place between July and November 1916, and was fought in the upper reaches of the River Somme in France. The first day of the Somme offensive marked the worst day in the history of the British Army, suffering 57,470 casualties. The Somme was also the first battle in which tanks were used.

12 What an “O” means in XOXO : HUG

In the sequence letter sequence “XOX”, the X represents a kiss, and the O a hug. “OOO” is a string of hugs, and “XXX” a string of kisses. Hugs and kisses …

13 Bitter beer, briefly : IPA

India pale ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

21 Shell’s industry : OIL

Royal Dutch Shell is the fourth largest company in the world in terms of revenue (Walmart is the largest) and is headquartered in the Hague, in the Netherlands. The company was formed in 1907 with the merger of the Royal Dutch Petroleum Company and Shell Transport and Trading company of the UK. The two companies merged in order to compete globally with the biggest US oil company of the day, John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil. Shell Oil Company is a US-based subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell that is headquartered in Houston, Texas.

23 Blue-blooded Brit : ARISTO

“Aristo” is short for “aristocrat”.

The idiomatic phrase “blue blood” applies to someone of noble descent. The phrase is a translation from the Spanish “sangre azul”, which was applied to the royal family in Spain. The notion is that someone of noble birth does not have to work outdoors in the fields, and so has untanned skin. The veins showing in the skin had “blue blood”, whereas those veins were masked by the darker skin of the peasant classes.

26 Stone face? : STUCCO

Stucco is a decorative coating that is applied to walls and ceilings. “Stucco” is the Italian name for the material, and a word that we imported into English.

27 Clash with : TILT AT

The verb phrase “tilt at” meaning “fight with” derives from the sport of jousting, or “tilting”, in which contestants fought each other on horseback with lances.

33 Indian yogurt dip : RAITA

Raita is a condiment served in Indian restaurants, made from yogurt flavored with coriander, cumin, mint and cayenne pepper.

44 Former competitor of Nikon and Canon : MINOLTA

Minolta was a Japanese manufacturer of cameras and related products. Minolta was founded in 1928 to make cameras using imported German technology. One of the company’s most memorable products was the world’s first integrated autofocus 35mm SLR camera. Minolta merged with Konica in 2003, forming Konica Minolta.

50 Channel founded by Ted Turner : CNN

Ted Turner’s big initiative in the world of business was the founding of CNN, the first 24-hour cable news channel. Turner never graduated from college as he was expelled from Brown University for having a female student in his dormitory room. Years later, in 1989, Brown awarded him an honorary B.A.

57 Kipling’s “Rikki-Tikki-___” : TAVI

In Rudyard Kipling’s “The Jungle Book”, one of the short stories is titled “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi”, the story about a mongoose, the brave pet of an English family that protects them from a succession of snakes.

58 Obsessive about details : ANAL

The use of the word “anal” to mean “stiffly conventional” is an abbreviated form of “anal-retentive”, a term derived from Freudian psychology. Regardless, I’m not a big fan of the term …

60 C.I.A.’s Soviet counterpart : KGB

The “Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti” (KGB) was the national security agency of the Soviet Union until 1991. The KGB was dissolved after the agency’s chairman led a failed attempt at a coup d’état designed to depose President Mikhail Gorbachev.

61 Org. whose monthly magazine advertises magazines : NRA

The National Rifle Association (NRA) publishes several periodicals, including “American Rifleman”, “American Hunter” and “America’s 1st Freedom”.

62 Sushi bar fish : EEL

Anyone going to a sushi restaurant can order all types of raw fish (known collectively as “sashimi”). However, eel is always served cooked, and that’s because the blood of eels contains a protein that cramps muscles if eaten. If the heart muscle “cramps”, the result can be death. The protein is easily rendered harmless by applying heat, i.e. by cooking.

64 Upstate N.Y. school : RPI

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the “application of science to the common purposes of life”, an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school’s sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 River that formed part of the border between East and West Germany : ELBE
5 Cold and moist, as a cellar : DANK
9 Brewery in the Nikkei 225 : ASAHI
14 MGM symbol : LION
15 Jannings who won the first Best Actor Oscar (1928) : EMIL
16 Put in a crate : BOX UP
17 British term for a row of houses converted from stables : MEWS
18 Chess ending : MATE
19 Ω : OMEGA
20 What’s gained or lost with daylight saving time : ONE HOUR
22 What a psychic may read : PALM
24 Dublin’s land : EIRE
25 Italian port on the Adriatic Sea : TRIESTE
29 Rope fiber : SISAL
32 Deux + un : TROIS
34 “Open ___ …” (store sign) : ‘TIL
35 Bronze coin in the Harry Potter books : KNUT
36 Flight board posting, for short : ETA
37 Is obliged to : SHOULD
39 1/12 of a foot : INCH
40 What each set of shaded letters in this puzzle represents : JOINT
42 Entr’___ : ACTE
43 Challenge to a bully : MAKE ME!
45 Confucian philosophy : TAO
46 Classic Chrysler product : K-CAR
47 “The ___ Club” (1970s-’80s televangelist show) : PTL
48 Bygone Apple messenger : ICHAT
50 Coagulates : CLOTS
51 View, as the future : SEE INTO
53 ___ Reader : UTNE
55 Biblical verb with “thou” : DOST
56 Not pay for each drink individually, say : RUN A TAB
60 Sorrowful bell sound : KNELL
63 Legal order : WRIT
65 Barn topper : VANE
66 Say hello to : GREET
67 Religious setback? : APSE
68 Emergency operation, for short : EVAC
69 Raft-making wood : BALSA
70 Any sacrament : RITE
71 Smooth sheet material : SILK

Down

1 “Tickle me” doll : ELMO
2 Protection for a lender : LIEN
3 Ring champ Riddick : BOWE
4 Cover, as a knife : ENSHEATHE
5 Take exception to something : DEMUR
6 Liqueur whose name is Italian for “a little bitter” : AMARETTO
7 Critical point? : NIT
8 Prefix with -mania : KLEPTO-
9 Formally end : ABOLISH
10 French river in fierce W.W. I fighting : SOMME
11 Green Knight’s weapon in “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” : AXE
12 What an “O” means in XOXO : HUG
13 Bitter beer, briefly : IPA
21 Shell’s industry : OIL
23 Blue-blooded Brit : ARISTO
26 Stone face? : STUCCO
27 Clash with : TILT AT
28 Tribal chiefs, typically : ELDERS
29 Economizes maybe too much : SKIMPS
30 God-given, as abilities : INNATE
31 Nurse, as a newborn : SUCKLE
33 Indian yogurt dip : RAITA
36 Kicks out of the game : EJECTS
38 Cluster around an acorn : OAK LEAVES
41 Believer in nudism : NATURIST
44 Former competitor of Nikon and Canon : MINOLTA
49 Active conflict : HOT WAR
50 Channel founded by Ted Turner : CNN
52 Wastes gas, maybe : IDLES
54 Student with a private teacher : TUTEE
57 Kipling’s “Rikki-Tikki-___” : TAVI
58 Obsessive about details : ANAL
59 Partner of call : BECK
60 C.I.A.’s Soviet counterpart : KGB
61 Org. whose monthly magazine advertises magazines : NRA
62 Sushi bar fish : EEL
64 Upstate N.Y. school : RPI

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