0202-19 NY Times Crossword 2 Feb 19, Saturday

Constructed by: David Steinberg
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 22m 20s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Football franchise since 1899 : AC MILAN

The famous Italian soccer club Associazione Calcio Milan is better known as AC Milan. AC Milan has won four world club titles, more than any club in the game anywhere. The team’s home ground is San Siro, which has a capacity of just over 80,000, the highest in the country. AC Milan is owned by former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

18. “The Good Samaritan,” e.g. : PARABLE

A parable is story told to illustrate a lesson or principle. It is similar to a fable, differing in that a fable uses mainly animals as characters, and a parable uses humans.

“The Good Samaritan” is a parable told by Jesus that can be read in the Gospel of Luke. According to the story, a Jewish traveler is robbed and beaten and left for dead at the side of the road. A priest happens by and sees the poor man, but does not stop to help. A fellow Jewish traveler also passes and refuses to help. A third man stops and gives aid. This kind person is a Samaritan, a native of Samaria. Back then Jewish and Samarian people were said to generally despise each other, and yet here a detested creature gives aid. Jesus told to the story to a self-righteous lawyer, the intent being (I assume) to shake up his self-righteousness.

19. Company that once owned Capitol and Virgin Records : EMI

EMI was a British music company, with the initialism standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

20. Outré : BIZARRE

“Bizarre” is a French word, with the same meaning in French as English. However, back in the 16th century, “bizarre” used to mean “handsome, brave” in French. So that’s what my wife means when she refers to me as “bizarre” …

The word “outré” meaning “unconventional, bizarre” comes to us from French, as one might imagine. It is derived from the verb “outrer” meaning “to overdo, exaggerate”. “Outrer” is also the ultimate root of our word “outrage”.

22. Evoker of dirty looks, maybe, in brief : PDA

Public display of affection (PDA)

23. Spoon : NECK

The term “necking” applies to kissing and caressing. I like what Groucho Marx had to say on the subject:

Whoever named it necking was a poor judge of anatomy.

29. “___ make history and not the other way around”: Harry Truman : MEN

Harry Truman wanted to go to West Point having served with the Missouri Army National Guard on active duty in WWI, but he couldn’t get in because of his poor eyesight. Young Truman didn’t have the money to pay for college anywhere else. He did manage to study for two years towards a law degree at the Kansas City Law School in the twenties, but he never finished his schooling. So, Harry S. Truman was the last US President (out of a list of ten) who did not have a college degree.

31. Anise-flavored liqueur : SAMBUCA

Sambuca is an Italian liqueur that is flavored with anise. Sambuca is often served straight up with three coffee beans floating on the surface. The beans are said to represent health, happiness and prosperity. A more “saucy” representation for the beans is the husband, wife and mistress.

35. Shot of minors? : BBS

A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.070″ in diameter) to size FF (.230″). Birdshot that is size BB (0.180″ in diameter) gives the airgun its name.

36. Informal slip-on : MOC

“Moc” is short for “moccasin”, a type of shoe. The moccasin is a traditional form of footwear worn by members of many Native American tribes.

50. ___ Larsson, author of the “Millennium” novels : STIEG

Stieg Larsson was a Swedish journalist and writer. Indeed, one of the main characters in his “Millennium” series of novels is a journalist as well. The first two titles in the series are “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and “The Girl Who Played with Fire”. The last of the three titles in the Millennium series is “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest”, which was the most-sold book in the US in 2010. All of the books in the series were published after Larsson’s death. He passed away from a heart attack while climbing several flights of stairs, when he was just 50 years old.

52. Island formed by two shield volcanoes : OAHU

Oahu has been called “The Gathering Place”, although the word “O’ahu” has no translation in Hawaiian. It seems that “O’ahu” is simply the name of the island. One story is that it is named after the son of the Polynesian navigator who first found the islands. The island is made up of two volcanoes, Wai’anae and Ko’olau, joined together by a broad valley, the O’ahu Plain.

53. Great ___ : APE

The tailless primates known as apes are divided into two main branches: gibbons (lesser apes) and hominids (great apes). The hominids are the great apes, and belong to the family of primates called Hominidae. Extant genera that make up the family Hominidae are:

  • chimpanzees
  • gorillas
  • humans
  • orangutans

54. Natural seasoning : SEA SALT

The lobbyists have done their job when it comes to the labelling of “sea salt”. In the US, sea salt doesn’t even have to come from the sea. The argument is that all salt came from the sea if you look back far enough. The politics of food, don’t get me started …

56. Pentagon letters : DOD

Department of Defense (DOD)

The incredible building known as the Pentagon was built during WWII, and dedicated on January 15, 1943. It is the largest office building in the world (by floor space) covering an area of about 6.5 million square feet. As it was built during the war years, a major requirement was that it use a minimum amount of steel. That steel shortage dictated that the building be no more than four stories in height, and hence cover an awful lot of real estate.

61. Professorial, e.g. : ERUDITE

“Erudite” is a lovely-sounding word meaning “learned, well-educated”. The term comes from the Latin verb “erudire” meaning “to educate”, or more literally “to bring out of the rough”.

62. It’s done on hands and knees : CAT POSE

In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

Down

2. Mythical hybrid : CHIMERA

In Greek mythology, a chimera was a fire-breathing monster with the body of a lioness, a tail that ended in a snake’s head, and the head of a goat that emanated from the lioness’s spine. The term chimera has entered into our modern language and means a fanciful illusion or fabrication.

4. Raiding grp. : ICE

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is a federal agency that was founded within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in 2003. ICE was effectively formed from a merger of sections of the US Customs Service and the Immigration and Naturalization Service.

11. Overseer of trains, for short : MTA

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has public transportation responsibility in the state of New York (as well as part of Connecticut). “MTA” might also refer to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which is known as “the Metro” and sometimes “the MTA”.

12. Place to get wired : USB PORT

Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

13. Bud to chill with? : COLD ONE

The American beer called Budweiser (often shortened to “Bud”) is named for the Czech town of Budweis (“České Budějovice” in Czech). The name is the subject of a dispute as here is an original Czech beer with a similar name, Budweiser Budvar. American Budweiser is sold in most European countries as “Bud”.

24. Dog and cat food : KIBBLES

Kibbles ‘n Bits is a dog food first produced by Del Monte Foods that was introduced in 1981. The original selling feature of the product was that it contained both chewy and hard crunchy pieces.

26. Italian white wine : MOSCATO

Asti is in the Piedmont region of northwestern Italy. It is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine. Moscato d’Asti is produced from the same grape (Moscato Bianco) but is a much sweeter wine with a lower alcohol content. It is usually served as a dessert wine.

32. Most-watched TV drama in the world for a record six years : CSI

The “CSI” TV show franchise uses hits from the Who as theme music:

  • “Who Are You” … “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”
  • “Baba O’Riley” … “CSI: New York”
  • “Won’t Get Fooled Again” … “CSI: Miami”
  • “I Can See for Miles” … “CSI: Cyber”

34. Music genre : EMO

The emo musical genre originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from “emotional hardcore”. “Emo” is also the name given to the associated subculture. Not my cup of tea …

41. Things to learn in kindergarten : THE ABCS

“Kindergarten” is a German term, one translating as “children’s garden”. The term was coined by the German education authority Friedrich Fröbel in 1837, when he used it as the name for his play and activity institute that he created for young children to use before they headed off to school. His thought was that children should be nourished educationally, like plants in a garden.

43. Longtime TV curmudgeon : DR HOUSE

I think that “House” is one of the better shows made by Fox television. It is fun for me to see English actor Hugh Laurie in the title role as coming from the other side of the Atlantic I have been watching him in various comedic roles for decades. Famously he played Bertie Wooster opposite Stephen Fry in P.G. Wodehouse’s “Jeeves & Wooster”, as well as one of the bumbling “bad guys” in “101 Dalmatians” (the version starring Glenn Close).

“Curmudgeon” is a favorite term used by my wife to describe me. A curmudgeon is a bad-tempered person full of resentment and stubborn notions. I am sure she uses it very affectionately …

55. “Ciao” : TA-TA

“Ciao” is Italian for “‘bye”. “Arrivederci” is more formal, and translates as “goodbye”.

58. Tower stack : CDS

The compact disc (CD) was developed jointly by Philips and Sony as a medium for storing and playing sound recordings. When the first commercial CD was introduced back in 1982, a CD’s storage capacity was far greater than the amount of data that could be stored on the hard drive of personal computers available at that time.

60. Final Fantasy or Dark Souls, for short : RPG

Role-playing game (RPG)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Football franchise since 1899 : AC MILAN
8. Dummy : SCHMUCK
15. Where the term “jazz” as applied to jazz music originated : CHICAGO
16. Them’s fightin’ words : OH, IT’S ON
17. Part of WarnerMedia : CINEMAX
18. “The Good Samaritan,” e.g. : PARABLE
19. Company that once owned Capitol and Virgin Records : EMI
20. Outré : BIZARRE
22. Evoker of dirty looks, maybe, in brief : PDA
23. Spoon : NECK
25. Not versed in : NEW AT
26. Kind of music : MOOD
27. Place for markers : TRAIL
29. “___ make history and not the other way around”: Harry Truman : MEN
30. Lifted : BORNE
31. Anise-flavored liqueur : SAMBUCA
33. Magnetic intensity unit named after a Danish physicist : OERSTED
35. Shot of minors? : BBS
36. Informal slip-on : MOC
37. Requirement for some downloads : APPLE ID
41. In the direction of : TOWARDS
45. Digs too deep : PRIES
46. Natural blanket : ASH
48. Outing spoiler : STORM
49. Some hotel freebies : PENS
50. ___ Larsson, author of the “Millennium” novels : STIEG
52. Island formed by two shield volcanoes : OAHU
53. Great ___ : APE
54. Natural seasoning : SEA SALT
56. Pentagon letters : DOD
57. Stock spreads : RANCHES
59. Enthusiastic greeting : BEAR HUG
61. Professorial, e.g. : ERUDITE
62. It’s done on hands and knees : CAT POSE
63. Polite turndown of a proposal : LET’S NOT
64. Caught : SNAGGED

Down

1. Some work at hair salons : ACCENTS
2. Mythical hybrid : CHIMERA
3. Spy’s shooter, say : MINICAM
4. Raiding grp. : ICE
5. Main ingredient in the dish lechazo : LAMB
6. “Not ___!” : AGAIN
7. Classic product in a cobalt blue jar : NOXZEMA
8. One never ends on a low note : SOPRANO
9. Hit list? : CHART
10. Find a position for : HIRE
11. Overseer of trains, for short : MTA
12. Place to get wired : USB PORT
13. Bud to chill with? : COLD ONE
14. Like tired muscles at a massage parlor : KNEADED
21. Transfix : AWE
24. Dog and cat food : KIBBLES
26. Italian white wine : MOSCATO
28. Garage requests : LUBES
30. They may be raised (hmm …) : BROWS
32. Most-watched TV drama in the world for a record six years : CSI
34. Music genre : EMO
37. Word after gay or American : APPAREL
38. Ready : PREPARE
39. Flavorful seed : PINE NUT
40. Group of values : DATA SET
41. Things to learn in kindergarten : THE ABCS
42. Passing concern? : ROAD HOG
43. Longtime TV curmudgeon : DR HOUSE
44. Dirty, in a way : SMUDGED
47. Auntie, to one’s parent : SIS
50. Deal with : SEE TO
51. Gather : GLEAN
54. One guarded in football : SHIN
55. “Ciao” : TA-TA
58. Tower stack : CDS
60. Final Fantasy or Dark Souls, for short : RPG

10 thoughts on “0202-19 NY Times Crossword 2 Feb 19, Saturday”

  1. As usual Mr Steinberg displayed his superior intellect over me. I spent about an hour to come up with 10% of this puzzle. “Young Mr Steinberg ” and Saturday are not a good combination . YUCK

  2. Slogged through it finally. Had nest for neck for a long time. Always thought spoon meant cuddle, not neck.

  3. Slow start, but once I got traction it went smoothly. Had to adjust my thinking on “football.” Just keep at it Jack; it’s all about rhythm that develops over time. Good Saturday from DS.

  4. DNF after 43 minutes. Hate to give up after completing 80% of the puzzle, but the upper right corner just wouldn’t work for me. Even though I had CINEMAX and MINICAM, I put UNICORN in 2D and just couldn’t rethink it to CHIMERA.

  5. Thought I was a DNF until chimera came to me. Bill’s time is definitely something to aspire to but probably not in this lifetime!

  6. I gave up using Butler’s blog to check my NYT answers, and gain a little knowledge from reading his “googlies”, about a month ago because the site refused to open on my antique iPad. I’ve been using Rex Parker’s blog.

    I’ve often been put off by Parker’s acidic rants, but today provided the impetus to get me to try Butler again. I’m sooo glad it works. Read SoyBoy Parker’s rant about ICE from today’s puzzle. I personally, am very grateful for the thankless work IC.E. does.

    http://rexwordpuzzle.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2019-02-03T00:00:00-05:00&max-results=2&reverse-paginate=true

    Thank you Bill, for your impartiality!

    1. I like Bill Butler for his straightforward and informative coverage, and I like Rex Parker (aka Michael Sharp) for his acidic and provocative reviews. The best of both worlds, I think.

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