0105-19 NY Times Crossword 5 Jan 19, Saturday

Constructed by: Andrew Zhou
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 34m 47s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. ___ shoes (ballet wear) : POINTE

“En pointe” is the name given to ballet dancing on the tips of the toes, and is a French term. A ballerina wears pointe shoes (sometimes “toe shoes”) to perform this delightful-looking, albeit unhealthy feat (pun!).

13. Asok in “Dilbert,” e.g. : INTERN

In the “Dilbert” comic strip, the character named Asok is one of Dilbert’s coworkers, and a graduate from the Indian Institute of Technology. “Dilbert” creator Scott Adams named Asok for a friend and former coworker of his own at Pacific Bell.

16. 1972 hit with the lyric “You can bend but never break me” : I AM WOMAN

The successful singer Helen Reddy was born in Melbourne, Australia. In 1966, Reddy won a talent contest and earned herself a trip to New York City for an audition. The 25-year-old single mother decided to stay in the US, and a few years later was able to launch a successful singing career. Her hit song “I Am Woman”, released in 1972, was the first recording by an Australian artist to reach #1 in the US charts.

20. It. is in it : NATO

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was founded not long after WWII in 1949 and is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. The first NATO Secretary General was Lord Ismay, Winston Churchill’s chief military assistant during WWII. Famously, Lord Ismay said the goal of NATO was “to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down.”

24. Historic town in SE Connecticut : LYME

Lyme disease is an infectious disease that is becoming more and more common. The condition takes its name from the town of Lyme, Connecticut where several cases were diagnosed in 1975. Humans catch the disease when bitten by infected ticks. If caught early enough, the disease is usually treated successfully with antibiotics.

25. ___ Kapoor, “Slumdog Millionaire” actor : ANIL

The brilliant film “Slumdog Millionaire” is a screen adaptation of a 2005 novel by Indian author Vikas Swarup. A low-budget movie, it ended up winning eight Oscars in 2008. I reckon it turned a profit …

27. Skewers : PANS

To pan something is to criticize it harshly.

28. Design of park land requiring minimal water : XERISCAPING

A location described as “xeric” is extremely dry, arid. The Greek prefix “xero-” means “dry, withered”. The derivative “xeriscaping” is landscaping that reduces or eliminates the need for irrigation, i.e. drought-tolerant landscaping.

32. Gymnast who won all-around gold in Rio : SIMONE BILES

Simone Biles holds the record for the most gold medals won by an American gymnast in a single Olympic Games. She achieved the feat at the 2016 games held in Rio.

34. Word after half or before size : PINT

A US pint is made from 16 fluid ounces, and an imperial pint is 20 fluid ounces. The term “pint” comes into English via Old French, ultimately from the Latin “picta” meaning “painted”. The name arose from a line painted on the side of a beer glass that marked a full measure of ale.

35. Fill : SATE

“Sate” is a variant of the older word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

40. Labrador greeting : ARF!

The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814, and the chocolate Labrador appeared over a century later in the 1930s. The name “Labrador Retriever” is simply a reference to the breed’s origin and behavior. Labs originally “retrieved” from the “Labrador Sea”.

44. Lord Byron, notably, in his personal life : ROUE

“Roue” is a lovely word, I think, one used to describe a less than lovely man, someone of loose morals. “Roue” comes from the French word “rouer” meaning “to break on a wheel”. This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

George Gordon Byron, known simply as “Lord Byron”, was an English poet active in the early 1800s. Byron was equally as famous for his poetry as he was for the wild excesses in his personal life. Byron lived much of that life outside of England, and fought for revolutionaries in both Italy and Greece. He died from a fever contracted while fighting for the Greeks against the Ottomans.

46. Rose Bowl and others : STADIA

The Rose Bowl is the stadium in Pasadena, California that is home to the UCLA football team. It is also host to the Rose Bowl football game held annually on New Year’s Day.

48. Big part of Greenland : ICE SHEET

Greenland is the largest island on the planet. Geographically, Greenland is part of the continent of North America, but culturally and politically is considered part of Europe. The island became a Danish colony in 1815, and joined the European Economic Community (EEC) with Denmark. Greenland withdrew from the EEC after a referendum in 1983. Since 2009, Greenland has been relatively autonomous, with the Danish government retaining control of foreign affairs, defence and the judicial system.

52. Knee injury common among athletes : ACL TEAR

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four major ligaments that support the knee.

54. Rubes, north of the border : HOSERS

The derogatory word “hoser”, meaning “foolish or uncultivated person”, is apparently attributed to Canadians. That said, I just read that the term is in fact rarely used north of the border.

A rube is person lacking sophistication, someone often described as a country bumpkin. The term derives from the masculine name “Reuben”, which was considered back in the early 1800s to be a typical name used in rural areas.

Down

1. It has a stigma : PISTIL

The stamen is the male reproductive organ of a flower. The part of the stamen known as the anther sits on a stalk called the filament that carries the pollen. The pollen is picked up by insects, especially bees, who then transfer pollen from flower to flower. The pistil is the female reproductive organ, and it accepts the pollen.

4. Platform for early Zelda games, for short : NES

The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was sold in North America from 1985 to to 1995. The NES was the biggest selling gaming console of the era. Nintendo replaced the NES with Wii, which is also the biggest-selling game console in the world.

“The Legend of Zelda” is a video game. Apparently, it’s very successful …

6. Feeling akin to Weltschmerz : ENNUI

“Ennui” is the French word for “boredom”, and a word that we now use in English. It’s one of the few French words we’ve imported that we haven’t anglicized, and actually pronounce “correctly”.

9. In a bit, to bards : ANON

“Anon” originally meant “at once”, but the term’s meaning evolved into “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

10. Fast times? : RAMADANS

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and is traditionally a period of fasting. The faithful who observe Ramadan refrain from eating, drinking and sexual relations from dawn to dusk everyday, a lesson in patience, humility and spirituality.

12. Ecclesiastical jurisdictions : SYNODS

The word “synod” comes from the Greek word for assembly, or meeting. A synod is a church council, usually in the Christian faith.

29. Pre-hosp. childbirth aide, often : EMT

Emergency medical technician (EMT)

30. Graceful antlered animals : ROES

Roe deer are found mainly in Europe. They would be the deer shown on television and in movies when Robin Hood was out hunting in Sherwood Forest.

31. Intifada grp. : PLO

The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) was founded in 1964. The PLO’s early stated goal was the liberation of Palestine, with Palestine defined as the geographic entity that existed under the terms of the British Mandate granted by the League of Nations back in 1923. The PLO was granted observer status (i.e. no voting rights) at the United Nations in 1974.

32. Petroleum substitutes : SYNFUELS

Synthetic fuel (synfuel)

33. It blows across the Mediterranean : SIROCCO

A sirocco is a warm, dry and often dusty wind that originates in the Arabian or Sahara desert, and blows across the Mediterranean onto the Southern European coast.

34. One who’s blackballed : PARIAH

“Pariah” is an anglicized version of the Tamil word “Paraiyar”. The Paraiyar are a social group of about 9 million people found in some Indian states and in Sri Lanka. The term “pariah” came to be a general term for members of the lowest caste in society, outcasts.

There is a traditional type of secret ballot in which a voter selects a white wall to indicate support and a black ball indicates opposition. This voting method led to the use of the term “blackball” to mean to shun or to vote against.

39. Interstate numbers : SPEEDS

The US Interstate System is more correctly known as the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, a nod to President Eisenhower who championed the construction. The President had come to recognise the value of the German autobahn system in his experiences during WWII, and resolved to give the US a similar infrastructure. In real terms, the US Interstate construction project is said to have been the largest public works project since the Pyramids of Egypt.

42. Widely used antibiotic brand : CIPRO

Ciprofloxacin (aka “cipro”) is an antibiotic used to treat a whole host of bacterial infections including anthrax.

45. Italia’s Casa d’___ : ESTE

Este is a town in the Province of Padua in the north of Italy. The town gave its name to the House of Este, a European princely dynasty. Members of the House of Este were important patrons of the arts, especially during the Italian Renaissance. The House of Hanover, that ruled Britain from 1714 to 1901 when Queen Victoria died, was perhaps the most notable branch of the House of Este.

49. “Death Becomes ___” (Meryl Streep film) : HER

“Death Becomes Her” is a dark comedy released in 1992 that stars Meryl Streep, Goldie Hawn and Bruce Willis. It’s all about two women downing a magic potion in a quest for eternal youth.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. ___ shoes (ballet wear) : POINTE
7. Museum installations : ALARMS
13. Asok in “Dilbert,” e.g. : INTERN
14. Farm feed holder : GRANARY
15. Holds back, for now : SITS ON
16. 1972 hit with the lyric “You can bend but never break me” : I AM WOMAN
17. Nail site : TOE
18. Strong objection : OUTCRY
20. It. is in it : NATO
21. Spinning out of control : IN A SPIRAL
23. Impersonated : DID
24. Historic town in SE Connecticut : LYME
25. ___ Kapoor, “Slumdog Millionaire” actor : ANIL
27. Skewers : PANS
28. Design of park land requiring minimal water : XERISCAPING
32. Gymnast who won all-around gold in Rio : SIMONE BILES
33. Computer crash cause : SYSTEM ERROR
34. Word after half or before size : PINT
35. Fill : SATE
36. What a jam is packed with : CARS
40. Labrador greeting : ARF!
41. Lived in a love nest : SHACKED UP
44. Lord Byron, notably, in his personal life : ROUE
46. Rose Bowl and others : STADIA
47. Tampa-to-Naples dir. : SSE
48. Big part of Greenland : ICE SHEET
50. Glorification : PRAISE
52. Knee injury common among athletes : ACL TEAR
53. Ready to face another day, say : RESTED
54. Rubes, north of the border : HOSERS
55. Dawns : ONSETS

Down

1. It has a stigma : PISTIL
2. Like some bagels and dips : ONIONY
3. Grp. troubleshooting a 33-Across : IT TEAM
4. Platform for early Zelda games, for short : NES
5. Travel in large numbers : TROOP
6. Feeling akin to Weltschmerz : ENNUI
7. Group that 5-Downs : ARMY
8. Its spirit may be broken : LAW
9. In a bit, to bards : ANON
10. Fast times? : RAMADANS
11. Classification for violent video games : M-RATING
12. Ecclesiastical jurisdictions : SYNODS
14. Pasta dinner staple : GARLIC BREAD
16. “Obviously!” : I CAN SEE THAT!
19. To whom a conductor reports : TRAINMASTER
22. Like much locker room humor : SEXIST
26. Retreat : LAIR
27. Go through : PIERCE
29. Pre-hosp. childbirth aide, often : EMT
30. Graceful antlered animals : ROES
31. Intifada grp. : PLO
32. Petroleum substitutes : SYNFUELS
33. It blows across the Mediterranean : SIROCCO
34. One who’s blackballed : PARIAH
37. What a pop-up link might lead to : AD SITE
38. Shade akin to chestnut : RUSSET
39. Interstate numbers : SPEEDS
42. Widely used antibiotic brand : CIPRO
43. Wife of Mike Pence : KAREN
45. Italia’s Casa d’___ : ESTE
46. High ___ : SEAS
49. “Death Becomes ___” (Meryl Streep film) : HER
51. Jerk : ASS

7 thoughts on “0105-19 NY Times Crossword 5 Jan 19, Saturday”

  1. 14:59, no errors. A strangely easy one, perhaps a gift from the god of crosswords in compensation for tangling with yesterday’s Tim Croce and today’s WSJ (the “Saturday Stumper”) … 😜.

    1. Oops … today’s Newsday (the “Saturday Stumper”) … I did the WSJ, too, but it was easy … 😳

  2. Must’ve been easy…33:47 for me on a Saturday! Had no clue what a “roue” was, but solved it with the down words.

  3. Stubbornly stuck with DOES instead of ROES knowing that does are antlerless. Would have helped, obviously, if I had XERI instead of XEDI. Very close, no cigar.

  4. Mercifully easier than yesterday’s, but had a some problems in the NW corner, which resulted in a couple of look-ups (aka “cheats” or “errors”).

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