0830-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Aug 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Lee Taylor
THEME: Conflicting Advice … each of today’s themed answers is a piece of advice, a well-known saying. And, each themed answer is clued with another saying, with the opposite meaning:

24A. “He who hesitates is lost, but …” : … LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP
111A. “You can’t judge a book by its cover, but …” : … CLOTHES MAKE THE MAN
3D. “Birds of a feather flock together, but …” : … OPPOSITES ATTRACT
6D. “Great minds think alike, but …” : … FOOLS SELDOM DIFFER
34D. “Slow and steady wins the race, but …” : … TIME WAITS FOR NO MAN
38D. “Knowledge is power, but …” : … IGNORANCE IS BLISS

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Many establishments on Paris’s Boulevard Saint-Germain : CAFES
Paris’s Boulevard Saint-Germain is a street on the Left Bank of the River Seine that cuts right through the Saint-Germain-des-Prés area of the city. Saint-Germain-des-Prés is home to lots of cafés, including Les Deux Magots and Café de Flore, which have been frequented by many famous people over the years. The most celebrated customers have been writers and painters such Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Ernest Hemingway and Pablo Picasso.

14. Ex-Mrs. Trump : IVANA
Ivana Winklmayr was born in Czechoslovakia. Winklmayr was an excellent skier, and was named as an alternate for the 1982 Czech Olympic Team. She was promoting the Montreal Olympics in New York in 1976 when she met Donald Trump. Ivana and Donald’s marriage was very public and well-covered by the media, but not nearly so well as their very litigious divorce in the early nineties.

20. Cause of a 2014 epidemic : EBOLA
The Ebola virus causes a very nasty form of hemorrhagic fever. The name of the virus comes from the site of the first known outbreak, in a mission hospital in the Ebola River Valley in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The disease is transmitted from human to human by exposure to bodily fluids. In nature, the main carrier of Ebola is the fruit bat.

21. Word with light or horse : OPERA
“Horse opera” is a slang term for a western movie or show.

22. Figure in Jewish folklore : GOLEM
Golem is Yiddish slang for “dimwit”. In Jewish folklore a golem is an anthropomorphic being made out of inanimate matter, somewhat like an unintelligent robot.

29. Mathematician Fibonacci : LEONARDO
Leonardo of Pisa was a famous and respected Italian mathematician, also known as simply “Fibonacci”. He is remembered for writing about a number sequence (although he didn’t “discover” it) that later was given the name “Fibonacci sequence”. He wrote about the series of numbers in his book called “Liber Abaci”, a celebrated work that introduced Arabic numerals (i.e. 0-9) to the Western world.

30. N.B.A. team once coached by Larry Bird : PACERS
The Indiana Pacers are the professional basketball team based in Indianapolis, who play in the NBA. The name was chosen when the team was formed in 1967. “Pacers” is a homage harness racing pacers (famed in Indiana) and the pace car used in the Indianapolis 500.

Larry Bird played basketball for the Boston Celtics from 1978 to 1992. Bird has a lot of very loyal fans, and some might even be described as fanatical. In 2005 an Oklahoma City man was convicted of a crime involving a shooting. On being sentenced to 30 years imprisonment, the guilty man requested that the sentence be changed to 33 years so that it matched the number on Larry Bird’s jersey. The judge obliged …

33. Rich cake : TORTE
A torte is a type of cake made primarily with eggs, sugar and ground nuts (but no flour).

34. Brown who wrote “The Diana Chronicles” : TINA
Tina Brown is a British/American journalist and author. Brown wrote “The Diana Chronicles”, a biography of Diana, Princess of Wales, of whom Brown was a personal friend. She emigrated to the US in 1984 to become editor for “Vanity Fair”, and later took the helm at “The New Yorker”.

49. Kind of arch : OGEE
An ogee is a type of S-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S). An ogee arch is composed of two ogees, with one being the mirror of the other and meeting at the arch’s apex.

51. ___ Soetoro, stepfather of Barack Obama : LOLO
Barack Obama, Sr. was first married at the age of 18 in his home country of Kenya, and had two children during that marriage. He left his wife and children back in Kenya when he enrolled in the University of Hawaii in 1959 as the school’s first African foreign student. There Obama met Ann Dunham in a Russian language course. The two entered into a romantic relationship and Dunham became pregnant. Obama told Dunham that he was divorced from his first wife (not true), and the pair were married on Maui in 1961. Six months later, Barack Obama II was born, destined to become the 44th President of the United States. The couple divorced in 1964. After the divorce, Dunham was able to marry Lalo Soetoro, a Javanese surveyor who she met while he was studying for a masters degree at the university. Soetoro returned to Indonesia in 1966, and Dunham joined him there the following year with her 6-year-old son. Barack Obama spent four years in Indonesia before returning to Hawaii to live with his grandparents.

52. Longest river entirely within Switzerland : AARE
The Aar (also called the “Aare” in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. A famous spot along the Aar is the Reichenbach Falls in the center of the country, actually a series of waterfalls near the city of Meiringen. These falls are renowned in the world of literature as it was here that Sherlock Holmes fell to his supposed doom with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (in “The Adventure of the Final Problem”).

53. Group of Coyotes, for short : NHL
The Arizona Coyotes are the National Hockey League (NHL) team based in Glendale, a suburb of Phoenix. The team was founded in 1971 as the Winnipeg Jets of the World Hockey Association. After the team joined the NHL, they became the Phoenix Coyotes in 1996, and finally the Arizona Coyotes in 2014.

54. Name on a toy truck : HESS
The Hess Corporation is an oil company based in New York City. In 1964, the company started selling toy trucks with the Hess logo on them, in Hess gas stations. The company has been selling them every since, bringing out new models just before Christmas. Hess toy trucks have become quite collectible and the old ones can fetch a pretty penny.

56. To the point : AD REM
The Latin term “ad rem” translates literally as “to the matter”.

62. Crumbly cheeses : FETAS
Feta is a Greek cheese made from sheep’s milk, or a mixture of sheep’s and goat’s milk. The cheese is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months before it is eaten.

64. Arctic lights : AURORAE
The spectacular aurorae phenomenon is seen lighting up the night sky at both poles of the earth (the Aurora Borealis in the north, and the Aurora Australis in the south). The eerie effect is caused by charged particles colliding with atoms at high latitudes.

69. Locale of the 15-Down Eyjafjallajökull : ICELAND
(15. See 69-Across : VOLCANO)
The Eyjafjallajökull volcano of Iceland was the one that spewed ash into the atmosphere over Europe in 2010, disrupting air travel for weeks.

71. Like pop-ups : ARCED
In a baseball game, a pop-up arcs across the infield.

74. 2006 Pixar film : CARS
“Cars” is a 2006 animated feature from Pixar. The great cast of voice actors includes Paul Newman in his last movie role before he passed away in 2008.

75. Heavy drinker, in slang : DIPSO
“Dipsomania” is a craving for alcohol to the point of damaging one’s health. “Dipsa” is the Greek for “thirst”, hence dipsomania is a “manic thirst”.

79. ESPNU covers it : NCAA
ESPNU (ESPN Universities) is a sports channel focused on college athletics.

82. Celestial altar : ARA
The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for “altar”.

83. Gladly, old-style : FAIN
“Fain” is an old way of saying “gladly, joyfully”.

84. Steer closer to the wind : LUFF
When a sailboat sails too close to the wind, the leading edge of the sail starts to flap slightly, as air passes behind it. The boat is said to be luffing, with the same term being used for the flapping of the sail. The leading edge of the sail is also known as the luff.

85. It borders the N. Atl. : EUR
The continent of Europe was named for Europa, a Phoenician princess of Greek mythology.

96. Head of an inn? : BOAR
Lots of inns are named “The Boar’s Head”.

97. Caliban in “The Tempest,” e.g. : SLAVE
William Shakespeare’s play “The Tempest” tells the story of Prospero, who was removed from the throne of Milan and banished to a deserted island along with his daughter Miranda. The island is home to a devilish character called Caliban, who is forced into slavery on the arrival of the exiles. Prospero learns sorcery while cast away, and eventually conjures up a tempest that drives those who usurped his throne onto the island’s shores (in particular his own brother, Antonio). On the island, Prospero is eventually successful in revealing Antonio’s lowly nature.

102. Pooh-bah : NABOB
A nabob is a person of wealth and prominence. “Nabob” comes from the title of a governor in India.

The term “pooh-bah” (also “poobah”), meaning an ostentatious official, comes from the world of opera. Pooh-Bah is a character in the wonderful Gilbert & Sullivan comic opera “The Mikado”. Famously, Pooh-Bah holds many, many offices, including that of “Lord High Everything Else”.

106. Part of a dominatrix’s outfit : STILETTO
The stiletto knife was developed in Italy, and is a knife intended for thrusting and stabbing as opposed to slashing and cutting. The term “stiletto” comes from the Latin “stilus”, which was a thin pointed writing instrument used in Ancient Rome to engrave wax or clay tablets. And, there are also stiletto heels on some women’s shoes, heels that are long and thin.

115. Blazing stars : NOVAE
A nova is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

117. Emulate Isocrates : ORATE
Isocrates was an influential ancient Greek orator. He is listed as one of the ten Attic orators, the greatest orators of the classical era.

121. Trig functions : SINES
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent (abbreviated to “sin, cos and tan”). Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The “reciprocal” of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent. These inverted ratios should not be confused with the “inverse” trigonometric functions e.g. arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. These inverse functions are the reverse of the sine, cosine and tangent. For example, the arctangent can be read as “What angle is equivalent to the following ratio of opposite over adjacent?”

122. Boom source : SST
Supersonic transports (SSTs) like the Concorde broke Mach 1, the speed of sound. As a plane flies through air, it creates pressure waves in front (and behind) rather like the bow and stern waves of a boat. These pressure waves travel at the speed of sound, so as an aircraft itself accelerates towards the speed of sound it catches up with the pressure waves until they cannot “get out of the way”. When the aircraft reaches the speed of sound, the compressed waves merge into one single shock wave, creating a sonic boom.

Down
2. All-Star second baseman Infante : OMAR
Omar Infante is a professional baseball player from Venezuela who mainly plays as a second baseman.

4. Solo features of six Bach suites : CELLOS
Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello” include some of the most recognizable pieces of cello music in the repertoire. The actual instrument for which Bach wrote these pieces (if any) is the subject of some debate.

5. Blood type system : ABO
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a “universal donor”.

7. Actress Sommer : ELKE
Elke Sommer is a German-born actress who was at the height of her success on the silver screen in the sixties. Sommer won a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer Actress for her role opposite Paul Newman in 1964’s “The Prize”. She also sings and has released several albums. Now Sommer focuses on painting, producing artwork that is strongly influenced by the work of Marc Chagall.

8. Clog : SABOT
There is a story that disgruntled textile workers would kick their wooden shoes, called sabots, into the looms in order to disable them so that they didn’t have to work. This act of vandalism was named for the shoe, an act of “sabot-age”.

10. Left at sea : APORT
The left side of a ship used to be called the “larboard” side, but this was dropped in favor of “port” as pronunciation of “larboard” was easily confused with “starboard”, the right side of the vessel. The term “port” was chosen as it was customary to dock a ship, for loading in port, with the left side of the vessel against the dock.

11. Like some salsa : VERDE
“Salsa verde” is simply Spanish for “green sauce”.

13. 2004 musical biopic for which the star won Best Actor : RAY
Ray Charles came up with his stage name by dropping the family name from his real moniker, Ray Charles Robinson. His life was a wild ride, well represented in the excellent biopic called “Ray” released in 2004 and starring Jamie Foxx in the title role. Ray Charles was married twice and fathered 12 children with nine different women. As I said, a wild ride …

14. Pet in the comic strip “FoxTrot” : IGUANA
“FoxTrot” is a comic strip by Bill Amend that was first published in 1988. Originally appearing seven days a week, “Foxtrot” has been a Sunday-only offering since 2007. The strip’s main characters are the five members of the Fox family, and Quincy, the pet iguana belonging to the youngest Fox child.

16. “Helm ___!” (captain’s cry) : ALEE
“Alee” is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing “aweather”.

25. Ambient music innovator Brian : ENO
Brian Eno was one of the pioneers of the “ambient” genre of music. Eno composed an album in 1978 called “Ambient 1: Music for Airports”, the first in a series of four albums with an ambient theme. Eno named the tracks somewhat inventively: 1/1, 2/1, 2/1 and 2/2.

35. Shanghai nursemaid : AMAH
“Amah” is an interesting word in that we associate it so much with Asian culture and yet it actually comes from the Portuguese “ama” meaning “nurse”. Ama was imported into English in the days of the British Raj in India when a wet-nurse became known as an amah.

Shanghai is a major city on the west coast of China that is home to the busiest container port in the world. The name “Shanghai” translates as “Upon-the-Sea”.

36. Winter Olympics sport : LUGE
A luge is a small sled used by one or two people, on which one lies face up and feet first. The luge can be compared to the skeleton, a sled for only one person and on which the rider lies face down and goes down the hill head-first.

39. 1943 conference site : TEHRAN
The leaders of the Big Three Allies in WWII held several conferences during the war, the first of which was held in Tehran in 1943. The meeting between Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill was held in Tehran, Iran in the Soviet Embassy. The main decision made during the meeting was to open a second front against Nazi Germany.

40. Checked online reviews of, modern-style : YELPED
yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”. I have a young neighbor here who used to work for yelp …

44. One on staff? : CLEF
Clef is the French word for “key”. In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

46. Trifle : BAGATELLE
A bagatelle is a bauble or trinket and is a word that we imported from French, in which language it has the same meaning.

47. Cousin of Sven : LARS
Sven is a Scandinavian name. “Sven” is derived from the Old Norse word for “young man” or “young warrior”.

Lars is a Nordic name that is derived from the Roman name Laurentius, and so is related to the English names Laurence and Lawrence. The root name means “crowned with laurel”.

48. Michael Sheen’s character in “Twilight” : ARO
The reference is to a character in “The Twilight” series of books by Stephenie Meyer. “The Twilight Saga” is a series of films based on the books. “The Twilight” books feature vampires, and I don’t do vampires …

Michael Sheen is a gifted actor from Wales who has played former British prime minister Tony Blair in three films: “The Deal” (2003), “The Queen” (2006), and “The Special Relationship” (2010). He also played comedian Kenneth Williams In “Fantabulosa!” (2006), broadcaster David Frost in “Frost/Nixon” (2008) and soccer team manager Brian Clough in “The Damned United” (2009). He is now playing Dr. William Masters on the Showtime TV series “Masters of Sex”.

55. Mystical Muslims : SUFIS
A Sufi is a Muslim mystic, an ascetic.

58. Ill-gotten gains : LUCRE
Our word “lucre” meaning “money, profits” comes from the Latin “lucrum” that means the same thing.

59. Port on the Panama Canal : COLON
Colón is a sea port near the Caribbean Sea entrance to the Panama Canal.

61. D.C.’s ___ Constitution Hall : DAR
In order to be a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), an applicant has to prove that she is a descendant of someone closely associated with, and supportive of, the American Revolution.

DAR Constitution Hall is a concert hall that was built in Washington, D.C. by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) in 1929. The facility was originally built to house the DAR’s annual convention as the membership had outgrown the nearby Memorial Continental Hall that had been used in prior years.

65. “Born to Die” singer Lana Del ___ : REY
Lana Del Rey is the stage name of singer/songwriter Elizabeth Grant. Del Rey calls herself a “self-styled gangsta Nancy Sinatra”. Nice …

71. Part of SEATO : ASIA
The Southeast Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO) was set up in 1954, a defense organization with the mission to block communist influence growing in Southeast Asia. The driving force behind the organization’s creation was President Eisenhower’s Secretary of State, John Dulles. The list of SEATO members included Australia, France, the Philippines, the UK and the US. The organization was never really considered effective and it fell apart in 1977 largely due to a lack of interest by the members.

72. Billet-___ : DOUX
Billet-doux is a French term for a love letter. A “billet” is a short note, and “doux” means sweet.

81. Part of M.F.A. : ARTS
Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

88. Oh-so-bored : BLASE
“Blasé”, meaning “nonchalant, bored from overindulgence” comes from the French verb “blaser”, meaning “to satiate”.

90. “Glee” star ___ Michele : LEA
Lea Michele is both an actor and a singer and started performing as a child actor on Broadway, including appearances in “Les Miserables” and “Fiddler on the Roof”. These days Michele plays Rachel Berry on the Fox TV show “Glee”.

The TV show called “Glee” has proven to be very popular. The storyline focuses on a high school glee club in Lima, Ohio called New Directions.

93. Comedian Daniel and musician Peter : TOSHES
Daniel Tosh is a stand-up comedian and host of “Tosh.0”, a video clip show on Comedy Central.

Peter Tosh was a musician from Jamaica, a member of the Wailers reggae band. Sadly, Tosh was murdered in a home invasion and extortion attempt in 1987.

100. Nov. 11 honoree : VET
Veterans Day used to be known as Armistice Day, and is observed on November 11th each year. This particular date was chosen as the Armistice that ended WWI was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

104. Lummox : CLOD
The word “lummox” comes from East Anglian slang (northeast of London). The term is probably a contraction of “lumbering ox”.

106. Beijing problem : SMOG
“Smog” is a portmanteau formed by melding “smoke” and “fog”. The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s.

The city of Beijing was given its name in 1403, with “Beijing” chosen as it translates as “Northern Capital”. The name distinguished it from the city of Nanjing, which name translates as “Southern Capital”.

107. Hatcher of “Desperate Housewives” : TERI
Teri Hatcher’s most famous role these days is the Susan Mayer character in “Desperate Housewives”. I’ve never seen more than a few minutes of “Housewives” but I do know Teri Hatcher as a Bond girl, as she appeared in “Tomorrow Never Dies”.

I haven’t even seen one episode of the hit show “Desperate Housewives”, I must admit. During pre-production, the show was called “Wisteria Lane” and then “The Secret Lives of Housewives”.

110. Emoji holder : TEXT
An emoji is a character found on many cell phones now that is like an emoticon, but more elaborate.

112. Place for a “me day” : SPA
The word “spa” migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name “Spa” comes from the Walloon word “espa” meaning “spring, fountain”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Fake blood, e.g. : GOO
4. Many establishments on Paris’s Boulevard Saint-Germain : CAFES
9. Enjoy thoroughly : SAVOR
14. Ex-Mrs. Trump : IVANA
19. Person behind a strike? : UMP
20. Cause of a 2014 epidemic : EBOLA
21. Word with light or horse : OPERA
22. Figure in Jewish folklore : GOLEM
23. One time around : LAP
24. “He who hesitates is lost, but …” : … LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP
27. Beat around the bush? : PROWL
29. Mathematician Fibonacci : LEONARDO
30. N.B.A. team once coached by Larry Bird : PACERS
31. DVR lineup : SHOWS
33. Rich cake : TORTE
34. Brown who wrote “The Diana Chronicles” : TINA
35. Handles : ALIASES
37. Silliness : INANITY
41. Half-and-half, maybe : MUTT
42. Park place : BENCH
46. ___ game : BLAME
49. Kind of arch : OGEE
50. Frequent subject of fibbing : AGE
51. ___ Soetoro, stepfather of Barack Obama : LOLO
52. Longest river entirely within Switzerland : AARE
53. Group of Coyotes, for short : NHL
54. Name on a toy truck : HESS
56. To the point : AD REM
57. Empty stomach sound : GROWL
59. ___ limit (sign at the edge of town) : CORP
60. Sound : AUDIO
62. Crumbly cheeses : FETAS
64. Arctic lights : AURORAE
66. Regimented resort : FAT FARM
68. See 73-Across : FIT
69. Locale of the 15-Down Eyjafjallajökull : ICELAND
70. Decked out : ATTIRED
71. Like pop-ups : ARCED
73. Check for 68-Across : TRY ON
74. 2006 Pixar film : CARS
75. Heavy drinker, in slang : DIPSO
77. Out of the barn, say : LOOSE
79. ESPNU covers it : NCAA
82. Celestial altar : ARA
83. Gladly, old-style : FAIN
84. Steer closer to the wind : LUFF
85. It borders the N. Atl. : EUR
86. Prison escape path, maybe : DUCT
88. A sharp equivalent : B-FLAT
89. Sing the praises of : EXTOL
91. Unused : MINT
92. Give the right : ENTITLE
94. Second chances for students : RETESTS
96. Head of an inn? : BOAR
97. Caliban in “The Tempest,” e.g. : SLAVE
102. Pooh-bah : NABOB
103. Get into : ACCESS
106. Part of a dominatrix’s outfit : STILETTO
108. Babe in the woods : OWLET
111. “You can’t judge a book by its cover, but …” : … CLOTHES MAKE THE MAN
114. “___ no idea” : I’VE
115. Blazing stars : NOVAE
116. Pairs are seen in it : POKER
117. Emulate Isocrates : ORATE
118. Birth certificate datum : SEX
119. Paradises : EDENS
120. Chemical ___ : AGENT
121. Trig functions : SINES
122. Boom source : SST

Down
1. [Um, this can’t be good] : GULP
2. All-Star second baseman Infante : OMAR
3. “Birds of a feather flock together, but …” : … OPPOSITES ATTRACT
4. Solo features of six Bach suites : CELLOS
5. Blood type system : ABO
6. “Great minds think alike, but …” : … FOOLS SELDOM DIFFER
7. Actress Sommer : ELKE
8. Clog : SABOT
9. Till now : SO FAR
10. Left at sea : APORT
11. Like some salsa : VERDE
12. Stackable dessert item : OREO
13. 2004 musical biopic for which the star won Best Actor : RAY
14. Pet in the comic strip “FoxTrot” : IGUANA
15. See 69-Across : VOLCANO
16. “Helm ___!” (captain’s cry) : ALEE
17. Within view : NEAR
18. Ratchets (up) : AMPS
25. Ambient music innovator Brian : ENO
26. Put forward : OPINE
28. “Huh?” : WHAT?
32. It’s a trap : WEB
34. “Slow and steady wins the race, but …” : … TIME WAITS FOR NO MAN
35. Shanghai nursemaid : AMAH
36. Winter Olympics sport : LUGE
38. “Knowledge is power, but …” : … IGNORANCE IS BLISS
39. 1943 conference site : TEHRAN
40. Checked online reviews of, modern-style : YELPED
43. Here/there connector : NOR
44. One on staff? : CLEF
45. Sphere of civilian activity during war : HOME FRONT
46. Trifle : BAGATELLE
47. Cousin of Sven : LARS
48. Michael Sheen’s character in “Twilight” : ARO
55. Mystical Muslims : SUFIS
56. Broadcast : AIRED
58. Ill-gotten gains : LUCRE
59. Port on the Panama Canal : COLON
61. D.C.’s ___ Constitution Hall : DAR
63. Personal quirk : TIC
65. “Born to Die” singer Lana Del ___ : REY
66. Pretense : FACADE
67. Galloping : AT A RUN
71. Part of SEATO : ASIA
72. Billet-___ : DOUX
76. Gal ___ : PAL
78. More than once in a while : OFT
80. You may have a great one in your family : AUNT
81. Part of M.F.A. : ARTS
87. Like some mountain guides : TIBETAN
88. Oh-so-bored : BLASE
90. “Glee” star ___ Michele : LEA
91. It may mean “Pet me!” : MEOW!
93. Comedian Daniel and musician Peter : TOSHES
95. Broadsides, informally : T-BONES
97. Rooting interest : STAKE
98. Compare : LIKEN
99. Not nodding : ALERT
100. Nov. 11 honoree : VET
101. Community spirit : ETHOS
103. Red in the face? : ACNE
104. Lummox : CLOD
105. Inlet : COVE
106. Beijing problem : SMOG
107. Hatcher of “Desperate Housewives” : TERI
109. Holiday lead-ins : EVES
110. Emoji holder : TEXT
112. Place for a “me day” : SPA
113. Gorged on : ATE

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6 thoughts on “0830-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Aug 15, Sunday”

  1. OMA Infacte signed with Kansas City in 2013.

    I love intentionally throwing people by mixing my metaphors, just to gauge their reaction. Something like, "A bird in the hand saves a stitch in time." Speaking of baseball, I take my adages from Yogi Berra.

  2. A pleasant puzzle, and I liked the theme. Many years ago, when I first acquired a desktop computer at work, I got in the habit of copying into a file quotes that I came across (many of them the result of working cryptograms). Being somewhat obsessive-compulsive, I still do this (in spite of the fact that such collections are now all over the web) and my collection is nearing 25,000 items. One of the things one can't help but notice is how many such quotes contradict each other. (And another is how many of them are absolute nonsense.) I have often thought that, if I were only clever enough to write it, there's a book lurking in that file.

  3. Hi Bill…for your comment on 14 Across, there were no Olympics in 1982. Ivana must have been an alternate in 1980 (Lake Placid) or 1984 (Sarajevo).

    Great work, as always. My crossword is not complete until I have read your post.

  4. 90 D – Lea Michele You refer to her as an actor. She's an actress. Could she win an Academy Award as Best Actor? This political correctness is ridiculous.

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