1123-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 23 Nov 14, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: Surround Sound … each of today’s themed answers is made up of two words, with the end of the second sounding like the first:

23A. Office missive sent out arbitrarily? : RANDOM MEMORANDUM
30A. Stone fruit? : GRANITE POMEGRANATE
48A. Aeronaut who’s headed for the moon? : LUNAR BALLOONER
66A. Photographers who stalk future lieutenants? : ROTC PAPARAZZI
84A. Desktop machine made of malleable metal? : PEWTER COMPUTER
101A. Provides some idea of an object’s size? : MENTIONS DIMENSIONS
113A. Lassie’s affliction after failing to rescue Timmy? : COLLIE MELANCHOLY

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 17s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
1. Canned food you don’t eat : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with “Alpo” being an abbreviation for “Allen Products”. Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

5. “Black Swan” director Aronofsky : DARREN
Darren Aronofsky is a film director and screenwriter from Brooklyn, New York. Two of Aronofsky’s more celebrated directorial works are “The Wrestler” starring Mickey Rourke and “Black Swan” with Natalie Portman.

21. Org. that prepares tables : IRS
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was set up during the Civil War to raise money to cover war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, the government was funded by levies on trade and property.

22. Norway’s patron saint : OLAV
Of the many kings of Norway named Olaf/Olav (and there have been five), Olaf II is perhaps the most celebrated as he was canonized and made patron saint of the country. Olaf II was king from 1015 to 1028 and was known as “Olaf the Big” (or Olaf the Fat) during his reign. Today he is more commonly referred to as “Olaf the Holy”. After Olaf died he was given the title of Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae, which is Latin for “Norway’s Eternal King”.

26. “Rent” character ___ Marquez : MIMI
The musical “Rent” is based on the Puccini opera “La bohème”. “Rent” tells the story of struggling artists and musicians living in the Lower East Side of New York, and is set against the backdrop of the AIDS epidemic. We saw “Rent” on Broadway quite a few years ago and we were very disappointed …

27. It borders five U.S. states : ONTARIO
The Canadian province of Ontario is bordered by five US states:

– Minnesota (land border)
– Michigan (land border)
– New York (land border)
– Ohio (lake border)
– Pennsylvania (lake border)

29. What Gustave Doré’s “The Confusion of Tongues” depicts : BABEL
“The Confusion of Tongues” is an 1865 engraving by French artist Gustave Doré. The work features workers building the Tower of Babel, tormented by the “Confusion of Tongues” caused by their disobedience of God.

We use the word “babel” now to describe a scene of confusion, lifting the term from the biblical story of the Tower of Babel. The Tower was built in the city of Babylon, and the construction was cursed with a confusion of languages due to the varied origins of all the builders.

39. Gourmand’s want : MORE
A gourmand is someone who takes great pleasure in consuming food and drink, often eating and drinking to excess. The related term “gourmet” refers to someone who has a refined palate.

41. Dark horse : BAY
Bay is a reddish-brown color, usually used to describe the coat of a horse.

48. Aeronaut who’s headed for the moon? : LUNAR BALLOONER
An aeronaut is the pilot of a craft that is lighter than air, like a hot air balloon for example.

64. D.C. transport : METRO
The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) provides transit service within and around Washington, D.C. The service generally goes by the name “Metro”. The authority’s two main services are Metrorail and Metrobus.

66. Photographers who stalk future lieutenants? : ROTC PAPARAZZI
The Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program for officers based in colleges all around the US. The ROTC program was established in 1862 when as a condition of receiving a land-grant to create colleges, the federal government required that military tactics be part of a new school’s curriculum.

Paparazzi are photojournalists who specialize in taking candid shots of celebrities. The name comes from the famous Fellini movie, “La Dolce Vita”. One of the characters in the film is a news photographer called Paparazzo.

74. The Pequod, e.g. : WHALER
The Pequod is the ship that figures in Herman Melville’s classic novel “Moby Dick”. The ship is owned by a consortium of the citizens of Nantucket Island, including Captains Ahab, Bildad and Peleg.

75. Poverty relief organization : OXFAM
Oxfam was founded in 1942 in Oxford, England, and was originally called Oxford Committee for Famine Relief. The original mission of Oxfam was to persuade the British government to allow food into Greece during WWII in the days the country was occupied by the Axis Powers. The name OXFAM was adopted in 1965, and it was quite simply the organization’s telegraph address (remember telegraphs?).

78. Animal that may carry its baby on its back : KOALA
The koala bear really does look like a little bear, but it’s not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope. I’m a little jealous of the koala, as it sleeps up to 20 hours a day …

84. Desktop machine made of malleable metal? : PEWTER COMPUTER
Pewter is a relatively soft alloy that is made up mostly of tin, with some copper, antimony, bismuth and lead.

88. Eddie ___, “Leave It to Beaver” boy : HASKELL
On the hit television show “Leave It to Beaver”, the Eddie Haskell character was played by child actor Ken Osmond. When Osmond grew up, he abandoned the acting life and opted instead to serve as a police officer in Los Angeles. He served for 18 years, and then retired after being hit with three bullets when chasing a suspected car thief.

93. Blast furnace input : ORE
The better lead ores are processed in a blast furnace, to extract the metal. The “waste” from this process is called “slag”. Slag does contain some lead and it can be processed further in a “slag furnace” to extract the residual metal. Slag furnaces also accept poorer lead ores as a raw material.

94. Thurman of “The Producers” : UMA
Robert Thurman was the first westerner to be ordained a Tibetan Buddhist monk. Robert raised his children in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and called his daughter “Uma” as it is a phonetic spelling of the Buddhist name “Dbuma”. Uma’s big break in movies came with her starring role in Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 hit “Pulp Fiction”. My favorite Uma Thurman film is the wonderful 1996 romantic comedy “The Truth About Cats and Dogs”.

“The Producers” is a 1968 satirical movie written and directed by Mel Brooks, the first film he ever directed. Brooks adapted the movie into a hugely successful Broadway musical that won a record 12 Tony Awards. The original leads in the stage show, Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick, then appeared in a 2005 movie adaptation of the musical version of the original film!

107. Oscar nominee for “Silkwood” : CHER
Cher’s real name is Cherilyn Sarkisian, born in 1946. In her acting career, Cher was nominated for the Best Supporting Actress Oscar of 1984 for her performance in “Silkwood”. She went further in 1998 and won the Best Actress Oscar for playing Loretta Castorini in “Moonstruck”.

“Silkwood” is a 1983 film about a nuclear power plant whistleblower. The movie is based on the true story of labor activist Karen Silkwood who was killed in a car accident under suspicious circumstances. She had just alleged wrongdoing at the power plant in which she worked. In real life, the power plant operators were found liable for Silkwood’s death and settled with her estate for $1.3 million.

108. Feed supplier : TWITTER
Twitter is a microblogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). But, I don’t think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters.

113. Lassie’s affliction after failing to rescue Timmy? : COLLIE MELANCHOLY
We owe the character Lassie to one Eric Knight who wrote a short story that he expanded into a novel called “Lassie Come Home”, published in 1940. “Lassie Come Home” was turned into a movie three years later, the first of a very successful franchise. The original Lassie (a female) was played by a dog called Pal, a male dog. In fact, all of the dogs that played Lassie over the years were males, because they looked better on camera, retaining a thick coat even during the summer months.

118. C.P.A.’s study : ECON
Certified public accountant (CPA)

119. 1965 Johnny Mathis album of Latin American music : OLE
Johnny Mathis had to face a tough choice in 1956. Mathis was a talented high jumper in college and was invited to try out for the US Olympic team destined for the Melbourne Games. At the same time he was scheduled to make his first recordings, in New York. Mathis opted to go to the Big Apple.

121. “Into the Wild” star Hirsch : EMILE
Emile Hirsch is an actor from Topanga, California. Hirsch’s most famous role was the lead in the 2007 drama “Into the Wild”.

“Into the Wild” is an interesting film, directed by Sean Penn and based on a non-fiction book of the same name by Jon Krakauer. The book and movie tell the true story of Christopher McCandless, a young man who hiked into the Alaskan wilderness with very little food and equipment, seeking an extended period of solitude. After four months alone he was found dead from starvation. At time of death, he weighed only 67 pounds.

122. ___ mining : DATA
The process of data mining is used to extract information from a database and present it in a form that facilitates further use.

Down
1. Age of Aquarius hairstyle : AFRO
“Age of Aquarius” or “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In” is medley of two songs from the musical “Hair” that was released as a single by the 5th Dimension.

8. Kia model : RIO
Kia have making the subcompact model called a Rio since 2000.

12. Last name in horror : KRUEGER
Freddy Krueger is the creepy serial killer in the “A Nightmare on Elm Street” movies. Krueger has a burned and disfigured face, wears a brown fedora and a leather glove with metal razors that he uses to kill his victims during their nightmares. He is played by the actor Robert Englund in all of the films.

14. George Eliot, but not Marilyn Manson : WOMAN
George Eliot was the pen name of English novelist Mary Anne Evans. As one might think, Evans chose a male pen name in order that her work might be best appreciated in the Victorian era. Eliot wrote seven novels including “Adam Bede” (1859), “The Mill on the Floss” (1860), “Silas Marner” (1861) and “Middlemarch” (1871-72).

Marilyn Manson is the stage name of the outrageous musician Brian Warner, and is also the name of the band that Warner co-founded and fronted for many years. Warner chose his stage name from two famous Americans, celebrated for very different reasons: Marilyn Monroe and Charles Manson.

15. Chinese company whose 2014 I.P.O. was the world’s largest in history : ALIBABA
Alibaba is an e-commerce company that was founded in Hangzhou, China in 1999. The company went public in 2014 in the US and raised about $25 billion in the process, making it the largest initial public offering (IPO) in history.

24. Some Veterans Day honorees, for short : MIAS
Missing in action (MIA)

25. Pentagon Papers subject, for short : NAM
Daniel Ellsberg is a former military analyst, who famously became very disillusioned with the Vietnam War. While still working as an analyst, he made copies of classified documents related to the Johnson administration’s conduct of the war. The documents, known as the Pentagon Papers, demonstrated that the administration knew early on that the Vietnam War was essentially “unwinnable” and that continued fighting would lead to higher numbers of casualties than was being projected in the public arena. Ellsberg ended up in court charged with espionage, but all charges were dropped when it was revealed that the Nixon administration had used illegal methods to bolster its case against the defendant.

29. Babe in the woods : BAMBI
The 1942 Disney classic “Bambi” is based on a book written by Felix Salten called “Bambi, A Life in the Woods”. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

33. “Cubist” Rubik : ERNO
What was originally called the “Magic Cube” became better known as Rubik’s Cube, named for its inventor Ernő Rubik. Rubik’s Cube is the world’s biggest selling puzzle game, with over 350 million sold in just over 30 years.

36. Hybrid animal : MULE
A hinny is the offspring of a male horse (the “h-” from h-orse) and a female donkey/ass (the “-nny” from je-nny). A mule is more common, and is the offspring of a female horse and male donkey/ass.

37. South American capital : ASUNCION
Asunción is the capital city of Paraguay. It is one of the oldest cities in South America, and hence if known as “Mother of Cities”. The city was first visited by Spanish conqueror Juan de Ayolas, and he founded a fort there in 1537 that he called Nuestra Señora Santa María de la Asunción, which is why we use the current name.

44. Amenity in a G.M. vehicle : ONSTAR
The OnStar system was developed as a joint venture between GM, EDS and Hughes. The product itself was launched in 1996. Today, OnStar is only available on GM cars, although it used to be offered on other makes of car through a licensing agreement. OnStar is a subscription service that packages vehicle security, telephone, satellite navigation and remote diagnostics.

47. First Nations tribe : CREE
“First Nations” is a term used in Canada describing the ethnicity of Native Americans who are neither Inuit nor Métis people.

The Cree are one of the largest groups of Native Americans on the continent. In the US most of the Cree nation live in Montana on a reservation shared with the Ojibwe people. In Canada most of the Cree live in Manitoba.

51. “Bugsy Malone” star Scott : BAIO
Scott Baio is the actor who played Chachi Arcola in the great sitcom “Happy Days” and in the not so great spin-off “Joanie Loves Chachi”. Baio also played the title role in a later sitcom called “Charles in Charge”. Earlier in his career, he played another title role, in the 1976 movie “Bugsy Malone”, appearing opposite a young Jodie Foster.

52. ___ avis : RARA
A “rara avis” is anything that is very rare, and is Latin for “rare bird”.

56. Candy from Austria : PEZ
PEZ is an Austrian brand name for a particular candy sold in a mechanical dispenser. The name PEZ comes from the first, middle and last letters of “Pfefferminz”, the German word for “peppermint”.

58. Briggs & ___ (engine maker) : STRATTON
Briggs & Stratton is a manufacturer of air-cooled, gas-powered engines, primarily for lawn mowers.

59. Tinseltown event : PREMIERE
“Tinsel Town” is a nickname for Hollywood.

62. Nyasaland, today : MALAWI
Malawi is in southeast Africa and is one of the least-developed countries in the world. The Malawi population has a low life expectancy and a high infant mortality rate. HIV/AIDS is a major killer. The British colonized the area in 1891, at which point it was called Nyasaland. Malawi became independent in 1964.

65. Reformer from the time of D.D.E. to L.B.J. : MLK
Martin Luther King, Jr. was only 35 years old when he won the Nobel Peace Prize, making him the youngest person to be so honored. King was given the award for his work to end racial segregation and discrimination using non-violent means. The following year he was awarded the American Liberties Medallion by the American Jewish Community.

President Eisenhower was born in Denison, Texas and given the name David Dwight Eisenhower, but by the time he made it to the White House he was going by the name Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE). Growing up, his family called him Dwight, and when “Ike” enrolled in West Point he himself reversed the order of his given names.

President Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) is one of only four people to have held all four elected federal offices, namely US Representative, US Senator, US Vice-President and US President. As President he is perhaps best remembered for escalating involvement in the Vietnam War, and for his “Great Society” legislation.

67. Tommy Lasorda’s jersey number : TWO
Tommy Lasorda had been with the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers for over sixty years when he retired in 1996 (although he did spend one season playing with the Kansas City Athletics).

68. Require balm, say : CHAP
A person with chapped lips might apply lip balm, say.

76. A.C.C. school : FSU
Florida State University (FSU) is located in Tallahassee, the state capital of Florida. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Seminoles (sometimes “the ‘Noles”). The team name was chosen in 1947 by the students in a vote, and alludes to the Seminole people who originally lived in the state. Most of the Seminole now live in Oklahoma, after their forced relocation by the US government in the 1840s.

78. Five-time Jockey Club Gold Cup winner : KELSO
There is a list of the top 100 US thoroughbred horses of the 20th century maintained by “The Blood-Horse” magazine. Numbers 1-4 on the list are:

1. Man o’War
2. Secretariat
3. Citation
4. Kelso

81. Reputation, informally : CRED
“Street cred” is slang for “street credibility”, of which I have none …

86. To be, to Balzac : ETRE
Honoré de Balzac was a French novelist and playwright from the 19th century. Balzac wrote a huge collection of related novels called “La Comédie humaine”.

89. “A poem in our eyes,” per Emerson : AMERICA
According to Ralp Waldo Emerson, as he lamented the lack of poetic writing about America:

America is a poem in our eyes; its ample geography dazzles the imagination, and it will not wait long for metres.

91. $5 picture : LINCOLN
The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

96. Jessica Simpson’s sister : ASHLEE
Ashlee Simpson is the younger sister of Jessica Simpson. They are both reality show stars. I know no more … I want know no more …

102. Singer ___ Marie : TEENA
Teena Marie is a very successful R&B singer, born Mary Christine Brockert.

103. First of 50: Abbr. : DEL
The state of Delaware takes its name from Virginia’s first colonial governor, Englishman Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr. Delaware is known as “The First State” as it was the first to ratify the US Constitution, in 1787. It is also the second smallest state in the union, after Rhode Island.

104. Source of the word “galore” : IRISH
Our word “galore”, meaning “in great numbers”, comes from the Irish phrase “go leór” that translates as “sufficiently, enough”.

105. 2006 World Cup winner : ITALY
The 2006 FIFA World Cup soccer tournament was held in the Germany. The two teams making it to the final were France and Italy, with Italy winning in a penalty shootout.

110. “___ and Basie!” (1963 jazz album) : ELLA
“Ella and Basie!” is the 1963 album in which Ella Fitzgerald sings with the count Basie Orchestra accompanying. The album marked only the second time that Fitzgerald and the Basie band had recorded together, the previous occasion being the recording of “One O’Clock Jump” in 1957.

111. Jim Beam and Wild Turkey : RYES
Jim Beam is the world’s highest-selling brand of bourbon. Jim Beam whiskey has roots going back to around 1795 when Jacob Beam sold his first corn whiskey. The whiskey took on the name “bourbon”, possibly after Bourbon County in Kentucky.

Wild Turkey is a brand of Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey that has been distilled in and around Lawrenceburg, Kentucky since 1869. Wild Turkey’s Master Distiller is Jimmy Russell, who is now the longest-serving master distiller in the whole world.

114. Palindromic animal : EWE
The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:

– Able was I ere I saw Elba
– A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
– Madam, I’m Adam

One of my favorite words is “Aibohphobia”, although it doesn’t appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. “Aibohphobia” is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix “-phobia”.

115. Once-high station? : MIR
The Russian Mir Space Station was a remarkably successful project, with the station still holding the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at just under ten years. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001.

116. “Paradise Lost” figure : EVE
“Paradise Lost” is an epic poem written by Englishman John Milton. It is indeed an epic work, published originally in ten volumes with over ten thousand lines of verse. The “paradise” that is “lost” is the Garden of Eden, from which Adam and Eve were expelled by God in the “Fall of Man”.

117. Media exec Moonves : LES
Leslie Moonves had many senior positions in the television industry, especially with CBS and Viacom. Early in his career he was an actor and played tough guy roles on “Cannon” and “The Six Million Dollar Man”. Moonves is the great-nephew of David Ben-Gurion, the first Prime Minister of Israel, and he is married to TV news personality Julie Chen.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Canned food you don’t eat : ALPO
5. “Black Swan” director Aronofsky : DARREN
11. Compete in the Winter Games, say : SKI
14. Lose strength : WANE
18. Whistle prompters : FOULS
20. Become invalid : EXPIRE
21. Org. that prepares tables : IRS
22. Norway’s patron saint : OLAV
23. Office missive sent out arbitrarily? : RANDOM MEMORANDUM
26. “Rent” character ___ Marquez : MIMI
27. It borders five U.S. states : ONTARIO
28. Yarn : TALE
29. What Gustave Doré’s “The Confusion of Tongues” depicts : BABEL
30. Stone fruit? : GRANITE POMEGRANATE
36. Fellow sailors : MATEYS
39. Gourmand’s want : MORE
40. Tailor’s sideline? : SEAM
41. Dark horse : BAY
42. Applicability : USE
43. Back : SPONSOR
46. Expander during inhalation : RIBCAGE
48. Aeronaut who’s headed for the moon? : LUNAR BALLOONER
53. Headmaster honorific : SIR
54. Earnest request : ENTREATY
55. Suffix with land or sea : -SCAPE
57. “Outside the Lines” broadcaster : ESPN
61. Stickers? : CACTI
62. Like audiences for R-rated films : MATURE
64. D.C. transport : METRO
65. It may be open at a bar : MIC
66. Photographers who stalk future lieutenants? : ROTC PAPARAZZI
71. Sunset shade : RED
72. One getting a licking, informally? : LOLLY
74. The Pequod, e.g. : WHALER
75. Poverty relief organization : OXFAM
77. Support for a proposal? : KNEE
78. Animal that may carry its baby on its back : KOALA
79. Wireless? : ACOUSTIC
82. Subsist : ARE
84. Desktop machine made of malleable metal? : PEWTER COMPUTER
88. Eddie ___, “Leave It to Beaver” boy : HASKELL
92. Like some restrictions : DIETARY
93. Blast furnace input : ORE
94. Thurman of “The Producers” : UMA
95. Turkey’s place, in large part : ASIA
97. Snowbelt city : ERIE
98. Groused : MOANED
101. Provides some idea of an object’s size? : MENTIONS DIMENSIONS
106. Communicate with the server, perhaps : ORDER
107. Oscar nominee for “Silkwood” : CHER
108. Feed supplier : TWITTER
112. Wind up : RILE
113. Lassie’s affliction after failing to rescue Timmy? : COLLIE MELANCHOLY
118. C.P.A.’s study : ECON
119. 1965 Johnny Mathis album of Latin American music : OLE
120. Turn while seated : SWIVEL
121. “Into the Wild” star Hirsch : EMILE
122. ___ mining : DATA
123. Gender-neutral pronoun : ONE
124. Excommunication provocation : HERESY
125. “It’s a pity” : ALAS

Down
1. Age of Aquarius hairstyle : AFRO
2. Student’s burden : LOAN
3. Bad choice on first down : PUNT
4. Retirement period : OLD AGE
5. Possessor? : DEMON
6. Medieval battle weapon : AXE
7. Dashboard abbr. : RPM
8. Kia model : RIO
9. Go astray : ERR
10. “That’s amazing!” : NEATO!
11. Moves obliquely : SIDLES
12. Last name in horror : KRUEGER
13. Doctrine : ISM
14. George Eliot, but not Marilyn Manson : WOMAN
15. Chinese company whose 2014 I.P.O. was the world’s largest in history : ALIBABA
16. Retail clerk’s accessory : NAME TAG
17. Glare : EVIL EYE
19. “You’ll be ___!” : SORRY
24. Some Veterans Day honorees, for short : MIAS
25. Pentagon Papers subject, for short : NAM
29. Babe in the woods : BAMBI
31. Lead one to believe : IMPLY
32. Plane, e.g. : TOOL
33. “Cubist” Rubik : ERNO
34. Dinero unit : PESO
35. Not just see : RAISE
36. Hybrid animal : MULE
37. South American capital : ASUNCION
38. Arm of the sea : TENTACLE
43. Was in session : SAT
44. Amenity in a G.M. vehicle : ONSTAR
45. What some dreams and themes do : RECUR
47. First Nations tribe : CREE
49. What doesn’t come full circle? : ARC
50. Hear again : RETRY
51. “Bugsy Malone” star Scott : BAIO
52. ___ avis : RARA
56. Candy from Austria : PEZ
58. Briggs & ___ (engine maker) : STRATTON
59. Tinseltown event : PREMIERE
60. Drift off : NOD
62. Nyasaland, today : MALAWI
63. Parody : APE
64. Problem of mistaken identity : MIX-UP
65. Reformer from the time of D.D.E. to L.B.J. : MLK
67. Tommy Lasorda’s jersey number : TWO
68. Require balm, say : CHAP
69. Reacted to a shock, maybe : PALED
70. Streak : ZOOM
73. Boon for an investigative journalist : LEAK
76. A.C.C. school : FSU
78. Five-time Jockey Club Gold Cup winner : KELSO
79. Farm name ender : ACRES
80. Unforthcoming : COY
81. Reputation, informally : CRED
83. Have an encore presentation of : REAIR
85. Abound : TEEM
86. To be, to Balzac : ETRE
87. Drops out of the sky : RAIN
88. Played along with : HUMORED
89. “A poem in our eyes,” per Emerson : AMERICA
90. Little pitcher’s place : SANDLOT
91. $5 picture : LINCOLN
96. Jessica Simpson’s sister : ASHLEE
98. No longer standing tall? : MOWN
99. In readiness : ON ICE
100. Bronchial woe : ASTHMA
102. Singer ___ Marie : TEENA
103. First of 50: Abbr. : DEL
104. Source of the word “galore” : IRISH
105. 2006 World Cup winner : ITALY
109. Work hard : TOIL
110. “___ and Basie!” (1963 jazz album) : ELLA
111. Jim Beam and Wild Turkey : RYES
113. Gentle bird call : COO
114. Palindromic animal : EWE
115. Once-high station? : MIR
116. “Paradise Lost” figure : EVE
117. Media exec Moonves : LES

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2 thoughts on “1123-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 23 Nov 14, Sunday”

  1. Hi there, Diane.

    Well, I had to think about this one. There are indeed three US states that share a land border with the province of Ontario. But, Ohio and Pennsylvania also share a border, albeit in the middle of Lake Erie.

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