0203-19 NY Times Crossword 3 Feb 19, Sunday

Constructed by: Natan Last
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Ejection Letters

Themed answers come in groups of three. Each group includes the name of a sportsman, an answer from which that player’s name has been “ejected”, and a reason that a player might be ejected in that sport. Clever …

  • 21A. Reason for an ejection in the M.L.B. : BEANBALL
  • 87A. Seeming opposite of “Ignorance is bliss” : THE T(RUTH) WILL SET YOU FREE
  • 64A. M.L.B. star ejected from 87-Across : RUTH
  • 22A. Reason for an ejection in the N.B.A. : FLAGRANT FOUL
  • 105A. Stew that’s decidedly not very spicy : (ONE-AL)ARM CHILI
  • 48A. N.B.A. star ejected from 105-Across : O’NEAL
  • 33A. Reason for an ejection in FIFA : ILLEGAL SLIDE TACKLE
  • 65A. Belief in one’s role as a savior : (MESSI)AH COMPLEX
  • 186D. FIFA star ejected from 65-Across : MESSI
  • 58A. Reason for an ejection in the N.F.L. : HELMET HIT
  • 102A. Entry fee : P(RICE) OF ADMISSION
  • 28A. N.F.L. star ejected from 102-Across : RICE

Bill’s time: 27m 23s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • MARIE (Manie!)
  • ORYX (Onyx)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Patron of the high seas : ST ELMO

Saint Elmo is the patron saint of sailors. More formally referred to as Erasmus of Formia, St. Elmo is perhaps venerated by sailors as tradition tells us that he continued preaching despite the ground beside him being struck by a thunderbolt. Sailors started to pray to him when in danger of storms and lightning. He lends his name to the electrostatic weather phenomenon (often seen at sea) known as St. Elmo’s fire. The “fire” is actually a plasma discharge caused by air ionizing at the end of a pointed object (like the mast of a ship), something often observed during electrical storms.

21. Reason for an ejection in the M.L.B. : BEANBALL

A beanball is a baseball pitch deliberately thrown at a batter’s head.

22. Reason for an ejection in the N.B.A. : FLAGRANT FOUL

In basketball, a flagrant foul is one in which excessive contact could cause injury.

24. Bank takebacks, for short : REPOS

Repossession (repo)

28. N.F.L. star ejected from 102-Across : RICE
(102A. Entry fee : P(RICE) OF ADMISSION)

Retired footballer Jerry Rice scored a record 208 touchdowns in his career. Rice also won three Super Bowl rings with the San Francisco 49ers; in Super Bowl XXIII vs the Bengals, Super Bowl XXIV vs the Broncos and Super Bowl XXIX vs the Chargers.

37. The Bronx Bombers, on scoreboards : NYY

The New York Yankees baseball team has the nickname “the Bronx Bombers”. The nickname reflects where the team plays (the Bronx) and the team’s reputation for hitting (bombers). The New York Yankees were the first team to retire a uniform number, doing so on July 4, 1939. That day they retired the number 4 in honor of Lou Gehrig.

40. Student taking Torts or Property : ONE L

“One L” is a name used in general for first-year law students, especially those attending Harvard.

43. Snowshoe hare predator : LYNX

The lynx is a wild cat, of which there are four species. These are:

  • The Eurasian lynx: the biggest of the four species.
  • The Canada lynx: well-adapted to life in cold environments.
  • The Iberian lynx: a native of the Iberian Peninsula in Southern Europe, and the most endangered cat species in the world.
  • The bobcat: our North American wildcat, the smallest of the four lynxes

44. Brian with the album “Before and After Science” : ENO

Brian Eno is a musician, composer and record producer from England who first achieved fame as the synthesizer player with Roxy Music. As a producer, Eno has worked with David Bowie, Devo, Talking Heads and U2.

48. N.B.A. star ejected from 105-Across : O’NEAL

Retired basketball player Shaquille O’Neal now appears regularly as an analyst on the NBA TV show “Inside the NBA”. Shaq has quite a career in the entertainment world. His first rap album, called “Shaq Diesel”, went platinum. He also starred in two of his own reality show: “Shaq’s Big Challenge” and “Shaq Vs.”

51. Sound heard in Georgia? : SOFT G

Both letters G in the word “Georgia” are soft Gs.

54. Onetime Sprint competitor : GTE

GTE was a rival to AT&T, the largest of the independent competitors to the Bell System. GTE merged with Bell Atlantic in 2000 to form the company that we know today as Verizon. Verizon made some high-profile acquisitions over the years, including MCI in 2005 and AOL in 2015.

The company that we know today as Sprint has a history that is linked with the Southern Pacific railroad company. Southern Pacific developed a microwave communication system for its internal use across its network using rights-of-way associated with the company’s extensive railway lines. In the early seventies, the company laid huge lengths of fiber optic cable in those rights-of-way, alongside the tracks, primarily for internal use. The railroad sold excess fiber capacity to private companies, allowing those companies to operate long distance telephone service outside of AT&T, which at that time had a long-distance monopoly. Southern Pacific took advantage of changing FCC regulations and started offering voice service directly to consumers. That service was offered under the name SPRINT, an acronym that stood for Southern Pacific Railroad Internal Networking Telephony. Very interesting …

57. Meursault’s love in Camus’s “The Stranger” : MARIE

“The Stranger” was Albert Camus’ first novel, and it is probably his most famous. The original title in French is “L’Étranger”, which can indeed be translated as “The Stranger”. However, the book is usually called “The Outsider” when translated into English, as this alternative meaning of “L’Étranger” better reflects the novel’s theme.

62. Sepals of a flower : CALYX

The calyx is the collective name for the sepals of a flower, which form the outermost whorl that forms the flower (the pretty part!).

64. M.L.B. star ejected from 87-Across : RUTH
(87A. Seeming opposite of “Ignorance is bliss” : THE T(RUTH) WILL SET YOU FREE)

Jack Dunn was the owner/manager of the Baltimore Orioles back in 1913, when he signed on George Herman Ruth as a pitcher. The other players called Ruth “Jack’s newest babe”, and the name “Babe” stuck.

67. Anatomical lashes : CILIA

“Cilia” is Latin for “eyelashes”.

68. Drum held between the knees : BONGO

Bongo drums are Cuban percussion instruments consisting of a pair of drums, one larger than the other, The smaller drum is called the “hembra” (female) and the larger the “macho” (male).

71. English dialect in which “food shopping” is “makin’ groceries” : CAJUN

The great explorer Verrazzano gave the name “Arcadia” to the coastal land that stretched from north of present day Virginia right up the North American continent to Nova Scotia. The name Arcadia was chosen as it was also the name for a part of Greece that had been viewed as idyllic from the days of classical antiquity. The “Arcadia” name quickly evolved into the word “Acadia” that was used locally here in North America. Much of Acadia was settled by the French in the 1600s, and then in 1710 Acadia was conquered by the British. There followed the French and Indian War after which there was a mass migration of French Acadians, often via the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) to the French colony of Louisiana. The local dialectic pronunciation of the word “Acadian” was “Cajun”, giving the name to the ethnic group for which Louisiana has been home for about 300 years.

76. Kabuki sash : OBI

Kabuki is a Japanese form of theater involving dance and drama. In the original Kabuki theater, both male and female parts were played by women. In contrast, the Noh dramas have the male and female parts played by men.

77. Bloke : GENT

“Bloke” is British slang for “fellow”. The etymology of “bloke” seems to have been lost in the mists of time.

92. Pollyannaish : ROSY

Someone described as “polyanna” sees the bright side in the most difficult situations. The term is a reference to the 1913 novel “Pollyanna” by Eleanor Hodgman Porter. The title character, Pollyanna Whittier, has a remarkably positive disposition, even in the face of disaster.

97. Plays charades, say : ACTS

In the parlor game known as charades, players take turns in acting out words or phrases. “Charade” is a French word describing a literary puzzle that was popular in 18th-century France. In said game, the word or phrase was broken into its constituent syllables, with each syllable being described somewhat enigmatically. This puzzle evolved into “acted charades”, which we now refer to simply as “charades”.

98. Tweeter’s “Then again …” : OTOH …

On the other hand (OTOH)

100. Fruity soda brand : FANTA

The soft drink named “Fanta” has quite an interesting history. As WWII approached, the Coca-Cola plant in Germany had trouble obtaining the ingredients it needed to continue production of the cola beverage, so the plant manager decided to create a new drink from what was available. The new beverage was built around whey (leftover from cheese production) and pomace (left over after juice has been extracted from fruit). The inventor asked his colleagues to use their “imagination” (“Fantasie” in German) and come up with a name for the drink, so they piped up “Fanta!”

101. A Musketeer : ATHOS

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is the trio’s young protégé D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

105. Stew that’s decidedly not very spicy : (ONE-AL)ARM CHILI

The spiciness or “heat” of a serving of chili is often designated by an unofficial scale ranging from one-alarm upwards.

The full name of the dish that is often called simply “chili” is “chili con carne”, Spanish for “peppers with meat”. The dish was created by immigrants from the Spanish Canary Islands in the city of San Antonio, Texas (a city which the islanders founded). The San Antonio Chili Stand was a popular attraction at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, and that stand introduced the dish to the rest of America and to the world.

107. Durkheim who helped found the field of sociology : EMILE

The sociologist Émile Durkheim is often listed with Max Weber and Karl Marx as the founders of sociology, with Durkheim cited as the “father of sociology”.

110. Array in a cockpit : DIALS

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the original “cockpit” was a “pit” used for fighting “cocks”. The term was then applied nautically, as the name for the compartment below decks used as living quarters by midshipmen. The cockpit of a boat today, usually on a smaller vessel, is a sunken area towards the stern in which sits the helmsman and others (who can fit!). The usage extended to aircraft in the 1910s and to cars in the 1930s.

112. Actress Jean who played Joan of Arc in “Saint Joan” : SEBERG

Down

“Saint Joan” is a 1957 film adapted from a play of the same name by George Bernard Shaw. Directed by Otto Preminger, the film recounts the life of Joan of Arc, with newcomer Jean Seberg playing the title role. The critics didn’t receive Seberg’s performance well at all.

2. “Receiving poorly,” in CB lingo : TEN-ONE

There is a set of “ten-codes” that were developed in 1937 for the use of law enforcement departments. As of 2006, the US federal government is recommending that they be replaced by plain language due to a lack of standardization in ten-codes. Examples of ten-codes are:

  • 10-1 meaning “bad reception”
  • 10-4 meaning “understood”
  • 10-9 meaning “say again”
  • 10-33 meaning “emergency, all units stand by”

5. Organization of Afro-American Unity founder : MALCOLM X

Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little in Omaha, Nebraska in 1925. He told his own life story in the incredibly successful book “The Autobiography of Malcolm X”, on which he collaborated with author Alex Haley. Malcolm Little changed his name when he joined the Nation of Islam, choosing “X” to represent the African family name that he could never know.

7. Joe can provide it : CAFFEINE FIX

Caffeine is a naturally occurring stimulant that is found in several plants. The chemical serves as a natural pesticide by paralyzing and killing certain insects that would otherwise feed on the plant. Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive drug that is consumed by humans across the world.

10. Hebrew “shalom” to Arabic “salaam,” e.g. : COGNATE

“Shalom” is a Hebrew word meaning “peace” that is also used to mean “hello” and “goodbye”.

The word “salaam” is an Anglicized spelling of the Arabic word for “peace”. The term can describe an act of deference, and in particular a very low bow.

11. “Seven Samurai” director : KUROSAWA

Akira Kurosawa was an Oscar-winning Japanese film director. His most famous movie to us in the West has to be “The Seven Samurai”, the inspiration for “The Magnificent Seven” starring Yul Brynner, and indeed a basis for “Star Wars: The Clone Wars”.

26. It gained independence from France in 1960 : MALI

The Republic of Mali is a landlocked country in western Africa located south of Algeria. Formerly known as French Sudan, the nation’s most famous city is Timbuktu. Mali is the third-largest producer of gold on the continent, after South Africa and Ghana.

34. King of morning TV : GAYLE

Gayle King is a co-anchor on the news magazine show “CBS This Morning”. King met Oprah Winfrey in 1976, with the pair now describing each other as best friends.

35. Poet who invented the terza rima rhyme scheme : DANTE

The Italian poet Dante invented the terza rima rhyming scheme. It has a chain rhyming pattern and so has the format ABA, BCB, CDC, etc. Dante introduced terza rima in his epic poem called “Divine Comedy”.

36. Bay of Biscay feeder : LOIRE

The Loire is the longest river in France. It is so long that it drains one-fifth of the nation’s land mass. The Loire rises in the southeast, in the Cevennes mountain range, then heads north then due west, emptying into the Bay of Biscay at the city of Nantes. The Loire Valley is home to some of France’s most famous wine production, and includes the wine regions of Sancerre, Pouilly-Fumé and Muscadet.

The Bay of Biscay is the large gulf that sits north of Spain and west of France. The bay is named after the Spanish province of Biscay located in Basque country.

43. Rodeo ring? : LASSO

Our English word “lasso” comes from the Spanish “lazo”, and ultimately from the Latin “laqueum” meaning “noose, snare”.

46. Politico Abzug : BELLA

Bella Abzug was one of the leader’s of the Women’s Movement who founded the National Women’s Political Caucus in 1971. Abzug was elected to the US Congress the same year, helped along by a famous campaign slogan “This woman’s place is in the House – the House of Representatives”.

52. Margaret Atwood’s “___ and Crake” : ORYX

Canadian author Margaret Atwood is best known for her novels. However, Atwood also conceived the idea of the LongPen, a remote robotic writing technology. The LongPen allows a user to write remotely in ink via the Internet. Atwood came up with the idea so that she could remotely attend book signings.

57. Country south of Sicily : MALTA

The island state of Malta is relatively small (122 square miles), but its large number of inhabitants makes it one of the most densely populated countries in Europe. Malta’s strategic location has made it a prized possession for the conquering empires of the world. Most recently it was part of the British Empire and was an important fleet headquarters. Malta played a crucial role for the Allies during WWII as it was located very close to the Axis shipping lanes in the Mediterranean. The Siege of Malta lasted from 1940 to 1942, a prolonged attack by the Italians and Germans on the RAF and Royal Navy, and the people of Malta. When the siege was lifted, King George VI awarded the George Cross to the people of Malta collectively in recognition of their heroism and devotion to the Allied cause. The George Cross can still be seen on the Maltese flag, even though Britain granted Malta independence in 1964.

58. Amazon Prime competitor : HULU

Hulu.com is a website providing streaming video of full television shows. It is a joint venture of NBC and Disney, and so features a lot of their content. The service is free and is supported by advertising, but you can sign up for a premium subscription and get access to more shows. A lot of younger folks seem to use it a lot …

59. Ireland, to poets : ERIN

“Éire”, is the Irish word for “Ireland”. The related “Erin” is an anglicized version of “Éire” and actually corresponds to “Éirinn”, the dative case of “Éire”.

60. “Rainbow” fish : TROUT

The steelhead and rainbow trout are actually the same species. The difference is that rainbow trout spend almost their whole lives in freshwater. Steelheads spend much of their lives in estuaries or open ocean, returning to freshwater to spawn.

62. Tax pros, for short : CPAS

Certified public accountant (CPA)

63. They’re located between Samoa and Vanuatu : FIJI ISLANDS

The island nation of Fiji is an archipelago in the South Pacific made up of over 330 islands, 110 of which are inhabited. Fiji was occupied by the British for over a century and finally gained its independence in 1970.

The official name for the South Pacific nation formerly known as Western Samoa is the Independent State of Samoa. Samoa is the western part of the island group, with American Samoa lying to the southeast. The whole group of islands used to be known as Navigators Island, a name given by European explorers in recognition of the seafaring skills of the native Samoans.

The Republic of Vanuatu is an island nation in the South Pacific. The country became independent in 1980 after having suffered through Spanish, French and British rule.

67. Revolutionary group : CABAL

A cabal is a small group of plotters acting in secret, perhaps scheming against a government or an individual.

68. Language family that includes Xhosa and Zulu : BANTU

There are hundreds of Bantu languages, which are mainly spoken in central, east and southern Africa. The most commonly spoken Bantu language is Swahili, with Zulu coming in second.

71. Monastery garb : COWLS

A cowl is a long garment with a hood that is primarily worn by monks in the the Christian tradition.

74. Metonym for local government : CITY HALL

A metonym is a word that is used for something that is closely associated with that word. For example, “Broadway” is a metonym for “American theater” and “Washington” is a metonym for “the US government”.

77. Noted Belle Epoque locale : GAY PAREE

“Who Said Gay Paree?” is a song from the Cole Porter musical “Can-Can”.

78. Psyche’s beloved : EROS

In the myth of Cupid (aka Eros) and Psyche, the two title characters must overcome many obstacles to fulfill their love for each other. Overcome them they do, and the pair marry and enjoy immortal love.

86. FIFA star ejected from 65-Across : MESSI
(65A. Belief in one’s role as a savior : (MESSI)AH COMPLEX)

Lionel “Leo” Messi is a soccer player from Argentina. Messi was awarded FIFA’s Ballon d’Or (Golden Ball) award from 2009 to 2013. The Ballon d’Or is presented to the player who is considered the best in the world in the prior year.

88. Choice of cheese : EDAM

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

89. ___ Stark, Oona Chaplin’s “Game of Thrones” role : TALISA

Oona Chaplin is an actress from Madrid in Spain. Chaplin is getting a lot of airtime these days as she plays Talisa Maegyr on HBO’s hit fantasy series “Game of Thrones”. Oona is the granddaughter of Charlie Chaplin, and is named for her maternal grandmother Oona O’Neill, the daughter of playwright Eugene O’Neill.

90. Russian ethnic group : TATARS

Tatars (sometimes “Tartars”) are an ethnic group of people who mainly reside in Russia (a population of about 5 1/2 million). One of the more famous people with a Tatar heritage was Hollywood actor Charles Bronson. Bronson’s real name was Charles Buchinsky.

103. ___ Moines : DES

The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French “Riviere des Moines” meaning “River of the Monks”. It looks like there isn’t any “monkish” connection to the city’s name per se. “Des Moines” was just the name given by French traders who corrupted “Moingona”, the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

106. Literary fairy queen : MAB

In Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, Mercutio refers to the fairy known as Queen Mab. It seems that Queen Mab was Shakespeare’s creation, although she became popular in subsequent works of literature. For example, she is referred to in Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick”, in Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility”, and Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote a large poetic work called “Queen Mab: A Philosophical Poem”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Patron of the high seas : ST ELMO
7. Metric in digital journalism : CLICKS
13. Some marble works : BUSTS
18. Den mother : SHE-BEAR
19. Make less stuffy : AIR OUT
20. Opening : INTRO
21. Reason for an ejection in the M.L.B. : BEANBALL
22. Reason for an ejection in the N.B.A. : FLAGRANT FOUL
24. Bank takebacks, for short : REPOS
25. Snug as a bug in a rug : COMFY
27. Make mention of : NOTE
28. N.F.L. star ejected from 102-Across : RICE
29. “Right on!” : AMEN!
30. Actress/singer Janelle : MONAE
31. Rudimentary : BASIC
32. Treats, as a sprain : ICES
33. Reason for an ejection in FIFA : ILLEGAL SLIDE TACKLE
37. The Bronx Bombers, on scoreboards : NYY
38. Intent : AIM
39. Soon : IN A FEW
40. Student taking Torts or Property : ONE L
43. Snowshoe hare predator : LYNX
44. Brian with the album “Before and After Science” : ENO
45. Shorten : ABRIDGE
48. N.B.A. star ejected from 105-Across : O’NEAL
51. Sound heard in Georgia? : SOFT G
53. Musician’s skill : EAR
54. Onetime Sprint competitor : GTE
56. Burn a perfume stick in : CENSE
57. Meursault’s love in Camus’s “The Stranger” : MARIE
58. Reason for an ejection in the N.F.L. : HELMET HIT
61. “Love, when we met, ___ like two planets meeting”: Ella Wheeler Wilcox : ‘TWAS
62. Sepals of a flower : CALYX
63. Rolls up : FURLS
64. M.L.B. star ejected from 87-Across : RUTH
65. Belief in one’s role as a savior : (MESSI)AH COMPLEX
67. Anatomical lashes : CILIA
68. Drum held between the knees : BONGO
69. On fire : LIT
70. ___ milk : OAT
71. English dialect in which “food shopping” is “makin’ groceries” : CAJUN
72. Aries and Taurus : AUTOS
73. Result of a judicial conflict of interest : RECUSAL
76. Kabuki sash : OBI
77. Bloke : GENT
79. Polish up, in a way : EDIT
80. “Actually, come to think of it …” : OH, WAIT …
83. Skill : ART
84. Part of a “fence” in the game Red Rover : ARM
87. Seeming opposite of “Ignorance is bliss” : THE T(RUTH) WILL SET YOU FREE
92. Pollyannaish : ROSY
95. Mends, in a way : DARNS
96. Some flaws in logic : LEAPS
97. Plays charades, say : ACTS
98. Tweeter’s “Then again …” : OTOH …
99. Set down : ALIT
100. Fruity soda brand : FANTA
101. A Musketeer : ATHOS
102. Entry fee : P(RICE) OF ADMISSION
105. Stew that’s decidedly not very spicy : (ONE-AL)ARM CHILI
107. Durkheim who helped found the field of sociology : EMILE
108. Browned at high heat : SEARED
109. Hit from behind : REAR-END
110. Array in a cockpit : DIALS
111. Butterfly-attracting flowers : ASTERS
112. Actress Jean who played Joan of Arc in “Saint Joan” : SEBERG

Down

1. Well-formed : SHAPELY
2. “Receiving poorly,” in CB lingo : TEN-ONE
3. Retreats : EBBS
4. Grazing land : LEA
5. Organization of Afro-American Unity founder : MALCOLM X
6. 1960s group with a fabric-related name, with “the” : ORLONS
7. Joe can provide it : CAFFEINE FIX
8. Bell-shaped flower : LILY
9. Writer/critic ___ Madison III : IRA
10. Hebrew “shalom” to Arabic “salaam,” e.g. : COGNATE
11. “Seven Samurai” director : KUROSAWA
12. Unchanging : STATIC
13. Pinch : BIT
14. Drop from one’s Facebook circle : UNFRIEND
15. Poker-faced : STOIC
16. Armistice : TRUCE
17. They may hit the ground running : SOLES
18. Respectable : SEEMLY
21. Genius : BRAIN
23. Head turner? : NECK
26. It gained independence from France in 1960 : MALI
30. Principal : MAIN
31. Discombobulate : BEFOG
34. King of morning TV : GAYLE
35. Poet who invented the terza rima rhyme scheme : DANTE
36. Bay of Biscay feeder : LOIRE
41. Easter activity : EGG HUNT
42. “Move on already!” : LET IT GO!
43. Rodeo ring? : LASSO
46. Politico Abzug : BELLA
47. Members of the flock : RAMS
48. Of base 8 : OCTAL
49. One getting onboarded : NEW HIRE
50. Made into law : ENACTED
51. Bargain hunter’s delight : SALE
52. Margaret Atwood’s “___ and Crake” : ORYX
55. Standard of living? : ETHOS
57. Country south of Sicily : MALTA
58. Amazon Prime competitor : HULU
59. Ireland, to poets : ERIN
60. “Rainbow” fish : TROUT
62. Tax pros, for short : CPAS
63. They’re located between Samoa and Vanuatu : FIJI ISLANDS
66. Entrance to a cave : MOUTH
67. Revolutionary group : CABAL
68. Language family that includes Xhosa and Zulu : BANTU
71. Monastery garb : COWLS
74. Metonym for local government : CITY HALL
75. They’re only a few stories : LOW-RISES
77. Noted Belle Epoque locale : GAY PAREE
78. Psyche’s beloved : EROS
81. Suggests : HINTS AT
82. Typical summer intern : TEEN
84. Forming an upward curve : ARCHING
85. Like oral history : RETOLD
86. FIFA star ejected from 65-Across : MESSI
88. Choice of cheese : EDAM
89. ___ Stark, Oona Chaplin’s “Game of Thrones” role : TALISA
90. Russian ethnic group : TATARS
91. Church title : FATHER
92. Partitioned, with “off” : ROPED
93. People of south-central Mexico : OTOMI
94. Director Coppola : SOFIA
100. Author Jonathan Safran ___ : FOER
101. Land parcel : ACRE
103. ___ Moines : DES
104. Pique : IRE
106. Literary fairy queen : MAB

5 thoughts on “0203-19 NY Times Crossword 3 Feb 19, Sunday”

  1. 29:05, no errors, but the last letter I filled in was the “R” at the intersection of 52D and 57A and that was a pure guess, so I could easily have gotten it wrong on another day.

  2. Does anyone else notice that sometimes Bill’s explanations don’t provide the reason for the answer? For 10D I learned a lot about the meaning of shalom and salaam but not why cognate is the answer.

  3. @Brian:
    The adjective word “Cognate” simply means descended from a common ancestor, or having a common ancestor or origin. So I think what Bill is saying for 10D is that the Hebrew “shalom” and the Arabic “salaam” which both means “peace” have the same ancestral origin. And they almost sound the same too, don’t they?

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