0103-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 Jan 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Woolf
THEME: Record of the Year … today’s grid gives us a RECORD OF THE YEAR, a calendar of sorts. The black squares divide our “calendar” into twelve sections. Within each section we have a rebus square that uses the three-letter abbreviation for each month. And, those monthly sections are in the right order, starting with JAN at the top-left and ending with DEC in the bottom-right.

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 37m 04s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … GCHAT (ICHAT!!), GOTYE (Iotye)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Malicious computer programs : TROJANS
In the world of computing, a “Trojan horse” is an apparently useful computer program that is actually a piece of malicious code. The user is fooled into installing the program, hence the name. “Trojan horse” is a reference to the Ancient Greek story of the Wooden Horse of Troy.

The story of the Wooden Horse of Troy is told in the Virgil’s poem “The Aeneid”. According to the tale, the city of Troy finally fell to Greeks after a siege that had lasted for ten years. In a ruse, the Greeks sailed away in apparent defeat, leaving behind a large wooden horse. Inside the horse were hidden 30 crack soldiers. When the horse was dragged into the city as a victory trophy, the soldiers sneaked out and opened the city’s gates. The Greeks returned under cover of night and entered the open city.

13. Chippendales dancer, e.g. : ADONIS
In Greek mythology, Adonis is a beautiful young god loved by Aphrodite. Adonis dies in a hunting accident (gored by a boar), but not before he gives Aphrodite a child. Adonis was originally a Phoenician god “absorbed” into Greek lore (Phoenicia is modern day Lebanon). The child born of Adonis to Aphrodite was called Beroe, after which is named Beirut, the capital city of Lebanon. We also use the term “adonis” to mean “beautiful male”.

Chippendales is a big touring operation featuring exotic male dancers. The show started out as a nightclub in Los Angeles in the early eighties. The club name was inspired by the Chippendale-style furniture used in the club.

21. Band that doesn’t play much music nowadays : AM RADIO
The radio spectrum is divided into bands based on frequency. “High band” is composed of relatively high frequency values, and “low band” is composed of frequencies that are relatively low. FM radio falls into the band called Very High Frequency, or VHF. Television signals use frequencies even higher than VHF, frequencies in the Ultra High Frequency band (UHF). AM radio uses lower frequencies that fall into the relatively low bands of Low, Medium and High Frequency (LF, MF, and HF).

23. 2001 foreign film with five Oscar nominations : AMELIE
“Amélie” is a 2001 French film, a romantic comedy about a shy waitress in Montmartre, Paris played by Audrey Tautou (who also played the female lead in “The Da Vinci Code”). The movie was originally released under the French title, “Le Fabuleux Destin d’Amélie Poulain” (“The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain”).

24. Radishes with long white roots : DAIKONS
The daikon is a Japanese winter radish with a mild flavor. The Japanese name “daikon” translates as “big root”.

30. Battery parts : TESTS
Test often come in “batteries”, as in “a battery of tests”.

33. Passing mention? : OBIT
“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

35. Short pants : CAPRIS
Capri pants first became popular on the island of Capri, apparently. They were invented in Europe in 1948, but only became stylish in the US in the sixties. Mary Tyler Moore often wore Capri pants on “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and to some extent she sparked a fashion trend. After a lull in the seventies and eighties there was a resurgence in sales after Uma Thurman wore them (and danced in them) in “Pulp Fiction”. Can’t stand the look of them myself …

39. McKellen of “The Hobbit” : IAN
Sir Ian McKellen is a marvelous English actor, someone who is comfortable playing anything from Macbeth on stage to Magneto in an “X-Men” movie. On the big screen, McKellen is very famous for playing Gandalf in “The Lord of Rings”. In the UK Sir Ian is noted for being at the forefront of the campaign for equal rights for gay people, a role he has enthusiastically embraced since the eighties.

“The Hobbit, or There and Back Again” is a children’s fantasy novel by J. R. R. Tolkien that was popular from the time of its first publication in 1937. Included in the early awards for “The Hobbit” was a prize for best juvenile fiction from “The New York Herald Tribune”. The novel was adapted into a series of three films that are related to “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy.

40. Alternative to Facebook Messenger : GCHAT
“Gchat” is a common name for the Google Talk instant messaging service. Google Talk offers both text and voice communication as well as a plugin that allows video chat. All of this works seamlessly with Gmail, my personal favorite email client. That said, much of this functionality seems to have been replaced with the Google Hangouts service.

42. Golden Bears’ sch. : CAL
The California Golden Bears are the athletic teams of the University of California, Berkeley. The University of California, Berkeley (Cal) is the most difficult public university to get into in the world. It opened in 1869 and is named for Anglo-Irish philosopher George Berkeley.

47. Supreme Court justice who once said “I am a New Yorker, and 7 a.m. is a civilized hour to finish the day, not to start it” : SOTOMAYOR
Sonia Sotomayor is the first Hispanic justice on the US Supreme Court, and the third female justice. Sotomayor was nominated by President Barack Obama to replace the retiring Justice David Souter.

52. Concupiscence : LIBIDO
“Libido” is a term first popularized by Sigmund Freud. Freud’s usage was more general than is understood today, as he used “libido” to describe all instinctive energy that arose in the subconscious. He believed that we humans are driven by two desires, the desire for life (the libido, or Eros) and the desire for death (Thanatos). Personally, I don’t agree …

54. Power, so to speak : OCTANE
The difference between a premium and regular gasoline is its octane rating. The octane rating is measure of the resistance of the gasoline to auto-ignition i.e. its resistance to ignition just by virtue of being compressed in the cylinder. This auto-ignition is undesirable as multiple-cylinder engines are designed so that ignition within each cylinder takes place precisely when the plug sparks, and not before. If ignition occurs before the spark is created, the resulting phenomenon is called “knocking”.

55. Language of Afghanistan : PASHTO
Pashto is one of the Eastern Iranian languages, the one with the most native speakers. Most of those 50 million speakers today live in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

56. “The Undiscovered Self” author : CARL JUNG
Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist, the founder of analytical psychology. Jung was very much associated with the analysis of dreams, and also introduced us to the psychological concepts of introversion and extroversion.

59. How curry is often served : ON RICE
Curry powder is a mixture of spices used in South Asian cuisine. The actual composition of curry powder varies depending on the cuisine. The term “curry” is an anglicization of the Tamil “kari” meaning “sauce”.

60. Divisions politiques : ETATS
In French, a “état” (state) is a “division politique” (political division).

64. Cousin of a foil : EPEE
The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, both of which are also thrusting weapons. However, the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

66. Dark horses : BAYS
Bay is a reddish-brown color, usually used to describe the coat of a horse.

68. Capital of Gambia : BANJUL
Banjul is the capital city of the Gambia, and is located on an island in the Gambia River where it enters the Atlantic Ocean.

83. One having a simple existence : AMOEBA
An ameba (or “amoeba”, as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

97. “Vous êtes ___” : ICI
“Vous êtes ici” are important words to know when navigating your way around Paris. They mean “You are here”, and you’ll often see them on maps in the street.

100. Fig. often discounted : MSRP
Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)

119. Lover boys : CASANOVAS
Giacomo Casanova was an 18th-century adventurer from Venice. We know so much about him, and his reputation as a womanizer, because he left us his autobiography “Histoire de ma vie” (Story of My Life). A guy recounting stories of his love life and conquests. All true, I am sure …

121. Sole representatives, maybe : TOKENS
A token representative of a population might be the sole representative.

122. Gum arabic source : ACACIA
Acacia is a genus of tree and shrub, also known as thorntree, whistling thorn and wattle. The acacia is the primary food source for the giraffe in the wild, with the animal eating the leaves high in the tree, leaves that are inaccessible by competing species. The natural gum from two species of acacia tree is known as gum arabic, which is used in the food industry as a stabilizer.

123. Oakland’s county : ALAMEDA
The city of Oakland, located in the San Francisco Bay Area, was settled by the Spanish in 1772. The area now known as Oakland was called “encinal” by those early settlers, which translates as “oak grove”, giving the city its name.

127. Blues musician known as Sleepy John : ESTES
Sleepy John Estes was a blues guitarist and singer from Tennessee. There are stories that the “Sleepy” moniker was given to Estes as he suffered from narcolepsy.

Down
2. Ending with Cine- : -RAMA
Cinerama is a widescreen format that was introduced in some theaters in the fifties. A Cinerama screen is very curved, and it takes three movie projectors operating simultaneously to provide the full image.

5. Setting for van Gogh’s “River Bank in Springtime” : SEINE
Vincent van Gogh painted a whole series of paintings along the Seine river in 1886 and 1887, in Paris and the suburbs of Clichy and Asnières. One of the series is oil on canvas titled “River Bank in Springtime”, which I was privileged to view in the Dallas Museum of Art a while back.

7. Some desktops : IMACS
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

8. Running a high temperature : FEBRILE
The medical symptom of elevated body temperature is called fever, febrile response or pyrexia.

9. Staples Center athlete : LAKER
The Staples Center is a sports arena in Los Angeles that opened in 1999. The Staples Center is home to several sporting franchises, including the LA Lakers and LA Clippers basketball teams and the LA Kings hockey team.

13. Box in an arena? : AMP
An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

17. Turkish inn : IMARET
Imarets were inns or hostels used by pilgrims throughout the Ottoman Empire. The network of imarets was set up to provide food to anyone in need, so also served as “soup kitchens”.

27. Something people do not want to see outside, for short : PDA
PDA is an abbreviation for “public display of affection”.

29. Cartoon exclamation : D’OH!
“The Simpsons” is one of the most successful programs produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. Homer Simpson’s catchphrase is “D’oh!”, which became such a famous exclamation that it has been included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) since 2001. “D’oh!” can be translated as “I should have thought of that!”

34. Setting not actually found in “Romeo and Juliet” : BALCONY
The “balcony” scene is perhaps the best known scene in William Shakespeare’s play “Romeo and Juliet”. The irony is that Shakespeare never mentioned a balcony at all in his original text. In fact, the word “balcony” did not exist in English in Shakespeare’s day. A balcony was added in many productions starting about a century after the play’s premiere, and that balcony persists to this day.

In William Shakespeare’s play “Romeo and Juliet”, the lovers discuss the sad fact that they have been born into two feuding families in the famous balcony scene. Juliet says:

O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.
Romeo’s reply includes the famous lines:
What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;

37. Mural’s beginning? : INTRA-
Intramural sports are conducted within a certain geographic area, as opposed to varsity sports which are played with teams outside that area. The term “intramural” comes from the Latin for “within walls” and first applied to events held between teams based within the walls of a city.

40. Singer with the 2012 #1 hit “Somebody That I Used to Know” : GOTYE
Gotye is the stage name of Belgian-Australian singer Wally De Backer. The stage name comes from the French name “Gauthier” meaning “Walter” (Wally).

41. It splits the uprights : CROSSBAR
Those would be parts of goal posts in football, say.

42. Paramecium propellers : CILIA
A “paramecium” is a single-celled organism that moves around in water using the tightly-spaced cilia (hairlike structures) that surround its body.

43. Kind of professor : ADJUNCT
An adjunct professor is an educator who is employed part-time or temporarily to give classes at a university.

44. Some premium seating : LOGES
In most theaters today, “loge” is the name given to the front rows of a mezzanine level. Loge can also be the name given to box seating.

46. Licorice flavor : ANISE
Liquorice (also licorice) and aniseed have similar flavors, but they come from unrelated plants. The liquorice plant is a legume like a bean, and the sweet flavor is an extract from the roots. The flavor mainly comes from an ether compound called anethole, the same substance that gives the distinctive flavor to anise. The seedpods of the anise plant are what we know as “aniseed”. The anise seeds themselves are usually ground to release the flavor.

48. Colorful gem : OPAL
An opal is often described as having a milky iridescence, known as “opalescence”.

49. Barber’s supply : TALC
Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

50. ___ Accords : OSLO
The Oslo Accords grew out of secret negotiations between the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel in a residence in Oslo in the early nineties. The delegates shared the same house while they conducted 14 meetings. While eating all their meals together at the same table, the negotiators came to respect one another and apparently friendships developed.

51. Keystone Kops-like scene : MAYHEM
The Keystone Cops (sometimes “Keystone Kops”) were a band of madcap policemen characters who appeared in silent movies. A 1914 short film called “A Thief Catcher” that was believed lost was rediscovered in 2010. “A Thief Catcher” featured the magnificent Charlie Chaplin in an early role as a Keystone Cop.

65. Church book : PSALTER
In the Christian tradition, a “psalter” is a book devoted primarily to the Bible’s Book of Psalms, with other liturgical material usually included.

67. One of the Obamas : SASHA
Sasha is the younger of the two Obama children, born in 2001. She is the youngest child to reside in the White House since John F. Kennedy, Jr. moved in with his parents as a small infant. Sasha’s Secret Service codename is “Rosebud”, and her older sister Malia has the codename “Radiance”.

69. Rural community : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

71. Kentucky Derby drinks : JULEPS
The mint julep is a bourbon-based cocktail that is associated with the American South, and with the Kentucky Derby in particular. If you’d like to make yourself a mint julep, one recipe is:

– 3 oz of Bourbon
– 4-6 sprigs of mint
– granulated sugar to taste

73. Ones up in arms? : ULNAS
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinkie-side”.

76. ___ Reader : UTNE
The “Utne Reader” is known for aggregation and republishing of articles on politics, culture and the environment from other sources in the media. The “Utne Reader” was founded in 1984, with “Utne” being the family name of the couple that started the publication.

79. Big lipstick seller : SEPHORA
Sephora is a French chain of cosmetic stores, founded in 1969. The name “Sephora” is derived from the Greek for “beauty” (“sephos”). We’ve been able to visit Sephora outlets in JCPenney stores since 2006.

81. Memorable 2011 hurricane : IRENE
Hurricane Irene caused extensive flooding in 2011 as it travelled through the Caribbean, up the East Coast of the United States and into the Atlantic seaboard of Canada. The hurricane was unusual in that it came so far up north. Fifty-five deaths were attributed to Irene.

82. Mint roll : CERTS
Certs were the first breath mints to be marketed nationally in the US, hitting the shelves in 1956. A Cert is called a mint, but it isn’t really as it contains no mint oil and instead has its famous ingredient named “Retsyn”. Retsyn is a mixture of copper gluconate (giving the green flecks), partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil (not healthy!) and flavoring (maybe mint?).

84. Rathskeller decoration : BEER STEIN
A stein is a type of beer glass. The term is German in origin, and is short for “Steinkrug” meaning “stone jug”. “Stein” is the German for “stone”.

A city hall in Germany is called a Rathaus. In days gone by there was often a restaurant located in the basement or cellar of a Rathaus, and this restaurant was given the name Rathskeller. Now any bar located below street level in any building is called a Rathskeller.

92. Word often seen in brackets : SIC
“Sic” indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. “Sic” is Latin for “thus, like this”. The term is more completely written as “sic erat scriptum”, which translates as “thus was it written”.

96. Green grp. : EPA
Environmental Protection Agency(EPA)

100. Guy’s thanks? : MERCI
“Thank you” is “merci” in French, and “danke” in German.

“Guy” is a quite common name used by French males.

102. Dollar competitor : ALAMO
The third largest car rental company right now is Alamo, a relative newcomer founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun intended!) into the market by popularizing the idea of “unlimited mileage”.

Dollar Rent A Car was founded in 1965. Chrysler acquired the company in 1990 and merged it with Thrifty Car Rental, which Chrysler had purchased a year earlier.

104. A lot : SCADS
The origin of the word “scads”, meaning “lots and lots”, is unclear, although back in the mid-1800s “scads” was used to mean “dollars”.

105. Horatian work : EPODE
An epode is a lyric poem made up of couplets in which the first line is long, and the second line much shorter. The form was invented by the Greek poet Archilochus, and was most famously used by the Roman poet Horace.

The adjective “Horatian” describes something pertaining to the Roman poet Horace.

107. Boil down : DECOCT
“To decoct” is to extract the flavor of a liquid by boiling down and increasing the concentration. A related term is “to concoct”, meaning “to boil together”. We use the verb “to concoct” in figurative sense to mean to contrive, devise.

110. Publisher of Champion magazine, for short : NCAA
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)

111. “Who is John ___?” (question in “Atlas Shrugged”) : GALT
John Galt is a character in the Ayn Rand novel “Atlas Shrugged”.

Ayn Rand was a Russian-American novelist born Alisa Rosenbaum. Her two best known works are her novels “The Fountainhead” published in 1943 and “Atlas Shrugged” from 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, “Atlas Shrugged”. This group called itself “The Collective”, and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan.

113. Hosp. readouts : EKGS
An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

116. They were wiped off the map in ’91 : SSRS
The former Soviet Union (USSR) was created in 1922, not long after the Russian Revolution of 1917 that overthrew the Tsar. Geographically, the new Soviet Union was roughly equivalent to the old Russian Empire, and was comprised of fifteen Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs).

118. Daniel ___ Kim, “Hawaii Five-0” actor : DAE
Daniel Dae Kim is an American actor who is famous for playing Jin-Soo Kwon on “Lost”. Kim now plays one of the leads on the CBS remake of “Hawaii Five-O”, portraying the character Chin Ho Kelly.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Malicious computer programs : TROJANS
6. Essence : LIFEBLOOD
13. Chippendales dancer, e.g. : ADONIS
19. One in the closet : HANGER
21. Band that doesn’t play much music nowadays : AM RADIO
22. Common gas station attachment : MINIMART
23. 2001 foreign film with five Oscar nominations : AMELIE
24. Radishes with long white roots : DAIKONS
25. Nag : PESTER
26. Accepted, as an offer : TAKEN UP
28. Was behind a register, maybe : CLERKED
30. Battery parts : TESTS
31. For whom products are designed : END USERS
33. Passing mention? : OBIT
35. Short pants : CAPRIS
39. McKellen of “The Hobbit” : IAN
40. Alternative to Facebook Messenger : GCHAT
42. Golden Bears’ sch. : CAL
45. Suggest : HINT AT
47. Supreme Court justice who once said “I am a New Yorker, and 7 a.m. is a civilized hour to finish the day, not to start it” : SOTOMAYOR
52. Concupiscence : LIBIDO
54. Power, so to speak : OCTANE
55. Language of Afghanistan : PASHTO
56. “The Undiscovered Self” author : CARL JUNG
57. Filthy : SORDID
58. Low points : VALLEYS
59. How curry is often served : ON RICE
60. Divisions politiques : ETATS
61. Beckons through a portal : WELCOMES IN
63. “I hate when that happens!” : RATS!
64. Cousin of a foil : EPEE
66. Dark horses : BAYS
68. Capital of Gambia : BANJUL
72. Like some building damage : STRUCTURAL
78. Sterile : ASEPTIC
83. One having a simple existence : AMOEBA
85. Blowout, in sports lingo : SLAUGHTER
86. To land : ASHORE
87. Drive off : DISPEL
88. Available : ON HAND
89. Spring forecast : SHOWER
90. How silverware is often sold : AS A SET
91. Obesity : FATNESS
93. Rear : PARENT
94. Your of yore : THY
95. Some protective barriers : REEFS
97. “Vous êtes ___” : ICI
99. Tap things? : ALES
100. Fig. often discounted : MSRP
101. Pre-curve figure : RAW SCORE
106. “Sounds likely to me” : I’D BET
109. Exceptionally well behaved : ANGELIC
112. Boom box pair : TAPE DECKS
117. Looked (in) : PEERED
119. Lover boys : CASANOVAS
121. Sole representatives, maybe : TOKENS
122. Gum arabic source : ACACIA
123. Oakland’s county : ALAMEDA
124. Like HBO and Showtime vis-à-vis basic cable : EDGIER
125. Something you can believe in : DOCTRINE
126. If everything fails : AT WORST
127. Blues musician known as Sleepy John : ESTES

Down
1. Pointer’s request? : THAT
2. Ending with Cine- : -RAMA
3. Brief race, in brief : ONE-K
4. What keys on a key ring do : JANGLE
5. Setting for van Gogh’s “River Bank in Springtime” : SEINE
6. Sonny : LAD
7. Some desktops : IMACS
8. Running a high temperature : FEBRILE
9. Staples Center athlete : LAKER
10. Stinks : ODORS
11. Emanation from a pen : OINK!
12. Doctor’s recommendation : DOSE
13. Box in an arena? : AMP
14. One helping with servings : DIETITIAN
15. Start : ONSET
16. “You’re missing a comma” and others : NITS
17. Turkish inn : IMARET
18. Orch. section : STRS
20. Together again : REUNITED
27. Something people do not want to see outside, for short : PDA
29. Cartoon exclamation : D’OH!
32. Young ___ : UNS
34. Setting not actually found in “Romeo and Juliet” : BALCONY
35. Opted for : CHOSE
36. Kind of orchard : APRICOT
37. Mural’s beginning? : INTRA-
38. Town: Ger. : STADT
40. Singer with the 2012 #1 hit “Somebody That I Used to Know” : GOTYE
41. It splits the uprights : CROSSBAR
42. Paramecium propellers : CILIA
43. Kind of professor : ADJUNCT
44. Some premium seating : LOGES
46. Licorice flavor : ANISE
48. Colorful gem : OPAL
49. Barber’s supply : TALC
50. ___ Accords : OSLO
51. Keystone Kops-like scene : MAYHEM
53. Icy remark? : BRRR!
58. Diverges : VEERS OFF
61. Besprinkle, say : WET
62. Suffix with conspirator : -IAL
65. Church book : PSALTER
67. One of the Obamas : SASHA
68. Unable to do well : BAD AT
69. Rural community : AMISH
70. Lack of influence : NO SAY
71. Kentucky Derby drinks : JULEPS
73. Ones up in arms? : ULNAS
74. No longer wanted : CAUGHT
75. More ___ enough : THAN
76. ___ Reader : UTNE
77. Most lipstick options : REDS
79. Big lipstick seller : SEPHORA
80. Dry (off) : TOWEL
81. Memorable 2011 hurricane : IRENE
82. Mint roll : CERTS
84. Rathskeller decoration : BEER STEIN
86. Breathe in : ASPIRATE
92. Word often seen in brackets : SIC
96. Green grp. : EPA
98. Item in a tent : COT
100. Guy’s thanks? : MERCI
101. Cut over, in a way : RESAW
102. Dollar competitor : ALAMO
103. Convince : WIN OVER
104. A lot : SCADS
105. Horatian work : EPODE
106. Certain tablet : IPAD
107. Boil down : DECOCT
108. Handle : BEAR
110. Publisher of Champion magazine, for short : NCAA
111. “Who is John ___?” (question in “Atlas Shrugged”) : GALT
113. Hosp. readouts : EKGS
114. Lies : DECEIT
115. Just above where 35-Across end : KNEE
116. They were wiped off the map in ’91 : SSRS
118. Daniel ___ Kim, “Hawaii Five-0” actor : DAE
120. Remained in inventory : SAT

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4 thoughts on “0103-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 Jan 16, Sunday”

  1. Too much for me in the "Feb" and "Mar" areas to declare any sort of victory. Quite difficult cluing. But I suppose it's to be expected–we haven't had a Sunday rebus in a while.

  2. 1:15:41, with two errors: I had KCHAT / KOTYE instead of GCHAT / GOTYE. (I guess I thought KOTYE was KANYE's brother … 🙂

    Tough end of a tough week for me …

  3. 53:15, 3 errors. 40D EETYE, 47A SOTOMAYER, 40A ECHAT. Haven't followed the music scene for a few decades. Tough, but enjoyable, puzzle.

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