0820-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 20 Aug 17, Sunday

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Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today’s New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Ruth Bloomfield Margolin
THEME: Found in Your Inbox
Each of today’s themed answers are common phrases, but with a starting RE- omitted. The RE- prefix is included in the themed clue, hinting that the the answer is the title of an email that might be FOUND IN YOUR INBOX:

22A. Re: ___ (suitor’s subject line) : (RE)QUEST FOR PROPOSAL
29A. Re: ___ (stingy date’s subject line) : (RE)TREAT IS NOT AN OPTION
45A. Re: ___ (song lyricist’s subject line) : (RE)VERSE COURSE
65A. Re: ___ (film director’s subject line) : (RE)ACTION TIME
69A. Re: ___ (sales agent’s subject line … with an attachment) : (RE)AD-ONLY FILE
88A. Re: ___ (duster’s subject line) : (RE)MOTE CONTROL
104A. Re: ___ (prison librarian’s subject line) : (RE)WARD FOR INFORMATION
115A. Re: ___ (celebrity physician’s subject line) : (RE)ACHES FOR THE STARS

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 29m 09s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Matisse, e.g., stylistically : FAUVE
Henri Matisse was a French artist renowned for his contribution to modern art. In his early career, Matisse was classed as a “fauve”, one of the group of artists known as the “wild beasts” who emphasized strong color over realism in their works. He was a lifelong friend of Pablo Picasso, and the two were considered to be good-natured rivals so their works are often compared. One major difference between their individual portfolios is that Picasso tended to paint from his imagination, whereas Matisse tended to use nature as his inspiration.

6. H. H. Munro pseudonym : SAKI
Hector Hugh Munro was a British writer who actually was born in Burma. He was most famous for his short stories, which he published using the pen name “Saki”. “The Square Egg and Other Sketches” was a collection of short stories published in 1924, nine years after his death.

10. XXX : CHIS
The Greek letter “chi” is the one that looks like our “X”.

26. The first pope, to French speakers : ST PIERRE
The Catholic Church regards Saint Peter as the first to hold the papal office, as he was the first bishop of Rome. Peter took office in 30 CE and probably died in 64 CE, which makes him the longest-reigning pope.

27. Words before fat and lean, in a nursery rhyme : EAT NO …
Jack Sprat was a nickname given in the 16th century to people of small stature. Jack featured in a proverb of the day:

Jack will eat not fat, and Jull doth love no leane. Yet betwixt them both they lick the dishes cleane.

Over time, this mutated into a nursery rhyme that is still recited in England:

Jack Sprat could eat no fat. His wife could eat no lean. And so between them both, you see, they licked the platter clean.

28. The Gabor sisters, e.g. : TRIO
Magda Gabor was the elder sister of Zsa Zsa and Eva Gabor. Like her sisters, Magda was an actress and socialite. Magda married six times in all. Her most famous husband was probably the fifth, the English actor George Sanders, although that only lasted for 32 days. Sanders had been married to Magda’s younger sister Zsa Zsa.

Zsa Zsa Gabor was a Hungarian American actress, born in Budapest as Sári Gábor (the older sister of the actress Eva). Zsa Zsa Gabor was married a whopping nine times, including a 5-year stint with Conrad Hilton and another 5 years with the actor George Sanders. One of Gabor’s famous quips was that she was always a good housekeeper, as after every divorce she kept the house!

Eva Gabor was the youngest of the Gabor sisters, all three of whom were celebrated Hollywood actresses and socialites (her siblings were Zsa-Zsa and Magda). One of Eva’s claims to fame is the unwitting promotion of the game called “Twister”, the sales of which were languishing in 1966. In an appearance on “The Tonight Show” she got on all fours and played the game with Johnny Carson. Sales took off immediately, and Twister became a huge hit.

39. The crystal in some crystal balls : QUARTZ
Quartz is a form of silicon oxide and is the second most abundant mineral found in the Earth’s crust, after feldspar. The name “quartz” comes into English via German, and probably ultimately derives from a Slavic word meaning “hard”.

41. Carrier to Seoul, for short : KAL
Korean Air (KAL) is South Korea’s largest airline. KAL was founded in 1946 as Korean National Airlines.

49. Part of a locust tree : THORN
The various species known as the locust tree are apparently so called because their seed pods resemble the locust, the insect.

56. Quenched : SLAKED
“To slake” is to satisfy a craving, as in slaking one’s thirst.

61. Kind of diagram : VENN
Englishman John Venn was an expert in the field of logic, and introduced the Venn diagram in his book “Symbolic Logic” in 1881. Venn diagrams are used in set theory, to illustrate the logical relationships between sets of variables.

62. Dwellers on the Arabian Peninsula : OMANIS
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

77. One is usually set by a chair : AGENDA
“Agenda” is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

85. Baseball exec Bud : SELIG
Bud Selig was the Commissioner of Baseball for Major League Baseball from 1998 to 2015. Selig became acting commissioner in 1992 after the resignation of Fay Vincent. The team owners searched for a new commissioner for six years, and finally gave the permanent job to Selig in 1998.

91. Tony winner Hagen : UTA
Uta Hagen was a German-born American actress. Hagen married Jose Ferrer in 1938, but they were divorced ten years later after it was revealed that she was having a long-running affair with Paul Robeson. Her association with Robeson, a prominent civil rights activist, earned her a spot on the Hollywood Blacklist during the McCarthy Era. This forced her away from film, but towards a successful stage career in New York City.

92. $$$$, on Yelp : PRICEY
yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

94. “Selma” director DuVernay : AVA
Ava DuVernay is a filmmaker who became the first African-American woman to win the Best Director Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, a feat she achieved in 2012 for her feature film “Middle of Nowhere”. “Middle of Nowhere” tells the story of a woman who drops out of medical school to focus on husband when he is sentenced to 8 years in prison. DuVernay also directed the 2014 film “Selma”, which was centered on the 1965 voting rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

95. Greek gods’ drink : NECTAR
In Greek mythology, according to Homer anyway, the drink of the gods was nectar, and their food was ambrosia.

97. “Down,” at a diner : ON TOAST
Diner lingo, the verbal slang used by the staff, can be very colorful. Here are a few examples:

  • Adam & Eve on a raft: two poached eggs on toast
  • Adam & Eve on a raft and wreck ’em: two scrambled eggs on toast
  • Burn one: put a hamburger on the grill
  • Burn one, take it through the garden and pin a rose on it: hamburger with lettuce, tomato and onion
  • Down: on toast
  • Whiskey down: on rye toast
  • Cluck and grunt: ham and eggs

100. Pithy observations : APERCUS
An apercu is a first view, a glance. By extension, the term “apercu” can also be used for a detached view, an overview or a short synopsis. “Aperçu” is French for “perceived”.

109. Sidney who directed “12 Angry Men” : LUMET
As a movie director, Sidney Lumet had a great string of celebrated films to his name including “12 Angry Men”, “Dog Day Afternoon”, “Network” and “The Verdict”. Although nominated for the Academy Award for Best Director for each of these films, he never won an individual Oscar. However, the Academy gave Lumet the recognition he deserved in 2004 by presenting him with an Honorary Award.

The powerful 1957 movie “12 Angry Men” was directed by Sidney Lumet, and has a stellar cast of “jury members” including Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Jack Klugman and Ed Begley. If ever there is a movie that clearly was based on a play, it’s this one. Practically the whole film takes place on one set, the jury room.

114. The Destroyer, in Hinduism : SIVA
The Hindu Trinity is Brahma the creator, Vishnu the maintainer or preserver, and Shiva (also Siva) the destroyer or transformer.

119. Mark Zuckerberg when founding Facebook, e.g. : TEEN
If you’ve seen the movie “The Social Network”, you’ll know that Facebook started off as “Facemash”, a site created by Mark Zuckerberg while he was attending Harvard. Facemash became “Thefacebook” and membership was opened to students beyond Harvard, initially including Ivy League schools and then most colleges across North America.

120. Eliminated by a ref’s decision : TKO’D
In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can’t get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly “knocked out”. A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter’s safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

121. Heavenly hunter : ORION
The very recognizable constellation of Orion is named for the Greek God Orion, the Hunter. If you take a look at the star in Orion’s “right shoulder”, the second brightest star in the constellation, you might notice that it is quite red in color. This is the famous star called Betelgeuse, a red supergiant, a huge star that is on its way out. Betelgeuse is expected to explode into a supernova within the next thousand years or so. You don’t want to miss that …

123. European capital : OSLO
Oslo is the capital of Norway. The city of Oslo burns trash to fuel half of its buildings, including all of its schools. The problem faced by the city is that it doesn’t generate enough trash. So, Oslo imports trash from Sweden, England and Ireland, and is now looking to import some American trash too.

Down
1. Online help : FAQS
Most websites have a page listing answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). Even this blog has one!

3. Lone Star State sch. : UTEP
The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) was founded in 1914, and was originally named the Texas State School of Mines and Metallurgy. To this day, there is a mine shaft on the campus. The mascot of the school’s sports teams is Paydirt Pete, a prospector from the mining industry. The teams are also known as the UTEP Miners and Lady Miners.

The single star on the state flag of Texas is a reminder of the “lone star” on the 1836 National Standard of Texas. The single gold star on a blue background symbolized Texas as an independent republic and its struggle for independence from Mexico.

5. Perfume compound : ESTER
Esters are very common chemicals. The smaller, low-molecular weight esters are usually pleasant smelling and are often found in perfumes. At the other end of the scale, the higher-molecular weight nitroglycerin is a nitrate ester and is very explosive, and polyester is a huge molecule and is a type of plastic. Fats and oils found in nature are fatty acid esters of glycerol known as glycerides.

6. Inspector Clouseau’s employer : SURETE
The French National Police Force used to be known as “La Sûreté Nationale”. The National Police force operates in cities and large towns. The military Gendarmerie is the second national organization tasked with law enforcement in France, and it has jurisdiction in smaller towns and rural areas as well as at the country’s borders.

A lot of people think that the Inspector Clouseau character (played originally by Peter Sellers) is “The Pink Panther”. It’s actually the jewel that was stolen in the original movie. Would you believe there are eleven “Pink Panther” movies in the whole series?

7. “A Navel” artist, 1923 : ARP
Jean Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

8. Wine-and-cassis drink : KIR
Kir is a French cocktail made by adding a teaspoon or so of crème de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to a glass, and then topping it off with white wine. The drink is named after Felix Kir, the Mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who used to offer the drink to his guests. My wife is particularly fond of a variant called a Kir Royale, in which the white wine is replaced with champagne.

10. Dalmatian, e.g. : CROAT
The Republic of Croatia is a Balkan country. The Croats declared independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. Croatia became a member of NATO in 2009, and a member of the European Union in 2013.

Dalmatia is a historical region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, with most of its area falling in modern-day Croatia.

11. Lilylike plant : HOSTA
The Hosta genus of plant was once classified as a lily, but is now in a family of its own and is described as “lily-like”. The plant was given the name “Hosta” in honor of the Austrian botanist Nicholas Thomas Host.

14. Like the people who invented golf : SCOTTISH
The modern game of golf originated in Scotland in the 15th century. The first written record of golf is actually a banning of the game, by King James II in 1457. King James IV was a fan of golf, and so lifted the ban in 1502. The venerated Old Course at St. Andrews dates back to 1574. The first golf club established in the US was in Yonkers, New York in 1888. That first club was also named St. Andrews.

15. Astronaut after whom Buzz Lightyear was named : ALDRIN
Buzz Aldrin was a true American hero, I’d say. He flew 66 combat missions in Korea, shot down two MiGs, earned his Sc. D. degree from MIT, and was one of the two men who landed on the moon for the first time. Now that man, he lived a life worth living.

1995’s “Toy Story” was the world’s first feature-length computer-animated movie. “Toy Story” was also the studio Pixar’s first production. The main roles in the film are Woody and Buzz Lightyear, voiced by Tom Hanks and Tim Allen respectively. Hanks was the first choice to voice Woody, Allen was asked to voice Buzz after Billy Crystal turned down the role.

16. Couch potato : VIDIOT
“Vidiot” is such a colorful term. It is a portmanteau of “video and “idiot”, and is used to describe someone obsessed with watching television or playing video games. The term was coined in 1957 by jazz musician and storyteller Ken Nordine who used as the title of song about a TV-addicted patient in a therapist’s office.

17. Some home printers : EPSONS
Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, and one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

19. Title Seuss creature : LORAX
“The Lorax” is a children’s book written by Dr. Seuss. It is an allegorical work questioning the problems created by industrialization, and in particular its impact on the environment. At one point in the story, the Lorax “speaks for the trees, for the trees have no tongues”. “The Lorax” was adapted into an animated film that was released in 2012, with Danny DeVito voicing the title character.

24. Lowly worker : PEON
A peon is a lowly worker with no real control over his/her working conditions. The word comes into English from Spanish, in which language it has the same meaning.

31. Short and detached, in music: Abbr. : STAC
Staccato is a musical direction signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato, indicating long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

34. An official color of the Miami Dolphins : AQUA
The Miami Dolphins football team was founded in 1966 by politician Joe Robbie and the comedian Danny Thomas.

36. Tirade : RANT
The term “tirade” describes a long and vehement speech, and is a word that came into English from French. “Tirade” can have the same meaning in French, but is also the word for “volley”. So, a tirade is a “volley” of words.

43. The first “A” in Reddit’s A.M.A. : ASK
Reddit.com is a networking and news website that started up in 2005. It is essentially a bulletin board system with posts that are voted up and down by users, which determines the ranking of posts. The name “Reddit” is a play on “read it”, as in “I read it on Reddit”. One popular feature of the Reddit site is an online forum that is similar to a press conference. Known as an AMA (for “ask me anything”), participants have included the likes of President Barack Obama, Madonna, Bill Gates, Stephen Colbert and Gordon Ramsay. President Obama’s AMA was so popular that the high level of traffic brought down many parts of the Reddit site.

46. Mesmerized : RAPT
Franz Mesmer was a German physician, the person who coined the phrase “animal magnetism”. Back then the term described a purported magnetic field that resided in the bodies of animate beings. Mesmer also lent his name to our term “mesmerize”.

47. “You bet!,” in Yucatán : SI SI!
The Yucatán Peninsula is located in southeastern Mexico, where it separates the Gulf of Mexico to the northwest from the Caribbean Sea to the southeast.

48. Radiuses’ neighbors : ULNAS
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinkie-side”.

51. Third one’s a harm? : RAIL
The first commercial uses of a third rail to power trains were actually in Ireland, with the Giant’s Causeway Tramway in 1883, and the Bessbrook and Newry Tramway in 1885.

57. Doofus : DOLT
“Doofus” (also “dufus”) is student slang that has been around since the sixties. Apparently the word is a variant of the equally unattractive term “doo-doo”.

60. Novelist Seton : ANYA
“Anya Seton” was the pen name of Ann Seton, an author of historical romances from New York City. Seton’s 1944 novel “Dragonwyck” was released into theaters in 1946 and starred Gene Tierney and Walter Huston.

61. Mesa ___ National Park : VERDE
Mesa Verde National Park is in Colorado. Mesa Verde is home to ancient cliff dwellings built by the Puebloan people, also know as the Anasazi.

65. The Red Baron and others : ACES
Snoopy, the famous beagle in the “Peanuts” comic strip, has a number of alter-egos and is sometimes depicted as a World War I flying ace. Snoopy’s arch-enemy in the air is Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, and Snoopy can often be seen shaking his fist and crying out, “Curse you, Red Baron!”

66. Northern Montana tribe : CREE
The Cree are one of the largest groups of Native Americans on the continent. In the US most of the Cree nation live in Montana on a reservation shared with the Ojibwe people. In Canada most of the Cree live in Manitoba.

68. ___ Python : MONTY
The zany comedy show called “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” first aired in 1969 on the BBC. The show ran for four seasons and finished up soon after John Cleese decided to leave the team and move onto other projects.

74. From the top, to a musician : DA CAPO
The musical term “da capo” is an instruction to repeat from the beginning. The term translates literally from Italian as “from the head”.

78. Sierras, e.g. : GMC TRUCKS
The GMC Sierra truck is also sold as the Chevrolet Silverado.

79. Want ad letters : EOE
Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE)

83. Lee of Marvel Comics : STAN
Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board. If you like superhero movies based on the characters from Marvel Comics, then you could spend a few hours trying to spot Stan Lee in those films as he has a penchant for making cameo appearances. Lee can be spotted in “X-Men” (2000), “Spider-Man” (2002), “Hulk” (2003), “Fantastic Four” (2005), “Iron Man” (2008) and many other films.

84. Storied also-ran : HARE
“The Tortoise and the Hare” is perhaps the most famous fable attributed to Aesop. The cocky hare takes a nap during a race against the tortoise, and the tortoise sneaks past the finish line for the win while his speedier friend is sleeping.

86. Apple product discontinued in 2017 : IPOD NANO
The iPod Nano was the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There were seven versions of the Nano, until it was discontinued in 2017.

87. Tennis’s Steffi : GRAF
Steffi Graf is a former World No. 1 professional tennis player from Germany. Graf won 22 Grand Slam singles titles, more than any other man or woman other than Margaret Court. She is married to another former World No. 1, namely Andre Agassi.

93. Quarantine : ISOLATE
The original use of our word “quarantine” back in the 1500s was as a legal term. A quarantine was the 40 days in which a widow had the legal right to reside in her dead husband’s house.

102. Deseret News reader, e.g. : UTAHN
When Mormon pioneers were settling what is today the state of Utah, they referred to the area as Deseret, a word that means “beehive” according to the Book of Mormon. Today Utah is known as the Beehive State and there is a beehive symbol on the Utah state flag.
Manchuria is a region in Northeast China, home to the Manchu people after whom the area gets its name.

107. Paris’s Musée d’___ : ORSAY
The Musée d’Orsay is one of the premier museums in Paris, and holds the world’s largest collection of impressionist art. A truly beautiful building, the d’Orsay is a former Beaux-Arts railway station.

111. Fleet on Fleet Street : CABS
Fleet Street in London used to be home to most British national newspapers, but not anymore. The last British news office moved out of the high-priced neighborhood in 2005. It is now home to investment banking, legal and accountancy firms. The street is named for the River Fleet, which is the city’s largest underground river.

112. With 117-Down, Mesabi Range output : IRON
The Mesabi Range has the largest deposit of iron ore in the country, and is located in Minnesota. Robert Allen Zimmerman was raised in the area (whom we know him better as “Bob Dylan”) and he wrote a song called “North Country Blues” that tells of the decline of the mining industry in the Mesabi Range.

118. Small inlet : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, with both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Matisse, e.g., stylistically : FAUVE
6. H. H. Munro pseudonym : SAKI
10. XXX : CHIS
14. Back up on disk : SAVE
18. Cons : ANTIS
19. Juicy : LURID
20. Seats by the orchestra pit, perhaps : ROW A
21. Film excerpt : CLIP
22. Re: ___ (suitor’s subject line) : (RE)QUEST FOR PROPOSAL
25. 25, 27, 29, etc. : ODDS
26. The first pope, to French speakers : ST PIERRE
27. Words before fat and lean, in a nursery rhyme : EAT NO …
28. The Gabor sisters, e.g. : TRIO
29. Re: ___ (stingy date’s subject line) : (RE)TREAT IS NOT AN OPTION
34. Hairstyle rarely seen in the military : AFRO
37. Apply to : EXERT ON
38. Formally chooses : ANOINTS
39. The crystal in some crystal balls : QUARTZ
41. Carrier to Seoul, for short : KAL
42. The lowest of the low : BASSES
44. Catering staple : URN
45. Re: ___ (song lyricist’s subject line) : (RE)VERSE COURSE
49. Part of a locust tree : THORN
53. Place to say 9-Down : ALTAR
55. Help : AID
56. Quenched : SLAKED
58. World leader who proclaimed “Women hold up half the sky” : MAO
59. Bathday cakes? : SOAPS
61. Kind of diagram : VENN
62. Dwellers on the Arabian Peninsula : OMANIS
65. Re: ___ (film director’s subject line) : (RE)ACTION TIME
69. Re: ___ (sales agent’s subject line … with an attachment) : (RE)AD-ONLY FILE
72. Peanut butter choice : CREAMY
73. Municipal regs. : ORDS
75. Prefix with liberal or conservative, but not moderate : ULTRA-
76. Slippery sort : EEL
77. One is usually set by a chair : AGENDA
80. Purpose : USE
81. Talk smack about : TRASH
85. Baseball exec Bud : SELIG
88. Re: ___ (duster’s subject line) : (RE)MOTE CONTROL
91. Tony winner Hagen : UTA
92. $$$$, on Yelp : PRICEY
94. “Selma” director DuVernay : AVA
95. Greek gods’ drink : NECTAR
97. “Down,” at a diner : ON TOAST
100. Pithy observations : APERCUS
103. Best-of-the-best : A-ONE
104. Re: ___ (prison librarian’s subject line) : (RE)WARD FOR INFORMATION
108. Hansen of a 2016 Broadway hit : EVAN
109. Sidney who directed “12 Angry Men” : LUMET
110. Actress Arquette : PATRICIA
114. The Destroyer, in Hinduism : SIVA
115. Re: ___ (celebrity physician’s subject line) : (RE)ACHES FOR THE STARS
119. Mark Zuckerberg when founding Facebook, e.g. : TEEN
120. Eliminated by a ref’s decision : TKO’D
121. Heavenly hunter : ORION
122. Monastery figure : ABBOT
123. European capital : OSLO
124. Repair shop figs. : ESTS
125. Stuff : GEAR
126. Simple, as a question : YES/NO

Down
1. Online help : FAQS
2. “Are you some kind of ___?” : A NUT
3. Lone Star State sch. : UTEP
4. Guest : VISITOR
5. Perfume compound : ESTER
6. Inspector Clouseau’s employer : SURETE
7. “A Navel” artist, 1923 : ARP
8. Wine-and-cassis drink : KIR
9. See 53-Across : I DO
10. Dalmatian, e.g. : CROAT
11. Lilylike plant : HOSTA
12. Tot’s “Lemme up on your shoulders!” : I WANNA SEE!
13. Old-fashioned gunfight locales : SALOONS
14. Like the people who invented golf : SCOTTISH
15. Astronaut after whom Buzz Lightyear was named : ALDRIN
16. Couch potato : VIDIOT
17. Some home printers : EPSONS
19. Title Seuss creature : LORAX
23. “Stop!,” to a cop : FREEZE!
24. Lowly worker : PEON
30. Bugged : IRKED
31. Short and detached, in music: Abbr. : STAC
32. Surefire : NO-LOSE
33. Expert on meters and feet : POET
34. An official color of the Miami Dolphins : AQUA
35. Roll up : FURL
36. Tirade : RANT
40. Den, often : TV ROOM
42. Gucci or Givenchy, e.g. : BRAND
43. The first “A” in Reddit’s A.M.A. : ASK
46. Mesmerized : RAPT
47. “You bet!,” in Yucatán : SI SI!
48. Radiuses’ neighbors : ULNAS
50. Marriott competitor : OMNI
51. Third one’s a harm? : RAIL
52. Wine’s aroma : NOSE
54. China setting : ASIA
57. Doofus : DOLT
60. Novelist Seton : ANYA
61. Mesa ___ National Park : VERDE
63. Moaning Hogwarts ghost : MYRTLE
64. Not even close : AFAR
65. The Red Baron and others : ACES
66. Northern Montana tribe : CREE
67. Poker player’s tic, perhaps : TELL
68. ___ Python : MONTY
70. Depose : OUST
71. Cubbie or Card : NLER
74. From the top, to a musician : DA CAPO
78. Sierras, e.g. : GMC TRUCKS
79. Want ad letters : EOE
80. Take the heat from? : UNARM
82. Motorcade unit : AUTO
83. Lee of Marvel Comics : STAN
84. Storied also-ran : HARE
86. Apple product discontinued in 2017 : IPOD NANO
87. Tennis’s Steffi : GRAF
89. Through with : OVER
90. Like some training : ON-SITE
93. Quarantine : ISOLATE
96. “Is that even possible?” : CAN IT BE?
97. Must pay : OWES TO
98. Main forces? : NAVIES
99. See the world : TRAVEL
100. Tea times: Abbr. : AFTS
101. Ransom note writer : CAPTOR
102. Deseret News reader, e.g. : UTAHN
105. “Turn up the A/C!” : I’M HOT!
106. Must have : NEEDS
107. Paris’s Musée d’___ : ORSAY
111. Fleet on Fleet Street : CABS
112. With 117-Down, Mesabi Range output : IRON
113. Regarding : AS TO
116. Thick coat on a cold day? : FOG
117. See 112-Down : ORE
118. Small inlet : RIA

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6 thoughts on “0820-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 20 Aug 17, Sunday”

  1. 70:04 but no errors. Did this a day late. Loved the theme even though it took almost the entire puzzle to figure it out so I couldn't enjoy it. Perhaps too many proper names for my tastes (a.k.a. Ted Tadious.. ) Really had to figure out the theme to finish this one. Almost gave up a few times.

    Never heard VIDIOT before, but it made me laugh. I'll have to use it someday. Careful before we're all referred to as "crosswordiotes"….

    Best –

  2. 43:35, and 7 errors. Just some stuff in here I didn't know. Did not appreciate the theme at all.

    Another week off to a poor start…

  3. Quarentine from the Italian word "quaranta" meaning 40 was the number of days foreign cargo ships coming with goods to Venice had to wait before the crew could disembark to prove there was no disease like the plague. They were quarentined.

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