0827-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Aug 17, Sunday


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CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Jeff Chen
THEME: Location, Location, Location
Within each of today’s long answers is LOCATED a hidden word. A second clue references the number of the square in the grid where that hidden word is LOCATED. The answer to that second clue is a combination of the hidden word and a type of LOCATION:

22A. Astonishing March Madness success, e.g. : CINDERELLA STORY
29A. 23-Across, literally? : LAST PLACE

116A. Detective in a lab : FORENSIC ANALYST
106A. 118-Across, literally? : CANAL ZONE

42D. Contributed to the world : MADE A DIFFERENCE
43D. 56-Down, literally? : DEAD SPOT

14D. New Hampshire : THE GRANITE STATE
55D. 60-Down, literally? : TEST SITE

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 00s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Way around London, with “the” : TUBE
The official name “London Underground”, used for the city’s train-based mass transit system, is a little deceptive. In fact, over half of the network’s track is “over ground”, with the underground sections reserved for the central areas. It is the oldest subway system in the world, opening in 1863. It was also the first system to use electric rolling stock, back in 1890. “The Tube”, as it is known by Londoners, isn’t the longest subway system in the world though. That honor belongs to the Shanghai Metro. My personal favorite part of the Tube is the Tube map! It is a marvel of design …

5. E.R. V.I.P.s : MDS
One might find a registered nurse (RN) or a medical doctor (MD) in an emergency room (ER).

13. Backflow preventer in a drain : P-TRAP
Most sinks in a home have a P-trap in the outlet pipe that empties into the sewer line. This P-trap has at its heart a U-bend that retains a small amount of water after the sink is emptied. This plug of water serves as a seal to prevent sewer gases entering into the home. By virtue of its design, the U-bend can also capture any heavy objects (like an item of jewelry) that might fall through the plughole. But the “trapping” of fallen objects is secondary to the P-trap’s main function of trapping sewer gases.

20. Sub : HOAGIE
Hoagy is another name for a submarine sandwich. The term “hoagy” (sometimes “hoagie”) originated in Philadelphia, apparently introduced by Italians working in the shipyards during WWI. The shipyards were located on Hog Island, and the sandwich was first called the Hog Island, which morphed into the hoagy.

21. Oscar role for Vivien Leigh : O’HARA
As casting proceeded for the movie version of “Gone With the Wind”, Clark Gable was a shoo-in from day one. The role of Scarlett O’Hara was considered very desirable in the acting community, with Bette Davis on the short list, and Katherine Hepburn demanding an appointment with producer David O. Selznick to discuss the role. Vivien Leigh was an unlikely contender, an English actress for the definitive Southern belle role. Selznick was adamant though, and stuck by his preference for Leigh despite a lot of protests.

22. Astonishing March Madness success, e.g. : CINDERELLA STORY
In the world of sports, a “Cinderella Story” is a situation in which a competitor or team is far more successful than is reasonably expected. The term is a reference to the “Cinderella” fairy tale.

“March Madness” is the name given to the NCAA Men’s Division 1 Basketball Championship (among others), that is held in spring each year.

24. He denied Christ three times : PETER
The Catholic Church regards Saint Peter as the first to hold the papal office, as he was the first bishop of Rome. Peter took office in 30 CE and probably died in 64 CE, which makes him the longest-reigning pope.

25. Device with a Retina display : IPAD
“Retina Display” is a brand name used by Apple for screens that have a high enough pixel density so that individual pixels are not visible to the naked eye at normal viewing distance.

27. “Madame X” painter John Singer ___ : SARGENT
John Singer Sargent was an American artist, best known for his portrait painting. Sargent trained as an artist mainly in Paris, although he found that he had to leave the city after one of his paintings was deemed “scandalous” by French society. The work was “Portrait of Madame X” (1884), a painting of a noted lady in society that was considered too risque and sensual. After the painting was exhibited, his commissions dried up and Sargent moved to London in order to continue his career. Today the “Portrait of Madame X” is considered by many to be Sargent’s best work.

35. Actor ___ Buchholz of “The Magnificent Seven” : HORST
“The Magnificent Seven” really is a very entertaining western movie (and I am no fan of westerns, quite frankly). Famously, it is a 1960 remake of the Akira Kurosawa 1954 Japanese film, “Seven Samurai”. “The Magnificent Seven” is the second most shown film on television in the US. Only “The Wizard of Oz” gets more air time.

41. “Where America’s Day Begins” : GUAM
Guam is a US territory in the western Pacific Ocean, the largest of the Mariana Islands. Guam is also the first territory in the United States to see the sun rise on any particular day. As such, the territory has adopted the motto, “Where America’s day begins”. During WWII, the US territory of Guam was occupied by the Japanese for 31 months until it was liberated in the Battle of Guam in July 1944. Of the 18,000 Japanese men holding the island, only 485 surrendered, so almost all perished in the invasion. One Japanese sergeant hid out on the island for an incredible 28 years, finally surrendering in 1972!

46. Get ready to be dubbed : KNEEL
Kneel, and the Queen might “dub thee a knight” if you’re lucky. “Dub” is a specific term derived from Old English that was used to mean “make a knight”. As the knight was also given a knightly name at the same time, “dub” has come to mean “give someone a name”.

50. Machine-gun while flying low : STRAFE
We’ve been using “strafe” to mean an attack on a ground position from low-flying aircraft since WWII. Prior to that, the word was used by British soldiers to mean any form of attack. It was picked up from the German word for “punish” as it was used in “Gott strafe England” meaning, “May God punish England”.

52. Stereotypical oil tycoon : TEXAN
Our term “tycoon” meaning powerful business person was originally used by foreigners to describe the shogun of Japan. “Tycoon” is an anglicization of the Japanese “taikun” meaning “great lord or prince”.

61. Muskmelon variety : HONEYDEW
What we call “honeydew” melons are also known as White Antibes, especially in France and Algeria where the cultivar has been grown for many years. Antibes is a commune in southeastern France, located between Nice and Cannes.

65. Bombs developed in the 1950s : EDSELS
The Edsel brand of automobile was named for Edsel Ford, son of Henry. Sadly, the name “Edsel” has become synonymous with “failure”, which was no fault of Edsel himself who had died several years before the Edsel line was introduced. When the Ford Motor Company introduced the Edsel on 4 September 1957, Ford proclaimed the day to be “E Day”.

67. Eminently draft-worthy : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System (SSS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

68. Pitch : SPIEL
A spiel is a lengthy speech or argument designed to persuade, like a sales pitch. “Spiel” comes to us from German, either directly (“spiel” is the German for “play”) or via the Yiddish “shpil”.

74. Heat : PRELIM
The term “heat”, meaning a qualifying race, dates back to the 1660s. Originally a heat was a run given to a horse to prepare it for a race, to “heat” it up.

78. Noon, in Nantes : MIDI
Nantes is a beautiful city located on the delta of the Loire, Erdre and Sèvre rivers. It has the well deserved nickname of “The Venice of the West”. I had the privilege of visiting Nantes a couple of times on business, and I can attest that it really is a charming city …

82. Singer Simone : NINA
Nina Simone was the stage name of Eunice Waymon. Simone was very much associated with jazz music, although she really wanted to be a classical musician early in her career. She was inspired by a love for the music of Bach.

85. N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Thomas : ISIAH
Isiah Thomas played his whole professional career with the Detroit Pistons, and he is now the head coach with the Florida International University Golden Panthers. When you’re out shopping for popcorn, keep an eye out for the Dale & Thomas brand, as it’s co-owned by Isiah Thomas.

91. Staff openings? : CLEFS
“Clef” is the French word for “key”. In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, the alto clef is the C-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

110. Africa’s oldest republic : LIBERIA
Liberia is a country in West Africa. The country was founded in 1847 by former American slaves who were repatriated to Africa. As a result, the Liberian flag resembles the US flag, and the country’s motto is “The love of liberty brought us here”.

115. Old Russian ruler known as “Moneybag” : IVAN I
Ivan I was the Prince of Moscow, and was nicknamed “Kalita” (“Moneybag”). He used his wealth well, giving loans to neighboring principalities. These cities got into so much debt that Ivan’s successors were eventually able to annex them.

116. Detective in a lab : FORENSIC ANALYST
Something described as forensic is connected with a court of law, or with public discussion or debate. The term comes from the Latin “forensis” meaning “of a forum, of a place of assembly”. We mainly use the word today to mean “pertaining to legal trials” as in “forensic medicine” and “forensic science”.

122. Frisbees and such : DISCS
The Frisbee concept started back in 1938 with a couple who had an upturned cake pan that they were tossing between each other on Santa Monica Beach in California. They were offered 25 cents for the pan on the spot, and as pans could be bought for 5 cents, the pair figured there was a living to be earned.

126. Gregor ___, protagonist in Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” : SAMSA
“The Metamorphosis” is a famous novella by Franz Kafka, regarded by many as one of the greatest pieces of short fiction written in the 20th century. The story tells of the metamorphosis of Gregor Samsa into a gigantic insect. His sister Grete Samsa becomes his caregiver.

127. Snack food brand : UTZ
Utz is the largest privately-held producer of snack foods in the US. The company was founded in 1921 and is based in Hanover, Pennsylvania.

Down
2. Sea urchin, at a sushi bar : UNI
Sea urchins are globular, spiny creatures found just about everywhere in the ocean. The “roe” of a sea urchin is eaten as a delicacy in several cuisines around the world. In a sushi restaurant, the sea urchin roe is called “uni”. The term “roe” normally means “fish eggs”, but in the case of the sea urchin it refers to the gonads of both the male and female.

3. Declare verboten : BAN
“Verboten” is the German word for “forbidden”, and is a word that we have imported into English.

7. 1904 world’s fair city: Abbr. : STL
The 1904 World’s Fair was actually called the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, as it celebrated the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase. There are many claims of “firsts” at the 1904 Fair, and among the list of real “firsts” are the introduction of Dr. Pepper, the ice cream cone and Puffed Wheat! The fair, which ran for much of 1904, was the host for the 1904 Summer Olympic Games, the first to be held in the US.

9. Loosely woven fabric with a rough texture : RATINE
Ratiné is a loosely woven and rough fabric made with knotty yarns. Ratiné is also known as “sponge cloth”.

10. Try to find oneself? : EGOSURF
We’ve all done it, googling our own names to see what comes up. It’s called “egosurfing”.

11. ___ quotes : AIR
Air quotes are those gestures that some make with their fingers to emphasise sarcastically a particular word or phrase.

13. Candy that fizzes in the mouth : POP ROCKS
The fizzy candy marketed as Pop Rocks was introduced in 1975. The candy is made by exposing a melted sugar syrup to carbon dioxide at high pressure. As the syrup cools, it traps high-pressure bubbles of the gas inside the candy. When the candy dissolves in the mouth, the carbon dioxide is released with a popping sound.

14. New Hampshire : THE GRANITE STATE
New Hampshire is called the Granite State, because it has lots of granite quarries and granite formations.

17. Line usually on the left or right side : PART
That would be the parting in a head of hair.

19. Tonto player of 2013 : DEPP
On the television version of “The Lone Ranger”, Tonto was played by the actor Jay Silverheels. On the television version of “The Lone Ranger”, Tonto was played by the actor Jay Silverheels. In the 2013 movie “The Lone Ranger”, Tonto was played by Johnny Depp. Famously, the Lone Ranger’s horse was called Silver and Tonto’s mount was named Scout. But in the early TV shows, Tonto rode a horse called White Feller.

23. Murderer of Hamlet : LAERTES
In William Shakespeare’s play “Hamlet”, Laertes is the son of Polonius and brother of Ophelia. It is Laertes who kills Hamlet using a poisoned sword..

31. Facial feature of the Bond villain Ernst Blofeld : SCAR
Ernst Stavro Blofeld is a villain in the James Bond universe. Blofeld has been played on the big screen several times by different actors. My favorite is Donald Pleasance in 1967’s “You Only Live Twice”. In the original Ian Fleming novels, Blofeld was born on 28 May 1908, which happens to be Fleming’s own birthday.

32. Jargon : CANT
Cant is insincere language, or the language associated with a particularly group. Back in the 1600s, the term described the whining of beggars.

“Jargon” can mean nonsensical and meaningless talk, or the specialized language of a particular group, trade or profession. The term is Old French, with the more usual meaning of “a chattering”. How apt …

48. Home to the National Border Patrol Museum : EL PASO
Although there have been human settlements in the El Paso area for thousands of years, the first European settlement was founded in 1659 by the Spanish. That first community was on the south bank of the Rio Grande, and was called El Paso del Norte (the North Pass). Most of the urban development under Spanish rule took place on the south side of the river, with El Paso del Norte acting as the center of governance for the Spanish for the territory of New Mexico. The Rio Grande was chosen as the border between Mexico and the US in 1848, so most of the city of El Paso del Norte became part of the Mexican state of Chihuahua (and is now called Ciudad Juárez ). The area north of the river developed as a US military post, eventually becoming the modern city of El Paso, Texas.

51. Funny Tina : FEY
Comic actress Tina Fey has a scar on her face a few inches long on her left cheek, which I was shocked to learn was caused by a childhood “slashing” incident. When she was just five years old and playing in the front yard of her house, someone just came up to her and slashed her with a knife. How despicable!

53. Bubkes : NADA
“Bupkis” (also “bubkes”) is a word that means “absolutely nothing, nothing of value”, and is of Yiddish origin.

59. Setting eschewed by Hawaii: Abbr. : DST
Arizona and Hawaii are the only two states in the US that do not observe daylight saving time (DST), having opted out when the Uniform Time Act was passed by the US Congress in 1966. Some Native American nations in Arizona observe DST, and some don’t. As a result, times can change back and forth a few times while driving across Arizona during the summer.

61. Capturer of some embarrassing gaffes : HOT MIC
Our word “gaffe”, meaning a social blunder, comes from the French “gaffe” meaning “clumsy remark”, although it originally was the word for a boat hook. The exact connection between a boat hook and a blunder seems to be unclear.

62. “The Iceman Cometh” playwright : O’NEILL
“The Iceman Cometh” is a play written by American playwright Eugene O’Neill that was first performed in 1946 on Broadway. The play centers on some down-and-out men in a shabby saloon in Manhattan. The title is a reference to the “iceman”, the man who would have delivered ice to homes back in the time of the play. The reference is to a bawdy joke in which the “iceman” was having an affair with someone’s wife.

69. Winner of four 1990s-2000s golf majors : ELS
Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. He is a former World No. 1 and has won four majors: the US Open (1994 & 1997) and the British Open (2002 & 2012).

70. 1953 Leslie Caron film : LILI
“Lili” is 1953 musical film starring Leslie Caron in the title role, a naive French orphan girl. A famous song from the movie is “Hi-Lili, Hi-Lo”.

The beautiful and talented French actress and dancer Leslie Caron is best known for her appearances in the classic Hollywood musical films “An American in Paris”, “Lili” and “Gigi”. Although I love the movie “Gigi”, my favorite of her performances is in the comedy war drama “Father Goose” in which she played opposite Cary Grant. Caron has danced with the best, including Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Rudolf Nureyev.

81. Former world capital called “City of Lights” : KARACHI
Karachi is the largest city in Pakistan. Karachi was the country’s capital when Pakistan gained independence from Britain in 1947. The capital was moved to Rawalpindi in 1958, and then to the newly built city of Islamabad in 1960.

84. Shift+8 : ASTERISK
The name of the typographical symbol “asterisk” comes from the Greek word “asteriskos” meaning “little star”. The original use of the asterisk was by printers of family trees in feudal times. Back then it was a symbol indicating the date of birth.

89. Mathematician Turing : ALAN
Alan Turing was an English mathematician. He was deservedly well-respected for his code-breaking work during WWII at Bletchley Park in England. However, despite his contributions to cracking the German Enigma code and other crucial work, Turing was prosecuted for homosexuality in 1952. He agreed to chemical castration, treatment with female hormones, and then two years later he committed suicide by taking cyanide. Turing’s life story is told in the 2014 film “The Imitation Game” with Benedict Cumberbatch playing the lead. I thoroughly enjoyed that film …

93. Asked for a desk, say : ANAGRAM
“Asked” is an anagram of “a desk”.

95. That the sum of the numbers on a roulette wheel is 666, e.g. : FUN FACT
The name “roulette” means “little wheel” in French, and the game as we know it today did in fact originate in Paris, in 1796. A roulette wheel bears the numbers 1-36. A French entrepreneur called François Blanc introduced the number “0” on the wheel, to give the house an extra advantage. Legend has it that Blanc made a deal with the devil in order to unearth the secrets of roulette. The legend is supported by the fact that the numbers 1 through 36 add up to a total of “666”, which is the “Number of the Beast”. Spooky …

98. Uganda’s Amin : IDI
Idi Amin received most of his military training in the British armed forces, eventually achieving the highest rank possible for a Black African in the British Colonial Army in 1959, that of Warrant Officer. On his return to Uganda Amin joined his country’s military and quickly rose to the rank of Deputy Commander of the Army. During that time he was quite the athlete. He was a noted rugby player and swimmer, and for nine years held the Ugandan national light-heavyweight boxing title. By the early seventies, Amin was commander of all the armed forces of Uganda and in 1971 seized power in a military coup, displacing the country’s president Milton Obote. There followed seven years of brutal rule by Amin during which it is estimated that between 100,000 and 500,000 people were murdered. Amin was ousted from power in 1979 after a war with Tanzania, and fled to Libya where he stayed for a year. He then moved to Saudi Arabia, where he was financially supported by the Saudi Royal Family for the remainder of his life. Amin died in 2003.

99. Marsh birds : EGRETS
Egrets are a group of several species of white herons. Many egret species were faced with extinction in the 1800s and early 1900s due to plume hunting, a practice driven by the demand for egret plumes that could be incorporated into hats.

107. Desi of Desilu Productions : ARNAZ
As one might imagine, “Desilu” is a contraction of the names of the production company’s owners, Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball. The name “Desilu” was first given to the couple’s ranch in Chatsworth, California. Desilu the production company ended up producing some great shows, including the original “Star Trek” and “Mission: Impossible”.

111. Where fighter jets are found: Abbr. : AFBS
Air Force Base (AFB)

113. “Gangnam Style” hitmaker : PSY
PSY is the stage name of South Korean rapper Park Jae-sang. PSY became an international star when his 2102 music video “Gangnam Style” went viral on YouTube. That video had over 1 billion views on YouTube in about six months, making it the most viewed YouTube video clip of all time. I am not one of that billion …

117. ___ pro nobis (pray for us) : ORA
“Ora pro nobis” translates from Latin as “pray for us”. It is a common phrase used in the Roman Catholic tradition and is often shortened to “OPN”.

118. Sch. in Fort Collins : CSU
Colorado State University was founded in Fort Collins in 1870 as the Colorado Agricultural College. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Colorado State Rams, although back in the days of the Colorado Agricultural College, the teams were referred to as the Aggies.

119. The dark side : YIN
The yin and the yang can be illustrated using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

121. “Eww, stop!” : TMI
TMI (too much information!)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Way around London, with “the” : TUBE
5. E.R. V.I.P.s : MDS
8. Haunted house sound : CREAK
13. Backflow preventer in a drain : P-TRAP
18. Brief, as a visit : IN AND OUT
20. Sub : HOAGIE
21. Oscar role for Vivien Leigh : O’HARA
22. Astonishing March Madness success, e.g. : CINDERELLA STORY
24. He denied Christ three times : PETER
25. Device with a Retina display : IPAD
26. The opposition : ANTIS
27. “Madame X” painter John Singer ___ : SARGENT
29. 23-Across, literally? : LAST PLACE
33. Cozy : SNUG
35. Actor ___ Buchholz of “The Magnificent Seven” : HORST
36. Epitome of simplicity : ABC
37. Sour : TART
39. Spicy fare? : EROTICA
41. “Where America’s Day Begins” : GUAM
43. Made an impression? : DENTED
45. Iron: Fr. : FER
46. Get ready to be dubbed : KNEEL
50. Machine-gun while flying low : STRAFE
52. Stereotypical oil tycoon : TEXAN
54. Remains unused : SITS IDLE
56. Sweets : DEAR
58. Take both sides? : STRADDLE
60. Word on a jar : TIPS
61. Muskmelon variety : HONEYDEW
65. Bombs developed in the 1950s : EDSELS
66. Some airport figures, for short : ETAS
67. Eminently draft-worthy : ONE-A
68. Pitch : SPIEL
71. Wiped out : ATE IT
72. Middling : SO-SO
73. Plenty sore, with “off” : TEED
74. Heat : PRELIM
76. Antiparticle first observed in 1929 : POSITRON
78. Noon, in Nantes : MIDI
79. Disaster film? : OIL SLICK
82. Singer Simone : NINA
83. Doomed : ILL-FATED
85. N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Thomas : ISIAH
87. Ladies’ shoe fastener : T-STRAP
91. Staff openings? : CLEFS
92. By way of : VIA
94. Wine bar order : CARAFE
96. Elusive : EELY
97. ___ Lenoir, inventor of the internal-combustion engine : ETIENNE
100. Location of Waimea Valley : OAHU
101. What one will never be, in golf : PAR
102. Tended, with “for” : CARED
104. Comedian’s stock in trade : GAGS
106. 118-Across, literally? : CANAL ZONE
110. Africa’s oldest republic : LIBERIA
112. Result of some plotting : GRAPH
114. Bingo square : FREE
115. Old Russian ruler known as “Moneybag” : IVAN I
116. Detective in a lab : FORENSIC ANALYST
122. Frisbees and such : DISCS
123. Like spoiled kids : BRATTY
124. Metallic element that’s #21 on the periodic table : SCANDIUM
125. Like many concept cars : SLEEK
126. Gregor ___, protagonist in Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” : SAMSA
127. Snack food brand : UTZ
128. Latin years : ANNI

Down
1. Sign of nervousness : TIC
2. Sea urchin, at a sushi bar : UNI
3. Declare verboten : BAN
4. Break off a romance : END IT
5. Takeaway, of a sort : MORAL
6. When a baby is expected : DUE DATE
7. 1904 world’s fair city: Abbr. : STL
8. Utilities, insurance, advertising, etc. : COSTS
9. Loosely woven fabric with a rough texture : RATINE
10. Try to find oneself? : EGOSURF
11. ___ quotes : AIR
12. What a designated driver takes : KEYS
13. Candy that fizzes in the mouth : POP ROCKS
14. New Hampshire : THE GRANITE STATE
15. Gives stars to : RATES
16. Have no existence : AREN’T
17. Line usually on the left or right side : PART
19. Tonto player of 2013 : DEPP
20. ___ characters (Chinese writing) : HAN
23. Murderer of Hamlet : LAERTES
28. Tuna, at a sushi bar : AHI
29. Doesn’t keep up : LAGS
30. Go up against : ABUT
31. Facial feature of the Bond villain Ernst Blofeld : SCAR
32. Jargon : CANT
34. Runs for a long pass, say : GOES DEEP
38. One component of a data plan : TEXT
40. What the prefix “tera-” means : TRILLION
42. Contributed to the world : MADE A DIFFERENCE
43. 56-Down, literally? : DEAD SPOT
44. “Don’t you ___!” : DARE
47. Line judge? : EDITOR
48. Home to the National Border Patrol Museum : EL PASO
49. Teacher’s unit : LESSON
51. Funny Tina : FEY
53. Bubkes : NADA
55. 60-Down, literally? : TEST SITE
57. Stay : REPRIEVE
59. Setting eschewed by Hawaii: Abbr. : DST
61. Capturer of some embarrassing gaffes : HOT MIC
62. “The Iceman Cometh” playwright : O’NEILL
63. Hospital sticker : NEEDLE
64. Handling well : WIELDING
69. Winner of four 1990s-2000s golf majors : ELS
70. 1953 Leslie Caron film : LILI
75. Other: Abbr. : MISC
77. Networking assets : INS
80. “Ta-ta!” : CIAO!
81. Former world capital called “City of Lights” : KARACHI
84. Shift+8 : ASTERISK
86. “Everybody’s a comedian” : HA HA
88. Certain cheap car, informally : REPO
89. Mathematician Turing : ALAN
90. Apt rhyme for “fire” : PYRE
93. Asked for a desk, say : ANAGRAM
95. That the sum of the numbers on a roulette wheel is 666, e.g. : FUN FACT
98. Uganda’s Amin : IDI
99. Marsh birds : EGRETS
102. Showing politesse : CIVIL
103. Lower : ABASE
105. International package deliverer : SANTA
107. Desi of Desilu Productions : ARNAZ
108. Show a bias : LEAN
109. Nintendo game princess : ZELDA
110. Lens caps? : LIDS
111. Where fighter jets are found: Abbr. : AFBS
113. “Gangnam Style” hitmaker : PSY
117. ___ pro nobis (pray for us) : ORA
118. Sch. in Fort Collins : CSU
119. The dark side : YIN
120. Symbol on the flag of Argentina or Uruguay : SUN
121. “Eww, stop!” : TMI

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8 thoughts on “0827-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Aug 17, Sunday”

  1. 41:05, no errors. Lost a lot of time entering alternate words that fit in the boxes. For example: 70D GIGI for LILI; 80D HIHO for CIAO.

  2. I understand why there are only two comments ahead of me late in the day. Not happy about time spent and ending with several errors. My compensation: I did figure out the theme though I have never liked cross references.

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