0210-19 NY Times Crossword 10 Feb 19, Sunday

Constructed by: Lee Taylor
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: That’s a Mouthful

Themed answers might be described as tongue twisters:

  • 58D. Hard way to say the answers to the starred clues in this puzzle (good luck!) : FIVE TIMES FAST
  • 22A. *Result of a foul on a long basketball shot : THREE FREE THROWS
  • 38A. *Albino orca, e.g. : REAL RARE WHALE
  • 67A. *Part of a department store where people sit : SHOE SECTION
  • 93A. *Home of the world’s only 14-lane suspension bridge : UNIQUE NEW YORK
  • 114A. *Timekeeper on the Emerald Isle : IRISH WRISTWATCH
  • 4D. *What a dairymaid does all day long : SHE SEES CHEESE

Bill’s time: 20m 35s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • BALTO (Barto)
  • ILENE (Irene)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

18. He planned for a rainy day : NOAH

According to the Book of Genesis, Noah lived to a ripe old age. Noah fathered his three sons Shem, Ham and Japheth when he was 500 years old, and the Great Flood took place when he was 600.

19. Sled dog with a statue in Central Park : BALTO

In 1925 there was a serious outbreak of diphtheria in Nome, Alaska. A desperately-needed supply of diphtheria antitoxin had to be transported from Anchorage by train, and then by dog sled into Nome. The team of dogs that made that last dash to Nome was led by the Siberian Husky Balto. The dramatic sled run is commemorated even to this day by the annual Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. And you can see a statue of Balto in New York’s Central Park, and Balto was even there for the unveiling of the monument in 1925.

20. Jewish month before Nisan : ADAR

Adar is the twelfth month of the Hebrew ecclesiastical calendar. Adar is equivalent to February-March in the Gregorian calendar.

21. Corolla part : PETAL

The corolla of a flower is its collection of petals viewed as a unit. “Corolla” is Latin for “small garland”.

25. Bandleader Shaw : ARTIE

Artie Shaw was a composer, bandleader and jazz clarinetist. Shaw’s real name was Arthur Jacob Arshawsky, born in New York City in 1910. One of his many claims to fame is that he (a white bandleader) hired Billie Holiday (a black vocalist) and toured the segregated South in the late thirties. Holiday chose to leave the band though, due to hostility from Southern audiences back then. Artie Shaw was married eight times in all. The list of his wives includes the actresses Lana Turner and Ava Gardner, as well as Betty Kern, daughter of songwriter Jerome Kern.

26. Start of Euripides’ signature : EPSILON

Epsilon is the fifth letter of the Greek alphabet. The uppercase epsilon looks very similar to our Latin E.

Euripides was a celebrated playwright of Ancient Greece and someone renowned for his tragedies. Euripides was one of the three great writers of tragedy of classical Athens, alongside Aeschylus and Sophocles.

32. Popular jeans : LEES

The Lee company that is famous for making jeans was formed in 1889 by one Henry David Lee in Salina, Kansas.

35. A, B or C, in Washington : STREET

Famously, the layout of the streets in Washington was designed by French-born American architect Pierre Charles L’Enfant. The L’Enfant Plan called for a grid of east-west and north-south streets. This grid was crisscrossed with diagonal avenues. The avenues and streets met at circles and rectangular plazas. The east-west streets are generally named for letters, while the north-south streets are numbered. Later, many of the diagonal avenues were named for states of the union.

42. Skedaddles : SCRAMS

“Skedaddle” is a slang term meaning “run away” that dates back to the Civil War.

49. Places for toasters and roasters : DAISES

A dais is a raised platform for a speaker. The term “dais” comes from the Latin “discus” meaning a “disk-shaped object”. I guess that the original daises had such a shape.

51. Word after sock or bunny : HOP

Sock hops were high school dances typically held in the school gym or cafeteria. The term “sock hop” arose because the dancers were often required to remove their shoes to protect the varnished floor in the gym.

60. Wise-looking : OWLISH

The Greek goddess Athena (sometimes “Athene”) is often associated with wisdom, among other attributes. In many representations. Athena is depicted with an owl sitting on her head. It is this linkage of the owl with the goddess of wisdom that led to today’s perception of the owl as being “wise”. Athena’s Roman counterpart was Minerva.

74. Lilac color : MAUVE

The name given to the light violet color that we know as “mauve” comes via French from the Latin “malva”. The Latin term translates as “mallow”, the common name of several species of plants, many of which have mauve-colored flowers.

79. Andrew Jackson’s Tennessee home, with “the” : HERMITAGE

Like many of the earlier US presidents, Andrew Jackson was a career military man. Jackson distinguished himself as commander of American forces during the War of 1812, particularly in the defense of New Orleans. He had a reputation of being fair to his troops, but strict. It was during this time that he was described as “tough as old hickory”, giving rise to the nickname “Old Hickory” that stuck with him for life.

83. Family reunion attendee, informally : COZ

Cousin (“cuz, coz”)

87. ___ Pueblo (World Heritage Site) : TAOS

The town of Taos, New Mexico is named for the Native American village nearby called Taos Pueblo. Taos is famous for its art colony. Artists began to settle in Taos in 1899, and the Taos Society of Artists was founded in 1915.

90. Philadelphia art museum, with “the” : BARNES

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was a French painter who was very much at the forefront of the Impressionist Movement. Renoir was a prolific artist, with several thousand works attributed to him. The largest collection of Renoirs is actually in the United States. You can see 181 of his paintings at the Barnes Foundation just outside Philadelphia.

92. With 29-Across, source of a famous smile : MONA …
(29.A See 92-Across : … LISA)

Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece that we know in English as the “Mona Lisa” is called “La Gioconda” in Italian, the language of the artist. It’s also known as “La Joconde” by the Government of France which owns the painting and displays it in the Louvre Museum in Paris. The title comes from the name of the subject, almost certainly Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo. Giocondo was a wealthy silk merchant in Florence who commissioned the painting for the couple’s new home to celebrate the birth of their second son.

93. *Home of the world’s only 14-lane suspension bridge : UNIQUE NEW YORK

New York City’s George Washington Bridge (GWB) spans the Hudson River and links the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan with Fort Lee in New Jersey. When the bridge was opened in 1931 it had one deck, allowing six lanes of traffic to traverse the river. The bridge’s designer allowed for the construction of a second deck under the first, and this was added in 1946. Today, the bridge carries 14 lanes of traffic, which is more than any other suspension bridge anywhere. As a result, the GWB is the world’s busiest vehicular bridge. Some locals refer to that second deck as “Martha”, a reference to the president’s wife.

98. “Atonement” author Ian : MCEWAN

Ian McEwan is an English novelist with a track record of writing well-received novels. His most famous work of recent years I would say is “Atonement” which has benefited from the success of a fabulous movie adaptation released in 2007.

102. Bollywood instruments : SITARS

The sitar has been around since the Middle Ages. It is a stringed instrument that is played by plucking, and is used most often in Hindustani classical music. In the West we have been exposed to the instrument largely through the performances of Ravi Shankar and some music by George Harrison of the Beatles, a onetime student of Shankar.

“Bollywood” is the informal name given to the huge film industry based in Mumbai in India. The term “Bollywood” is a melding of “Bombay” (the former name of Mumbai), and “Hollywood”.

105. Man Ray’s genre : DADA

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

Man Ray was an American modernist artist who spent most of his working life in Paris. Man Ray was born in South Philadelphia in 1890, and his real name was Emmanuel Radnitzky. His family shortened “Radnitzky” to “Ray” in response to the anti-Semitic feeling that was prevalent at the time. Emmanuel was known as “Manny”, and he decided to assume the name Man Ray and use it for his work.

106. Ham it up : OVERACT

The word “ham”, describing a performer who overacts, is a shortened form of “hamfatter” and dates back to the late 1800s. “Hamfatter” comes from a song in old minstrel shows called “The Ham-Fat Man”. It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the “acting” qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

114. *Timekeeper on the Emerald Isle : IRISH WRISTWATCH

Ireland is often referred to as “the Emerald Isle” (and described as “green”) because of all that green grass that grows due to the seemingly non-stop rain.

117. “Free ___” : TIBET

Free Tibet is an organization based in London that was founded in 1987. The group asserts that Tibetans have the right to determine their own futures, and fights for human rights in Tibet.

119. Assists in a way one shouldn’t : ABETS

The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (it literally means “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

122. Avant-garde : EDGY

Someone or something described as avant-garde is especially innovative. “Avant-garde” is French for “advance guard”.

124. Scottish caps : TAMS

A tam o’shanter is a man’s cap traditionally worn by Scotsmen. “Tams” were originally all blue (and called “blue bonnets”) but as more dyes became readily available they became more colorful. The name of the cap comes from the title character of the Robert Burns poem “Tam O’Shanter”.

Down

2. Architect Mies van der ___ : ROHE

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe was a German architect who was routinely referred to simply as “Mies”. I am a philistine, I know, but Mies’ buildings look very plain to me. However, he did come up with two far-from-plain sayings, namely “less is more” and “God is in the details”.

3. Complain : CARP

The word “carp” used to mean simply “talk” back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian “karpa” meaning “to brag”. A century later, the Latin word “carpere” meaning “to slander” influenced the use of “to carp” so that it came to mean “to find fault with”.

5. Poi plants : TAROS

The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

6. Chaiken who co-created “The L Word” : ILENE

Ilene Chaiken was the executive producer for the Showtime drama series “The L Word”. The show deals with lesbian, bisexual and transgender people living in West Hollywood. The title refers to “the L word”: lesbian.

7. Printemps follower : ETE

In French, “printemps: (spring) is followed by “été” (summer).

8. Source of a deferment in the 1960s draft : ROTC

The Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program for officers based in colleges all around the US. The ROTC program was established in 1862 when as a condition of receiving a land-grant to create colleges, the federal government required that military tactics be part of a new school’s curriculum.

9. Syndicate : CARTEL

A cartel is a group of independent businesses who cooperate to regulate production, pricing and marketing of their common product(s).

13. Figurehead? : CPA

Certified public accountant (CPA)

15. Ancient Greek state with Athens : ATTICA

The historic region of Attica is home to the city of Athens. Attica comprises a peninsula in the southwest of the country that juts out into the Aegean Sea. As a result, the region is sometimes referred to as the Attic peninsula.

23. Aer Lingus destination : EIRE

Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn’t that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with “Aer Lingus” being a phonetic spelling of the Irish “aer-loingeas” meaning “air fleet”. These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland’s oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline called Ryanair.

24. Performances for Hawaii tourists : HULAS

The hula is a native dance of Hawaii that uses arm movements to relate a story. The hula can be performed while sitting (a noho dance) or while standing (a luna dance).

35. Picket line crosser : SCAB

We first started calling strikebreakers “scabs” in the early 1800s, and before that a scab was a person who refused to join a trade union (back as early 1777). The word probably comes from the use of “scab” as a symptom of a skin disease, and so is a term that is meant to insult.

36. Hobbes’s favorite food in “Calvin and Hobbes” : TUNA

The comic strip “Calvin and Hobbes” is still widely syndicated, but hasn’t been written since 1995. The cartoonist Bill Watterson named the character Calvin after John Calvin, the 16th century theologian. Hobbes was named for Thomas Hobbes a 17th century English political philosopher.

39. Leading characters in “Mad Max” : EMS

The leading characters in the title “Mad Max” are letters M (EM).

40. Matter in court : RES

“Res” is the Latin for “thing”. “Res” is used in a lot of phrases in the law, e.g. “res ipsa loquitur” and “res judicata”.

43. Pretentious : CHICHI

Someone or something described as chichi is showily trendy and pretentious. “Chichi” is a French noun meaning “airs, fuss”.

44. 1984 Olympic gymnastics sensation : RETTON

Mary Lou Retton is an Olympic champion gymnast from Fairmont, West Virginia. Retton won Olympic Individual All-Around gold in the 1984 games, making her the first female athlete to do so who wasn’t from Eastern Europe.

47. ___ Boston (noted hotel) : TAJ

The luxury hotel known today as the Taj Boston was opened in 1927 as the Ritz Carlton.

49. ___ de leche : DULCE

“Dulce de leche” is Spanish for “candy of milk”, and is a confection made by slowly heating milk and sugar until it develops a pleasing flavor and color.

56. Writer Stieg Larsson, e.g. : SWEDE

Stieg Larsson was a Swedish journalist and writer. Indeed, one of the main characters in his “Millennium” series of novels is a journalist as well. The first two titles in the series are “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and “The Girl Who Played with Fire”. The last of the three titles in the Millennium series is “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest”, which was the most-sold book in the US in 2010. All of the books in the series were published after Larsson’s death. He passed away from a heart attack while climbing several flights of stairs, when he was just 50 years old.

60. Willow twig : OSIER

Most willows (trees and shrubs of the genus Salix) are called just that, “willows”. Some of the broad-leaved shrub varieties are called “sallow”, and the narrow-leaved shrubs are called “osier”. Osier is commonly used in basketry, as osier twigs are very flexible. The strong and flexible willow stems are sometimes referred to as withies.

61. San ___, Calif. : SIMEON

San Simeon is a town on the Pacific coast of California between San Francisco and Los Angeles. Most notably, San Simeon is home to Hearst Castle, the magnificent mansion and estate built by newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst. Stop by if you’re ever in the area. It’s well worth your time …

65. What “btw” means : ALSO

By the way (BTW)

66. Mess (with) : FUTZ

To futz around is to waste time on trivial matters, to fool around. “Futz” is probably derived from a “not-so-nice” word that has been merged with “putz”.

69. Book before Deut. : NUM

The Book of Numbers in the Hebrew and Christian Bibles relates much of the journey of Moses and the Israelites from Egypt to the promised land. The title comes from the numbering of the people that is described in the beginning of the book.

75. London’s Old ___ : VIC

The Old Vic is a very famous theater (or I should I say “theatre”?) in London. It was previously known as the Royal Coburg Theatre and then the Royal Victorian Theatre (giving it the current name “The Old Vic”). The theater owes a lot of its fame and standing to the fact that it housed the National Theater of Great Britain after it was founded in 1963 by Sir Laurence Olivier. Today the National Theater has new, modern premises, but the Old Vic Theatre Company stills garners a lot of attention.

82. Pizazz : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style, flair”.

Pizazz (also “pizzazz”) is energy, vitality. There’s a kind of cool thing about the “pizzazz” spelling, namely that it is the only 7-letter word in English that cannot be played in Scrabble. You can get close by using the Z-tile with the two blank tiles to get to three of the required four Zs, but there’s no way to get to the fourth Z.

85. Wine: Prefix : OEN-

In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oeno-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

87. What “light” cigarettes are lower in : TAR

The partially-combusted particulate matter that is produced as a cigarette burns forms a resinous material called “tar”. Cigarette tar is different than the tar used on roads, but it is still very toxic. Marijuana smoke produces a very similar tar to cigarette smoke, and is just as dangerous.

90. “The Garden of Earthly Delights” painter : BOSCH

Hieronymus Bosch was a Dutch painter who worked late 15th and early 16th centuries. Perhaps his most recognized work is his triptych titled “The Garden of Earthly Delights”.

94. One of the B vitamins : NIACIN

Niacin is also known as vitamin B3. A deficiency of niacin causes the disease pellagra. Pellagra is often described by “the four Ds”, the symptoms being diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia and death.

97. Like the smell of some bread : YEASTY

Yeasts are unicellular microorganisms in the kingdom Fungi. The species of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for centuries in the making of wine and beer, and in breadmaking. Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates into carbon dioxide and alcohol in the process of fermentation. When making beer and wine, the carbon dioxide and alcohol may be captured by the liquid. When making bread, the carbon dioxide and alcohol is driven off by heat.

99. Where something annoying might be stuck : CRAW

“Craw” is another name for “crop”, a portion of the alimentary tract of some animals, including birds. The crop is used for the storage of food prior to digestion. It allows the animal to eat large amounts and then digest that food with efficiency over an extended period. The expression “to stick in one’s craw” is used one when one cannot accept something, cannot “swallow” it.

108. Start of a classic Christmas poem : ‘TWAS

The poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” was published anonymously in 1823, and is better known today by its first line “‘Twas the night before Christmas”. Most scholars believe that the poem was written by Clement Clarke Moore, a theologian from New York City. Others say that it was written by Henry Livingston, Jr., a poet from Upstate New York.

110. James of jazz : ETTA

“Etta James” was the stage name of celebrated blues and soul singer Jamesetta Hawkins. James’ most famous recording was her 1960 hit “At Last”, which made it into the pop charts. James performed “At Last” at the age of 71 in 2009 on the reality show “Dancing with the Stars”, which was to be her final television appearance. She passed away in 2012.

111. Ponzi scheme, e.g. : SCAM

Charles Ponzi was born in Luigi, Italy in 1882 and arrived in the US in 1903, flat broke having gambled away all his money on the voyage to Boston. Ponzi devised a scheme to buy what were known as “international reply coupons” through friends in Italy, which he had sent to him in the US so that he could redeem them on this side of the Atlantic. As the value in the US was greater than that in Italy, he could make a handsome profit. This was in itself an “illegal” transaction, buying an asset in one market at a low price, then immediately selling it in another market at a higher price. But it’s what he did next that became known as a Ponzi Scheme. He couldn’t redeem his coupons quickly enough due to red tape so he approached other investors, initially friends, and had them give him cash so that he could buy more coupons in Italy. He promised the investors he would double their money, which they did initially. Many people wanted to get in on the scheme seeing that Ponzi was able to make the new investors a profit and double the money of the original investors. Eventually, somebody did the math and word started to get out that the investment was risky, so the number of new investors started to fall. Without sufficient new investors Ponzi couldn’t double the money of his latest investors, and the whole scheme unraveled.

113. Wilbur’s home in “Charlotte’s Web” : STY

“Charlotte’s Web” is a children’s novel by author E. B. White. Charlotte is a barn spider, who manages to save the life of a pig named Wilbur. Wilbur is a pet pig, owned by the farmer’s daughter, Fern Arable. The story also includes a gluttonous rat named Templeton who provides some light and comical moments.

115. Box score inits. : RBI

In baseball, the line square is a summary set of statistics for the game. It is seen at every baseball stadium, and includes the number of runs scored by each team per innings, as well as the total number of hits and errors. The more comprehensive box score includes the line score, but also shows the individual performance of each player.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Parabolas, essentially : ARCS
5. Part of a wedding 9-Across : TIER
9. See 5-Across : CAKE
13. Trophy winner : CHAMP
18. He planned for a rainy day : NOAH
19. Sled dog with a statue in Central Park : BALTO
20. Jewish month before Nisan : ADAR
21. Corolla part : PETAL
22. *Result of a foul on a long basketball shot : THREE FREE THROWS
25. Bandleader Shaw : ARTIE
26. Start of Euripides’ signature : EPSILON
27. Bargain-basement : CUT-RATE
29. See 92-Across : … LISA
30. Took off the board : ERASED
32. Popular jeans : LEES
33. Does, as an animated character : VOICES
35. A, B or C, in Washington : STREET
38. *Albino orca, e.g. : REAL RARE WHALE
41. “You’re on!” and others : CUES
42. Skedaddles : SCRAMS
45. Country singer Chesney : KENNY
46. “It was all ___” : AN ACT
48. Chops down : HEWS
49. Places for toasters and roasters : DAISES
51. Word after sock or bunny : HOP
54. Subjects of some New Year’s resolutions : BAD HABITS
56. Deli order : SUB
57. Reddish : RUFOUS
59. When repeated, emergency cry to a fighter pilot : EJECT!
60. Wise-looking : OWLISH
63. Pub orders : PINTS
64. On base, say : SAFE
67. *Part of a department store where people sit : SHOE SECTION
70. Legally confer, as a power : VEST
71. Opulent : PLUSH
73. Kind of joke : INSIDE
74. Lilac color : MAUVE
76. High regard : ESTEEM
78. Certain intersection : TEE
79. Andrew Jackson’s Tennessee home, with “the” : HERMITAGE
83. Family reunion attendee, informally : COZ
84. One taking inventory? : LOOTER
87. ___ Pueblo (World Heritage Site) : TAOS
88. Polite : CIVIL
89. Expensive outing : SPREE
90. Philadelphia art museum, with “the” : BARNES
92. With 29-Across, source of a famous smile : MONA …
93. *Home of the world’s only 14-lane suspension bridge : UNIQUE NEW YORK
98. “Atonement” author Ian : MCEWAN
100. Old barracks decorations : PINUPS
101. Catches up to : TIES
102. Bollywood instruments : SITARS
105. Man Ray’s genre : DADA
106. Ham it up : OVERACT
109. Wine orders : CARAFES
112. Good servers : ACERS
114. *Timekeeper on the Emerald Isle : IRISH WRISTWATCH
117. “Free ___” : TIBET
118. Text message status : SENT
119. Assists in a way one shouldn’t : ABETS
120. One getting the red-carpet treatment : STAR
121. Diary passage : ENTRY
122. Avant-garde : EDGY
123. Father : SIRE
124. Scottish caps : TAMS

Down

1. Hill and tunnel builder : ANT
2. Architect Mies van der ___ : ROHE
3. Complain : CARP
4. *What a dairymaid does all day long : SHE SEES CHEESE
5. Poi plants : TAROS
6. Chaiken who co-created “The L Word” : ILENE
7. Printemps follower : ETE
8. Source of a deferment in the 1960s draft : ROTC
9. Syndicate : CARTEL
10. Big fan : ADORER
11. Yamaha competitor : KAWASAKI
12. Formerly, once : ERST
13. Figurehead? : CPA
14. Tim ___, frequent collaborator with Adam Sandler : HERLIHY
15. Ancient Greek state with Athens : ATTICA
16. “The Marvelous Mrs. ___” (award-winning Amazon series) : MAISEL
17. “I beg of you” : PLEASE
19. A sharps : B-FLATS
23. Aer Lingus destination : EIRE
24. Performances for Hawaii tourists : HULAS
28. Plane, e.g. : EVENER
31. Column in soccer standings : DRAWS
34. Confesses : OWNS UP
35. Picket line crosser : SCAB
36. Hobbes’s favorite food in “Calvin and Hobbes” : TUNA
37. Text message status : READ
39. Leading characters in “Mad Max” : EMS
40. Matter in court : RES
43. Pretentious : CHICHI
44. 1984 Olympic gymnastics sensation : RETTON
47. ___ Boston (noted hotel) : TAJ
49. ___ de leche : DULCE
50. Somewhat : A BIT
51. Put an edge on : HONE
52. Loopholes : OUTS
53. “Hey you!” : PSST!
55. Wanna-___ : BES
56. Writer Stieg Larsson, e.g. : SWEDE
58. Hard way to say the answers to the starred clues in this puzzle (good luck!) : FIVE TIMES FAST
60. Willow twig : OSIER
61. San ___, Calif. : SIMEON
62. Having a frog in one’s throat : HOARSE
64. Building direction, briefly : SPEC
65. What “btw” means : ALSO
66. Mess (with) : FUTZ
68. Spanish direction : ESTE
69. Book before Deut. : NUM
72. Extend a hand to after a fall, say : HELP UP
75. London’s Old ___ : VIC
77. Beyond that : MORESO
79. Listens attentively : HARKS
80. Declare : AVOW
81. “Jane the Virgin” actress Rodriguez : GINA
82. Pizazz : ELAN
85. Wine: Prefix : OEN-
86. Was on the verge of collapse : TEETERED
87. What “light” cigarettes are lower in : TAR
89. Not so hip : SQUARER
90. “The Garden of Earthly Delights” painter : BOSCH
91. Cleverness : SMARTS
93. App release : UPDATE
94. One of the B vitamins : NIACIN
95. Underwater : IN DEBT
96. Electrician’s concern : WIRING
97. Like the smell of some bread : YEASTY
99. Where something annoying might be stuck : CRAW
103. Less welcoming : ICIER
104. Sample : TASTE
107. What a headache might feel like : VISE
108. Start of a classic Christmas poem : ‘TWAS
110. James of jazz : ETTA
111. Ponzi scheme, e.g. : SCAM
113. Wilbur’s home in “Charlotte’s Web” : STY
115. Box score inits. : RBI
116. Time sheet units: Abbr. : HRS

One thought on “0210-19 NY Times Crossword 10 Feb 19, Sunday”

  1. 40:27, with a one-square error that took forever to find and fix (which is why my time is so large): several guesses on things I wasn’t sure of were actually okay, but I had entered “DOLCE” instead of “DULCE” and had a hard time seeing that “SOB” should be “SUB”. Geez … 😳😜.

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